National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for total electricity retail

  1. 2015 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Retail Price (cents/kWh) (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 19.43 15.46 12.34 10.07 16.52 Connecticut 20.94 15.97 12.95 13.18 17.77 Maine 15.61 12.47 9.05 12.78 Massachusetts 19.83 15.79 13.54 7.76 16.90 New Hampshire 18.50 14.96 12.74 16.02 Rhode Island 19.29 15.78 13.76 18.54 17.01 Vermont 17.09 14.54 10.27 14.41 Middle Atlantic 15.97 13.13 7.32 11.72 13.00 New Jersey 15.81 12.79

  2. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Regional Support Office (Purchase Order DE-AP45-97R553188). Funding was provided by the Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies, Ofiice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection (1.3 MB) More

  3. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We ...

  4. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...3,393685,35089.3,8.9130396 "Coos-Curry Electric Coop, ...,598333,28491.3,4.7617798 "Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, ... "City of Sturgeon Bay - (WI)","WI","Municipal",873...

  5. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 48,211.7 12.49 City of Bay City - (MI) MI Municipal ... 379,900 34,167.6 8.99 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 604,703 29,473.2 4.87 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ...

  6. 2015 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 447 410,148 24,961.2 6.09 Calpine Power America LLC CA Power Marketer 1 1,069,832 57,737.7 5.40 City of Cerritos - (CA) CA Municipal 303 80,466 5,882.9 7.31 City of Corona - (CA) CA Municipal 975 68,598 5,759.7 8.40 Commerce Energy, Inc. CA Power Marketer 10,977 337,263 23,998.8 7.12 Constellation

  7. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4560,1201929.7,"NA","NA","NA",7923662.4 "Percentage of revenue",62.5,18.74,3.59,15.17,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",9.02,9.15,4.92,11.02,"NA","NA","NA",9.02...

  8. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3,"NA",1063623.3,"NA","NA","NA",3703710.6 "Percentage of revenue",58.49,12.8,"NA",28.72,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",7.81,7.9,"NA",8.22,"NA","NA","NA",7.93...

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Full Service Providers sell bundled electricity services (e.g., both energy and delivery) ... Other Providers sell either the energy or the delivery services, but not both. Sales ...

  10. The next gordian knot for state regulators and electric utilities: The unbundling of retail services

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, K.W.

    1995-11-01

    Unbundling of retail electric services will accelerate competitive forces in a way that could radically change the future course of the electric power industry. Although simple in concept, unbundling raises a broad range of complex issues, many of which are fundamental to today`s concepts of regulation and utility management. This article addresses four questions: (1) What is retail unbundling? (2) What role might it play in the future electric power industry? (3) What lessons can be learned from retail unbundling in other regulated industries, specifically the natural gas industry? (4) What are the major issues associated with retail unbundling for electric utilities and state regulators?

  11. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  12. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  14. A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

    2006-11-15

    Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

  15. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014" "Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1219363,276627,129773,812963,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1134527,513748,563581,57198,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal

  16. Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total...

  17. "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural ... It does not include electricity inputs from onsite" "cogeneration or generation from ...

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4,"Duke Energy Progress - (NC)","Investor-owned",6559067,2292609,1804594,2461864,0 5,"Berkeley Electric Coop Inc","Cooperative",2095651,1269704,244465,581482,0 " ","Total ...

  19. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",38670...

  1. Retailer Energy Alliance Subcommittees

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Retailer Energy Alliances Subcommittees: Lighting and Electrical, Restaurant and Food Preparation, Refrigeration, HVAC, and Whole Building Systems.

  2. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United ... Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700 "Nuclear",100334,100266,100755,101004,10116...

  3. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Thousand Megawatthours)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 ...

  4. Table A39. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,"RSE" ,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Economic

  5. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Massachusetts",17.390969,14.676411,12.740483,8.7639584,15.354558 "New Hampshire",17.52928,14.339091,11.929516,0,15.220362 "Rhode Island",17.167946,14.560559,12.86...

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Hawaiian Electric Co Inc","Investor-owned",6781665,1611149,2270495,2900021,0 2,"Maui Electric Co Ltd","Investor-owned",1132056,381979,373947,376130,0 3,"Hawaii Electric Light Co

  7. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.17 0.13 0.23 0.23 0.29 0.60 0.53 2000's 0.81 1.29 1.98 1.68 2.14 1.79 2.34 2.57 2.46 3.30 2010's 3.81 4.53 4.40 4.08 4.25 4.12 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016

  8. Table 15. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (billion kilowatt-hours)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",2843,2891,2928,2962,3004,3039,3071,3112,3148,3185,3228,3263,3298,3332,3371,3406,3433,3469 "AEO 1995",,2951,2967,2983,3026,3058,3085,3108,3134,3166,3204,3248,3285,3321,3357,3396,3433,3475 "AEO

  9. Table 15. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Projected

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Projected (billion kilowatt-hours) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2843 2891 2928 2962 3004 3039 3071 3112 3148 3185 3228 3263 3298 3332 3371 3406 3433 3469 AEO 1995 2951 2967 2983 3026 3058 3085 3108 3134 3166 3204 3248 3285 3321 3357 3396 3433 3475 AEO 1996 2973 2998 3039 3074 3106 3137 3173 3215 3262 3317 3363 3409 3454 3505 3553 3604 3660 3722 3775 AEO 1997 3075

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,"Southwestern Public Service Co","Investor-owned",5014741,1127323,1655334,2232084,0 3,"El Paso Electric Co","Investor-owned",1640996,651515,910681,78800,0 4,"City of Farmington - ...

  11. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The enclosed report is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1815 of the Act established a five-member Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force.

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Georgia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-Owned",83740365,27132065,32894391,23548775,165134 2,"Jackson Electric Member Corp - (GA)","Cooperative",5201199,3003210,1476773,721216,0 3,"Cobb Electric Membership

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maryland" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Baltimore Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",12270475,8927905,3147168,195402,0 2,"WGL Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",7202209,1077458,6124751,0,0 3,"Potomac Electric Power

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Massachusetts" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Massachusetts Electric Co","Investor-owned",10602381,7180002,3013034,409068,277 2,"NSTAR Electric Company","Investor-owned",8805023,5064032,3531796,209195,0 3,"Direct Energy

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vermont" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",4281682,1551471,1572378,1157833,0 2,"Vermont Electric Cooperative, Inc","Cooperative",446870,222366,122807,101697,0 3,"City of Burlington Electric -

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Virginia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Virginia Electric & Power Co","Investor-owned",75562974,29406355,39038242,6916360,202017 2,"Appalachian Power Co","Investor-owned",15954286,6461192,4013267,5479827,0 3,"Rappahannock Electric

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Arkansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Arkansas Inc","Investor-owned",21049257,8069917,6170936,6808318,86 2,"Southwestern Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",4018839,1121436,1354356,1543047,0 3,"Mississippi County Electric

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Tennessee E M C","Cooperative",5743330,3134733,1993358,615239,0 5,"Knoxville Utilities Board","Public",5536187,2506771,2279472,749944,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Arizona" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Arizona Public Service Co","Investor-owned",27584533,12837752,12477518,2269263,0 2,"Salt River Project","Public",27548529,12293633,11099759,4155137,0 3,"Tucson Electric Power

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    California" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Southern California Edison Co","Investor-owned",75828585,29972416,37903351,7874457,78361 2,"Pacific Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",75114523,29289082,28107971,17717470,0 3,"Los Angeles Department of Water &

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    District of Columbia" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",3556542,40286,3515507,749,0 2,"Potomac Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",3015764,1733437,1282327,0,0 3,"WGL Energy Services,

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maine" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NextEra Energy Power Marketing","Investor-owned",1984446,859679,1082377,42390,0 2,"New Brunswick Power Generation Corp.","Investor-owned",2101006,1963787,58020,79199,0 3,"Electricity Maine,

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Michigan" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"DTE Electric Company","Investor-owned",41923906,14932840,16790364,10199382,1320 2,"Consumers Energy Co","Investor-owned",33253922,12593983,11045552,9614387,0 3,"Constellation Energy Services,

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Missouri" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Union Electric Co - (MO)","Investor-owned",37022540,13649267,14751404,8600114,21755 2,"Kansas City Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",8554331,2571510,4454312,1528509,0 3,"KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oklahoma" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",24307160,8652606,9472917,6181637,0 2,"Public Service Co of Oklahoma","Investor-owned",17947669,6320906,6389387,5237376,0 3,"Grand River Dam

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wisconsin" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Wisconsin Electric Power Co","Investor-owned",23909329,7778541,8832104,7298684,0 2,"Wisconsin Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",10646058,3533105,2424249,4688704,0 3,"Wisconsin Public Service

  7. Monitoring and Characterization of Miscellaneous Electrical Loads in a Large Retail Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile-Polese, L.; Frank, S.; Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Rader, E.; Smith, J.; Long, N.

    2014-02-01

    Buildings account for 40% of primary energy consumption in the United States (residential 22%; commercial 18%). Most (70% residential and 79% commercial) is used as electricity. Thus, almost 30% of U.S. primary energy is used to provide electricity to buildings. Plug loads play an increasingly critical role in reducing energy use in new buildings (because of their increased efficiency requirements), and in existing buildings (as a significant energy savings opportunity). If all installed commercial building miscellaneous electrical loads (CMELs) were replaced with energy-efficient equipment, a potential annual energy saving of 175 TWh, or 35% of the 504 TWh annual energy use devoted to MELs, could be achieved. This energy saving is equivalent to the annual energy production of 14 average-sized nuclear power plants. To meet DOE's long-term goals of reducing commercial building energy use and carbon emissions, the energy efficiency community must better understand the components and drivers of CMEL energy use, and develop effective reduction strategies. These goals can be facilitated through improved data collection and monitoring methodologies, and evaluation of CMELs energy-saving techniques.

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4,"Wheeling Power Co","Investor-owned",3269892,425005,447849,2397038,0 5,"Black Diamond Power Co","Investor-owned",56232,39152,17080,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wheeler Elec Member Corp","Cooperative",1662817,621444,300425,740948,0 5,"Baldwin County El Member Corp","Cooperative",1361550,911009,450541,0,0 " ","Total sales, top five ...

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Delaware" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Delmarva Power","Investor-owned",3604764,2673209,902845,28710,0 2,"Delaware Electric Cooperative","Cooperative",1301698,1060347,241351,0,0 3,"Direct Energy Business","Investor-owned",709072,0,709072,0,0 4,"City of Dover -

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kentucky" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Kentucky Utilities Co","Investor-owned",18888411,6334638,5483135,7070638,0 2,"Louisville Gas & Electric Co","Investor-owned",11817164,4157326,4885866,2773972,0 3,"Kenergy Corp","Cooperative",9670080,757715,325857,8586508,0

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nebraska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Omaha Public Power District","Public",10659655,3561537,3640059,3458059,0 2,"Nebraska Public Power District","Public",3353118,895508,1211817,1245793,0 3,"Lincoln Electric System","Public",3219685,1193586,1526628,499471,0

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oregon" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Portland General Electric Co","Investor-owned",17603187,7461863,6849512,3283792,8020 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",12958735,5309295,5109334,2524679,15427 3,"City of Eugene - (OR)","Public",2336296,919175,872330,544791,0

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"The Narragansett Electric Co","Investor-owned",5006934,2852069,1901360,253505,0 2,"Direct Energy Business","Investor-owned",589515,0,589515,0,0 3,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",469721,0,296950,149198,23573

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Utah" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",24105301,6605139,8564346,8875134,60682 2,"Provo City Corp","Public",784886,236348,410174,138364,0 3,"City of St George","Public",616490,276947,68066,271477,0 4,"Moon Lake Electric Assn

  16. Retail Unbundling

    Reports and Publications

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides a brief summary of the status of retail unbundling programs (also known as "customer choice" programs) for residential natural gas customers in various states,

  17. Delaware Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...e","-","-","-","-","-" "Other","-","-",11,6,"-" "Total",7182,8534,7524,4842,5628 " " "s Value is less than 0.5 of the table metric, but value is included in any associated total.

  18. The calm before the storm. [Retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1993-05-15

    The right to refuse retail wheeling requests is one of the cornerstones of a utility's monopoly power. Utilities have fought staunchly to preserve it, most recently in preventing retail wheeling from becoming an important issue in the congressional debate over deregulation; the Energy Policy Act of 1992 steered clear of it. For the present, the prohibition of retail wheeling gives utilities enormous power over the retail electric power market. The ability to refuse retail wheeling requests, of course, prevents retail customers from buying power from third parties. This enables a utility to sell retail customers all the power it can generate, at a price that covers its cost plus an allowed return-even if its price exceeds that of power available in the wholesale market. The denial of retail wheeling thus protects a utility's inefficiencies, whose price is ultimately shouldered onto customers through cost-plus electric rates. Allowing retail wheeling would remove the foundation for much of the current monopoly power that utilities enjoy. Third parties could sell power to a utility's retail customers, since the utility would be required to wheel it. Retail customers would be able to bypass the local distribution utility to buy power from the cheapest source available. Market forces would drive pricing rather than the cost-plus ratemaking process. A utility whose electric rates were above market would have to meet the competitive price or lose sales.

  19. "Table A48. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity,...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...teristics(a)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Supplier(c)","Supplier(b)","Pipelines","Supplier(d)","Factors"," " ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.4,2.7,1.5...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    emissions estimates, 1990-2014 Table 8.Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990-2014 Table 9.Retail electricity sales statistics, 2014 Table 10.Supply

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1990-2014 Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990-2014 Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2014 Table 10. Supply and disposition of ...

  2. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    End Use: August 2016 Retail rates/prices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on

  3. Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset | Department of Energy 7: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 fotw#937_web.xlsx (17.8 KB) More Documents & Publications

  4. Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 | Department of Energy 7: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The number of battery packs sold for plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) declined by 3.4% from 2014 to 2015. However, the total battery capacity for all PEVs sold between 2014 and

  5. Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC Smart Grid Project | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    deploys new services and market offerings for retail customers in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region. Reliant is deploying in-home energy displays,...

  6. "Table A38. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural Gas" " by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam" ,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC",,"Utility","Nonutility","Utility","Nonutility","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  7. "Table A46. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Steam, and Natural" " Gas by Type of Supplier, Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries," 1991 " (Estimates in Million Dollars)" ,," Electricity",," Steam",," Natural Gas" ,,"-","-----------","-","-----------","-","------------","-","RSE"

  8. Time evolution of the total electric-field strength in multimode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, W.; Fischer, R.; Paul, H.

    1988-05-01

    Our previous numerical studies of the output characteristics of multimode lasers are extended to include the evolution of the total electric-field strength. The regular or irregular behavior of the system, which becomes manifest in the evolution of the amplitudes and the phases in the different modes, is reflected also in the evolution of the total electric-field strength in a stroboscopic view. (The total electric-field strength, with its high-frequency time dependence suppressed, is considered at times t, t+..delta..t, t+2..delta..t,..., where ..delta..t is a multiple of the round-trip time in the resonator.) Moreover, it is demonstrated that the evolution of the system is very sensitive to slight changes in the initial conditions. This finding supports the view that the irregularity falls in the class of the so-called deterministic chaos.

  9. Electricity Monthly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  10. Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Product: Total Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases PropanePropylene Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel ...

  11. Total..........................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.9 Q Q Q Heat Pump......7.7 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System......Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration ...

  12. Total..........................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.9 Q Q Q Heat Pump......6.2 3.8 2.4 Steam or Hot Water System......Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information ...

  13. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other

  14. Total............................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592

  15. Total...................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing

  16. Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total floor- space 1 Heated floor- space 2 Total floor- space 1 Cooled floor- space 2 Total floor- space 1 Lit floor- space 2 All buildings 87,093 80,078 70,053 79,294 60,998 83,569 68,729 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 6,699 5,833 6,124 4,916 7,130 5,590 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,590 6,316 7,304 5,327 8,152 6,288 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 12,744 10,540 12,357 8,840 13,250 10,251 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 10,911 9,638 10,813 7,968 11,542 9,329 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 13,114

  17. "Table A16. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Transfers","Total

  18. Table A26. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Di

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," ","Sales/"," ","RSE" " "," ","Transfers","Onsite","Transfers"," ","Row" "Economic

  19. Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," ","

  20. Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent

  1. Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural

  2. Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural

  3. Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and

  4. Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  5. Total...................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to

  6. Total..........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to

  7. Total..........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.5 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 3.9 2.4 1.5 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 4.4 3.2 1.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 3.5 2.4 1.1 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 3.2 2.1 1.1 2,500 to

  8. Total..........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7

  9. Total..........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general...

  11. Retail wheeling: Is this revolution necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Cudahy, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    As of a former state regulator and a once enthusiastic practitioner of public utility law, I find it fascinating to see the latest nostrum to burst on the electric utility scene: retail wheeling. Wheeling became a personal interest in the Texas interconnection fight of the late seventies and may have led to the interconnection and wheeling provision of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Retail wheeling contemplates that every electric power customer should be given an opportunity to seek out the lowest cost source of power wherever it can be found. As a practical matter, the drums for retail wheeling are presently being beaten by large industrial users, who believe that they have the capability to find low cost sources and to make advantageous commercial arrangements to acquire electricity. Large industrials have long been fighting the utilities for cheaper electricity, frequently using the threat of self-generation and cogeneration.

  12. Total................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to

  13. Total..........................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7

  14. Total...................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................ 3.2 0.4 Q 0.6 1.7 0.4 500 to 999................................................... 23.8 4.8 1.4 4.2 10.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 20.8 10.6 1.8 1.8 4.0 2.6 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 15.4 12.4 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499............................................. 12.2 10.7 1.0 0.2 Q Q 2,500 to

  15. Total.........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3

  16. Total..........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1

  17. Total..........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4

  18. Total...........................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9

  19. Total...........................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8

  20. Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets

    Annual Energy Outlook

    & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price...

  1. Table A15. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry

  2. Table A34. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,"1,000","Row"

  3. Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use

  4. Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Fuel Type, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and End Use, 1994:" " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding",,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"Row" "Code(a)","End-Use

  5. Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion

  6. Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000

  7. Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    " Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(c)","Natural

  8. Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000

  9. 1990,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",4208809...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1990,"AK","Electric Utility","Coal",646430,832,2881 1990,"AK","Electric Utility","Natural Gas",1886585,9,4364 1990,"AK","Electric Utility","Petroleum",281115,1562,592 ...

  10. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  11. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  12. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  13. The great ``retail wheeling`` illusion, and more productive energy futures

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper sets out the reasons why many environmental and public interest organizations oppose retail wheeling. Cavanagh argues that retail wheeling would destroy incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation--benefits that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. The current debate over the competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is critical from both economic and environmental perspectives. All attempts to introduce broad-scale retail wheeling in the United States have failed; instead, state regulators are choosing a path that emphasizes competition and choice, but acknowledges fundamental differences between wholesale and retail markets. Given the physical laws governing the movement of power over centrally controlled grids, the choice offered to customers through retail wheeling of electricity is a fiction -- a re-allocation of costs is all that is really possible. Everyone wants to be able to claim the cheapest electricity on the system; unfortunately, there is not enough to go around. By endorsing the fiction of retail wheeling for certain types of customers, regulators would be recasting the retail electricity business as a kind of commodity exchange. That would reward suppliers who could minimize near-term unit costs of electricity while simultaneously destroying incentives for many investments, including cost-effective energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation, that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. This result, which has been analogized unpersuasively to trends in telecommunications and natural gas regulation, is neither desirable nor inevitable. States should go on saying no to retail wheeling in order to be able to create something better: regulatory reforms that align utility and societal interests in pursuing a least-cost energy future. An appendix contains notes on some recent Retail Wheeling Campaigns.

  14. 2013 Electricity Form Proposals

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The EIA-861 survey has historically collected retail sales, revenue, and a variety of information related to demand response ...

  15. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Glacial Energy Holdings","IL","Power Marketer",2426,128194,8721.1,6.8030485 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",24967,198273,16620.1,8.3824323 "Homefield ...

  16. Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... '1994" "Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey', and Bureau of the Census, Industry" "Division, data files for the '1994 Annual Survey of Manufactures.'" "Table A53. Total ...

  17. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  18. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  19. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2009 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was

  20. Table 10. Supply and disposition of electricity, 1990 through...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,1.09,1.13,1.08,1.15,1.14,1.24,1.28,1.28 "Facility direct retail sales are electricity sales from non utility power producers which reported electricity sales to a retail customer. ...

  1. Table 10. Supply and disposition of electricity, 1990 through...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,1.43,1.48,1.33,1.33,1.36,1.36,1.29,1.19 "Facility direct retail sales are electricity sales from non utility power producers which reported electricity sales to a retail customer. ...

  2. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOEs more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.

  3. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GWmore » by 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE’s more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.« less

  4. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-04-15

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back in time, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030, and 2,900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE’s more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050.

  5. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the United States electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW by 2030 and 2900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE's more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050. Assessing the sustainability of such rapid growth of photovoltaics necessitates undertaking a careful analysis because PV markets largely are enabled by its promise to produce reliable electricity with minimum environmental burdens. Measurable aspects of sustainability include cost, resource availability, and environmental impact. The question of cost concerns the affordability of solar energy compared to other energy sources throughout the world. Environmental impacts include local-, regional-, and global-effects, as well as the usage of land and water, which must be considered in a comparable context over a long time, multigenerational horizon. As a result, the availability of material resources matters to current and future-generations under the constraint of affordability.

  6. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of...

    Energy Saver

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the...

  7. Considering the total cost of electricity from sunlight and the alternatives

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2015-03-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation has grown to about 17 GW in the United States, corresponding to one tenth of the global capacity. Most deployment in the country has happened during the last 6 years. Reflecting back, in early 2008 this author and his collaborators James Mason and Ken Zweibel, published in Scientific American and in Energy Policy a Solar Grand Plan demonstrating the feasibility of renewable energy in providing 69% of the United States electricity demand by 2050, while reducing CO2 emissions by 60% from 2005 levels; the PV contribution to this plan was assessed to be 250 GW bymore » 2030 and 2900 GW by 2050 [1]. The DOE's more detailed SunShot vision study, released in 2012, showed the possibility of having 300 GW of PV installed in the United States by 2030, and 630 GW by 2050. Assessing the sustainability of such rapid growth of photovoltaics necessitates undertaking a careful analysis because PV markets largely are enabled by its promise to produce reliable electricity with minimum environmental burdens. Measurable aspects of sustainability include cost, resource availability, and environmental impact. The question of cost concerns the affordability of solar energy compared to other energy sources throughout the world. Environmental impacts include local-, regional-, and global-effects, as well as the usage of land and water, which must be considered in a comparable context over a long time, multigenerational horizon. As a result, the availability of material resources matters to current and future-generations under the constraint of affordability.« less

  8. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  9. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  10. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  11. Module Embedded Microninverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Impact $3/W total installed price vs. GE base residential system @ $4/W; $0.13/kWh LCOE (< average EIA 2015 retail electricity price) $0.10/W (30%) reduction of microinverter cost, and >$0.25/W reduction of installed price; Safety, MPPT and grid support functions including Volt/VAR support Module Embedded Microninverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System RUI ZHOU/ GE GLOBAL RESEARCH Develop and demonstrate power electronics technologies that address the following

  12. "Table A25. Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Components of Total Electricity Demand by Census Region, Census Division, Industry" " Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," ","Sales and/or"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","

  13. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY Pursuant to Section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force Members: J. Bruce McDonald, Department of Justice Michael Bardee, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission John H. Seesel, Federal Trade Commission David Meyer, Department of Energy Karen Larsen, Department of Agriculture Report Contributors: Robin Allen -

  14. 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",18,8,232.7,225.8

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Planned Year","State Code","Producer Type","Fuel Source","Generators","Facilities","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)" 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","All Sources",18,8,232.7,225.8 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power Industry","Coal",1,1,50,50 2015,"AK","Total Electric Power

  15. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-216-3718 Website: www.dominionenergy.comen Outage...

  16. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 1: technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cuenca, R.; Formento, J.; Gaines, L.; Marr, B.; Santini, D.; Wang, M.; Adelman, S.; Kline, D.; Mark, J.; Ohi, J.; Rau, N.; Freeman, S.; Humphreys, K.; Placet, M.

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume I contains the major results, a discussion of the conceptual framework of the study, and summaries of the vehicle, utility, fuel production, and manufacturing analyses. It also contains summaries of comments provided by external peer reviewers and brief responses to these comments.

  17. State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... Wisconsin Wyoming United States Overview Go U.S. average retail price per kilowatthour is 10.44 cents Related Links State Energy Profiles State Renewable Electricity Profiles

  18. Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item ... 2,307,431 15 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.24 27 Sources: U.S. Energy ...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value ... (megawatthours) 181,386 42 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.20 41 Sources: U.S. Energy ...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value ... Direct use 1,925,932 18 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.90 48 kWh Kilowatthours. ...

  2. Electricity Monthly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    California (CAISO) due to very low natural gas prices. Hawaii's retail electricity revenue per kilowatthour fell the most of any state for the fifth month in a row, down 24%...

  3. Retail Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CALiPER Testing » Application Reports » Retail Replacement Lamps Retail Replacement Lamps Annual CALiPER testing of A19, G25, candelabra, night light, MR16/PAR16, PAR20, and PAR30 replacement lamps - purchased directly from store shelves - offers insights on performance trends from year to year. The report findings offer valuable insights for manufacturers and retailers alike. Retail Lamps Study 3 (48 pages, February 2014) Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

  4. Energy options: Cogen V and retail wheeling alternatives technical conference

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Energy Options technical conference proceedings contains 265 papers, of which 17 were selected for the database. The conference was split into two primary topics: cogeneration and retail wheeling. Subtopics under cogeneration included: the state of cogeneration in the United States, case studies in facility ownership, fuels considerations for tomorrow, and plant design considerations for cogeneration systems. Retail wheeling alternatives subtopics included U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rulings, end-user options for retail wheeling, deregulation issues, and forecasting of electricity generating costs. Papers not selected for the database, while clearly pertinent topics of interest, consisted of viewgraphs which were judged not to have sufficient technical information and coherence without the corresponding presentation. However, some papers which did consist of viewgraphs were included.

  5. Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Kilowatts)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44,887,000 0 [5] 18,500,000 13,000 [10] NA NA NA 18,513,000 NA 63,400,000 1950 NA NA NA NA 49,987,000 0 [5] 19,200,000 13,000

  6. Financing Energy Efficiency in Retail

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Driving the reduction of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through efficiency projects in the retail sector can be difficult, particularly when many energy managers lack awareness of financing mechanisms available to them to fund their projects.

  7. ,"U.S. Total Refiner Petroleum Product Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NUSDPG","EMAEPPRPTGNUSDPG","EMAEPPRLPTGNUSDPG","EMAEPPRHPTGNUSDPG" "Date","U.S. Total Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners (Dollars per Gallon)","U.S. Aviation Gasoline...

  8. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  9. Category:StandAloneRetail | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    IN Duke Energy Indiana Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Ind... 66 KB SVStandAloneRetail Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Jac... 63 KB SVStandAloneRetail...

  10. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-866-366-4357 Website: www.dom.com Outage Hotline: 1-866-366-4357...

  11. ,"New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ...

  12. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Markets - EAC 2011 | Department of Energy Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity Markets - EAC 2011 The purpose of this report is to assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1) establishing a framework for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a

  13. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  14. Factors affecting robust retail energy markets

    SciTech Connect

    Michelman, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper briefly defines an active retail market, details the factors that influence market activity and their relative importance, compares activity in various retail energy markets to date, and predicts future retail energy market activity. Three primary factors translate into high market activity: supplier margins, translated into potential savings for actively shopping customers; market size; and market barriers. The author surveys activity nationwide and predicts hot spots for the coming year.

  15. Impact of total ionizing dose irradiation on electrical property of ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S. A.; Tang, M. H. Xiao, Y. G.; Zhang, W. L.; Ding, H.; Chen, J. W.; Zhou, Y. C.; Xiong, Y.; Li, Z.; Zhao, W.; Guo, H. X.

    2014-05-28

    P-type channel metal-ferroelectric-insulator-silicon field-effect transistors (FETs) with a 300?nm thick SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} ferroelectric film and a 10?nm thick HfTaO layer on silicon substrate were fabricated and characterized. The prepared FeFETs were then subjected to {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation in steps of three dose levels. Irradiation-induced degradation on electrical characteristics of the fabricated FeFETs was observed after 1 week annealing at room temperature. The possible irradiation-induced degradation mechanisms were discussed and simulated. All the irradiation experiment results indicated that the stability and reliability of the fabricated FeFETs for nonvolatile memory applications will become uncontrollable under strong irradiation dose and/or long irradiation time.

  16. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  17. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release...

  18. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",2528,132247,20623,15.594305 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",48809,3782815,310903,8.2188265 ...

  19. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",39180,688117,81287,11.812962 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",283628,3270075,385380.5,11.785066 ...

  20. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Retailer Insights.

  1. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the information below to help their customers better understand energy-efficient lighting choices. New information will be added as it becomes available. U.S. retailers are welcome to use parts of these materials in their retail displays. In those cases, please do so without the Department of Energy's name, since we will

  2. Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

  3. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 2: appendices A-D to technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline- powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume II contains additional details on the vehicle, utility, and materials analyses and discusses several details of the methodology.

  4. Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on ...

  6. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Energy Saver

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) ...

  7. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Delaware References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  8. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  9. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  10. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Find the ...

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Electricity Monthly Update Explained Highlights The Highlights page features in the center a short article about a major event or an informative topic. The left column contains bulleted highlights at the top and key indicators in a table and graphics - data you might be interested in at a glance. The right column is used for navigation. End-Use: Retail Rates/Prices and Consumption The second section presents statistics on end-use: retail rates/prices and consumption of electricity. End-use data

  12. FGD markets & business in an age of retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Dalton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses (1) the market and technology outlook for flue gas desulfurization ({open_quotes}FGD{close_quotes}) systems, with particular emphasis on wet systems in North America and the implications of retail wheeling of electricity and emission allowances for the utility industry, and (2) implications for the utility industry of architect/engineering ({open_quotes}A/E{close_quotes}) firm tendencies to reduce greatly the FGD vendor`s scope of award. The paper concludes that (1) the FGD market will be modest domestically and robust offshore over the forecast period (5-10 years), although the utility industry`s response to federal and state air toxics rules and retail wheeling may eventually grow the FGD market domestically beyond that created by compliance with Phase II of the Clean Air Act`s Title IV acid rain program alone, (2) new designs are likely to follow trends established in the past few years, but will likely include advanced processes that use higher velocity and smaller space, and possibly multi-pollutant control to remain competitive, and (3) shrinking of the FGD vendor`s scope may have adverse implications for the utility end-user, while retail wheeling may increase third-party ownership of FGD technology

  13. Electric power annual 1995. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This document summarizes pertinent statistics on various aspects of the U.S. electric power industry for the year and includes a graphic presentation. Data is included on electric utility retail sales and revenues, financial statistics, environmental statistics of electric utilities, demand-side management, electric power transactions, and non-utility power producers.

  14. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  15. A Brief History of the Electricity Industry

    Annual Energy Outlook

    timing" problem sold coal and nuke plants at the wrong time Average Retail Price of Electricity, 1960-2005 Source: EIA, http:www.eia.doe.govemeuaerpdfpagessec838.pdf. ...

  16. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    706,952 91,541 3,023 0 801,516 Massachusetts 2,720,128 398,717 14,896 3 3,133,744 New Hampshire 606,883 105,840 3,342 0 716,065 Rhode Island 438,879 58,346 1,884 1 499,110 ...

  17. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Customers"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Maine",706952,91541,3023,0,801516 "Massachusetts",2720128,398717,14896,3,3133744 "New Hampshire",606883,105840,3342,0,716065 "Rhode Island",438879,58346,1884,1,499110 ...

  18. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  19. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 50046 Utility Location Yes Ownership R ISO Ercot Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  20. CPL Retail Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13151 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  1. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Budget History April 9, 2015 - FY 2015 (past) FY 2016 (current) FY 2017 - Dec. 31, 2018 ... retail financial calendars 3.1 Program Benchmarking Calls Q1, Q2 Q1 delayed less than a ...

  2. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This is a special CALiPER report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. It follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012 (products purchased in 2010 and 2011), and is intended as a continuation that identifies long-term trends. For this report, products were selected to investigate specific hypotheses, rather than represent a sample of the increasingly large retail LED market.

  3. Retail Sales Allocation Tool (RSAT)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  4. Electric power annual 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-08

    This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

  5. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Billion Btu)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995,055 414,632 569,375 NA 2,979,062 0 1,424,722 5,803 NA NA NA NA 1,430,525 NA 5,420 4,415,007 1950

  6. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  7. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and ...

  8. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website:...

  9. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Retail Energy, LLC Address: 2001 SE 10th St Place: Bentonville, AR Zip: 72712 Phone Number: (479) 204-0845...

  10. ,"New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ...

  11. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-07-03

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV

  12. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) – Arlington, VA Partners: -- Deloitte – New York, NY -- Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) – Boston, MA -- Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) – Washington, D.C. -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) – Boston, MA

  13. Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    However, when comparing the national average retail price for a gallon of regular gasoline and a kilowatt-hour (kWh) for residential electricity, the pricing for gasoline is far ...

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: ...

  15. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-09

    Customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States are often compensated at the customer’s underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. Calculations of the customer economics of PV, meanwhile, often assume that retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms will not change and that retail electricity prices will increase (or remain constant) over time, thereby also increasing (or keeping constant) the value of bill savings from PV. Given the multitude of potential changes to retail rates and PV compensation mechanisms in the future, however, understanding how such changes might impact the value of bill savings from PV is critical for policymakers, regulators, utilities, the solar industry, and potential PV owners, i.e., any stakeholder interested in understanding uncertainties in and potential changes to the long-term customer economics of PV. This scoping study investigates the impact of, and interactions among, three key sources of uncertainty in the future value of bill savings from customer-sited PV, focusing in particular on residential customers. These three sources of uncertainty are: changes to electricity market conditions that would affect retail electricity prices, changes to the types of retail rate structures available to residential customers with PV, and shifts away from standard net-metering toward other compensation mechanisms for residential PV.

  16. Hedging effects of wind on retail electric supply costs

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Frank; Litvinova, Julia

    2009-12-15

    In the short term, renewables - especially wind - are not as effective as conventional hedges due to uncertain volume and timing as well as possibly poor correlation with high-value periods. In the long term, there are more potential hedging advantages to renewables because conventional financial hedges are not available very far in the future. (author)

  17. How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

  18. Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion...

  19. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Pennsylvania) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Pennsylvania References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  20. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

  1. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for ... determined that most compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle owners in New Zealand were ...

  2. Unbundling electricity: Ancillary services

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

    1996-06-01

    The US electricity industry, dominated by vertically integrated, retail-monopoly, regulated utilities, is undergoing enormous changes. The industry, within the next few years, will evolve into a deintegrated, competitive-market dominated, less regulated industry. Part of this process involves unbundling electric generation from transmission, which raises the issue of ancillary services. Since the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) published its March 1995 proposed rule on open-access transmission, ancillary services have been an important topic. Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, transmit, and distribute electricity to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. These services cost US electricity consumers about $12 billion a year. This article examines the functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, transmit, and distribute electricity to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery.

  3. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  4. CALiPER Special Summary Report: Retail Replacement Lamp Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    CALiPER testing has evaluated many products for commercial lighting markets and found some excellent performers. However, many of these are not available on the retail market. This special testing was undertaken to identify and test solid-state lighting (SSL) replacement lamp products that are available to the general public through retail stores and websites.

  5. Should utility incumbents be able to extend their brand name to competitive retail markets? An economic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, J.R.; Clements, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    As retail competition begins, at least for the short run, there should be policy restrictions on an incumbent utility`s ability to extend its brand to an affiliated marketer. However, a utility-affiliated marketer should be permitted to compete in a newly deregulated market using a generic or self-developed brand name. If extending a brand name from an incumbent utility to an affiliated marketer does in fact create real barriers to entry in the retail market, competition will be crippled in this market and consumers will suffer. More important, deregulation will appear to have failed in the electric power market--a consequence with effects reaching past the electricity industry to other industries considering deregulation as a viable policy choice. However, if real barriers to entry are not erected by this type of brand name extension, the industry may suffer from lower quality products, less service, and reduced innovation if policymakers prohibit brand name extension.

  6. Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  7. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naïm R.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Mills, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer

  8. Total Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & < Imports -

  9. Electric power annual 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alaska" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Idaho" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kansas" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kentucky" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nevada" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hampshire" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Jersey" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mexico" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    York" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Washington" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wisconsin" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wyoming" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alabama" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  7. Proceedings: 1996 EPRI conference on innovative approaches to electricity pricing: Managing the transition to market-based pricing

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the proceedings from the EPRI conference on innovative approaches to electricity pricing. Topics discussed include: power transmission pricing; retail pricing; price risk management; new pricing paradigms; changes from cost-based to a market-based pricing scheme; ancillary services; retail market strategies; profitability; unbundling; and value added services. This is the leading abstract. Papers are processed separately for the databases.

  8. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Refiners (Thousand Gallons per Day)","New Mexico Total Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners ...87,16127.8,1684.4,1377.2,128.8,497.8,835.6,2030.3,1178.7,674.5,56.4,3.9,4678.6,764.1,9.3,1...

  9. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  10. Electric power monthly, March 1998 with data for December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  11. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  12. The New Hampshire retail competition pilot program and the role of green marketing

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.A.; Fang, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    Most states in the US are involved in electric industry restructuring, from considering the pros and cons in regulatory dockets to implementing legislative mandates for full restructuring and retail access for all consumers. Several states and utilities have initiated pilot programs in which multiple suppliers or service providers may compete for business and some utility customers can choose among competing suppliers. The State of New Hampshire has been experimenting with a pilot program, mandated by the State Legislature in 1995 and implemented by the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (NHPUC), before it implements full retail access. Green marketing, an attempt to characterize the supplier or service provider as environmentally friendly without referring to the energy resource used to generate electricity, was used by several suppliers or service providers to attract customers. This appeal to environmental consumerism was moderately successful, but it raised a number of consumer protection and public policy issues. This issue brief examines the marketing methods used in New Hampshire and explores what green marketing might mean for the development of renewable energy generation. It also addresses the issues raised and their implications.

  13. Electric power industry restructuring in Australia: Lessons from down-under. Occasional paper No. 20

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, D.

    1997-01-01

    Australia`s electric power industry (EPI) is undergoing major restructuring. This restructuring includes commercialization of state-owned electric organization through privatization and through corporatization into separate governmental business units; structural unbundling of generation, transmission, retailing, and distribution; and creation of a National Electricity Market (NEM) organized as a centralized, market-based trading pool for buying and selling electricity. The principal rationales for change in the EPI were the related needs of enhancing international competitiveness, improving productivity, and lowering electric rates. Reducing public debt through privatization also played an important role. Reforms in the EPI are part of the overall economic reform package that is being implemented in Australia. Enhancing efficiency in the economy through competition is a key objective of the reforms. As the need for reform was being discussed in the early 1990s, Australia`s previous prime minister, Paul Keating, observed that {open_quotes}the engine which drives efficiency is free and open competition.{close_quotes} The optimism about the economic benefits of the full package of reforms across the different sectors of the economy, including the electricity industry, is reflected in estimated benefits of a 5.5 percent annual increase in real gross domestic product and the creation of 30,000 more jobs. The largest source of the benefits (estimated at 25 percent of total benefits) was projected to come from reform of the electricity and gas sectors.

  14. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maryland References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form...

  15. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 212-997-8500 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  16. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  17. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  18. DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released another special report on LED lamps that are available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. CALiPER...

  19. Mercantile (Retail Other Than Mall) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Other Than Mall) Definition Buildings used for the sale and display of goods other than food. Sub Categories retail store; beer, wine, or liquor store; rental center; dealership or...

  20. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56620 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  1. Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56502 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  2. Net-Zero Energy Retail Store Debuts in Illinois

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Walgreens on November 21 opened a net-zero energy retail store in Evanston, Illinois that it anticipates will generate at least as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year.

  3. Efficiency Treasure Chest: How Cities, Manufacturers, and Retailers are

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Unlocking Energy Savings in Warehouses and Distribution Centers | Department of Energy Efficiency Treasure Chest: How Cities, Manufacturers, and Retailers are Unlocking Energy Savings in Warehouses and Distribution Centers Efficiency Treasure Chest: How Cities, Manufacturers, and Retailers are Unlocking Energy Savings in Warehouses and Distribution Centers January 10, 2017 3:00PM to 4:00PM EST Hear how partners are addressing energy use in warehouses and distributions and gain ideas for you

  4. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: ...

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: -1,159,080 - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total ...

  6. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: 0 Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: ...

  7. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Massachusetts",3490569.2,3827051.4,1014262.3,31636.4,8363519.3 "New Hampshire",790655.9,640173,234899.8,0,1665728.7 "Rhode Island",527115.5,532578.5,114110.7,41...

  8. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    300,412 0 1,518,372 Massachusetts 3,490,569 3,827,051 1,014,262 31,636 8,363,519 New Hampshire 790,656 640,173 234,900 0 1,665,729 Rhode Island 527,116 532,579 114,111 4,158 ...

  9. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Sales (Megawatthours

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...84570,3357486,0,12002661 "Massachusetts",20071160,26076208,7960941,360983,54469292 "New Hampshire",4510487,4464530,1969064,0,10944081 "Rhode Island",3070347,3657679,887150,27928,76...

  10. The changing structure of the electric power industry: Selected issues, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    More than 3,000 electric utilities in the United States provide electricity to sustain the Nation`s economic growth and promote the well-being of its inhabitants. At the end of 1996, the net generating capability of the electric power industry stood at more than 776,000 megawatts. Sales to ultimate consumers in 1996 exceeded 3.1 trillion kilowatthours at a total cost of more than $210 billion. In addition, the industry added over 9 million new customers during the period from 1990 through 1996. The above statistics provide an indication of the size of the electric power industry. Propelled by events of the recent past, the industry is currently in the midst of changing from a vertically integrated and regulated monopoly to a functionally unbundled industry with a competitive market for power generation. Advances in power generation technology, perceived inefficiencies in the industry, large variations in regional electricity prices, and the trend to competitive markets in other regulated industries have all contributed to the transition. Industry changes brought on by this movement are ongoing, and the industry will remain in a transitional state for the next few years or more. During the transition, many issues are being examined, evaluated, and debated. This report focuses on three of them: how wholesale and retail prices have changed since 1990; the power and ability of independent system operators (ISOs) to provide transmission services on a nondiscriminatory basis; and how issues that affect consumer choice, including stranded costs and the determination of retail prices, may be handled either by the US Congress or by State legislatures.

  11. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Digg Find

  13. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources

  14. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2008-07-15

    Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over the past decade has been propelled by a number of forces, including rising fossil fuel prices, environmental concerns, and policy support at the state and federal levels. In this article, we review and discuss what are arguably the two most important types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy: renewables portfolio standards and utility integrated resource planning requirements. Within the Western U.S., where the vast majority of the nation's readily-accessible geothermal resource potential resides, these two types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy, and both promise to continue to play a fundamental role for the foreseeable future. In its essence, a renewables portfolio standard (RPS) requires utilities and other retail electricity suppliers to produce or purchase a minimum quantity or percentage of their generation supply from renewable resources. RPS purchase obligations generally increase over time, and retail suppliers typically must demonstrate compliance on an annual basis. Mandatory RPS policies are backed by various types of compliance enforcement mechanisms, although most states have incorporated some type of cost-containment provision, such as a cost cap or a cap on retail rate impacts, which could conceivably allow utilities to avoid (full) compliance with their RPS target. Currently, 27 states and the District of Columbia have mandatory RPS requirements. Within the eleven states of the contiguous Western U.S., all but three (Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming) now have a mandatory RPS legislation (Utah has a more-voluntary renewable energy goal), covering almost 80% of retail electricity sales in the region. Although many of these state policies have only recently been established, their impact is already evident: almost 1800 MW of new renewable capacity has been installed in Western states following the

  15. Liberalization of the Japanese electricity market

    SciTech Connect

    Shimazaki, Masaki

    1994-12-31

    The Japanese electricity industry is shackled by more regulations than other domestic industries. Electricity liberalization, however, is one of the few areas in which discussion of deregulation has been making steady progress although the outcome of deregulation has become uncertain due to the turbulence of politics and bureaucratic resistance. This study examines the liberalization of the Japanese electricity market focusing on the characteristics of (1) entering the electricity generation business, (2) access to power companies` transmission facilities, (3) beginning an electricity retail business, and (4) reforming the electricity rating system. The article follows three themes. First, the background of the Japanese electricity liberalization can be explained from economic, political, and bureaucratic points of view. Second, international electricity price comparison should not only depend on exchange rates but should also take other factors into account. Finally, liberalization will increase fossil fuel consumption, which could have unwelcome consequences.

  16. Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series ...

  17. Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series ...

  18. Electric power monthly, February 1999 with data for November 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Statistics are provided for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt-hour of electricity sold.

  19. " Electricity Generation by Employment...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group," " and Selected Industries, 1994" " ...

  20. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A ...

  1. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality...

    Energy Saver

    Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality ...

  2. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Melendez, M.

    2007-12-01

    NREL developed a model to test the investment profitability of adding E85 to retail stations. This report discusses this model and how retailers can make E85 a profitable business venture.

  3. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total ... of electricity plus plant use and unaccounted for electrical system energy losses. ...

  4. S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g ... of electricity plus plant use and unaccounted for electrical system energy losses. ...

  5. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  6. Electric sales and revenue: 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  7. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 559 25,106 2,071.5 8.25 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 227 452,985 19,665.2 4.34 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ... 8.93 City of Sturgeon Bay - (WI) WI Municipal 1 14,452 ...

  8. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 35,654.1 13.57 City of Bay City - (MI) MI Municipal ... 254,348 24,210.5 9.52 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 9,251 132,861 8,545.5 6.43 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ...

  9. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 12,377.1 10.15 City of Bay City - (MI) MI Municipal ... 1,709 100,446 7,885.6 7.85 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 447 18,857 1,262.5 6.70 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ...

  10. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  11. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  12. CALiPER Exploratory Study Retail Replacement Lamps – 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-02

    In 2010, CALiPER conducted a study on LED replacement lamps found in retail stores. The results were less than satisfactory, and many products were classified as being unlikely to meet consumer expectations. In November 2011, CALiPER purchased a new sample of products for a follow-up study, with the intent of characterizing the progress of this essential market segment.

  13. DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps January 16, 2015 - 4:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. While previous reports in the CALiPER retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality, the new report - CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1 -

  14. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  15. Table C12. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Electricity Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per kWh",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  16. Green electricity: Tracking systems for environmental disclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Biewald, B.E.; Ramey, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    For the first time, electricity consumers in the US are beginning to choose their generation providers. One of the opportunities created by the introduction of retail choice in electricity is the chance for customers to influence the mix of generating resources through their purchasing decisions. Some environmentally aware consumers will want {open_quotes}clean,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}green,{close_quotes} or renewable power. While some suppliers will attempt to differentiate themselves according to their environmental performance, such claims for green electricity can be particularly difficult to verify given the complexity of the interconnected electric system. Because electricity is delivered over an integrated transmission grid and kilowatt-hours at the point of retail sale are indistinguishable from each other; disclosure requires tracking protocols to attribute generation at power plants to sales at the customers` meters. Fortunately, it is possible to implement a workable disclosure system. Some states have already included disclosure requirements in their electric industry restructuring orders and legislation. In this paper, a set of design criteria for an environmental disclosure system are presented along with two methods for disclosure: the company approach and the product approach. In addition, the authors discuss of power pools, data availability issues, and propose a company-based disclosure system using a {open_quotes}wholesale sales first{close_quotes} approach to transaction accounting.

  17. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-05-01

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

  18. Occupant Perceptions and a Health Outcome in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Mingjie; Kim, Yang-Seon; Srebric, Jelena

    2015-11-02

    Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) in commercial buildings, such as retail stores, can affect employee satisfaction, productivity, and health. This study administered an IEQ survey to retail employees and found correlations between measured IEQ parameters and the survey responses. The survey included 611 employees in 14 retail stores located in Pennsylvania (climate zone 5A) and Texas (climate zone 2A). The survey questionnaire featured ratings of different aspects of IEQ, including thermal comfort, lighting and noise level, indoor smells, overall cleanness, and environmental quality. Simultaneously with the survey, on-site physical measurements were taken to collect data of relative humidity levels, air exchange rates, dry bulb temperatures, and contaminant concentrations. This data was analyzed using multinomial logit regression with independent variables being the measured IEQ parameters, employees’ gender, and age. This study found that employee perception of stuffy smells is related to formaldehyde and PM10 concentrations. Furthermore, the survey also asked the employees to report an annual frequency of common colds as a health indicator. The regression analysis showed that the cold frequency statistically correlates with the measured air exchange rates, outdoor temperatures, and indoor PM concentrations. Overall, the air exchange rate is the most influential parameter on the employee perception of the overall environmental quality and self-reported health outcome.

  19. Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  20. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  1. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  2. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  3. Electric industry restructuring in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.W.

    1998-07-01

    A law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective on November 25, 1997. The law will break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and it will allow non-utility generators access to the retail end user market. The law contains many compromises aimed at protecting consumers, ensuring savings, protecting employees and protecting the environment. While it appears that the legislation recognizes the sanctity of independent power producer contracts with utilities, it attempts to provide both carrots and sticks to the utilities and the IPP generators to encourage renegotiations and buy-down of the contracts. Waste-to-energy contracts are technically exempted from some of the obligations to remediate. Waste-to-energy facilities are classified as renewable energy sources which may have positive effects on the value to waste-to-energy derived power. On November 25, 1997, the law restructuring the electric utility industry in Massachusetts became effective. The law will have two primary effects: (1) break up the existing utility monopolies into separate generation, distribution and transmission entities, and (2) allow non-utility generators access to the retail end-user market.

  4. The Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California Ryan Wiser, Andrew Mills, Galen Barbose & William Golove State Energy Advisory ...

  5. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year to year.

  6. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 4:23pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year to year.

  7. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact 858 February 2, ... highly volatile and often varies substantially throughout any given year. ...

  8. Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-20

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  9. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alabama Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  4. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross

  6. " Electricity Generation by Census Region...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " ...

  7. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  8. Wyoming Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wyoming Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity ...

  9. Iowa Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Iowa Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity ...

  10. Kansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kansas Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity ...

  11. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.

    2007-08-30

    Agenda: {lg_bullet} Convey current state of the retail gasoline market {lg_bullet} Explore E85 as part of the solution {lg_bullet} Test the profitability of E85 as an investment {lg_bullet} Give retailers guidance to assess if E85 would be a good investment for them

  12. Electric power monthly, March 1999 with data for December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be sued in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  13. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-28

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  14. Electric power monthly, May 1998, with data for February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974. The EPM provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 30 refs., 58 tabs.

  15. Electric power monthly, August 1998, with data for May 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 9 refs., 57 tabs.

  16. Electric power monthly, December 1997 with data for September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  17. Electric Power Monthly with data for July 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 57 tabs.

  18. Electric power monthly with data for June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation by energy source and capability of new generating units by company and plant are also included. A section is included in the report which summarizes major industry developments. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Patrick; Logan, Jeffrey; Bird, Lori; Short, Walter

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Three Proposed Federal Renewable Electricity Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.; Logan, J.; Bird, L.; Short, W.

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyzes potential impacts of proposed national renewable electricity standard (RES) legislation. An RES is a mandate requiring certain electricity retailers to provide a minimum share of their electricity sales from qualifying renewable power generation. The analysis focuses on draft bills introduced individually by Senator Jeff Bingaman and Representative Edward Markey, and jointly by Representative Henry Waxman and Markey. The analysis uses NREL's Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to evaluate the impacts of the proposed RES requirements on the U.S. energy sector in four scenarios.

  1. Customer-Economics of Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Impact of High Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings with Net Metering

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems in the US are often compensated at the customer's underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. There is growing interest in understanding how potential changes in rates may impact the value of bill savings from PV. This article uses a production cost and capacity expansion model to project California hourly wholesale electricity market prices under a reference scenario and a 33% renewables scenario. Second, based on the wholesale electricity market prices generated by the model, the article develops retail rates (i.e., flat, time-of-use, and real-time pricing) for each future scenario based on standard retail rate design principles. Finally, based on these retail rates, the bill savings from PV are estimated for 226 California residential customers under two types of net metering, for each scenario. The article finds that high renewable penetrations can drive substantial changes in residential retail rates and that these changes, together with variations in retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms, interact to place substantial uncertainty on the future value of bill savings from residential PV.

  2. Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series ...

  3. Total Space Heat-

    Annual Energy Outlook

    12 1 18 (*) 2 1 Q 6 Buildings without Cooling ... 30 1 (*) 4 (*) 14 (*) 4 (*) 1 6 Water-Heating Energy Source Electricity ... 402 21 57 42...

  4. Total Crude by Pipeline

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign

  5. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Colorado" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of Colorado","Investor-owned",28671219,9008526,12886370,6712282,64041 2,"City of Colorado Springs - (CO)","Public",4477715,1425423,1097160,1955132,0 3,"Intermountain Rural Elec

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Connecticut Light & Power Co","Investor-owned",8945482,6146224,2365991,367962,65305 2,"Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","Investor-owned",2018823,0,1320397,692814,5612 3,"United Illuminating

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Idaho" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Idaho Power Co","Investor-owned",13462077,4784073,3792971,4885033,0 2,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",3495174,665344,457510,2372320,0 3,"Avista Corp","Investor-owned",3083614,1188464,1029305,865845,0 4,"City of Idaho Falls -

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Illinois" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Commonwealth Edison Co","Investor-owned",18061768,9114941,7890441,1056386,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",10686139,5208659,5477480,0,0 3,"Homefield

  10. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Louisiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Louisiana LLC","Investor-owned",32904509,9047299,6757407,17099803,0 2,"Entergy Gulf States - LA LLC","Investor-owned",20822523,5368421,5529206,9924896,0 3,"Cleco Power

  11. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mississippi" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Entergy Mississippi Inc","Investor-owned",13204945,5672166,5235681,2297098,0 2,"Mississippi Power Co","Investor-owned",9960184,2136509,2905744,4917931,0 3,"Tennessee Valley Authority","Federal",4527039,0,0,4527039,0

  12. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nevada" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Nevada Power Co","Investor-owned",21109027,8922759,4638229,7539740,8299 2,"Sierra Pacific Power Co","Investor-owned",8097075,2268295,2959866,2868914,0 3,"Shell Energy North America (US),

  13. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hampshire" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Co of NH","Investor-owned",3799020,2390026,1240068,168926,0 2,"Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","Investor-owned",1008956,3870,1005086,0,0 3,"Constellation NewEnergy,

  14. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Jersey" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Public Service Elec & Gas Co","Investor-owned",19571938,11374261,7430854,766823,0 2,"Jersey Central Power & Lt Co","Investor-owned",9957517,7264641,2445207,247669,0 3,"Direct Energy

  15. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    York" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Consolidated Edison Co-NY Inc","Investor-owned",19756921,9869409,9783465,102499,1548 2,"New York Power Authority","Public",18956177,0,8062381,8156837,2736959 3,"Long Island Power

  16. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wyoming" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"PacifiCorp","Investor-owned",9568272,1041412,1503050,7023810,0 2,"Powder River Energy Corp","Cooperative",2640812,221881,891312,1527619,0 3,"Cheyenne Light Fuel & Power Co","Investor-owned",1175006,259090,533610,382306,0

  17. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    United States" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",104431096,55224658,46172611,2942385,91442 2,"Georgia Power Co","Investor-owned",83740365,27132065,32894391,23548775,165134 3,"Southern California Edison

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Utilities Co","Investor-owned",2068166,811250,1081889,175027,0 3,"Mountrail-Williams Elec Coop","Cooperative",2025153,263270,182264,1579619,0 4,"Otter Tail Power ...

  19. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Florida" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Florida Power & Light Co","Investor-owned",104431096...

  20. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Washington" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Puget Sound Energy Inc","Investor-owned",20568948...

  1. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Iowa" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"MidAmerican Energy Co","Investor-owned",20585461,570529...

  2. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Montana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"NorthWestern Energy LLC - (MT)","Investor-owned",597...

  3. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kansas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Westar Energy Inc","Investor-owned",9973395,3434301,4...

  4. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC","Investor-owned",567506...

  5. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Ohio" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-owned",41994756...

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pennsylvania" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"First Energy Solutions Corp.","Investor-owned",...

  7. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Indiana" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Duke Energy Indiana Inc","Investor-owned",28224148,9...

  8. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Minnesota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-ow...

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Northern States Power Co - Minnesota","Investor-owned...

  10. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than

  11. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Operated in Steady-State Conditions | Department of Energy Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions (42 pages, December 2014) (2.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Report 20.5: Chromaticity Shift Modes

  12. Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  13. Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  14. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Kiliccote, Sila

    2012-06-01

    In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

  15. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  16. "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)&

  17. "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel

  18. Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

  19. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New York References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 22509 This article is a...

  20. Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

  1. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  2. Effect of increases in energy-related labor forces upon retailing in Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The heightened mining employment that will result from increased extraction of coal from Alabama's Warrior Coal Basin will boost retail sales and employment. The Warrior Coal Basin counties (Fayette, Jefferson, Tuscaloosa and Walker) are heavily dependent upon coal mining as a source of employment and wages. Further, since the counties' economies grew increasingly dependent upon coal mining activities throughout the 1970s, it was believed that it would be possible to measure, with some acceptable level of reliability, the impact of the steadily rising mining activity upon the area's retailing sector. Therefore, a small scale econometric model was developed which represents the interrelationships among income, mining and trade employment and retail sales in the four-county Warrior Coal Basin area. The results of two versions of the model are presented. In the first version, area-wide retail sales are treated in the aggregate. In the second version, retail sales are disaggregated into twelve categories (e.g., food, apparel, furniture, etc.). The models were specified using 1960 to 1976 data. The mining employment growth scenario used in this report called for steady increases in mining employment that culminated in an employment level that is 4000 above the baseline employment projections by 1985. Both versions of the model predicted that cumulative real regional income would increase by $1.39 billion over seven years with the added mining employment. The predicted impacts on trade employment and real retail sales varied between the two models, however. The aggregate model predicts the addition of 7500 trade workers and an additional $1.35 billion in real retail sales. The disaggregate model suggests that food stores, automobile dealers, general merchandise stores, gas stations and lumber and building materials retailers would enjoy the greatest positive benefits.

  3. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  4. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 346 367 402 436 414 Gas Wells R 6,243 R 6,203 R 6,174 R 6,117 6,044 Production

  5. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 2,040 1,981 2,006 2,042 2,096 Gas Wells R 274 R 281 R 300 R 338 329 Production

  6. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 5,963 6,456 6,799 7,771 7,733 Gas Wells R 43,792 R 46,141 R 46,883 R 46,876

  7. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic

  8. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Hawaii - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S13. Summary statistics for natural gas - Hawaii, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From

  9. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Idaho - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From

  10. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    20 Maine - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From

  11. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 561 618 581 540 501 Gas Wells R 1,703 R 1,666 R 1,632 R 1,594 1,560

  12. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Montana - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 1,956 2,147 2,268 2,377 2,277 Gas Wells R 6,615 R 6,366 R 5,870 R 5,682 5,655

  13. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 12,887 13,791 14,171 14,814 14,580 Gas Wells R 40,231 R 40,441 R 40,119 R

  14. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 New York - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 988 1,170 1,589 1,731 1,697 Gas Wells R 7,372 R 7,731 R 7,553 R 7,619 7,605

  15. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 5,561 7,379 9,363 11,532 12,799 Gas Wells R 526 R 451 R 423 R 398 462

  16. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 6,775 6,745 7,038 7,257 5,941 Gas Wells R 31,966 R 31,647 R 30,804 R 31,060 26,599

  17. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 6,723 7,360 8,744 7,105 8,368 Gas Wells R 51,712 R 51,472 R 50,606 R 50,044

  18. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Gas Wells R 28 R 24 R 24 R 12 14 Production (million cubic feet) Gross

  19. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 7,046 7,627 7,164 8,481 7,557 Gas Wells R 61,815 R 62,922 R 61,838 R

  20. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 52 75 NA NA NA Gas Wells R 1,027 R 1,027 1,089 NA NA Production (million cubic

  1. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Texas - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 85,030 94,203 96,949 104,205 105,159 Gas Wells R 139,368 R 140,087 R 140,964 R 142,292

  2. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Utah - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 3,119 3,520 3,946 4,249 3,966 Gas Wells R 7,603 R 8,121 R 8,300 R 8,537 8,739 Production

  3. Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2015 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2011-2015 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Number of Wells Producing Natural Gas at End of Year Oil Wells 2 1 1 2 2 Gas Wells R 7,781 R 7,874 7,956 R 8,061 8,111 Production (million

  4. " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Quantity of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals;" " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Electricity","Components",,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" " "," ",,,"Electricity",,,"Natural

  5. Electric power monthly, September 1996, with data for June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  6. Electric power monthly with data for January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  7. Electric power monthly with data for December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  8. PROJECT PROFILE: Ethical Electric (T2M2) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ethical Electric (T2M2) PROJECT PROFILE: Ethical Electric (T2M2) Funding Opportunity: Technology to Market 2 SunShot Subprogram: Technology to Market Location: Washington, DC SunShot Award Amount: $1,250,000 Awardee Cost Share: $1,648,525 This project builds a platform to enable the sale of community solar at a significantly lower cost per acquisition than comparable residential solar sales. Ethical Electric will be the first competitive retail electric provider in deregulated states to offer

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    California Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 California full profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 67,328 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 16,460 24.4 Geothermal 2,004 3.0 Hydro Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 Wood/Wood

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Colorado Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,777 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,010 14.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 3 * Other Biomass 10

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Florida Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 59,222 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,182 2.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 344 0.6

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Other Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,536 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 340 13.4 Geothermal 31 1.2 Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 60 2.4 Other Biomass

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Idaho Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,990 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,140 78.7 Geothermal 10 0.3 Hydro Conventional 2,704 67.8 Solar - - Wind 352 8.8 Wood/Wood Waste 68 1.7 MSW/Landfill

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Illinois Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 44,127 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,112 4.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 123 0.3 Other Biomass - -

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Indiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,638 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,452 5.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 53 0.2 Other Biomass s *

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Iowa Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,592 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,728 25.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 11 0.1 Other Biomass 3 *

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maine Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,430 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,692 38.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 Wood/Wood Waste 600 13.6 MSW/Landfill Gas

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Michigan Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 29,831 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 807 2.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 232 0.8 MSW/Landfill Gas

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Minnesota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,715 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,588 17.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood/Wood Waste 177 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 134 0.9 Other

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nevada Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 11,421 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,507 13.2 Geothermal 319 2.8 Hydro Conventional 1,051 9.2 Solar 137 1.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mexico Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,130 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 818 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    York Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 39,357 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 6,033 15.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood/Wood Waste 86 0.2

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oregon Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Utah Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,497 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 528 7.0 Geothermal 42 0.6 Hydro Conventional 255 3.4 Solar - - Wind 222 3.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 9 0.1

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Washington Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 30,478 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 23,884 78.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood/Wood Waste 368 1.2

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    California Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 California full profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 67,328 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 16,460 24.4 Geothermal 2,004 3.0 Hydro Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 Wood/Wood

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Colorado Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,777 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,010 14.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 3 * Other Biomass 10

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Florida Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 59,222 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,182 2.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 344 0.6

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Hawaii Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Other Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,536 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 340 13.4 Geothermal 31 1.2 Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 60 2.4 Other Biomass

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Idaho Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,990 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,140 78.7 Geothermal 10 0.3 Hydro Conventional 2,704 67.8 Solar - - Wind 352 8.8 Wood/Wood Waste 68 1.7 MSW/Landfill

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Illinois Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 44,127 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,112 4.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 123 0.3 Other Biomass - -

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Indiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,638 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,452 5.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 53 0.2 Other Biomass s *

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Iowa Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,592 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,728 25.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 11 0.1 Other Biomass 3 *

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Maine Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,430 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,692 38.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 Wood/Wood Waste 600 13.6 MSW/Landfill Gas

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Michigan Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 29,831 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 807 2.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 232 0.8 MSW/Landfill Gas

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Minnesota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,715 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,588 17.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood/Wood Waste 177 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 134 0.9 Other

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Nevada Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 11,421 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,507 13.2 Geothermal 319 2.8 Hydro Conventional 1,051 9.2 Solar 137 1.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Mexico Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,130 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 818 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    York Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 39,357 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 6,033 15.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood/Wood Waste 86 0.2

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Oregon Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Washington Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 30,478 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 23,884 78.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood/Wood Waste 368 1.2

  12. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  13. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per...

  14. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  15. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  16. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  17. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per...

  18. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  19. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

  20. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

  1. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1990 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-06-01

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1990 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. The report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1990 time period, and gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1990. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell annually to four sectors. Data is provided on each retail customer sector and also on the customers Bonneville serves directly: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. 21 figs., 40 tabs.

  2. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 10,050 100.0 Total

  3. Montana Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Montana Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 29,791 100.0 Total

  4. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alabama Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 152,151 100.0 Total

  5. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook

    not necessarily coincide with the beginning and the end of months. For example, retail revenue and sales data reported in July reflects data for billing cycles that end sometime...

  6. Electricity | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    above is either the statewide average retail price or a multi-state regional average price reported by EIA. The latest gasoline pricing data is available on EIA's webpage....

  7. Parallel Total Energy

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-10-21

    This is a total energy electronic structure code using Local Density Approximation (LDA) of the density funtional theory. It uses the plane wave as the wave function basis set. It can sue both the norm conserving pseudopotentials and the ultra soft pseudopotentials. It can relax the atomic positions according to the total energy. It is a parallel code using MP1.

  8. Electricity from biogas

    SciTech Connect

    Augenstein, D.; Benemann, J.; Hughes, E.

    1994-12-31

    Biogas is a medium-Btu methane and carbon dioxide mix produced by bacterial decomposition of organic matter. Its sources include landfills, waste water sludges, and animal wastes. It can fuel energy applications, of which electricity generation is a frequently-preferred option. The greatest current U.S. biogas recovery and energy use is at landfills, where biogas at about 80 landfill sites fuels a total of approximately 300 MWe. Wastewater treatment plants and confined animal waste management systems support additional electric power production. Generation of electricity from biogas can present difficulties due to the generally small scale of the generating facility, variable energy content of the gas, fluctuating availability, contaminant problems, and often-demanding control needs. However, such difficulties are being successfully addressed and economics for electricity generation are often favorable as biogas can be essentially {open_quotes}free{close_quotes} fuel. Biogas recovery and use has the additional advantage of mitigating a potent greenhouse gas. Biogas from U.S. landfills alone could fuel about 1% of U.S. electrical generation while giving climate change benefit equivalent to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions in the electricity sector by more than 10%. Growth in landfill gas use will be facilitated by recent regulations, advances in equipment, and improved management techniques such as {open_quotes}controlled landfilling{close_quotes}. The potential for biogas recovery and electricity production from sewage sludges, animal wastes and other organic resources such as agricultural residues is uncertain but probably exceeds the estimate for landfills.

  9. 2014 Data Book Shows Increased Use of Renewable Electricity ...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Book shows that U.S. renewable electricity grew to 15.5 percent of total installed capacity and 13.5 percent of total electricity generation. Published annually by the National...

  10. " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " ...

  11. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and ...

  12. Summary Max Total Units

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  13. Total Space Heat-

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 50.0 2.6 7.1 5.2 1.9 17.7 0.3 5.7 1.2 2.4 5.8 Other Excluding Electricity ... 52.4 1.3 6.4 7.9 (*) 20.5 0.4 6.2 1.0 2.7 6.0 Bldgs without Water...

  14. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  15. Electrical stator

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    An electrical stator of an electromagnetic pump includes first and second spaced apart coils each having input and output terminals for carrying electrical current. An elongate electrical connector extends between the first and second coils and has first and second opposite ends. The connector ends include respective slots receiving therein respective ones of the coil terminals to define respective first and second joints. Each of the joints includes a braze filler fixedly joining the connector ends to the respective coil terminals for carrying electrical current therethrough.

  16. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2016-07-12

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  17. Electrical Engineer

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transmission Field Services is responsible for field switching operation and maintenance of Bonneville Power Administration's high-voltage electrical transmission system to provide safe, reliable,...

  18. Tennessee Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Tennessee" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",61336,61205,57753,42242,46203 " Coal",60498,60237,57058,41633,43670 " Petroleum",160,232,216,187,217 " Natural Gas",664,722,467,409,2302 " Other Gases",14,13,12,12,13 "Nuclear",24679,28700,27030,26962,27739 "Renewables",8559,5910,6611,11162,9125 "Pumped Storage",-668,-704,-739,-650,-721 "Other",5,3,8,1,3

  19. Texas Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Texas" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",349849,351720,344813,333227,341054 " Coal",146391,147279,147132,139107,150173 " Petroleum",1789,1309,1034,1405,708 " Natural Gas",197870,199531,193247,189066,186882 " Other Gases",3798,3601,3401,3649,3291 "Nuclear",41264,40955,40727,41498,41335 "Renewables",8480,11932,18679,22133,28967 "Pumped

  20. Pennsylvania Total Electric Power Industry Net Generation, by Energy Source

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",138173,143909,137862,136047,145210 " Coal",122558,122693,117583,105475,110369 " Petroleum",1518,1484,938,915,571 " Natural Gas",13542,19198,18731,29215,33718 " Other Gases",554,534,610,443,552 "Nuclear",75298,77376,78658,77328,77828 "Renewables",5317,4782,5353,6035,6577 "Pumped Storage",-698,-723,-354,-731,-708