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Sample records for tion col lec

  1. CLASSIFICdTION CAWXL~ DAm

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CLASSIFICdTION CAWXL DAm NAR 6 1969 For the Atomic EhergY hDh+ ,' ROBERT L JACKSON (' t' for the Chief, Declassification BJx

  2. ARM - Datastreams - aosccn1col

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    col Documentation XDC documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1256093 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AOSCCN1COL AOS: Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter Active Dates 2014.01.25 - 2016.11.17 Measurement Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Originating Instrument Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter (CCN) Measurements Only

  3. Col. Kabban receives NNSA Defense Programs Excellence Award ...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Excellence Award Col. Kabban receives NNSA Defense Programs Excellence Award Brig. Gen. Jim Dawkins, NNSA's Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Application,...

  4. Pilot-scale Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1, Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prudich, M.E.; Appell, K.W.; McKenna, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. A total of over 90 experimental trials have been performed using the pilot-scale moving-bed LEC dry scrubber as a part of this research project with run times ranging up to a high of 125 hours. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies as high as 99.9% were achievable for all experimental conditions studied during which sufficient humidification was added to the LEC bed. The LEC process and conventional limestone scrubbing have been compared on an equatable basis using flue gas conditions that would be expected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of a 500 MW coal-fired power plant. The LEC was found to have a definite economic advantage in both direct capital costs and operating costs. Based on the success and findings of the present project, the next step in LEC process development will be a full-scale commercial demonstration unit.

  5. Major COL4A5 gene rearrangements in patients with juvenile type Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renieri, A.; Galli, L.; Bruttini, M.; Ballabio, A.

    1995-11-20

    Mutations in the COL4A5 gene, which encodes the {alpha}5 chain of type IV collagen, are found in a large fraction of patients with X-linked Alport syndrome. The recently discovered COL4A6, tightly linked and highly homologous to COL4A5, represents a second candidate gene for Alport syndrome. We analyzed 177 Italian Alport syndrome families by Southern blotting using cDNA probes from both COL4A5 and COL4A6. Nine unrelated families, accounting for 5% of the cases, were found to have a rearrangement in COL4A5. No rearrangements were found in COL4A6, with the exception of a deletion encompassing the 5{prime} ends of both COL4A5 and COL4A6 genes in a patient with Alport syndrome and leiomyomatosis. COL4A5 rearrangements were all intragenic and included 1 duplication and 7 deletions. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was carried out to characterize deletion and duplication boundaries and to predict the resulting protein abnormality. The two smallest deletions involved a single exon (exons 17 and 40, respectively), while the largest ones spanned exons 1 to 36. The clinical phenotype of patients in whom a rearrangement in COL4A5 was detected was severe, with progression to end-stage renal failure in juvenile age and hypoacusis occurring in most cases. These data have some important implications in the diagnosis of patients with Alport syndrome. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Pilot-scale limestone emission control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1: Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. The primary goal of the current study is the demonstration of the techno/economic capability of the LEC system as a post-combustion FGD process capable of use in both existing and future coal-fired boiler facilities burning high-sulfur coal. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. The pilot plant was normally operated on the slipstream of the Ohio Univ. boiler plant flue gas, but also had the capability of operating at higher inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations (typically equivalent to 3-1/2% sulfur coal) than those normally available from the flue gas slipstream. This was accomplished by injecting SO{sub 2} gas into the slipstream inlet. The pilot plant was instrumented to provide around-the-clock operation and was fully outfitted with temperature, SO{sub 2}, gas flow and pressure drop monitors.

  7. Linkage approach and direct COL4A5 gene mutation screening in Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turco, A.E.; Rossetti, S.; Biasi, O.

    1994-09-01

    Alport Syndrome (AS) is transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait in the majority of families, the defective gene being COL4A5 at Xq22. In the remaining cases AS appears to be autosomally inherited. Recently, mutations in COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes at 2q35-q37 were identified in families with autosomal recessive AS. Mutation detection screening is being performed by non-radioactive single stand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex analysis, and automated DNA sequencing in over 170 AS patients enrolled in the ongoing Italian Multicenter Study on AS. So far twenty-five different mutations have been found, including missense, splicing, and frameshifts. Moreover, by using six tightly linked COL4A5 informative makers, we have also typed two larger AS families, and have shown compatible sex-linked transmission in one other, suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance. In this latter three-generation COL4A5-unlinked family we are now looking for linkage and for mutations in the candidate COL4A3 and COL4A4 genes on chromosome 2q.

  8. Celebrating the Legacy of Bioenergy Director Lt. Col. William C. Holmberg |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Celebrating the Legacy of Bioenergy Director Lt. Col. William C. Holmberg Celebrating the Legacy of Bioenergy Director Lt. Col. William C. Holmberg October 18, 2016 - 4:52pm Addthis By Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenergy Technologies Office The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) recognizes the foundational accomplishments of retired Marine Lieutenant Colonel William C. Holmberg, the founding director of DOE bioenergy efforts and

  9. COL Application Content Guide for HTGRs: Revision to RG 1.206, Part 1 - Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2012-08-01

    A combined license (COL) application is required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for all proposed nuclear plants. The information requirements for a COL application are set forth in 10 CFR 52.79, “Contents of Applications; Technical Information in Final Safety Analysis Report.” An applicant for a modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) must develop and submit for NRC review and approval a COL application which conforms to these requirements. The technical information necessary to allow NRC staff to evaluate a COL application and resolve all safety issues related to a proposed nuclear plant is detailed and comprehensive. To this, Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.206, “Combined License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants” (LWR Edition), was developed to assist light water reactor (LWR) applicants in incorporating and effectively formatting required information for COL application review (Ref. 1). However, the guidance prescribed in RG 1.206 presumes a LWR design proposal consistent with the systems and functions associated with large LWR power plants currently operating under NRC license.

  10. YAC contigs mapping the human COL4A5 and COL4A6 genes and DXS118 within Xq21.3-q22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Featherstone, T.; Wein, K.

    1995-04-10

    Sequence-tagged sites (STSs) were developed for three loci of uncertain X chromosomal localization (DXS122, DXS137, and DXS174) and were used to seed YAC contigs. Two contigs now total about 3.3 Mb formatted with 34 STSs. One contains DXS122 and DXS174 within 250 kb on single YACs; it is placed in Xq21.3-q22.1 by FISH analysis, which is consistent with somatic cell hybrid panel analyses and with the inclusion of a probe that detects polymorphism at the DXS118 locus already assigned to that general region. The other contig, which contains DXS137, is in Xq22.2 by FISH, consistent with cell hybrid analyses and with the finding that it covers the human COL4A5 and COL4A6 genes known to be in that vicinity. In addition to extending the cloned coverage of this portion of the X chromosome, these materials should aid, for example, in the further analysis of Alport syndrome. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Identification of four novel mutations in the COL4A5 gene of patients with Alport syndrome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemmink, H.H.; Schroeder, C.H.; Brunner, H.G.; Nelen, M.R.; Van Oost, B.A.; Smeets, H.J.M. ); Zhou, Jing; Tryggvason, K. ); Haagsma-Schouten, W.A.G. ); Roodvoets, A.P. ); Rascher, W. )

    1993-08-01

    The type IV collagen [alpha]5 chain (COL4A5) genes of patients with Alport syndrome were tested for major gene rearrangements by Southern blot analysis, using COL4A5 cDNA clones as probes. In addition, individual exons were screened for small mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Four new COL4A5 mutations were detected. A duplication of the nine most 3[prime] located nucleotides of exon 49 and the first nucleotide of intron 49 was identified in the COL4A5 gene of one patient. Two patients displayed single base substitutions leading to, respectively, a proline to threonine and an arginine to glutamine substitution in the C-terminal end. Both substitutions involve amino acids conserved through evolution. In COL4A5 intron 41 a mutation changing the splice acceptor site from AG to AA was identified. All mutations cosegregate with the clinical phenotype of Alport syndrome in affected family members. In a control population of 50 individuals tested by PCR-SSCP these mutations were never identified. Together with two mutations reported previously, a total of six mutations were found in 26 patients with Alport syndrome (23%) after systematic screening of about 30% of the COL4A5 coding region. The clinical features of these six patients are described in detail. 21 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Structure of the human type IV collagen COL4A6 gene, which is mutated in Alport syndrome-associated leiomyomatosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xu |; Zhou, Jing; Reeders, S.T.

    1996-05-01

    Basement membrane (type IV) collagen, a subfamily of the collagen protein family, is encoded by six distinct genes in mammals. Three of those, COL4A3, COL4A4, and COL4A5, are linked with Alport syndrome (hereditary nephritis). Patients with leimoyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome have been shown to have deletions in the 5{prime} end of the COL4A6 gene, in addition to having deletions in COL4A6. The human COL4A6 gene is reported to be 425 kb as determined by mapping of overlapping YAC clones by probes for its 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends. In the present study we describe the complete exon/intron size pattern of the human COL4A6 gene. The 12 {lambda} phage clones characterized in the study spanned a total of 110 kb, including 85 kb of the actual gene and 25 kb of flanking sequences. The overlapping clones contained all 46 exons of the gene and all introns, except for intron 2. Since the total size of the exons and all introns except for intron 2 is about 85 kb, intron 2 must be about 340 kb. All exons of the gene were assigned to EcoRI restriction fragments to facilitate analysis of the gene in patients with leiomyomatosis associated with Alport syndrome. The exon size pattern of COL4A6 is highly homologous with that of the human and mouse COL4A2 genes, with 27 of the 46 exons of COL4A6 being identical in size between the genes. 42 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. CUSSSFIC4TION CMUXLLq

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    At the timeofoastiug, the slutemperatame 188 probably scmewbere betaem Baja md 42000. These pieoee were oasttith thend ate; thfities wUbouttUbmmlopen.lng. Cnnone of these pieces ...

  14. The SpallaTion

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ORNL had deep expertise in nuclear science, but it had never built an ... charged hydrogen ion (h - ) beam from 2.5 to 1000 million electron volts, as well as the low energy ...

  15. Linkage mapping of the gene for Type III collagen (COL3A1) to human chromosome 2q using a VNTR polymorphism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiller, G.E.; Polumbo, P.A.; Summar, M.L. )

    1994-03-15

    The gene for the [alpha]1(III) chain of type III collagen, COL3A1, has been previously mapped to human chromosome 2q24.3-q31 by in situ hybridization. Physical mapping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has demonstrated that COL3A1 lies within 35 kb of COL5A2. The authors genotyped the CEPH families at the COL3A2 locus using a pentanucleotide repeat polymorphism within intron 25. They demonstrated significant linkage to 18 anonymous markers as well as the gene for carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPSI), which had been previously mapped to this region. No recombination was seen between COL3A1 and COL5A2 (Z = 9.93 at [theta] = 0) or D2S24 (Z = 10.55 at [theta] = 0). The locus order is (D2S32-D2S138-D2S148)-(D2S24-COL5A2-COL3A1)-(D2S118-D2S161), with odds of 1:2300 for the next most likely order. These relationships are consistent with the physical mapping of COL3A1 to the distal portion of 2q and place it proximal to CPSI by means of multipoint analysis. These linkage relationships should prove useful in further studies of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV and carbamyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency and provide an additional framework for localizing other genes in this region. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N. M., April 3, 2013-Col. Paul Tibbets IV, grandson of Enola Gay

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives 70th anniversary lecture April 3, 2013 Paul Tibbets IV to remember his grandfather, share experiences of his own Air Force career April 10 at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N. M., April 3, 2013-Col. Paul Tibbets IV, grandson of Enola Gay pilot Paul W. Tibbets Jr., talks about his grandfather and his experiences as a U.S. Air Force pilot flying B-1 and B-2 bombers during a talk at 5:30 p.m., April 10 at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science

  17. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I: Molecular heterogeneity for COL1A1 null alleles of type I collagen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Pitts, S.H.; Arikat, H.; Roberts, E.J.; Scott, D.A.; Slayton, R.L.; Byers, P.H.

    1994-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of inherited brittle-bone disease. Dermal fibroblasts from most affected individuals produce about half the usual amount of type I procollagen, as a result of a COL1A1 {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele. Using PCR amplification of genomic DNA from affected individuals, followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and SSCP, we identified seven different COL1A1 gene mutations in eight unrelated families with OI type I. Three families have single nucleotide substitutions that alter 5{prime} donor splice sites; two of these unrelated families have the same mutation. One family has a point mutation, in an exon, that creates a premature termination codon, and four have small deletions or insertions, within exons, that create translational frameshifts and new termination codons downstream of the mutation sites. Each mutation leads to both marked reduction in steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant allele and a quantitative decrease in type I procollagen production. Our data demonstrate that different molecular mechanisms that have the same effect on type I collagen production result in the same clinical phenotype. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Microsoft Word - davinson_stu_lec

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    well-covered, in the standard textbooks. Topics will include: (i) noise, interference, grounding and other black arts, (ii) data acquisition, and (iii) digital signal processing....

  19. Microsoft Word - davinson_stu_lec

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Lectures Thursday, February 18th at 3:00 - 4:00 PM Friday, February 19th at 3:00 - 4:00 PM Monday, February 22 at 3:00 - 4:00 PM "Three Lectures on Nuclear Electronics" Dr. Thomas Davinson The University of Edinburgh, UK Abstract: The objective of this short course of lectures is to provide students with an insight into state of the art of nuclear instrumentation technology and techniques - particular emphasis will be given to topics either not found, or not well-covered, in

  20. X-linked Alport syndrome: An SSCP-based mutation survey over all 51 exons of the COL4A5 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renieri, A.; Bruttini, M.; Galli, L.; Ballabio, A.; De Marchi, M.

    1996-06-01

    The COL4A5 gene encodes the {alpha}5 (type IV) collagen chain and is defective in X-linked Alport syndrome (AS). Here, we report the first systematic analysis of all 51 exons of COL4A5 gene in a series of 201 Italian AS patients. We have previously reported nine major rearrangements, as well as 18 small mutations identified in the same patient series by SSCP analysis of several exons. After systematic analysis of all 51 exons of COL4A5, we have now identified 30 different mutations: 10 glycine substitutions in the triple helical domain of the protein, 9 frameshift mutations, 4 in-frame deletions, 1 start codon, 1 nonsense, and 5 splice-site mutations. These mutations were either unique or found in two unrelated families, thus excluding the presence of a common mutation in the coding part of the gene. Overall, mutations were detected in only 45% of individuals with a certain or likely diagnosis of X-linked AS. This finding suggests that mutations in noncoding segments of COL4A5 account for a high number of X-linked AS cases. An alternative hypothesis is the presence of locus heterogeneity, even within the X-linked form of the disease. A genotype/phenotype comparison enabled us to better substantiate a significant correlation between the degree of predicted disruption of the {alpha}5 chain and the severity of phenotype in affected male individuals. Our study has significant implications in the diagnosis and follow-up of AS patients. 44 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Premature chain termination is a unifying mechanism for COL1A1 null alleles in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, M.C.; Deschenes, S.P.; Roberts, E.J.

    1996-10-01

    Nonsense and frameshift mutations, which predict premature termination of translation, often cause a dramatic reduction in the amount of transcript from the mutant allele (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay). In some genes, these mutations also influence RNA splicing and induce skipping of the exon that contains the nonsense codon. To begin to dissect how premature termination alters the metabolism of RNA from the COL1A1 gene, we studied nonsense and frameshift mutations distributed over exons 11-49 of the gene. These mutations were originally identified in 10 unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. We observed marked reduction in steady-state amounts of mRNA from the mutant allele in both total cellular and nuclear RNA extracts of cells from affected individuals, suggesting that nonsense-mediated decay of COL1A1 RNA is a nuclear phenomenon. Position of the mutation within the gene did not influence this observation. None of the mutations induced skipping of either the exon containing the mutation or, for the frameshifts, the downstream exons with the new termination sites. Our data suggest that nonsense and frameshift mutations throughout most of the COL1A1 gene result in a null allele, which is associated with the predictable mild clinical phenotype, OI type I. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Mutation in a gene for type I procollagen (COL1A2) in a woman with postmenopausal osteoporosis: Evidence for phenotypic and genotypic overlap with mild osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotila, L.D.; Constantinou, C.D.; Sereda, L.; Ganguly, A.; Prockop, D.J. ); Riggs, B.L. )

    1991-06-15

    Mutations in the two genes for type I collagen (COL1A1 or COL1A2) cause osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a heritable disease characterized by moderate to extreme brittleness of bone early in life. Here, the authors show that a 52-year-old post menopausal woman with severe osteopenia and a compression fracture of a thoracic vertebra had a mutation in the gene for the {alpha}2(I) chain of type I collagen (COL1A2) similar to mutations that cause OI. cDNA was prepared from the woman's skin fibroblast RNA and assayed for the presence of a mutation by treating DNA heteroduplexes with carbodiimide. The results indicated a sequence variation in the region encoding amino acid residues 660-667 of the {alpha}2(I) chain. Further analysis demonstrated a single-base mutation that caused a serine-for-glycine substitution at position 661 of the {alpha}2(I) triple-helical domain. The substitution produced posttranslational overmodification of the collagen triple helix, as is seen with most glycine substitutions that cause OI. The patient had a history of five previous fractures, slightly blue sclerae, and slight hearing loss. Therefore, the results suggest that there may be phenotypic and genotypic overlap between mild osteogenesis imperfecta and postmenopausal osteoporosis, and that a subset of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis may have mutations in the genes for type I procollagen.

  3. A second mutation in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) causing Stickler syndrome (arthro-ophthalmopathy) is also a premature termination codon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, N.N.; Knowlton, R.G.; DiMascio, J.; Prockop, D.J. ); McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Zackai, E.H.; LaRossa, D. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analyses suggest that mutations in type II collagen may be responsible for Stickler syndrome, or arthro-ophthalmopathy (AO), in many families. In the present study oligonucleotide primers were developed to amplify and directly sequence eight of the first nine exons of the gene for type II procollagen (COL2A1). Analysis of the eight exons in 10 unrelated probands with AO revealed that one had a single-base mutation in one allele that changed the codon of -CGA- for arginine at amino acid position [alpha]1-9 in exon 7 to a premature termination signal for translation. The second mutation found to cause AO was, therefore, similar to the first in that both created premature termination signals in the COL2A1 gene. Since mutations producing premature termination signals have not previously been detected in genes for fibrillar collagens, the results raise the possibility that such mutations in the COL2A1 gene are a common cause of AO. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A method distinguishing expressed vs. null mutations of the Col1A1 gene in osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redford-Badwal, D.A.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous group of heritable disorders of bone characterized by increased susceptibility to fracture. Most of the causative mutations were identified in patients with the lethal form of the disease. Attention is now shifting to the milder forms of OI where glycine substitutions and null producing mutations have been found. Single amino acid substitutions can be identified by RT/PCR of total cellular RNA, but this approach does not work well for null mutations since the defective transcript does not accumulate in the cytoplasm. We have altered our RNA extraction method to separate RNA from the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of cultured fibroblasts. Standard methods of mutation identification (RT/PCR followed by SSCP) is applied to each RNA fraction. DNA from an abnormal band on the SSCP gel is eluted and amplified by PCR for cloning and sequencing. Using this approach we have identified an Asp to Asn change in exon 50 (type II OI) and a Gly to Arg in exon 11 (type I OI) of the COL1A1 gene. These changes were found in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. These putative mutations are currently being confirmed by protein studies. In contrast, three patients with mild OI associated with reduced {proportional_to}(I)mRNA, had distinguishing SSCP bands present in the nuclear but not the cytoplasmic compartment. In one case a frame shift mutation was observed, while the other two revealed polymorphisms. The compartmentalization of the mutant allele has directed us to look elsewhere in the transcript for the causative mutation. This approach to mutation identification is capable of distinguishing these fundamentally different types of mutations and allows for preferential cloning and sequencing of the abnormal allele.

  5. COL000008.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  6. COL000009.pdf

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  7. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  8. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  9. Microsoft Word - S07012_RFL_2010_VMR_LEC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... At one time, Roaring Fork Resources operated a gravel mine on the property adjacent to and downgradient of the New Rifle site. Water was pumped from an active on-site mining pit ...

  10. UTICA 4, NEW YORK COFIPOR~TION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    H. J. Zmjian, GE", of the ncmbers of our orzaniza- has a "Q" cl:arance and our President is rcqueoting an 'L" clearance for some of us. -'n would appreciate it very much if you ...

  11. Combined Construction and Operating License (COL)

    Energy Savers

    ... EIS QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY ... Westinghouse AP1000 - Amended design certified on December ... 082609. COMPANY REACTOR SIZE (MWE) APPLICATION ...

  12. Combined Construction and Operating License (COL)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Updates available at: http://www.nuclear.gov NEXT UPDATE - April 2013 Page 1 News Updates  On October 22 Dominion Resources Inc. announced that it would close and decommission its Kewaunee Power Station located in Carlton, Wis. after failing to find a buyer for the plant. The company said that the plant closure was a purely economic decision resulting from low projected wholesale electricity prices. Power production will cease in the second quarter of 2013.  On November 20, 2012, the

  13. Cybersecurity Online Learning (COL) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    You must create a user account using a valid .mil or .gov email address as your User ID. The password you create will work for all future registrations. You must register ...

  14. SANDIA COKPOK4TION SANDIA BASE, .QLDUQUERQUE. N. M.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    F. k e r s , R. F. Beers, Inc. S. E . J e r m e , Univ. of Nev., Xeno %. L, B r m e , i h z e l t o n Nuclear Science Corp. 0. R. P l a c k , USPXS, Las Vegas, Nev. G. H. H i g ...

  15. 06-GA50035d_2-col.p65

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    repository to deal with radioactive wastes resulting from the operation of nuclear power plants. How recycling and spent fuel management would work Under GNEP, commercial used...

  16. 06-GA50035e_2-col.p65

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    be separated from the fission products and then be fabricated into new fuel. These recycling plants would only be located in countries that are "fuel supplier nations," thus...

  17. UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","COL1AMOUNT",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    55,"Aberdeen City of",4,3,0,0,0,0,0,"Nuclear Production (320-325)" 55,"Aberdeen City ... 207,"Alameda City of",4,3,0,0,0,0,0,"Nuclear Production (320-325)" 207,"Alameda City ...

  18. 06-GA50035f_2-col.p65

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    develop and demonstrate Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) that consume transuranic elements (plutonium and other long-lived radioactive material) while extracting their energy. The development of ABRs will allow us to build an improved nuclear fuel cycle that recycles used fuel. Accordingly, the U.S. will work with participating international partners on the design, development, and demonstration of ABRs as part of the GNEP. The ABR recycles used nuclear fuel The ABR would destroy transuranics in

  19. ADVANTG 3.0.1: AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-08-17

    Version 00 ADVANTG is an automated tool for generating variance reduction parameters for fixed-source continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulations with MCNP5 V1.60 (CCC-810, not included in this distribution) based on approximate 3-D multigroup discrete ordinates adjoint transport solutions generated by Denovo (included in this distribution). The variance reduction parameters generated by ADVANTG consist of space and energy-dependent weight-window bounds and biased source distributions, which are output in formats that can be directly used with unmodified versionsmore » of MCNP5. ADVANTG has been applied to neutron, photon, and coupled neutron-photon simulations of real-world radiation detection and shielding scenarios. ADVANTG is compatible with all MCNP5 geometry features and can be used to accelerate cell tallies (F4, F6, F8), surface tallies (F1 and F2), point-detector tallies (F5), and Cartesian mesh tallies (FMESH).« less

  20. Westinghouse P.O. Box 1970 Hanford COlTlpany Richland, Washington...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Historical data on the amounts and components of wastes discharged, from which locations ... Revision 2 brought about by the agricultural shortages and price rises of World War ...

  1. To1 Col. A. 8. Pry., Jr. Prom L. c. Furney

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . ' .... 200 lb6 B+ 2.0 lbe UjoB the A. C. Spark Plxq Company'aartified on IebmAr'y 4, 1947 that .they have reoelrad II-05 the UaabatknEaginoer Di&riCt 909.5 lb6 Of FWO, 33 lbs ...

  2. Table 5. U.S. proved reserves of crude oil and lease condensate...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...quisitions","Extensions","Discoveries","in Old Fields","Discoveries","Production","12... year + Col. 3 + Col. 4 + Col. 8 - Col. 9. " "Notes: Old means discovered in a prior year. ...

  3. Revisions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments Revisions Adjustments Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields ... year + Col. 3 + Col. 4 + Col. 8 - Col. 9. Notes: Old means discovered in a prior year. ...

  4. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse June 2011

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 CollAborAtion meeting on Fission meAsurements mAjewski to give leC- tures CommemorAting AnniversAry oF mArie Curie's nobel Prize 4 CholerA toxin binDing to moDel membrAnes reveAls PotentiAl signAling PAthwAy neutron DiFFrAC- tion stuDy oF γ-ChymotryPsin At the Protein CrystAllog- rAPhy stAtion 5 heADs uP!

  5. Hydrolysis of DFP and the Nerve Agent (S)-Sarin by DFPase Proceeds Along Two Different Reaction Pathways: Implica-tions for Engineering Bioscavengers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wymore, Troy W; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Field, Martin J.; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents such as (S)-sarin are among the most highly toxic compounds that have been synthesized. Engineering enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nerve agents ( bioscavengers ) is an emerging prophylactic approach to diminishing their toxic effects. Although its native function is not known, diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from Loligo vulgaris catalyzes the hydrolysis of OP compounds. Here, we investigate the mechanisms of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and (S)-sarin hydrolysis by DFPase with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) umbrella sampling simulations. We find that the mechanism for hydrolysis of DFP involves nucleophilic attack by Asp229 on phosphorus to form a pentavalent intermediate. P F bond dissociation then yields a phosphoacyl enzyme intermediate in the rate-limiting step. The simulations suggest that a water molecule, coordinated to the catalytic Ca2+, donates a proton to Asp121 and then attacks the tetrahedral phosphoacyl intermediate to liberate the diisopropylphosphate product. In contrast, the calculated free energy barrier for hydrolysis of (S)-sarin by the same mechanism is highly unfavorable, primarily due to the instability of the pentavalent phosphoenzyme species. Instead, simulations suggest that hydrolysis of (S)-sarin proceeds by a mechanism in which Asp229 could activate an intervening water molecule for nucleophilic attack on the substrate. These findings may lead to improved strategies for engineering DFPase and related six-bladed -propeller folds for more efficient degradation of OP compounds.

  6. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-046 Col School of Mines EC B3-6.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    heterogeneities. Tasks will include: 1) Build and characterize microfluid bead-based sediment analogs 2) Identify the impacts of physical and chemical heterogeneities on...

  7. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  8. Final Report for grant 50105251, entitled AN OPEN SOURCE PLATFORM FOR MULTI-SCALE SPATIALLY DISTRIBUTED SIMULA TIONS OF MICROBIAL ECOSYSTEMS, DOE # DE-SC0004962, period 8/15/2010 – 8/14/2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segre, Daniel

    2015-12-09

    The goal of this project was to develop a tool for facilitating simulation, validation and discovery of multiscale dynamical processes in microbial ecosystems. This led to the development of an open-source software platform for Computation Of Microbial Ecosystems in Time and Space (COMETS). COMETS performs spatially distributed time-dependent flux balance based simulations of microbial metabolism. Our plan involved building the software platform itself, calibrating and testing it through comparison with experimental data, and integrating simulations and experiments to address important open questions on the evolution and dynamics of cross-feeding interactions between microbial species.

  9. Final Report for Regulation of Embryonic Development in Higher Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harada, John J.

    2013-10-22

    The overall goal of the project was to define the cellular processes that underlie embryo development in plants at a mechanistic level. Our studies focused on a critical transcriptional regulator, Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC1), that is necessary and sufficient to induce processes required for embryo development. Because LEC1 regulates lipid accumulation during the maturation phase of embryo development, information about LEC1 may be useful in designing approaches to enhance biofuel production in plants. During the tenure of this project, we determined the molecular mechanisms by which LEC1 acts as a transcription factor in embryos. We also identified genes directly regulated by LEC1 and showed that many of these genes are involved in maturation processes. This information has been useful in dissecting the gene regulatory networks controlling embryo development. Finally, LEC1 is a novel isoform of a transcription factor that is conserved among eukaryotes, and LEC1 is active primarily in seeds. Therefore, we determined that the LEC1-type transcription factors first appeared in lycophytes during land plant evolution. Together, this study provides basic information that has implications for biofuel production.

  10. The real cost of solar energy in a hybrid system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nava, P.

    1996-12-31

    A key figure used to characterize the economic viability of a power project is the LEC (Levelized Electricity Generation Costs). The models (performance model, O and M model, investment cost model, economic model) which feed information into the calculation are briefly described. Examples are given in order to show the high LEC dependency on configuration, location and annual fuel load hours. Then, more in detail, a methodology is sketched how to separate the fuel and the solar related cost in a hybrid system. Using this methodology, the average LEC, the solar related LEC and the fuel related LEC are presented for different plant configurations under varying assumptions of fuel costs. In addition, the level of grant for the solar boiler is calculated which results in equivalent costs for the solar based and fuel based kWh`s.

  11. QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY JULY 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    authority to issue a full power operating license to ... US-EPR design certification application. A Reference COL (R-COL) application has been submitted for five reactor ...

  12. Advanced CSP Systems Analysis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    dramatically reduce costs (less than 10kWh by 2015) Accomplishments * Performed review ... The distribution of calculated LEC in this example ranged from approximately 0.08kWh e ...

  13. Statistical uncertainties of a chiral interaction at next-to-next-to leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekström, A.; Carlsson, B. D.; Wendt, K. A.; Forssén, Christian; Jensen, M. Hjorth; Machleidt, R.; Wild, S. M.

    2015-02-05

    In this paper, we have quantified the statistical uncertainties of the low-energy coupling-constants (LECs) of an optimized nucleon–nucleon interaction from chiral effective field theory at next-to-next-to-leading order. Finally, in addition, we have propagated the impact of the uncertainties of the LECs to two-nucleon scattering phase shifts, effective range parameters, and deuteron observables.

  14. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael; Halin, Cornelia

    2009-01-15

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

  15. Geologic Map of the Eugene Mountains, Northwestern Nevada | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Northwestern NevadaInfo GraphicMapChart Abstract Relief shown by contours and spot heights. Includes 3 col. cross sections, 3 col. graphical insets and 1 table designated...

  16. BPA-2013-01063-FOIA Response

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    REPI payment @ PublicAE13:AE70, and PTC payment at IOUS13:S67 and IPPAC13:AC67 (sb ESC lookup col. 16; was ESC col. 14). 5 24 2010 14. 2. 8 Corrected errors in calculating...

  17. California National Guard Sustainability Planning, Hydrogen Fuel Goals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate California National Guard Sustainability Planning, Hydrogen Fuel Goals 27 Oct 08 Lt Col Reuben Sendejas Lt Col Reuben Sendejas/916.361.4339/reuben.r.sendejas@us.army.mil California Army National Guard, Environmental Programs Directorate Sustainability Requires Commitment The Breakfast Analogy 11/11/2008 3 Lt Col Reuben

  18. joe_arm08.ppt

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    clear stable day with tion applied. Should be he curvature, which is eric instability.

  19. Modeling and analysis of advanced binary cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gawlik, K.

    1997-12-31

    A computer model (Cycle Analysis Simulation Tool, CAST) and a methodology have been developed to perform value analysis for small, low- to moderate-temperature binary geothermal power plants. The value analysis method allows for incremental changes in the levelized electricity cost (LEC) to be determined between a baseline plant and a modified plant. Thermodynamic cycle analyses and component sizing are carried out in the model followed by economic analysis which provides LEC results. The emphasis of the present work is on evaluating the effect of mixed working fluids instead of pure fluids on the LEC of a geothermal binary plant that uses a simple Organic Rankine Cycle. Four resources were studied spanning the range of 265{degrees}F to 375{degrees}F. A variety of isobutane and propane based mixtures, in addition to pure fluids, were used as working fluids. This study shows that the use of propane mixtures at a 265{degrees}F resource can reduce the LEC by 24% when compared to a base case value that utilizes commercial isobutane as its working fluid. The cost savings drop to 6% for a 375{degrees}F resource, where an isobutane mixture is favored. Supercritical cycles were found to have the lowest cost at all resources.

  20. Determination

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Spectral transmission and reflection measurements were col- lected with a Varian Cary 5000 UVvisNIR spectrophotometer equipped with a DRA-2500 diffuse reflectance accessory. The ...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_AMY_JOHNSON_MMSS 2014 AJohnson UUSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Amy Johnson, URENCO USA URENCO USA History June to June - Combined License (COL) approval ... beginning renegotiated thru experience and data gathering to support our changes ...

  2. Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2016 | Department...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2016 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - January 2016 News Updates The ... have received COLs; six (totaling 10 nuclear reactors) remain under active Nuclear ...

  3. Homesteading on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    an independent laboratory. April 10, 2013: Col. Paul Tibbets, IV, grandson of the Enola Gay pilot, shares personal reminiscences of his grandfather's military career. Tibbets...

  4. Quinault Comprehensive Biomass Strategy Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... QIN, ColPac, Grays Harbor Economic Development Council and ... key stakeholders in order to understand the inventory and future trends of biomass quantity and availability Selected ...

  5. Deletion of the paired [alpha]5(IV) and [alpha]6(IV) collagen genes in inherited smooth muscle tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, J.; Mochizuki, T.; Reeders, S.T. ); Smeets, H. ); Antignac, C. ); Laurila, P. ); Paepe, A. de ); Tryggvason, K. )

    1993-08-27

    The gene encoding [alpha]6(IV) collagen, COL4A6, was identified on the human X chromosome in a head-to-head arrangement and within 452 base pairs of the [alpha]5(IV) collagen gene, COL4A5. In earlier studies, intragenic deletions of COL4A5 were detected in a subset of patients with Alport syndrome (AS), a hereditary defect of basement membranes. In some families, AS cosegregates with diffuse leiomyomatosis (DL), a benign smooth muscle tumor diathesis. Here it is shown that patients with AS-DL harbor deletions that disrupt both COL4A5 and COL4A6. Thus, type IV collagen may regulate smooth muscle differentiation and morphogenesis.

  6. NREL: Energy Analysis - Solar Technology Analysis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Technology Analysis NREL conducts analysis to support research and development done by the Solar Energy Technologies Program in three major technology areas: concentrating solar power; solar electricity, also known as photovoltaics or PV; and solar heating and lighting. For example, in the area of photovoltaics, EERE's systems modeling and analysis activity rigorously assesses the performance, reliability, installed costs, and levelized energy costs (LECs) of a wide variety of flat-plate

  7. A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

    2002-05-17

    An appraisal of the potential performance of different Low Energy Cooling (LEC) systems in nonresidential buildings in California is being conducted using computer simulation. The paper presents results from the first phase of the study, which addressed the systems that can be modeled, with the DOE-2.1E simulation program. The following LEC technologies were simulated as variants of a conventional variable-air-volume system with vapor compression cooling and mixing ventilation in the occupied spaces: Air-side indirect and indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beams. Displacement ventilation. Results are presented for four populous climates, represented by Oakland, Sacramento, Pasadena and San Diego. The greatest energy savings are obtained from a combination of displacement ventilation and air-side indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beam systems have the lowest peak demand but do not reduce energy consumption significantly because the reduction in fan energy is offse t by a reduction in air-side free cooling. Overall, the results indicate significant opportunities for LEC technologies to reduce energy consumption and demand in nonresidential new construction and retrofit.

  8. Economic status and prospects of solar thermal industrial heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Hale, M.J.

    1992-12-01

    This paper provides estimates of the levelized energy cost (LEC) of a mid-temperature parabolic trough system for three different development scenarios. A current technology case is developed that is representative of recent designs and costs for commercial systems, and is developed using data from a recent system installed in Tehachapi, California. The second scenario looks at design enhancements to the currenttechnology case as a way to increase annual energy output and decrease costs. The third scenario uses the annual energy output of the enhanced design, but allows for cost reductions that would be possible in higher volume production than currently exist. A simulation model was used to estimate the annual energy output from the system, and the results were combined with cost data in an economic analysis model. The study indicates that R D improvements in the current trough system show promise of reducing the (LEC) by about 40%. At higher production rates, the LEC of the solar system with R D improvements could potentially be reduced by over 50%.

  9. Economic status and prospects of solar thermal industrial heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Hale, M.J.

    1992-12-01

    This paper provides estimates of the levelized energy cost (LEC) of a mid-temperature parabolic trough system for three different development scenarios. A current technology case is developed that is representative of recent designs and costs for commercial systems, and is developed using data from a recent system installed in Tehachapi, California. The second scenario looks at design enhancements to the currenttechnology case as a way to increase annual energy output and decrease costs. The third scenario uses the annual energy output of the enhanced design, but allows for cost reductions that would be possible in higher volume production than currently exist. A simulation model was used to estimate the annual energy output from the system, and the results were combined with cost data in an economic analysis model. The study indicates that R&D improvements in the current trough system show promise of reducing the (LEC) by about 40%. At higher production rates, the LEC of the solar system with R&D improvements could potentially be reduced by over 50%.

  10. Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives 70th anniversary lecture

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives lecture Grandson of Enola Gay pilot gives 70th anniversary lecture Col. Paul Tibbets IV, grandson of Enola Gay pilot Paul W. Tibbets Jr., talks about his grandfather and his experiences as a U.S. Air Force pilot flying B-1 and B-2 bombers. April 3, 2013 Col. Paul Tibbets IV, right, sits in the cockpit of "Fifi," a B-29 bomber, with his grandfather and Enola Gay pilot Paul W. Tibbets Jr., in this October 1998 photo taken in Midland, Texas. Col. Paul

  11. THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Kohbarger had the money that was col- lected. - . . "She didn' t know what to do with it. ... That made each of us 50 a day which was lots of money then. '

  12. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    following the sizable decrease registered in January. Further, crude oil stocks in PADD II fell to the lowest level recorded by EIA since it began col- lecting data at the...

  13. Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - July 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    until 2015. Structural changes were made to the design by vendor, which requires a new seismic analysis to be performed. Because of this, the review schedule for the COL...

  14. wcicomp_012306.dvi

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    from data on isoscalar compression modes S. Shlomo 1 , V. M. Kolomietz 2 , and G. Col o 3 1 Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA 2 ...

  15. fiberConnector-Quantities-18Oct2006.xls

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ID and OD fiber lengths Parameters Extra Fiber Length (in) 3 OD Frames 108 ID Scint Planes 196 Fibers per Preform 10 Bare Lengths (Ordered, mm) Scratch Col This Length Spare...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_gary_Tuesday 5-21 Facility Performance...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 * Paper PDF 2 Reporting Statistics for 2012 * 179 facilities reporting in XML 2 (56%) * 5 facilities reporting in XML 1 (2%) * 22 facilities reporting in 80 col (7%) * 114...

  17. Top U.S. Nuclear Official Commends Industry for Submitting 3rd...

    Energy Savers

    ... month, the Tennessee Valley Authority, a NuStart member, submitted a COL application to the NRC to construct two Westinghouse AP1000 reactors at its Bellefonte site in Alabama. ...

  18. 14,700 tons of silver at Y-12

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    calutron magnets was because of a shortage of copper during the war. As you will recall, Gen. Groves sent Col. Nichols to arrange for the purchase of as much uranium ore as could...

  19. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    indt are contaminated with radioc:tfve residual material as a result of programs conducted by the Yanhaitan nation in Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Col;;nission. ...

  20. Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    O 452.4C, Security and Use Control of Nuclear Explosives and Nuclear Weapons by LtCol Karl Basham Functional areas: Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Weapons, Security, Safety, Weapon...

  1. Photos: Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    particle called a positron, which col- lides with a nearby electron and creates a gamma ray. Despite this long chain of events, the gamma ray carries information about the...

  2. Stephen Harvey

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Steve earned a B.S. in physics and political science from Guilford Col- lege, and an M.P.P. from Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government. E-mail: ...

  3. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    81 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 ...

  4. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 22-24, 1985 SCP-TR-84 OB 5 COlJDITIOBS OF WATER BND ... and its confinement to the permeable deep fracturing zone. ...

  5. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies FY14 Budget At-a-Glance

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Validation: Demonstrating hydrogen and fuel cell systems under real-world conditions and col- ... improve durability (e.g., by increasing PEM fuel cell power out- put per gram of ...

  6. Nevada Operations Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HPDROB:TAG-80 Health Physics Divjsion J. Whitman, RAP, DOE-HQ (NE-24) GTN can Daily, Envir. Engr., (DE'SEP 4287), Nellis AFB, NV. Col. R. W. Smith, USAF Liaison Off., co DOE-NV

  7. NGNP High Temperature Materials White Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew Lommers; George Honma

    2012-08-01

    This white paper is one in a series of white papers that address key generic issues of the combined construction and operating license (COL) pre-application program key generic issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant reactor using the prismatic block fuel technology. The purpose of the pre-application program interactions with the NRC staff is to reduce the time required for COL application review by identifying and addressing key regulatory issues and, if possible, obtaining agreements for their resolution

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_AMY_JOHNSON_MMSS 2014 AJohnson UUSA 06MAY14.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Lessons Learned Associated with Obtaining License for a New Enrichment Plant Amy Johnson, URENCO USA URENCO USA History June to June - Combined License (COL) approval to production in 4 years  2003: License application to build in New Mexico  2006, June: COL issued by the NRC  2006, August: ground breaking  2007, July: first concrete placement - Central Utilities Building  2008, October: access to the Centrifuge Assembly Building  2009, September: first centrifuge installed 

  9. nemsoverview_928.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    581(2009) The Na tional En ergy Mod el ing Sys tem: An Over view 2009 October 2009 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min is tra tion Of fice of In te grated Anal y sis and Fore cast ing U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min is tra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and an a lyt i cal agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad

  10. ners-cp1-20130402104412

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    581(2009) The Na tional En ergy Mod el ing Sys tem: An Over view 2009 October 2009 En ergy In for ma tion Ad min is tra tion Of fice of In te grated Anal y sis and Fore cast ing U.S. De part ment of En ergy Wash ing ton, DC 20585 This re port was pre pared by the En ergy In for ma tion Ad min is tra tion, the in de pend ent sta tis ti cal and an a lyt i cal agency within the U.S. De part ment of En ergy. The in for ma tion con tained herein should be at trib uted to the En ergy In for ma tion Ad

  11. Osteogensis imperfecta type I is commonly due to a COLIAI null allel of type I collagen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willing, M.C.; Pruchno, C.J. ); Atkinson, M.; Byers, P.H. )

    1992-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts from most individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I produce about half the normal amount of type I procollagen, as a result of decreased synthesis of one of its constituent chains, pro[alpha](I). To test the hypothesis that decreased synthesis of pro[alpha](I) chains results from mutations in the COL1A1 gene, the authors used primer extension with nucleotide-specific chain termination to measure the contribution of individual COL1A1 alleles to the mRNA pool in fibroblasts from affected individuals. A polymorphic Mn/I restriction endonuclease site in the 3'-untranslated region of COL1A1 was used to distinguish the transcripts of the two alleles in heterozygous individuals. Twenty-three individuals from 21 unrelated families were studied. In each case there was marked diminution in steady-state mRNA levels from one COL1A2 allele. Loss of an allele through deletion or rearrangement was not the cause of the diminished COL1A1 mRNA levels. Primer extension with nucleotide-specific chain termination allows identification of the mutant COL1A1 allele in cell strains that are heterozygous for an expressed polymorphism. It is applicable to sporadic cases, to small families, and to large families in whom key individuals are uninformative at the polymorphic sites used in linkage analysis, making it a useful adjunct to the biochemical screening of collagenous proteins for OI. 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Field Communications Control Center Technical Organizational

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  13. United States

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    ... notwithstanding any other provision of law, 10.000.000 to remain available until ... notwithstanding any other provision of law or regulation, the construe- tion' of any ...

  14. Relaxation

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    ... wall of tokamak reactors 8 and other possible applica- tions. This investigation is expected to contribute to the un- derstanding of the dynamics of fast tritium or deuterium ...

  15. Predicting Pressure-Dependent Combustion Chemical Reactions

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    ... Chemical Reactions HomeCapabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Energy, ... in combus-tion and atmospheric chemistry that is expected to benefit auto and ...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center (Fact Sheet), Clean Cities, Vehicle...

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    Users can find real-life examples of delivery fleets that run on biodiesel, cities that ... The AFDC provides extensive informa- tion about alternative fuels, including biodiesel, ...

  17. Maintaining System Air Quality; Industrial Technologies Program...

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    2 * August 2004 Industrial Technologies Program Suggested Actions * Review compressed air applica- tions and determine the required level of air quality for each. * Review the ...

  18. --No Title--

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    9: Natural Gas (CBECS89.A09) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region ...

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  20. Search results | Department of Energy

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    tion-wind-energy-wind-turbines Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy technologies means strengthening the economy while protecting...

  1. Business Case for Energy Efficient Building Retrofit and Renovation

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    ... ripe for focusing on retrofit and renovation investments that could save energy and money. ... overall project valua- tion. the way this money is allocated to different products, ...

  2. ch_2

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    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

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  5. untitled

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  8. Glossary

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    mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons, with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in spark-ignition engines. Specifica- tions...

  9. LED Color Characteristics

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  11. N

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    ... Coatings in Fast Neutron and High Temperature Environments of Next Genera- tion Reactors May 2015 Highlights ... gas- and liquid-cooled (sodium, salt, and lead) systems. ...

  12. dudhia-98.pdf

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    wind components, vertical velocity, pressure perturba- tion, temperature, water vapor, ground temperature and microphysical water and ice content variables. It has an upper...

  13. In The News Feed

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    Microwave heat improves nanostructured molybdenum disulfide catalyst's ability to produce hydrogen.

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  14. Document

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  16. Search results | Department of Energy

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    tion-nevada-teachers-helping-students-learn-about-energy Download Infographics from the 2014 National Geothermal Student Competition With the theme of GeoEnergy is Beautiful, the...

  17. ARQfall99.pgm

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    ... for assembly into radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), but the LWRHU ... In addi- tion, an aqueous chloride processing line, CLEAR, will use enhanced organic ...

  18. An Assessment

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  19. PPPL Races Ahead with Fusion Research

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  1. Buildings and Energy in the 1980's (TABLES)

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    1982 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand) Consump- tion...

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    1980 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand) Consump- tion...

  3. Buildings and Energy in the 1980's (TABLES)

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    1981 End Uses RSE Row Fac- tors All End Uses Space Heating Water Heating Air Conditioning Appliances Building Characteristics Buildings (thou- sand) Consump- tion...

  4. --No Title--

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    segregation of elements in the steel matrix.The synergistic deployment of ... under- standing of the structural response of a 9CCr ODS steel to neutron irradia- tion. ...

  5. Microsoft Word - ViArray_Fact_ Sheet_SAND2011-3935P_updated_format...

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    decoupling ude: & Control tion itoring Parts & FPG vironment op ility System boratories ha pplications. services" wi me custom ra aging, test, fa om microele Hard S tructured Ap...

  6. William J. Clinton, 1998

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... To the extent feasible, remote sensing capabilities shall be developed and applied to this ... identifying the major causes and consequences of degrada- tion of coral reef ecosystems. ...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about using the New DOE Energy Savings...

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    ... FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 2 One example of modern design replacing prior conventional wisdom has occurred with steam plant and boiler decentraliza- tion. Many older ...

  8. X:\\ARM_19~1\\PGS29-47.WPD

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    Clouds are one of the most important moderators of the earth radiation budget and one of ... tions including cloud base height determination and cloud-type occurrence statistics. ...

  9. Agenda for Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring...

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    ... natural gas and erent transport mental Science a e Public Affairs, s Manager, Ho scussion gen in direct co tion applicatio structure rollo ass of stations & uilt to ...

  10. A dispersive treatment of Kl4 decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Passemar, Emilie; Stoffer, Peter

    2015-04-28

    Kl4 decays offer several reasons of interest: they allow an accurate measurement of ππ-scattering lengths; they provide the best source for the determination of some low-energy constants of xPT; one form factor is directly related to the chiral anomaly, which can be measured here. We present a dispersive treatment of Kl4 decays that provides a resummation of ππ- and Kπ-rescattering effects. In addition, the free parameters of the dispersion relation are fitted to the data of the high-statistics experiments E865 and NA48/2. The matching toxPT at NLO and NNLO enables us to determine the LECs Lr1, Lr2 and Lr3. With recently published data from NA48/2, the LEC Lr9 can be determined as well. In contrast to a pure chiral treatment, the dispersion relation describes the observed curvature of one of the form factors, which we understand as a rescattering effect beyond NNLO.

  11. Electromagnetic Currents and Magnetic Moments in $\\chi$EFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saori Pastore, Luca Girlanda, Rocco Schiavilla, Michele Viviani, Robert Wiringa

    2009-09-01

    A two-nucleon potential and consistent electromagnetic currents are derived in chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) at, respectively, $Q^{\\, 2}$ (or N$^2$LO) and $e\\, Q$ (or N$^3$LO), where $Q$ generically denotes the low-momentum scale and $e$ is the electric charge. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize the pion-loop corrections. A simple expression is derived for the magnetic dipole ($M1$) operator associated with pion loops, consisting of two terms, one of which is determined, uniquely, by the isospin-dependent part of the two-pion-exchange potential. This decomposition is also carried out for the $M1$ operator arising from contact currents, in which the unique term is determined by the contact potential. Finally, the low-energy constants (LEC's) entering the N$^2$LO potential are fixed by fits to the $np$ S- and P-wave phase shifts up to 100 MeV lab energies. Three additional LEC's are needed to completely specify the $M1$ operator at N$^3$L

  12. Re

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Re s pons e of a CSRM t o V arying M agnit ude s of Sh ort w av e M ont e Carl o Radiat iv e Trans f e r Nois e Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 3 1 Univ e rs it y of Brit is h Col um bia 2 M e t e orol ogical Se rv ice of Canada 3 Col orado St at e Univ e rs it y 1. I nt roduct ion 4. Re s ul t s (TO GA/ COARE) 2. Expe rim e nt Se t up CSRM Sys t e m f or At m os ph e ric M ode l l ing v e rs ion 6.5 (SAM v 6.5) 2D w it h axis orie nt e d w e s t -e

  13. Recurrent nonsense mutations within the type VII collagen gene in patients with severe recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovnanian, A.; Hilal, L.; Goossens, M. ); Blanchet-Bardon, C.; Prost, Y. de ); Christiano, A.M.; Uitto, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The generalized mutilating form of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (i.e., the Hallopeau-Siemens type; HS-RDEB) is a life-threatening disease characterized by extreme mucocutaneous fragility associated with absent or markedly altered anchoring fibrils (AF). Recently, the authors reported linkage between HS-RDEB and the type VII collagen gene (COL7A1), which encodes the major component of AF. In this study, they investigated 52 unrelated HS-RDEB patients and 2 patients with RDEB inversa for the presence, at CpG dinucleotides, of mutations changing CGA arginine codons to premature stop codons TGA within the COL7A1 gene. Eight exons containing 10 CGA codons located in the amino-terminal domain of the COL7A1 gene were studied. Mutation analysis was performed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified genomic fragments. Direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products with altered electrophoretic mobility led to the characterization of three premature stop codons, each in a single COL7A1 allele, in four patients. Two patients (one affected with HS-RDEB and the other with RDEB inversa) have the same C-to-T transition at arginine codon 109. Two other HS-RDEB patients have a C-to-T transition at arginine 1213 and 1216, respectively. These nonsense mutations predict the truncation of [approximately]56%-92% of the polypeptide, including the collagenous and the noncollagenous NC-2 domains. On the basis of linkage analysis, which showed no evidence for locus heterogeneity in RDEB, it is expected that these patients are compound heterozygotes and have additional mutations on the other COL7A1 allele, leading to impaired AF formation. These results indicate that stop mutations within the COL7A1 gene can underlie both HS-RDEB and RDEB inversa, thus providing further evidence for the implication of this gene in RDEB. 46 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; et al

    2016-08-15

    Here, an accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ~150eV, indicating an isotropicmore » source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.« less

  15. Nuclear Power 2010 Program Dominion Virginia Power Cooperative Project U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-05ID14635 Construction and Operating License Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene S. Grecheck David P. Batalo

    2010-11-30

    This report serves to summarize the major activities completed as part of Virginia Electric and Power Company's North Anna construction and operating license demonstration project with DOE. Project successes, lessons learned, and suggestions for improvement are discussed. Objectives of the North Anna COL project included preparation and submittal of a COLA to the USNRC incorporating ESBWR technology for a third unit a the North Anna Power Station site, support for the NRC review process and mandatory hearing, obtaining NRC approval of the COLA and issuance of a COL, and development of a business case necessary to support a decision on building a new nuclear power plant at the North Anna site.

  16. Chiral effective field theory analysis of hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viviani, Michele; Baroni, Alessandro; Girlanda, Luca; Kievsky, Alejandro; Marcucci, Laura E.; Schiavilla, Rocco

    2014-06-01

    Background: Weak interactions between quarks induce a parity-violating (PV) component in the nucleonnucleon potential, whose effects are currently being studied in a number of experiments involving few-nucleon systems. In the present work, we reconsider the derivation of this PV component within a chiral effective field theory (chiEFT) framework. Purpose: The objectives of the present work are twofold. The first is to perform a detailed analysis of the PV nucleon-nucleon potential up to next-to-next-to-leading (N2LO) order in the chiral expansion, in particular, by determining the number of independent low-energy constants (LECs) at N2LO. The second objective is to investigate PV effects in a number of few-nucleon observables, including the #2; p-p longitudinal asymmetry, the neutron spin rotation in #2;n-p and #2;n-d scattering, and the longitudinal asymmetry in the {sup 3}He(#2;{vector n},p){sup 3}H chargeexchange reaction. Methods: The chiEFT PV potential includes one-pion-exchange, two-pion-exchange, and contact terms as well as 1/M (M being the nucleon mass) nonstatic corrections. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize pion loops. The wave functions for the A = 2–-4 nuclei are obtained by using strong two- and three-body potentials also derived, for consistency, from chiEFT. In the case of the A = 3–-4 systems, the wave functions are computed by expanding on a hyperspherical harmonics functions basis. Results: We find that the PV potential at N2LO depends on six LECs: the pion-nucleon PV coupling constant h^1_pi and five parameters multiplying contact interactions. An estimate for the range of values of the various LECs is provided by using available experimental data, and these values are used to obtain predictions for the other PV observables. Conclusions: The chiEFT approach provides a very satisfactory framework to analyze PV effects in few-nucleon systems.

  17. July 2010, Status and Outlook for Nuclear Energy In the United States

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. nuclear power industry continues to make pro- gress toward the construction of new nuclear power plants in the United States. Currently, 13 license applica- tions are under active review...

  18. Using PHP format

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    ... the rapidly to the slowly rotating branch of solu- tions is shown as a dotted line. ... Technol. 19, 131 1991. 7 F. Gnesotto, P. Sonato, W. R. Baker et al., Fusion Eng. ...

  19. BPA-2013-01063-FOIA Request

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    Gener ating Station Value Study, including all of its workpapers, author ed by Robert Petty, manager of Power Services Business Opera tions. The draft I have seen was dated as...

  20. LA-11569-M Manual UC-15

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    ... sample well.3 A motor- driven cable moves the source into position where it irradiates the sample for a few seconds, then quickly withdraws the source to a shielded posi- tion. ...

  1. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 9: Natural Gas and Fuel Oil (cb86f09.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted ...

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 Section 3. Natural Gas Physical units Eight natural gas data series are used to derive the natural gas consump- tion estimates in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Several of ...

  3. US006753741Bl

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... separation of about 0.59 ns., Due to tion and dispersion in the nonlinear medium. ... A nonlinear wave crystal and about 10 V for the bi-layer-film waveguides. equation that ...

  4. --No Title--

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  5. Mr. John Kieling, Acting Chief Haza

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    or supervision according to a system designed to assure that qualified pers on nel prop erly gather and eva luate th e informa tion submitted . Based on our inquiry of the...

  6. DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER.

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    Saving clause If any provision of this chapter, or the applica- tion thereof to any person or circumstance, shall be held invalid, the validity of the remain- der of the chapter...

  7. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY LABO RATO RY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT...

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    AT 64 TRUDY DRIVE, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN004V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  8. O10'I'uf^^ff%

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AT 59 AVENUE C, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN008V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology Division ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  9. ORNL/RASA-86/67

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AT 61 TRUDY DRIVE, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN003V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  10. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT...

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    AT 121 AVENUE F, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN006V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  11. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT...

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    (LNO05V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology Division Date of Issue - December 1986 ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  12. ORNL/RASA-86/71

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AT 123 AVENUE F, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN007V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  13. ORNL/RASA-86/66

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AT 59 TRUDY DRIVE, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN002V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology ... In addi- tion, the authors appreciate the manuscript preparation by J. M. Wyrick, Biology ...

  14. U.S. Global Change Research Program Recommended Citation: Global...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... A billboard on Pohnpei, in the Fed- erated States of Micronesia, encour- ages water conservation in prepara- tion for the 1997 to 1998 El Nio. Extreme Sea-Level Days: Honolulu, ...

  15. Section 52

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    ... This includes the Planck func- tion, the contribution of minor species to absorption in ... this was accomplished by map- ping the Planck function at T5780K in each band ...

  16. Paul Hommert PRESIDENT AND LABORATORIES DIRECTOR

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    The post-Cold War world has presented new and complex issues for America, ranging from ... on clean, renewable solu- tions such as solar, wind, and research into fusion technology. ...

  17. Estimation of changes in insulation resistance with various design parameters of interdigitated wire loops.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Jones, Reese E.; Neel, Wiley Christopher

    2015-09-01

    In this report we explore the sensitivities of the insulation resistance between two loops of wire embedded in insulating materials with a simple, approximate model. We discuss limita- tions of the model and ideas for improvements.

  18. Microsoft Word - anthrax3.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Low pH condi- tions (around pH 5.5) then induce a pre-pore to pore conformational switch that allows the enzymes to enter and eventually kill the host cell. In severe cases, such ...

  19. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    marked the beginning of new federal and state regula- tions governing gasoline. The phase-in period for fed- eral Tier 2 gasoline sulfur standards (with regulations to be fully...

  20. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... April 4, 1968 (UCRL) (specific.- tions). MSA-23-2184 Well Temt Data, Volune 111, 1968, 1969 (EP1IG) (Specifications). USA-Not Cited Inventory of Wcllr and Springs Witbin a 10-Mile ...

  1. Explanatory Notes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    complete enumera- tion has the same nonsampling errors as the sample survey. The sampling error, or standard error of the estimate, is a measure of the variability among the...

  2. VOLUME

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    ... source from ioniza- tion of neutral hydrogen (deuterium) and low-Z impuri- ties, a ... current drive, or PPCD) to alter the mag- netic fluctuations and particle transport 12. ...

  3. Section 65

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    American Meteorological Society, Boston, 241-242. Ellingson, R.G., S.H. Shen, and J. Warner, 1994b: Calibra- tion of radiation codes used in climate models: Comparison of...

  4. TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN

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    ... The exhaust gas of a combus- tion turbine is very hot and ... can be deployed for coal-based ad- vanced integrated ... have a working fuid that contains mostly CO 2 and water. ...

  5. --No Title--

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    File 8: Electricity (cb86f08.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable ... was completed YRCONC3 31- 32 YRCONC. Electricity supplied ELSUPL3 34- 34 XXSUPL. ...

  6. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 8: Electricity (CBECS89.A08) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable ... 18 YRCONC. P1A Seasonal pricing for electricity ELSEAS4 20- 20 YESNO. P1B Time-of-day ...

  7. DOE/EIA-0207/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    to keep a log of their fuel purchases and odometer readings for a two-month period. The panel consists of 500 to 1,000 households reporting each month. Separate tabula tions of...

  8. SUBCHAPTER G-NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    shall provide a time limit of not less than thirty (30) days from the notice's date of publica- tion in the FEDERAL REGISTER for per- sons to file protests, comments, or a...

  9. Solid-Solution CrCoCuFeNi High-Entropy Alloy Thin Films Synthesized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... tion up to 800C,1-3 high yield strengths at elevated temperatures,4 high ... lowest surface energy planes are the 111 family of planes, which have been numerically ...

  10. Data Center Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Center Energy Efficiency In 2014, data centers in the U.S. con- sumed an estimated 70 billion kWh, 1.8% of total U.S. electricity consump- tion. 1 Thus, it is no surprise that both ...

  11. Tax Incentives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    tax credits for each kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity generated by the facility power projects are eligible to receive 2.3 cents per kWh for the produc - tion of electricity ...

  12. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... HISTORl' Li.YITELl ST.-ITES .4R.O' 1 I:iSHZ.% TO.- D. C., I985 tion plants. ... and lubri- cants-needed to operate the plants safelv and efficiently with the highly ...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    tion-energy-electricity-consumption-and-efficiency Download An Exploration of Wind Energy & Wind Turbines This unit, which includes both a pre and post test on wind power engages...

  14. November 2007 BWXTymes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The 9731 Beta calutrons made a signifi cant contribu- tion to the Stable Isotope Program that produced the genesis of the medical radioisotopes used for diagnosis and treatment of ...

  15. Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN AUGUST, 1991 BY E G 8 G ENERGY MEASUREMENTS, INC. TION ALLUVIAL FAN ... AT DESIRED CALCULATION INTERVAL LOSS RATE:GREEN AND AMPT INFILTRATION KINEMATIC WAVE: NEW ...

  16. 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Standards

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... XVII (7-1-07 Edition) 1910.7 which will be available on the OSHA web site. APPENDIX A ... tion), and synthetic web (nylon, poly- ester, and polypropylene). (b) Definitions. ...

  17. Simplified P N Equations Steven P. Hamilton, Thomas M. Evans

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 U.S.A. Abstract In this paper we show new solver strategies for the multigroup SP N equa- tions for nuclear reactor analysis. ...

  18. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Flags for HVAC, Lighting and Shell Conservation Features (cb86f14.csv) Ques- tion- ... Flags for HVAC, Lighting, and Shell Conservation Features (cb86f14.csv) (continued) ...

  19. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 15: Imputation Flags for Lighting and Conservation Features (CBECS89.A15) Ques- tion- ... ZMAINT4 90- 90 ZVAR. Imputed utility conservation program ZUTCNS4 92- 92 ZVAR. Imputed ...

  20. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 7: HVAC, Lighting, and Building Shell Conservation Features (cb86f07.csv) Ques- tion- ... 52- 52 YESNO. G-3A3 Other HVAC conservation measures OTHVAC3 54- 54 YESNO. G-3A3 ...

  1. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 7: Lighting and Conservation Features (CBECS89.A07) Ques- tion- naire Variable ... 102 YESNO. H6 Participated in utility conservation pgm UTCNS4 104- 104 YESNO. Adjusted ...

  2. Figure2b.eps

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... except the bare Coulomb interaction is replaced by the screened Coulomb interac- tion: W GG ' (q ; ) -1 GG ' (q ; )v(q + G ' ) where v is the bare Coulomb interaction. ...

  3. Microsoft Word - $ASQrpt78020.DOC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Op-tions, National Academies Press, Washington, DC. 2. U.S. Department of Energy (2005) Emission of Green-house Gases in the United States, www.eia.doe.gov oiaf1605flash...

  4. Washington. DC,20585

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you mayihave. ' ,. If you have any ques Dr. Y. Alexander Wil tions, please feel free to call me at 301-903-2531 or liams (301-903UW' of my staff..,, Sincerely, Enclosures...

  5. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 10: Fuel Oil (CBECS89.A10) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable ... YRCONC4 17- 18 YRCONC. P3 Total fuel oil tank capacity (gallons) TOTCAP4 20- 25 ...

  6. Dr. Googin and his early days at Y-12, part 8 -- Googin made...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    to do just that. His first "assault" on the chemical process, as he called it in his biography, was on the peroxide precipita- tion. He wanted to make the process handle more...

  7. An Optimized Swinging Door Algorithm for Wind Power Ramp Event...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... An applica- tion of the optimized SDA is provided to ascertain the op- timal parameter of the original SDA. Measured wind power data from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas ...

  8. Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private Partnerships Transforming...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IndustrIal technologIes save energy and Boost competItIveness EnErgy TEchnology SoluTionS public-private partnerships transforming Industry december 2010 "We need a sustained ...

  9. CABLE AOORIs*. HICRONIZER. MOORLblOWN. NEW ,SRIEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This provision, how- ever, ls.' subJect:to eny.prlor'arracmont between your Institu- tion and the government with respect to inventions and p?j,tents. ,.: 3,ri 'I :: .:v:ri ...

  10. ch_4

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    based on annual exposure for 1995, 1996, and 1999. Based on 1990 U.S. Census Bureau data, the surrounding popula- tion consisted of approximately 120,000 people within a ...

  11. BPA-2013-00334-FOIA Request

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    but not limited to, the use of existing access roads and tower loca tions on wetlands. Page 3 of 4 The subject of the request: Whether the subject of the requested records...

  12. PAR Pond N Roads

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Vegetation Community D Sandhill Scrub oakPine ' 580 Compartment 56 290 o 290 Soils Soi I Sa-i es and Pha:;e o LaB sc Figure 26-1. Plant COl1ll1lllllities and soils associated ...

  13. Differences in neurobehavioral responses of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to copper and cobalt: Behavioral avoidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J.A.; Marr, J.C.A.; Lipton, J.; Cacela, D.; Bergman, H.L.

    1999-09-01

    Behavioral avoidance of copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), and a Cu and Co mixture in soft water differed greatly between rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha). Chinook salmon avoided at least 0.7 {micro}g Cu/L, 24 {micro}g Co/L, and the mixture of 1.0 {micro}g Cu/L and 0.9 {micro}g Co/L, whereas rainbow trout avoided at least 1.6 {micro}g Cu/L, 180 {micro}g Co/L, and the mixture of 2.6 {micro}g Cu/L and 2.4 {micro}g Co/L. Chinook salmon were also more sensitive to the toxic effects of Cu in that they failed to avoid {ge}44 {micro}g Cu/L, whereas rainbow trout failed to avoid {ge}180 {micro}g Cu/L. Furthermore, following acclimation to 2 {micro}g Cu/L, rainbow trout avoided 4 {micro}g Cu/L and preferred clean water, but chinook salmon failed to avoid any Cu concentrations and did not prefer clean water. The failure to avoid high concentrations of metals by both species suggests that the sensory mechanism responsible for avoidance responses was impaired. Exposure to Cu concentrations that were not avoided could result in lethality from prolonged Cu exposure or in impairment of sensory-dependent behaviors that are essential for survival and reproduction.

  14. Structural Design Challenges in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, M.; Braverman, J.; Wei, X.; Hofmayer, C.; Xu, J.

    2011-07-17

    The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are confined within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of structural design chal- lenges encountered in recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

  15. Seismic Analysis Issues in Design Certification Applications for New Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, M.; Morante, R.; Xu, J.

    2011-07-17

    The licensing framework established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR) Part 52, “Licenses, Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants,” provides requirements for standard design certifications (DCs) and combined license (COL) applications. The intent of this process is the early reso- lution of safety issues at the DC application stage. Subsequent COL applications may incorporate a DC by reference. Thus, the COL review will not reconsider safety issues resolved during the DC process. However, a COL application that incorporates a DC by reference must demonstrate that relevant site-specific de- sign parameters are within the bounds postulated by the DC, and any departures from the DC need to be justified. This paper provides an overview of several seismic analysis issues encountered during a review of recent DC applications under the 10 CFR Part 52 process, in which the authors have participated as part of the safety review effort.

  16. Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License &

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report | Department of Energy Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report Nuclear Power 2010 Program: Combined Construction and Operating License & Design Certification Demonstration Projects Lessons Learned Report The Nuclear Power 2010 (NP 2010) Construction and Operating License/Design Certification (COL/DC) Demonstration program

  17. Word Pro - S1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table 1.7 Primary Energy Consumption, Energy Expenditures, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions Indicators Primary Energy Consumption a Energy Expenditures b Carbon Dioxide Emissions c Consump- tion Consump- tion per Capita Consumption per Real Dollar d of GDP e Expendi- tures Expendi- tures per Capita Expenditures as Share of GDP e Expenditures as Share of Gross Output f Emissions Emissions per Capita Emissions per Real Dollar d of GDP e Quadrillion Btu Million Btu Thousand Btu per Chained (2009)

  18. Combined Heat and Power Technology Fact Sheets Series: Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel cells use an electrochemical process to convert the chemical energy in a fuel to electricity. In contrast to recipro- cating engines and gas turbines, fuel cells generate electric- ity without combusting the fuel. The first practical applica- tion for fuel cells emerged in the 1950s when fuel cells were used to provide onboard power for spacecraft. Fuel cells continue to be used in space exploration, but over the past few decades the technology has migrated to other applica- tions,

  19. The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments and Impact

    Energy Savers

    NATIONAL AND HOMELAND SECURITY Continued next page Network Interconnectivity The business world is online. So are hackers. The dangers and complica- tions of controlling corporate network access and informa- tion flow from unauthorized users has been a consistent problem since the Inter- net's inception. The guiding principal seems to be that if a programmer can build it, a hacker can destroy it. A virtual back and forth battle of patches and worms, upgrades and viruses has evolved. In addition,

  20. Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)

    WindExchange

    Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding educa- tion to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institu- tions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind

  1. The Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    NATIONAL AND HOMELAND SECURITY Continued next page Network Interconnectivity The business world is online. So are hackers. The dangers and complica- tions of controlling corporate network access and informa- tion flow from unauthorized users has been a consistent problem since the Inter- net's inception. The guiding principal seems to be that if a programmer can build it, a hacker can destroy it. A virtual back and forth battle of patches and worms, upgrades and viruses has evolved. In addition,

  2. 1994 Solid waste forecast container volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; Clary, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes a 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes by container type. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste. These volumes and their associated container types will be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site for storage, treatment, and disposal at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during a 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The forecast data for the 30-year period indicates that approximately 307,150 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed by the SWOC. The main container type for this waste is 55-gallon drums, which will be used to ship 36% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of 55-gallon drums is Past Practice Remediation. This waste will be generated by the Environmental Restoration Program during remediation of Hanford`s past practice sites. Although Past Practice Remediation is the primary generator of 55-gallon drums, most waste generators are planning to ship some percentage of their waste in 55-gallon drums. Long-length equipment containers (LECs) are forecasted to contain 32% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of LECs is the Long-Length Equipment waste generator, which is responsible for retrieving contaminated long-length equipment from the tank farms. Boxes are forecasted to contain 21% of the waste. These containers are primarily forecasted for use by the Environmental Restoration Operations--D&D of Surplus Facilities waste generator. This waste generator is responsible for the solid waste generated during decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facilities currently on the Surplus Facilities Program Plan. The remaining LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste volume is planned to be shipped in casks and other miscellaneous containers.

  3. The dynamic behavior of thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Sebastian B. E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com; Hartmann, David; Sarfert, Wiebke E-mail: wiebke.sarfert@siemens.com; Winnacker, Albrecht

    2014-09-14

    Light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) have received increasing attention during recent years due to their simple architecture, based on solely air-stabile materials, and ease of manufacture in ambient atmosphere, using solution-based technologies. The LEC's active layer offers semiconducting, luminescent as well as ionic functionality resulting in device physical processes fundamentally different as compared with organic light-emitting diodes. During operation, electrical double layers (EDLs) form at the electrode interfaces as a consequence of ion accumulation and electrochemical doping sets in leading to the in situ development of a light-emitting p-i-n junction. In this paper, we comment on the use of impedance spectroscopy in combination with complex nonlinear squares fitting to derive key information about the latter events in thin-film ionic transition metal complex-based light-emitting electrochemical cells based on the model compound bis-2-phenylpyridine 6-phenyl-2,2´-bipyridine iridium(III) hexafluoridophosphate ([Ir(ppy)₂(pbpy)][PF₆]). At operating voltages below the bandgap potential of the ionic complex used, we obtain the dielectric constant of the active layer, the conductivity of mobile ions, the transference numbers of electrons and ions, and the thickness of the EDLs, whereas the transient thickness of the p-i-n junction is determined at voltages above the bandgap potential. Most importantly, we find that charge transport is dominated by the ions when carrier injection from the electrodes is prohibited, that ion movement is limited by the presence of transverse internal interfaces and that the width of the intrinsic region constitutes almost 60% of the total active layer thickness in steady state at a low operating voltage.

  4. JV Task 106 - Feasibility of CO2 Capture Technologies for Existing North Dakota Lignite-Fired Pulverized Coal Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Jones; Brandon M. Pavlish; Melanie D. Jensen

    2007-05-01

    The goal of this project is to provide a technical review and evaluation of various carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture technologies, with a focus on the applicability to lignite-fired facilities within North Dakota. The motivation for the project came from the Lignite Energy Council's (LEC's) need to identify the feasibility of CO{sub 2} capture technologies for existing North Dakota lignite-fired, pulverized coal (pc) power plants. A literature review was completed to determine the commercially available technologies as well as to identify emerging CO{sub 2} capture technologies that are currently in the research or demonstration phase. The literature review revealed few commercially available technologies for a coal-fired power plant. CO{sub 2} separation and capture using amine scrubbing have been performed for several years in industry and could be applied to an existing pc-fired power plant. Other promising technologies do exist, but many are still in the research and demonstration phases. Oxyfuel combustion, a technology that has been used in industry for several years to increase boiler efficiency, is in the process of being tailored for CO{sub 2} separation and capture. These two technologies were chosen for evaluation for CO{sub 2} separation and capture from coal-fired power plants. Although oxyfuel combustion is still in the pilot-scale demonstration phase, it was chosen to be evaluated at LEC's request because it is one of the most promising emerging technologies. As part of the evaluation of the two chosen technologies, a conceptual design, a mass and energy balance, and an economic evaluation were completed.

  5. The NuStart AP1000 Compact Control Room Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Daryl

    2006-07-01

    The nuclear power industry in the United States is experiencing renewed optimism that new nuclear power plants may be constructed in the foreseeable future. Presently a number of utilities in the U.S. are considering new nuclear plant construction. Among the reasons supporting the industry's optimism is the formation of the NuStart Energy Consortium. This consortium of leading energy companies, including Westinghouse Electric Company, is working with the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate and test the new licensing process for obtaining a Combined Construction and Operating License (COL) for an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). One ALWR design for which the NuStart Energy Consortium is pursuing a COL application is Westinghouse's passive AP1000. AP1000 received its Final Design Approval from the USNRC in the Fall of 2004 and was granted Design Certification by the NRC on December 30, 2005. A key element of the AP1000 COL application will be to close out Design Certification COL items related to the Main Control Room (MCR) and Human System Interface (HSI) design. During the AP1000 design certification licensing efforts, a control room and HSI design process was submitted and approved. Realizing that Instrumentation and Control (I and C) and HSI technology changes rapidly, Westinghouse chose to defer the detailed design of the control room and operator interfaces. This allows the latest technology to be used when a plant is actually going to be built. To fulfill the COL items for the upcoming application Westinghouse is performing a comprehensive Human Factors Engineering program in conjunction with development of an advanced set of HSI resources for a compact control room. This paper will discuss human factors program elements completed to date and the efforts currently in progress to complete the remaining elements. It will also describe the design progress for each HSI resource including a Wall Panel Information System, computerized procedure system

  6. NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2010-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

  7. System 80+ D-RAP, a communication tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegmann, E.R.; Mody, A.A.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of {open_quotes}RAP{close_quotes} music is to communicate, and the purpose of D-RAP is to foster communication between the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) group, designers, and the future combined operating license (COL) applicant. This is to ensure that the design is self-consistent and integrated with the procurement process. The designer reliability assurance program (D-RAP) is the first part of the RAP. The goals of the D-RAP are to have risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSCs) identified and considered in the detail design and procurement phases and to maintain consistency between PRA and design. Plant safety is maintained throughout the design phase, and pertinent information is passed on to the COL applicant. The operations RAP (O-RAP) covers the plant operation and maintenance.

  8. LAMMPS | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1000 MBOE 1000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary C a n a d a N Y P A N Y U S A Appalachian Basin, NY Area (Panel 1 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

    81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N

  9. Summary.qxd

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 6.4.4 HEALTH AND SAFETY Airborne contamination is the principal transport pathway through which radioactive materials from the INEEL affect workers and the public. The SNF and INEL EIS evaluated radiation releases and subsequent offsite doses associated with INEEL operations. Doses have always been small and within applicable radiation pro- tection standards. In 1996, for example, the col- lective radiological dose to the population within 50 miles of the

  10. -p Oak Ricf~e Assokiatbd Unwersltles

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    p Oak Ricf~e Assokiatbd Unwersltles : ,k.*,., ;"~, :,: .; ,,: ;;:::A ~, ' ,, : : ~' ,Pie&red foitlie RADI' OLOGICAL SURVEY' ~ OF THE' BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHO,US' ES NEW YORK, KNEW YORK' ~ ,, .,,~ P. R. COlTEN, Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT JUNE1990 ?- i i t * " i i, , F < I, ,., F 8 .& r . F, ; RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES NEW YORK, NEW YORK Prepared by P. R. Cotten

  11. SSQ V1 N1_24feb11_FINAL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 2011 Comments Questions or comments regarding the Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly should be directed to Terri Batuyong, Terri.Batuyong@nnsa.doe.gov Technical Editor: Douglas Drake, Publication Editor: Millicent Mischo Inside This Issue Stockpile Stewardship Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 1 Quarterly Office of Stockpile Stewardship NA-11 Office of Stockpile Stewardship Assistant Deputy Administrator, Dr. Chris Deeney Deputy for Operations, COL Mark Visosky

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_gary_Tuesday 5-21 Facility Performance.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Facility Reporting Analysis and Performance Gary L. Hirsch Project Lead  NMMSS is currently accepting data * Electronically o 80 Column o XML 1 o XML 2 * Paper / PDF 2  Reporting Statistics for 2012 * 179 facilities reporting in XML 2 (56%) * 5 facilities reporting in XML 1 (2%) * 22 facilities reporting in 80 col (7%) * 114 facilities reporting hardcopy input (35%) 3 ~ 65 % of reporting facilities are reporting electronically - This accounts for 97% of the transaction data 4 Reporting

  13. Notices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    0 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 37 / Tuesday, February 25, 2014 / Notices 1 By issuing an ESP, NRC approves one or more sites for a nuclear power facility, independent of the specific nuclear plant design. In reviewing an ESP application, the NRC evaluates site safety issues, environmental protection issues, and plans for coping with emergencies. By issuing a COL, NRC authorizes the licensee to construct and operate (under specified conditions) an approved design for a nuclear power plant at a

  14. UPF site readiness subproject completed on time and under budget | Y-12

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Complex site readiness ... UPF site readiness subproject completed on time and under budget Posted: March 16, 2015 - 1:36pm Don Peters, UPO; Lt. Col. John Hudson, commander of the Nashville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE); NNSA Administrator General Frank Klotz; Congressman Chuck Fleischmann; UPF Federal Project Director John Eschenberg; UPF Project Director Brian Reilly; and Eric Thompson, UPO. Washington D.C. - The Uranium Processing Facility project

  15. Southwestern Power Administration

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    January 29, 2015 Stockton Power Plant Back Online Refurbished Stockton Turbine Southwestern Administrator Chris Turner and Kansas City District Commander COL Andrew Sexton dedicate the new turbine at Stockton Power Plant. After a catastrophic failure and nearly two years of major equipment replacement work, the Stockton Power Plant in Stockton, Missouri, is back online, generating low-cost, renewable hydropower and energy for electric consumers in the marketing region of Southwestern Power

  16. Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Team roster: Harry Bonilla, Mechanical Engineering; Coral D. Colón, Electrical Engineering; Gabriel Cotto, Mechanical Engineering; Miguel Díaz, Mechanical Engineering; Eduardo Fenollal, Mechanical Engineering; Jorge W. Flores, Mechanical Engineering; Leishla González, Graphic Design (International School of Design and Architecture); Viany González, Industrial Engineering; Rubén I. Maldonado, Mechanical

  17. Unleashing the Power of Entrepreneurs to Solve Our Energy Challenges |

    Energy Savers

    Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Team roster: Harry Bonilla, Mechanical Engineering; Coral D. Colón, Electrical Engineering; Gabriel Cotto, Mechanical Engineering; Miguel Díaz, Mechanical Engineering; Eduardo Fenollal, Mechanical Engineering; Jorge W. Flores, Mechanical Engineering; Leishla González, Graphic Design (International School of Design and Architecture); Viany González, Industrial Engineering; Rubén I. Maldonado, Mechanical

  18. EMPHASIS(TM)/Nevada Unstructured FEM Implementation Version 2.1.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, C. David; Pointon, Timothy D.; Cartwright, Keith

    2014-08-01

    EMPHASIS TM /NEVADA is the SIERRA/NEVADA toolkit implementation of portions of the EMP HASIS TM code suite. The purpose of the toolkit i m- plementation is to facilitate coupling to other physics drivers such as radi a- tion transport as well as to better manage code design, implementation, co m- plexity, and important verification and validation processes. This document describes the theory and implementation of the unstructured finite - element method solver , associated algorithms, and selected verification and valid a- tion . Acknowledgement The author would like to recognize all of the ALEGRA team members for their gracious and willing support through this initial Nevada toolkit - implementation process. Although much of the knowledge needed was gleaned from document a- tion and code context, they were always willing to consult personally on some of the less obvious issues and enhancements necessary.

  19. Latexin is involved in bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadouchi, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Kei; Tangjiao, Liu; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hoshino, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2009-01-16

    Latexin is the only known carboxypeptidase A inhibitor in mammals. We previously demonstrated that BMP-2 significantly induced latexin expression in Runx2-deficient mesenchymal cells (RD-C6 cells), during chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we investigated latexin expression in the skeleton and its role in chondrocyte differentiation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes expressed latexin during skeletogenesis and bone fracture repair. In the early phase of bone fracture, latexin mRNA expression was dramatically upregulated. BMP-2 upregulated the expression of the mRNAs of latexin, Col2a1, and the gene encoding aggrecan (Agc1) in a micromass culture of C3H10T1/2 cells. Overexpression of latexin additively stimulated the BMP-2-induced expression of the mRNAs of Col2a, Agc1, and Col10a1. BMP-2 treatment upregulated Sox9 expression, and Sox9 stimulated the promoter activity of latexin. These results indicate that latexin is involved in BMP-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation and plays an important role in skeletogenesis and skeletal regeneration.

  20. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; et al

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  1. S A V A N N A H R I V E R S I T E

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Excerpts from "Strengthening Energy Security through Federal Partnerships" 67 ENE RGY The Military Engineer * No. 676 The need to shrink depen dence on fos- sil fuels is not a new conce pt in the na- tion's energy discus sion, nor is the need to invest in clean, renew able energy . But the challe nge of how to deliver solar, bioma ss, wind, wave, geothe rmal and other power genera tion techno logies in a cost effecti ve, large-s cale mann er-an d meet the chang - ing energy deman ds of

  2. Superconductivity Program Overview High-Temperature Superconductivity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    SuperconducTiviTy program haS Three FocuS areaS: SuperconducTiviTy applicaTionS Developing HTS-based electric power equipment such as transmission and distribution cables and fault current limiters Second-generaTion Wire developmenT Developing high-performance, low-cost, second- generation HTS wire at long lengths STraTegic reSearch Supporting fundamental research activities to better understand relationships between the microstructure of HTS materials and their ability to carry large electric

  3. AP1000{sup R} licensing and deployment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, R. P.; Russ, P. A.; Filiak, P. P.; Castiglione, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, both domestic and foreign utilities have turned to the standardized Westinghouse AP1000 plant design in satisfying their near - and long-term - sustainable energy needs. As direct support to these actions, licensing the AP1000 design has played a significant role by providing one of the fundamental bases in clearing regulatory hurdles leading to the start of new plant construction. Within the U.S. alone, Westinghouse AP1000 licensing activities have reached unprecedented milestones with the approvals of both AP1000 Design Certification and Southern Company's combined construction permit and operating license (COL) application directly supporting the construction of two new nuclear plants in Georgia. Further COL application approvals are immediately pending for an additional two AP1000 plants in South Carolina. And, across the U.S. nuclear industry spectrum, there are 10 other COL applications under regulatory review representing some 16 new plants at 10 sites. In total, these actions represent the first wave of new plant licensing under the regulatory approval process since 1978. Fundamental to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's AP1000 Design Certification is the formal recognition of the AP1000 passive safety design through regulatory acceptance rulemaking. Through recognition and deployment of the AP1000 Design Certification, the utility licensee / operator of this reactor design are now offered an opportunity to use a simplified 'one-step' combined license process, thereby managing substantial back-end construction schedule risk from regulatory and intervention delays. Application of this regulatory philosophy represents both acceptance and encouragement of standardized reactor designs like the AP1000. With the recent AP1000 Design Certification and utility COL acceptances, the fundamental licensing processes of this philosophy have successfully proven the attainment of significant milestones with the next stage licensing actions directed

  4. Microsoft Word - summer.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b trac ting fro m th e da ily a ve rag e hig h te m p e ra tu res fo r th e la st 10 y ea rs a n am o un t e qu al to tw ice a n estim ate o f the stan da rd de via tion for h igh...

  5. IoT Interoperability at Bosch

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Acquire d S oftwa re Innova tions , 2008 Bus ine s s proce s s ma na ge me nt Cloud-ba s e d IoT s olutions Acquiring P ros ys t (a nnounce d Fe brua ry 2015) P...

  6. The Honorable Aaron Thompson.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I lper ic. iiii SkIi lriili e 1 S.' ;e le ;hiT ' si viec I s'ii '0 ic It lb it i te L 1. ess In rma tjo ion I r Ai 'uil el a the I or .I . nls ,3"' .in : ,tion .' 'n is " eir ' ...

  7. Proposed Wild Horse Pass Substation Option

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    LAK E C ITY, U T PAN EL 2 ELEC TR IC ITY D ISTR IBU TION AN D EN D -U SE: H OW D O W E MAN AGE C H ALLEN GES AN D OPPOR TU N ITIES? AP R I L 2 5 , 2 0 1 6 Gila River Indian ...

  8. NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS - PEACEFUI APPLICATIONS PROJECT WUL 1 SON F I N A L OPERATIONAL WAB$OACTIVI TY REPORT PRODUCT1 ON TESTS FEBRUARY 1972 PEACEFUL APPLICATIONS DIVISION NEVADA OPER4TIONS OFFICE This page intentionally left blank TABLE OF CONTENTS Subject Page N o . Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledgements i i i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . Introduction 1 I1 . F i r s t Production Test . . . . .

  9. Transforming PV Installations Toward Dispatchable, Schedulable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Toward disPaTchable, schedulable energy soluTions MIChAEl MIllS-PrICE, SEGIS-AC ProGrAM MAnAGEr, AE SolAr EnErGy A B C N SATCON518kw1 B2+2 Cap Bank 7825S PHC870 6896 Aout Ain ...

  10. las

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Net confining p r e s s u r e ( N C P ) , which is the oil p r e s s u r e minus mean gas ... C o r e Laboratories, Inc., Measurements for Austral Oil Co., private communica- tion ...

  11. Transcription factor COUP-TFII is indispensable for venous and lymphatic development in zebrafish and Xenopus laevis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aranguren, Xabier L.; Beerens, Manu; Vandevelde, Wouter; Dewerchin, Mieke; Carmeliet, Peter; Luttun, Aernout

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} COUP-TFII deficiency in zebrafish affects arterio-venous EC specification. {yields} COUP-TFII is indispensable for lymphatic development in zebrafish. {yields} COUP-TFII knockdown in Xenopus disrupts lymphatic EC differentiation and migration. {yields} COUP-TFII's role in EC fate decisions is evolutionary conserved. -- Abstract: Transcription factors play a central role in cell fate determination. Gene targeting in mice revealed that Chicken Ovalbumin Upstream Promoter-Transcription Factor II (COUP-TFII, also known as Nuclear Receptor 2F2 or NR2F2) induces a venous phenotype in endothelial cells (ECs). More recently, NR2F2 was shown to be required for initiating the expression of Prox1, responsible for lymphatic commitment of venous ECs. Small animal models like zebrafish embryos and Xenopus laevis tadpoles have been very useful to elucidate mechanisms of (lymph) vascular development. Therefore, the role of NR2F2 in (lymph) vascular development was studied by eliminating its expression in these models. Like in mice, absence of NR2F2 in zebrafish resulted in distinct vascular defects including loss of venous marker expression, major trunk vessel fusion and vascular leakage. Both in zebrafish and Xenopus the development of the main lymphatic structures was severely hampered. NR2F2 knockdown significantly decreased prox1 expression in zebrafish ECs and the same manipulation affected lymphatic (L)EC commitment, migration and function in Xenopus tadpoles. Therefore, the role of NR2F2 in EC fate determination is evolutionary conserved.

  12. Conceptual design and techno-economic assessment of integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nezammahalleh, H.; Farhadi, F.; Tanhaemami, M.

    2010-09-15

    Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic trough collectors causes an increase to competitiveness of solar thermal power plants (STPP) by substitution of oil with direct steam generation that results in lower investment and operating costs. In this study the integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology is introduced and techno-economic assessment of this plant is reported compared with two conventional cases. Three considered cases are: an integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology (ISCCS-DSG), a solar electric generating system (SEGS), and an integrated solar combined cycle system with HTF (heat transfer fluid) technology (ISCCS-HTF). This study shows that levelized energy cost (LEC) for the ISCCS-DSG is lower than the two other cases due to reducing O and M costs and also due to increasing the heat to electricity net efficiency of the power plant. Among the three STPPs, SEGS has the lowest CO{sub 2} emissions, but it will operate during daytime only. (author)

  13. Engineering Evaluation of X/Q Values Consistent with Regulatory Guide 1.145

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Lowry, Peter P.

    2010-02-01

    A goal for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) is to demonstrate compliance with regulatory dose limits bases on an exclusion area boundary and emergency planning zones boundaries set nominally to 400 meters. This paper presents the development of the atmospheric dispersion (X/Q) estimates for use in calculating doses at this distance and evaluating the resultant X/Q for an 800 meter receptor against X/Q values submitted to the NRC for review as part of Design Control Documentation (DCD) in support of future combined licensing (COL) Applications.

  14. Suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation by microRNA-29b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekiya, Yumiko; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka ; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka; PhoenixBio Co. Ltd., Hiroshima ; Ikeda, Kazuo; Kawada, Norifumi; Liver Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka City University, Osaka

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during the activation of hepatic stellate cells in primary culture. {yields} Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs. {yields} It blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-b mRNAs essential for stellate cell activation. {yields} miR-29b overexpression led stellate cells to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their star-like morphology. {yields} miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in the regulation of cellular functions including proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. It has been previously shown that the miR-29 family is involved in regulating type I collagen expression by interacting with the 3'UTR of its mRNA. Here, we investigated the roles of miR-29b in the activation of mouse primary-cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a principal collagen-producing cell in the liver. Expression of miR-29b was found to be down-regulated during HSC activation in primary culture. Transfection of a miR-29b precursor markedly attenuated the expression of Col1a1 and Col1a2 mRNAs and additionally blunted the increased expression of {alpha}-SMA, DDR2, FN1, ITGB1, and PDGFR-{beta}, which are key genes involved in the activation of HSCs. Further, overexpression of miR-29b led HSCs to remain in a quiescent state, as evidenced by their quiescent star-like cell morphology. Although phosphorylation of FAK, ERK, and Akt, and the mRNA expression of c-jun was unaffected, miR-29b overexpression suppressed the expression of c-fos mRNA. These results suggested that miR-29b is involved in the activation of HSCs and could be a candidate molecule for suppressing their activation and consequent liver fibrosis.

  15. SREL Reprint #3225

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 A new set of microsatellite loci for Laptonycteris yerbabuenae and cross species amplification with other glossophagines Jose Antonio Romero-Meza1, Stacey L. Lance2, and Jorge Ortega1 1Laboratorio de Ictiología y Limnología, Posgrado en Ciencias Quimicobiológicas, Departamento de Zoología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Prolongación de Carpio y Plan de Ayala s/n, Col. Sto. Tomas, 11340 Mexico, DF, Mexico 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory,

  16. SREL Reprint #3233

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Development of 24 microsatellite markers for the white nosed coati (Nasua narica) using 454 sequencing Eduardo Sánchez Garibay1, Adrian Silva-Caballero1, Melina Del Real-Monroy1, Stacey L. Lance2, David Valenzuela-Galván3, and Jorge Ortega1 1Laboratorio de Ictiología y Limnología, Posgrado en Ciencias Quimicobiológicas, Departamento de Zoología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Prolongación de Carpio y Plan de Ayala s/n, Col. Sto. Tomas, 11340

  17. SREL Reprint #3272

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Development of microsatellite loci for the Honduran white-bat (Ectophylla alba) by using Illumina paired-end sequences Alberto Morales-Leyva1, Rodrigo A. Medellín2, Stacey L. Lance3, Bernal Rodríguez-Herrera4, Melina Del Real-Monroy1, and Jorge Ortega1 1Laboratorio de Bioconservación y Manejo, Posgrado en Ciencias Quimicobiológicas, Departamento de Zoología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Prolongación de Carpio y Plan de Ayala s/n, Col. Sto.

  18. Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation (FCRD-USED-2011-000132) Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Carlos F. Jové Colón (SNL) Florie A. Caporuscio, Schön S. Levy (LANL) Mark Sutton, James A. Blink, Harris R. Greenberg, Massimiliano Fratoni, William G. Halsey, Thomas J. Wolery (LLNL) Jonny Rutqvist, Carl I. Steefel, Juan Galindez, Jens Birkholzer, Hui-Hai Liu, (LBNL) June 15 th , 2011 SAND2011-4335 P

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    I PAGE OF PAGES 1 1 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REaUISITIONIPURCHASE REa. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 335 See Block 16C 12SCOO0484 Item 7 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED 8Y (If other than Item 6) CODE 100518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .* stroot. COlUlty. Stato and ZIP Code) (x) 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION

  20. Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2013 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy 3 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2013 News Updates Dominion has filed an updated integrated resource plan with Virginia and North Carolina State regulators; the plan sets an "earliest possible" in-service date of October 2024 for North Anna 3. Earlier this year, the company announced its intention to return to the General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) ESBWR reactor design with an amended Combined Operating License (COL) to be filed by the end of 2013. Entergy

  1. Cleaning and utilization of coals for low emission at Swedish power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forssberg, K.S.E.; Ryk, L.

    1995-10-01

    The paper discusses coal utilization in Sweden. All hard coals have to be imported from other countries. Peat from domestic sources is used as a complement. environmental legislation and taxation on fuel and emissions are severe. This situation affects the procurement, preparation, handling and use of coal. The paper presents: R and D projects concerning deep cleaning of thermal coal; handling and treatment of coal used in PFBC boilers and for blast furnace injection; dust prevention for coal and peat briquettes; and procurement of col emphasizing quality and environmental issues.

  2. CNS supports Tuskegee Airmen exhibit | Y-12 National Security Complex

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuskegee ... CNS supports Tuskegee Airmen exhibit Posted: May 24, 2016 - 12:38pm CNS's Cary Langham (right) met Tuskegee Airman Lt. Col. George Hardy at the Tuskegee Airmen's "Rise Above" traveling exhibit. The Tuskegee Airmen's "Rise Above" traveling exhibit landed in East Tennessee in April. The exhibit drew nearly 3,000 people. More than half of the attendees were children who were interested in the history of the all-black 99th Fighter Squadron, better known as the

  3. Jas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jared Sagoff About Us Jared Sagoff - Argonne National Laboratory Jared Sagoff is a public information officer at Argonne National Laboratory. He covers physical science research, including physics, chemistry, materials science and nanotechnology. Most Recent A New Leaf: Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Back Into Fuel August 18

    Sh ort w av e Radiat iv e T rans f e r in t h e M ul t is cal e M ode l l ing Fram e w ork Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 4

  4. LANL Vendor ISSP and CONOPS _bm_5_2_16

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Vendor Service Information Security Plan and Federal/FedRAMP CONOPS Vendor Provider and Application System Name Evaluation Date: COL: Vendor Signature Name Title/Role Email Phone Date Signature LANL RLM Name Title/Role Email Phone Date Signature LANL ISSM Name Title/Role Email Phone Date Signature Optional Name Title/Role Email Phone Date Signature SAVE PRINT CLEAR FORM Page 2 History of Changes Note: Non-security significant or minor changes are indicated by version revisions, such as x.1,

  5. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji; Zhu, Li-juan; Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhou, Xiao-zhong

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  6. CCI Report Guidelines | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact undergrad@anl.gov CCI Report Guidelines "Our task is to communicate experience and ideas to others. We must strive continually to extend the scope of our description, but in such a way that our messages do not thereby lose their objective or unambiguous character." -Niels Bohr The following is adapted from the DOE CCI Program Deliverables Requirements and Guidelines, and is written for participants in the Community ColIege Internship (CCI) program. The CCI project report is a

  7. AOT & LANSCE The Pulse February 2011

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 VersAtile AutomAteD sAmple chAnger For texture meAsure- ments At lAnsce neutron DiFFrAc- tion sheDs light on crystAl structure oF hyDrogen storAge mAteriAl 4 Workshop spot- lights lujAn center neutron scAttering expertise 5 smArts exAmines irrADiAtion-inDuceD eVolution oF DeFormA- tion mechAnisms lAnsce

  8. The relationship between leaf area growth and biomass accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Weraduwage, Sarathi M.; Chen, Jin; Anozie, Fransisca C.; Morales, Alejandro; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.

    2015-04-09

    Leaf area growth determines the light interception capacity of a crop and is often used as a surrogate for plant growth in high-throughput phenotyping systems. The relationship between leaf area growth and growth in terms of mass will depend on how carbon is partitioned among new leaf area, leaf mass, root mass, reproduction, and respiration. A model of leaf area growth in terms of photosynthetic rate and carbon partitioning to different plant organs was developed and tested with Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heynh. ecotype Columbia (Col-0) and a mutant line, gigantea-2 (gi-2), which develops very large rosettes. Data obtained from growthmore » analysis and gas exchange measurements was used to train a genetic programming algorithm to parameterize and test the above model. The relationship between leaf area and plant biomass was found to be non-linear and variable depending on carbon partitioning. The model output was sensitive to the rate of photosynthesis but more sensitive to the amount of carbon partitioned to growing thicker leaves. The large rosette size of gi-2 relative to that of Col-0 resulted from relatively small differences in partitioning to new leaf area vs. leaf thickness.« less

  9. The relationship between leaf area growth and biomass accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weraduwage, Sarathi M.; Chen, Jin; Anozie, Fransisca C.; Morales, Alejandro; Weise, Sean E.; Sharkey, Thomas D.

    2015-04-09

    Leaf area growth determines the light interception capacity of a crop and is often used as a surrogate for plant growth in high-throughput phenotyping systems. The relationship between leaf area growth and growth in terms of mass will depend on how carbon is partitioned among new leaf area, leaf mass, root mass, reproduction, and respiration. A model of leaf area growth in terms of photosynthetic rate and carbon partitioning to different plant organs was developed and tested with Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heynh. ecotype Columbia (Col-0) and a mutant line, gigantea-2 (gi-2), which develops very large rosettes. Data obtained from growth analysis and gas exchange measurements was used to train a genetic programming algorithm to parameterize and test the above model. The relationship between leaf area and plant biomass was found to be non-linear and variable depending on carbon partitioning. The model output was sensitive to the rate of photosynthesis but more sensitive to the amount of carbon partitioned to growing thicker leaves. The large rosette size of gi-2 relative to that of Col-0 resulted from relatively small differences in partitioning to new leaf area vs. leaf thickness.

  10. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  11. A mutation causing Alport syndrome with tardive hearing loss is common in the western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, D.F.; Denison, J.C.; Atkin, C.L.

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the COL4A5 gene, located at Xq22, cause Alport syndrome (AS), a nephritis characterized by progressive deterioration of the glomerular basement membrane and usually associated with progressive hearing loss. We have identified a novel mutation, L1649R, present in 9 of 121 independently ascertained families. Affected males shared the same haplotype of eight polymorphic markers tightly linked to COL4A5, indicating common ancestry. Genealogical studies place the birth of this ancestor >200 years ago. The L1649R mutation is a relatively common cause of Alport syndrome in the western United States, in part because of the rapid growth and migratory expansion of mid-nineteenth-century pioneer populations carrying the gene. L1649R affects a highly conserved residue in the NC1 domain, which is involved in key inter- and intramolecular interactions, but results in a relatively mild disease phenotype. Renal failure in an L1649R male typically occurs in the 4th or 5th decade and precedes the onset of significant hearing loss by {approximately}10 years. 45 refs., 5 figs.

  12. NREL Delivers In-Home HVAC Efficiency Testing Solutions (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivers In-Home HVAC Efficiency Testing Solutions Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have recently developed two simple in-home efficiency test methods that can be used by technicians, researchers, or interested homeowners to verify the correct opera- tion and energy efficiency of a home's air conditioning and heating equipment. An efficiency validation method for mini-split heat pumps (MSHPs)-highly efficient refrigerant-based air conditioning and heating systems

  13. NRELs Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak Power Loads Without Using Harmful Refrigerants (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DEVAP Slashes Peak Power Loads Desiccant-enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air-condi- tioning will provide superior comfort for commercial buildings in any climate at a small fraction of the elec- tricity costs of conventional air-conditioning equip- ment, releasing far less carbon dioxide and cutting costly peak electrical demand by an estimated 80%. Air conditioning currently consumes about 15% of the electricity generated in the United States and is a major contributor to peak electrical demand on

  14. Improving Catalyst Efficiency in Bio-Based Hydrocarbon Fuels (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    New study determines the effect of catalyst structure on product yields and coking during vapor phase upgrading of biomass pyrolysis products. Converting biomass, an abun- dant and renewable resource, into liquid transportation fuels has attracted significant atten- tion because of depleting fossil fuel reserves and associated environmental concerns. In the quest for sustainable and eco-friendly fuel alternatives, much research is focusing on improving the properties of bio-oil. Scientists at

  15. Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs Fifth Annual Report to Congress - 1996

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Abstract This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the U.S. Department of Energy's alterna- tive fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6374, et seq.). These programs, which comprise the most compre- hensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transporta- tion fuels and alternative fuel vehi- cles, are beginning their sixth year. This

  16. Industry and Education Experts Work Together to Establish Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Technician Training Standards

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    s more and more AFVs find their places in the transporta- tion industry, the need for qualified technicians to service these vehicles continues to grow. To help meet this need, transportation indus- try and education experts are working together to develop standards for AFV technician training, standards that will serve as a valuable tool for AFV technician training programs now and in the future. Background Section 411 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires that the U.S. Department

  17. Departm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Kie ling, Acting Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 San ta Fe, New Mexico 87 505-6303 MAY 2 4 2012 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modifica tion to the Hazard ous Waste Facility Permit, Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling: Enclosed is the fo llowing Class 1 Permit Modification Notification : * Update Emergency Coordinator Add ress and Telephone Numbers We certify under penalty of law that this document and

  18. CATALYTIC PROMOTION OF THE ADSORPTION OF VANADIUM ON AN ANIONIC EXCHANGE RESIN

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailes, R.H.; Ellis, D.A.

    1958-08-26

    An improvement in the process for the recovery of vanadium from acidic phosphatic solutions is presented. In this process the vanadium is first oxidized to the pentavaleat state, and is then separated by contacting such solutions with an anion exchange resin whereby adsorption of the complexed pentavalent vanadium is effected. The improvement lies in the fact that adsorp tion of the vanadium complex by the anion exchange resin is promoted and improved by providing fiuoride ions in solution to be contacted.

  19. Graduation Day

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduation Day Tevatron Impact Symposium Keynote Lisa Randall Graduation * grad*u*a*tion * [graj-oo-ey-shuhn * noun 1. an act of graduating; the state of being graduated. * 2. the ceremony of conferring degrees or diplomas, as at a college or school. * Today we celebrate the impact and legacy of the Tevatron * Both in terms of science and in its influence on technology and creative scientific thinking Legacy * Momentous time in particle physics. - Transition. - Many eyes on LHC. * But really

  20. BT16 Agricultural Residues and Biomass Energy Crops Factsheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    agricultural sector. POLYSYS was developed to simulate changes in eco- nomic policy, agricultural management, and natural resource conditions, as well as to estimate how agricultural producers may respond to new agricultural market opportunities, such as new demand for biomass, while considering the impact on other non-energy crops. For this analysis, the data in POLYSYS is anchored in a USDA-published baseline of yield, acreage, and price projec- tions for the agriculture sector, which are

  1. Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    C � Resources � Appendix C Resources for Energy and Facilities Professionals The references and resources provided below are by no means all-inclusive. The listed organiza- tions are not endorsed by the authors of this guide and are provided for your information only. To locate additional resources, the authors of this guide recommend contacting relevant trade groups, databases, and the world-wide web. Organizations American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) � Website: www.ashe.org

  2. Technical Sessions J. E. Penner Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Penner Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94550 The stated goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measure- ment (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radia- tion in general circulation models (GCMs). The means for doing so will be to compare model-predicted radiative fluxes with measured fluxes at four to six permanent sites. The measured fluxes will characterize the fluxes expected on the scale of a GCM grid box. Because aerosol optical depths at solar wavelengths

  3. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EIS - 0097-F c f ` f= �c J m s= Final Environmental Impact Statement BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION TRANSMISSION FACILITIES VEGETATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM U.S. Department of Energy August 1983 Appendices albLbfp= J MMVTJc= Responsible Official: tfiif^j= ^K= s^rde^k= Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection. Safety, and Emergency Prepafedness Final Environmental Impact Statement BONNEVILLE POWER ADM IN ISTRA TION TRANSMISSION FACILITIES VEGETATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM U.S. Department of

  4. Flexible Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Flexible Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology Improved Efficiency and Flexibility through the Development of Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology Welding is one of the most important and widely used fabrica- tion technologies in modern industry. Traditional fusion welding processes (e.g. arc welding and laser welding) require signifcant heat inputs and frequently lead to property deterioration, such as cracking and porosity during solidifcation. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state

  5. Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Financing for Tax-Exempt Entitities Facilitating deployments by structuring energy service contracts to include the Energy Investment Tax Credit. Introduction The Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) 1 can help reduce the cost of installing a fuel cell system. While Department of Treasury regulations prevent tax-exempt entities, e.g., not-for-proft organiza- tions, from directly taking advantage of tax benefts for property that they own, the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) and Treasury regulations

  6. Neutron-induced fission measurements at the time-of-flight facility nELBE

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kögler, T.; Beyer, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2015-05-18

    Neutron-induced fission of ²⁴²Pu is studied at the photoneutron source nELBE. The relative fast neutron fission cross section was determined using actinide fission chambers in a time-of-flight experiment. A good agreement of present nuclear data with evalua- tions has been achieved in the range of 100 keV to 10 MeV.

  7. International Training Course on Physical Protection (ITC-25) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overholt, Michelle Jungst

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this evaluation repor t is to provide the informa tion necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the In ternational Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-25 training content, delivery me thods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course pr ovides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the students' needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  8. San Francisco Operations Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    San Francisco Operations Office 1333 Broadway Oakland, California 94612 Dr. Joseph 0. Ward, Chief Radiological Health Section Department of Health Services 744 P Street Sacramento, California, 95814 SUBJECT: Certification Docket of Gilman Hall Dear Dr. Ward: The Department of Energy (DOE) has completed and reviewed the remedial ac- tions of Gilman Hall located at the University of California, Berkeley, California. Based on this review, DOE certifies that the condition of Gilman Hall is

  9. A Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Role for Immersion Freezing in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratus Gijs de Boer, Edwin W. Eloranta, Tempei Hashino, and Gregory J. Tripoli The University of Wisconsin - Madison (1) Introduction Ice formation appears to a dominant factor controlling the lifecycle of Arctic mixed-phase clouds. To date, our understanding of ice formation in these long-lasting cloud structures does not explain the formation of observed ice amounts. Particularly puzzling are observa- tions taken from the 2004

  10. old.new.factsheets.indd

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DARHT Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility, or DARHT, supports a critical component of LANL's primary mission: to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons in our na- tion's stockpile. Los Alamos scientists built DARHT, the world's most powerful x-ray machine, to analyze mockups of nuclear weapons. The DARHT Facility DARHT consists of two linear induction

  11. Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific J. H. Mather Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Convection is ubiquitous throughout the maritime continent region. However, the frequency of convec- tion is not uniform. While much of this region does not experience seasons to the same degree as one finds in mid-latitudes, the annual cycle of the sun's passage does have a large impact on convection throughout the maritime continent and the tropical

  12. QDP-JIT/PTX: A QDP++ Implementation for CUDA-Enabled GPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, Frank T.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2014-11-01

    These proceedings describe briefly the QDP-JIT/PTX framework for lattice field theory calcula- tions on the CUDA architecture. The framework generates compute kernels in the PTX assembler language which can be compiled to efficient GPU machine code by the NVIDIA JIT compiler. A comprehensive memory management was added to the framework so that applications, e.g. Chroma, can run unaltered on GPU clusters and supercomputers.

  13. New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes Improved Energy Efficiency through the Determination of Optimal Distillation Configuration The ability to apply low-energy distillation confgurations can allow chemical manufacturers to reduce energy consumption of both existing and grassroots plants. However, the determina- tion of an appropriate confguration is limited by an incomplete knowledge of the 'search space' for a proper distillation network. Currently, no systematic

  14. Final Technical Report - Stochastic Analysis of Advection-Diffusion-reaction Systems with Applications to Reactive Transport in Porous Media - DE-FG02-07ER24818

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-03-11

    The main objective of this project is to develop new computational tools for uncertainty quantifica- tion (UQ) of systems governed by stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with applications to advection-diffusion-reaction systems. We pursue two complementary approaches: (1) generalized polynomial chaos and its extensions and (2) a new theory on deriving PDF equations for systems subject to color noise. The focus of the current work is on high-dimensional systems involving tens or hundreds of uncertain parameters.

  15. Microsoft Word - Mitoneet.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2007 MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized by Diabetes Drugs The rise in obesity in the United States parallels a dramatic increase in obesity-associated diseases, most notably type-2 diabetes. This disease is predicted to reach epidemic propor- tions in the next several decades (Zimmet et al 2001, Urek et al 2007). Thus, understand- ing the biochemical processes underlying type-2 diabetes and identifying new targets for therapeutic intervention

  16. Cross-Cutting Hydrogen Station Infrastructure Review Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HYDROGEN STATION INFRASTRUCTURE REVIEW REPORT June 10th, 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Annual Merit Review NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any informa- tion,

  17. Chapter 5: Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    5: Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing High-Performance Engineering Design Lighting System Design Mechanical System Design Central Plant Systems Plumbing and Water Use Building Control Systems Electrical Power Systems Metering LANL | Chapter 5 High-Performance Engineering Design Lighting, HVAC, and Plumbing By now, the building envelope serves multiple roles. It protects the occupants from changing weather condi- tions and it plays a key part in meeting the occupants' comfort needs. The heating,

  18. American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 16

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is committed to performing the Cold War-era cleanup safely and with transparency. Oversight and direc- tion provided by stakeholders is key to keeping American taxpayers informed of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act spending and progress as America works toward economic prosperity. SRS's $1.6 billion Recovery Act pack- age invests in the workforce and area businesses to complete important cleanup projects years ahead of origi- nal projections. "We are

  19. VTA, SamTrans Look into Future with Bus Demo

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    induction motor for propulsion. Although there are several fuel cell chemistries and configura- tions, PEM is generally recog- nized as the best combination of electrochemistry, operating temperature, and weight for transportation applications. The fuel cell supplies electric current via an inverter to the propulsion motor, which is a proprietary design. This chassis- mounted, three-phase, induction motor is rated at 225 kW (369 horsepower). Hydrogen is stored onboard in eleven 5,000-psi

  20. NREL Assesses National Design Standards for Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Report summarizes regulations, standards, and guidelines for the design and operation of offshore wind projects in the United States. In 2012, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) published its Offshore Compliance Recommended Practices that are based on existing standards (Inter- national Electrotechnical Commission, International Organization for Standardiza- tion, and American Petroleum Institute) and guidelines (American Bureau of Ship- ping and DNV GL). Although the AWEA document

  1. NREL's Cyanobacteria Engineering Shortens Biofuel Production Process, Captures CO2 (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The flexibility of cyanobacterial metabolism supports direct conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to ethylene. Photosynthesis fuels growth in plants and algae, two of the primary components of biomass. Biomass, in turn, can be converted into various fuels and chemicals. NREL researchers have shortened this process by engineering one photosynthetic organism, cyanobacterium, so that it converts CO 2 directly into the target chemical ethylene, bypassing the biomass produc- tion and processing

  2. Summary and Comparison of BT16 with BT11

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    have substantial potential. Algae have a higher fuel yield per unit of biomass than terrestrial feedstocks. At higher farmgate prices, additional algal biomass could be available, but the prices will need to decrease for the full potential to be realized. Approach Biomass availability is dependent on many factors, including market, innova- tion, and time. As with BT2, terrestrial biomass supply increases with increasing price, higher yields, and over time. A major difference between BT2 and BT16

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Convective and Orographically Induced

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is providing the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to support a long-term precipitation study in the Black Forest region of Germany. Requested by researchers from the University of Hohenheim, the AMF will be deployed as one of four heav- ily instrumented supersites established for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipita- tion Study

  4. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Low power factor is expensive and inefficient. Many utility companies charge you an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95. Low power factor also reduces your electrical system's distribu- tion capacity by increasing current flow and causing voltage drops. This fact sheet describes power factor and explains how you can improve your power factor to reduce electric bills and enhance your electrical system's capacity. REDUCING POWER FACTOR COST To understand power factor, visualize a

  5. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Rock the Watt was a direct applica- tion of the Framework for Organiza- tional Change that included building sustainability champions, integration of a sustainability checklist, and sup- port for employees to come up with their own energy saving actions. Rock the Watt: An Energy Conservation Campaign at Pacific Northwest National Lab Pacifc Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), one of the seventeen Department of Energy laboratories, implemented the 3-month Rock the Watt campaign in FY2015 to

  6. SSL EVALUATION: OLED Lighting in the Offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc.

    Energy Savers

    EVALUATION: OLED Lighting in the Offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc. The first GATEWAY demonstra- tion involving OLEDs is also the first office test site for the use of OLEDs in general lighting. In March 2014, Aurora Lighting Design, Inc., in Grayslake, IL, made the bold decision to install an OLED lighting system during offce renovations. Aurora is a small architectural lighting design offce located in the lower level of a residence. With large windows overlook- ing a lake, the offce uses

  7. Industry | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    s more and more AFVs find their places in the transporta- tion industry, the need for qualified technicians to service these vehicles continues to grow. To help meet this need, transportation indus- try and education experts are working together to develop standards for AFV technician training, standards that will serve as a valuable tool for AFV technician training programs now and in the future. Background Section 411 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires that the U.S. Department

  8. DOE/EIA-0202(89/2Q)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2Q) 11989 SHORT-TERM t . t QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). Informa tion about purchasing this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC by mail, telephone or telecommunications device for the deaf

  9. DOE/EIA-0202(89/4Q) SHOKT-TERM

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4Q) SHOKT-TERM t . t QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (QPO). Informa tion about purchasing this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC by mail, telephone or telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD). Addresses, telephone numbers and hours

  10. Gina Pearson Assistant Administrator

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gina Pearson Assistant Administrator for Communications Duties Gina Pearson is the Assistant Administrator (AA) for Communications, and in this capacity provides leadership and direction to conduct the U.S. Energy Information Administration's comprehensive communications program for diverse external customer groups and agency employees. The AA for Communications is responsible for Agency communications policies and standards, the www.eia.gov website, press and media rela- tions, marketing and

  11. HTS Cable Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry ANL Air Liquide DOE Golden LANL AEP ORNL Nexans Niagara Mohawk Super Power American Superconductor NYSERDA BOC Praxair W ? tion systems. This is the most the nation. W superconductivity? HTS Cable Projects www.oe.energy.gov Phone: 202 \ 586-1411 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-1 U.S. Department of Energy - 1000 Independence Avenue, SW - Washington, DC 20585. Plugging America Into the Future of Power "A National Effort to

  12. Biphasic influence of dexamethasone exposure on embryonic vertebrate skeleton development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Xin; Chen, Jian-long; Ma, Zheng-lai; Zhang, Zhao-long; Lv, Shun; Mai, Dong-mei; Liu, Jia-jia; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Wan, Chao; Yang, Xuesong

    2014-11-15

    Dexamethasone (Dex) has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties against many conditions. There is a potential teratogenic risk, however, for pregnant women receiving Dex treatment. It has been claimed that Dex exposure during pregnancy could affect osteogenesis in the developing embryo, which still remains highly controversial. In this study, we employed chick embryos to investigate the effects of Dex exposure on skeletal development using combined in vivo and in vitro approach. First, we demonstrated that Dex (10{sup −8}–10{sup −6} μmol/egg) exposure resulted in a shortening of the developing long bones of chick embryos, and it accelerated the deposition of calcium salts. Secondly, histological analysis of chick embryo phalanxes exhibited Dex exposure inhibited the proliferation of chondrocytes, increased apoptosis of chondrocytes and osteocytes, and led to atypical arranged hypertrophic chondrocytes. The expression of genes related to skeletogenesis was also analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of ALP, Col1a2 and Col2a1 was decreased in the Dex treated phalanxes. A detectable increase was observed in Runx-2 and Mmp-13 expression. We next examined how Dex affected the different stages of skeletogenesis in vitro. Utilizing limb bud mesenchyme micromass cultures, we determined that Dex exposure exerted no effect on apoptosis but impaired chondrogenic cell proliferation. Interestingly, low dose of Dex moderately prompted nodule formation as revealed by alcian blue staining, but higher doses of Dex significantly inhibited similar chondrogenic differentiation. Dex exposure did not induce apoptosis when the chondrogenic precursors were still at the mesenchymal stage, however, cell viability was suppressed when the mesenchyme differentiated into chondrocytes. Alizarin red staining revealed that the capacity to form mineralized bone nodules was correspondingly enhanced as Dex concentrations increased. The mRNA level of Sox-9 was slightly

  13. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  14. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  15. Regulated Schedule 9

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    UTILITY","UTILITY_NAME","PLANT_ID","PLANT_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","COL1AMOUNT","DESCRIPTION" 2002,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"D G Hunter",9,1,"STEAM","Kind of Plant" 2002,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"D G Hunter",9,2,1956,"Year Originally Constructed" 2002,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"D G Hunter",9,3,1974,"Year Last Unit

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - ACTIVE_NYC_2006_1.ppt

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Particle Imager data from the Egret P. Connolly♣, K. Bower♣, M. Gallagher♣, G. Vaughan♣, T. Choularton♣, G. Allen♣, A. Heymsfield ♥ ♣School of Earth,Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester. ♥NCAR, USA 16.5 17 17.5 18 18.5 19 0 0.2 0.4 AE04, 16-Nov-2005 N 100-1800 µm (cm -3 ) CIP sph col plt sir bir 16.5 17 17.5 18 18.5 19 0 0.5 1 IWC (gm -3 ) 16.5 17 17.5 18 18.5 19 -60 -50 -40 -30 TIME (hrs) T ( ° C) 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 10 4 10 -8 10 -7 10 -6 10

  17. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3: Nuclear Energy Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2014 State Nuclear Electric Power Nuclear Fuel Consumption Prices Expenditures Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 41,244 431.4 0.80 344.2 Alaska 0 0.0 - - Arizona 32,321 338.0 0.82 276.7 Arkansas 14,478 151.4 0.83 126.1 California 16,986 177.7 0.65 115.2 Colorado 0 0.0 - - Connecticut 15,841 165.7 0.72 120.0 Delaware 0 0.0 - - Dist. of Col. 0 0.0 - - Florida 27,868 291.5 0.74 215.7

  18. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  19. Worksheet

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    UTILITY","UTILITY_NAME","PLANT_ID","PLANT_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","COL1AMOUNT","DESCRIPTION" 2003,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"D G Hunter",9,1,"STEAM","Type of Plant" 2003,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"D G Hunter",9,2,1956,"Year Originally Constructed" 2003,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"D G Hunter",9,3,1974,"Year Last Unit

  20. NGNP: High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Key Definitions, Plant Capabilities, and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip Mills

    2012-02-01

    This document is intended to provide a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project tool in which to collect and identify key definitions, plant capabilities, and inputs and assumptions to be used in ongoing efforts related to the licensing and deployment of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). These definitions, capabilities, and assumptions are extracted from a number of sources, including NGNP Project documents such as licensing related white papers [References 1-11] and previously issued requirement documents [References 13-15]. Also included is information agreed upon by the NGNP Regulatory Affairs group's Licensing Working Group and Configuration Council. The NGNP Project approach to licensing an HTGR plant via a combined license (COL) is defined within the referenced white papers and reference [12], and is not duplicated here.

  1. Combinatorial Algorithms to Enable Computational Science and Engineering: Work from the CSCAPES Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boman, Erik G.; Catalyurek, Umit V.; Chevalier, Cedric; Devine, Karen D.; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H.; Hovland, Paul D.; Pothen, Alex; Rajamanickam, Sivasankaran; Safro, Ilya; Wolf, Michael M.; Zhou, Min

    2015-01-16

    This final progress report summarizes the work accomplished at the Combinatorial Scientific Computing and Petascale Simulations Institute. We developed Zoltan, a parallel mesh partitioning library that made use of accurate hypergraph models to provide load balancing in mesh-based computations. We developed several graph coloring algorithms for computing Jacobian and Hessian matrices and organized them into a software package called ColPack. We developed parallel algorithms for graph coloring and graph matching problems, and also designed multi-scale graph algorithms. Three PhD students graduated, six more are continuing their PhD studies, and four postdoctoral scholars were advised. Six of these students and Fellows have joined DOE Labs (Sandia, Berkeley), as staff scientists or as postdoctoral scientists. We also organized the SIAM Workshop on Combinatorial Scientific Computing (CSC) in 2007, 2009, and 2011 to continue to foster the CSC community.

  2. License Structure for Multi-Module Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Hicks

    2010-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project is intended to be the prototype for multi-module commercial high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) for process heat and/or electricity generation. Part of the objectives of the project are to establish the conditions that would govern or enhance the design, licensing, construction and operation of numerous, modular nuclear plants, particularly suited for industrial applications or that could reduce the risk of such projects. A determination is desired regarding whether a multi-module reactor plant can be licensed with a single Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) review, hearing, and safety evaluation report. If it is determined that a multi-modular reactor plant can be licensed under a single review/hearing process, the structure and the duration of the license for each module will also need to be determined. The purpose of this paper is to describe for the NRC the NGNP position on these two issues and obtain either NRC general concurrence or comments on the approach to these issues. While the current NGNP planning provides for only a single reactor module, the project is intended to provide the basis and establish a licensing framework that can be used by future commercial HTGRs and other reactor designs, including a variety of small modular reactor technologies, with configurations reflecting design standardization of multi-module plants. Therefore, it is important to identify a path for addressing these modular reactor plant issues so that the resolution can be factored into the NGNP Project planning. The NGNP position is that a single combined license (COL) application can be submitted for a multi-modular reactor facility, the COL application can undergo a single NRC review/hearing process, and each module should be issued a separate license.

  3. UNVEILING SOURCES OF HEATING IN THE VICINITY OF THE ORION BN/KL HOT CORE AS TRACED BY HIGHLY EXCITED INVERSION TRANSITIONS OF AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddi, C.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Chandler, C. J.; Matthews, L. D.

    2011-09-20

    Using the Expanded Very Large Array, we have mapped the vicinity of the Orion BN/KL Hot Core with subarcsecond angular resolution in seven metastable inversion transitions of ammonia (NH{sub 3}): (J, K) = (6,6) to (12,12). This emission comes from levels up to 1500 K above the ground state, enabling identification of source(s) responsible for heating the region. We used this multi-transition data set to produce images of the rotational/kinetic temperature (T {sub rot}/T {sub kin}) and the column density N {sub col} of NH{sub 3} for ortho and para species separately and on a position-by-position basis. We find T {sub rot} and N {sub col} in the range 160-490 K and (1-4) x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, respectively. Our spatially resolved images show that the highest (column) density and hottest gas is found in a northeast-southwest elongated ridge to the southeast of Source I. We have also measured the ortho-para ratio of ammonia, estimated to vary in the range 0.9-1.6. Enhancement of ortho with respect to para and the offset of hot NH{sub 3} emission peaks from known (proto)stellar sources provide evidence that the NH{sub 3} molecules have been released from dust grains into the gas phase through the passage of shocks and not by stellar radiation. We propose that the combined effect of Source I's proper motion and its low-velocity outflow impinging on a pre-existing dense medium is responsible for the excitation of NH{sub 3} and the Orion Hot Core. Finally, we found for the first time evidence of a slow ({approx}5 km s{sup -1}) and compact ({approx}1000 AU) outflow toward IRc7.

  4. Summary

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary * The neighborhoods in which larger deep convective cloud objects occur tend to have higher values of albedo, cloud top height, ice water path, τ, and lower values of OLR, and cloud top temperature. These changes in the overall distributions with size are a combination of changes in the DC distribu- tions (similar to Xu et al. 2007) and an increase in the proportion of DC footprints. The non-DC distributions of these proper- ties change very little with cloud object size. * As SST

  5. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat

  6. T:\ClearanceEMEUConsumption\cbecs\pubuse86\txt\cb86sasfmt&layout.txt

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6/txt/cb86sasfmt&layout.txt[3/17/2009 4:43:14 PM] File 1: Summary File (cb86f01.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. Metropolitan statistical area MSA3 25- 25 $MSA. Climate zone CLIMATE3 27- 27 $CLIMAT. B-1 Square footage SQFT3 29- 35

  7. Word Pro - S4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 4.1 Natural Gas Overview (Billion Cubic Feet) Gross With- drawals a Marketed Production (Wet) b NGPL Production c Dry Gas Production d Supple- mental Gaseous Fuels e Trade Net Storage With- drawals f Balancing Item g Consump- tion h Imports Exports Net Imports 1950 Total .................... 8,480 i 6,282 260 i 6,022 NA 0 26 -26 -54 -175 5,767 1955 Total .................... 11,720 i 9,405 377 i 9,029 NA 11 31 -20 -68 -247 8,694 1960 Total .................... 15,088 i 12,771 543 i

  8. Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 lujAn Center reseArCh FeAtureD on Cover oF Langmuir 4 FunCtionAl oxiDes unDer extreme ConDi- tions-quest For new mAteriAls 6 heADs uP! By Diana Del Mauro ADEPS Communications Inside the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Victor Fanelli is busy preparing a superconducting magnet. In a series of delicate steps,

  9. M

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Deviation of static en- ergy (s=c p T+gz) from mesonet mean (location of cold pool) over- laid with gridded hourly precipita- tion amount contours. Figure 2. Divergence overlaid with gridded hourly precipitation amount. M u M d correlation with CRM precip M c,d M c,u M u M d M d + M u + MSE std dev wind std dev div i < -10 -4 S -1 div i > 10 -4 S -1 div i > 0 div i < 0 ] Mesoanalysis of the Interactions of Precipitating Convection and the Boundary Layer Ruiyu Sun, Steven K. Krueger,

  10. JJ'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ^x .,.,..,,, .,_...,,, .~, .~~ ,.,_,. _ . . ^..~ .,.-....-.. ~.~ .,,_,_ I-.~ ___:-._ ,,_ I --,,,,-.I I -... "I _-_,, i ,,,, (__. ..-;.mss,.r^-' . :' _.' i' . ' . r*911;&& --- _. JJ' 4)&-] " ]+-ic 7-g &Lc u.4 u - 7 S' JJ-- ,C- iki?rdC~L\T $' Y' IEThLS COP?O~,~TION d - I8 4.1 INROAD STREET (In ciuplicste) Xovezber 30, 1942. The I)ist?ict Eng~Gi U. S. EZi<i3eef Office, 2Zi%XttZ?l Cistrict, ? . 0 . z,ox 42, CL',t'~~'.' -~-~: ~,'y:-y;, :.yz --'- -- Station F., ,y: r:

  11. Research Portfolio Report Small Producers: Operations/Improved Recovery

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Small Producers: Operations/Improved Recovery Cover image: Drill rigs and pump jacks are some typical tools used in natural gas and oil opera- tions and for improved recovery Research Portfolio Report Small Producers: Operations/Improved Recovery DOE/NETL-2015/1698 Prepared by: Mari Nichols-Haining and Christine Rueter KeyLogic Systems, Inc. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Contact: James Ammer james.ammer@netl.doe.gov Contract DE-FE0004003 Activity 4003.200.03 DISCLAIMER This report

  12. Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Combined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden Central Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Case Study: Fuel Cells Provide Com- bined Heat and Power at Verizon's Garden City Central Office With more than 67 million customers nationwide, Verizon Communications is one of the largest telecommunica- tions providers in the U.S. Power inter- ruptions can severely impact network operations and could result in losses in excess of $1 million/minute. 1 In 2005, Verizon Communications installed a 1.4 MW phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system, consisting of seven 200 kW units, at its Central

  13. Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Delivery Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Distribution and Delivery Most of the hydrogen used in the U.S. is produced at or near where it is used - typically at large industrial sites. As a result, an efficient means of delivering large quantities of hydrogen fuel over long distances and at low cost does not yet exist. Before hydrogen can become a mainstream energy carrier, we must first develop and build the infrastructure (e.g. the miles of transmission and distribu- tion pipelines, bulk storage vessels, and refueling stations) that

  14. NTSF Spring 2012 Agenda

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    hilTon Knoxville Knoxville, Tennessee May 15-17 naTional TransporTaTion sTaKeholders ForuM 2012 2 3 Tuesday, May 15 Regional Meetings 8:15 am - 3:30 pm Western Governors' Association (WGA) Transportation Safety Technical Advisory Group Meeting - Salon A 8:30 am - 3:15 pm Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) Radioactive Materials Transportation Committees - Salon B 9:00 am - 3:30 pm Council of State Governments (CSG Midwest) Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Meeting - Salon

  15. Quantum Statistical Testing of a Quantum Random Number Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humble, Travis S

    2014-01-01

    The unobservable elements in a quantum technology, e.g., the quantum state, complicate system verification against promised behavior. Using model-based system engineering, we present methods for verifying the opera- tion of a prototypical quantum random number generator. We begin with the algorithmic design of the QRNG followed by the synthesis of its physical design requirements. We next discuss how quantum statistical testing can be used to verify device behavior as well as detect device bias. We conclude by highlighting how system design and verification methods must influence effort to certify future quantum technologies.

  16. UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UHlfED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE FEDERAL U B O R RElATlONS AUTHORITY DEPARTMENT 0 1 . ' E3iERGY ALBAkY RESEARCH CEhTER ALBANJ', OREGON -Actlvit)' -Ahill- SATIONAL. FEDEMTION OF FEDERAL EMYLOYEES, LOCAL 1141 -Peti tionerlExclus~v c Repmmbtlve -and- AMENCAN FEDERATION OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES, LOCAL I 104, AFL-CIO CASE NO. SF-RP-90042 Pursuant to Scc [ton 2422 1 of the Regulations of the Federal Labor Relations Authoriry, a pen t ~ o n was Filed seeking to amend rhe rscogni tion granted to the

  17. Pareto Efficient Policy for Supervisory Power Management Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    n this paper we address the problem of online optimization of the supervisory power management control in parallel hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). We model HEV opera- tion as a controlled Markov chain using the long-run expected average cost per unit time criterion, and we show that the control policy yielding the Pareto optimal solution minimizes the average cost criterion online. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation and compared to the solution derived with dynamic programming using the average cost criterion.

  18. Search for CPT-odd decays of positronium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vetter, Paul A.; Freedman, Stuart J.

    2003-07-11

    We have limited a CPT-violating correlation in annihilationsof polarized ortho-positronium. We searched for an asymmetry in thetriple correlations dot k1 cross k2, where k1 and k2 are the two largestphoton momenta, and s is the spin of the positronium. Using theGammasphere array of Compton-suppressed high-purity germanium detectors,we detected 2.65e7 events of ortho-Ps annihila tion. The amplitude of aCPT-violating asymmetry in the data set is found to be 0.0026 plus orminus 0.0031, a factor of 6 smaller than previousexperiments.

  19. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Cooling Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  20. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Cooling Equipment, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Build- ings*","Cooled Build- ings","Cooling Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Resid- ential- Type Central Air Condi- tioners","Heat Pumps","Indiv- idual Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- tioning Units","Swamp

  1. The Impact of Abrupt Suspension of Solar Radiation Management (Termination Effect) in Experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew; Haywood, J.; Alterskjaer, Kari; Boucher, Olivier; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Robock, Alan; Schmidt, Hauke; Singh, Balwinder; Tilmes, S.; Watanabe, Shingo; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-09-11

    We have examined changes in climate which result from the sudden termination of geoengineering after 50 years of offsetting a 1% per annum increase in CO2 concentra- tions as simulated by 11 different climate models in experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. The models agree on a rapid rate of global-mean warming following termination, accompanied by increases in global-mean precipitation rate and in plant net primary productivity, and decreases in sea-ice cover. While there is a considerable degree of consensus for the geographical distribution of warming, there is much less of an agreement regarding the patterns of change in the other quantities.

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 2: Building Activity (cb86f02.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. B-3 Any residential use RESUSE3 28- 28 $YESNO. B-4 Percent residential RESPC3 30- 30 $RESPC. Principal building activity PBA3 32-

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5: End Uses of Major Energy Sources (cb86f05.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY. D-2 Year construction was completed YRCONC3 31- 32 $YRCONC.

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6: End Uses of Minor Energy Sources (cb86f06.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY. D-2 Year construction was completed YRCONC3 31- 32 $YRCONC.

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File10: District Steam and Hot Water (cb86f10.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY. D-2 Year construction was completed YRCONC3 31- 32 $YRCONC.

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1: Propane and District Chilled Water (cb86f11.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY. D-2 Year construction was completed YRCONC3 31- 32 $YRCONC.

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 11: District Steam and Hot Water (CBECS89.A11) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. F3 Year construction was completed YRCONC4 17- 18 $YRCONC. Adjusted weight ADJWT4 20- 27 Variance stratum STRATUM4 29- 30 Pair indicator PAIR4 32- 32

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 12: District Chilled Water (CBECS89.A12) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. F3 Year construction was completed YRCONC4 17- 18 $YRCONC. Adjusted weight ADJWT4 20- 27 Variance stratum STRATUM4 29- 30 Pair indicator PAIR4 32- 32

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    File 14: Imputation Flags for End Uses (CBECS89.A14) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. F3 Year construction was completed YRCONC4 17- 18 $YRCONC. Imputed main heating ZHT14 20- 20 $ZVAR. Imputed secondary heating ZHT24 22- 22 $ZVAR.

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5: End Uses of Major Energy Sources (CBECS89.A05) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. C3AA Electricity used for main heating ELHT14 17- 17 $XXSUPL. C3BA Electricity used for secondary heating ELHT24 19- 19 $XXSUPL. C3CA Electricity used for

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6: End Uses of Minor Energy Sources (CBECS89.A06) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. C1D Propane used in past 12 months PRUSED4 17- 17 $YESNO. C3AD Propane used for main heating PRHT14 19- 19 $YESNO. C3BD Propane used for secondary heating

  12. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DE Bihl; JA MacLellan; ML Johnson; RK Piper; TP Lynch

    1999-05-14

    During calendar year (CY) 1998, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations OffIce (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo measurements, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibra- tion and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MST). The services were provided under a number of projects as summarized here.

  13. UHlfED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE FEDERAL U B O R RElATlONS AUTHORITY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    UHlfED STATES OF AMERICA BEFORE THE FEDERAL U B O R RElATlONS AUTHORITY DEPARTMENT 0 1 . ' E3iERGY ALBAkY RESEARCH CEhTER ALBANJ', OREGON -Actlvit)' -Ahill- SATIONAL. FEDEMTION OF FEDERAL EMYLOYEES, LOCAL 1141 -Peti tionerlExclus~v c Repmmbtlve -and- AMENCAN FEDERATION OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES, LOCAL I 104, AFL-CIO CASE NO. SF-RP-90042 Pursuant to Scc [ton 2422 1 of the Regulations of the Federal Labor Relations Authoriry, a pen t ~ o n was Filed seeking to amend rhe rscogni tion granted to the

  14. WTP Communications Strategy Discussion Topics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Discussion Topics For discussion at the April 7, 2015 PIC meeting Issue Managers: Bob Suyama, Dave Bernhard, Melanie Myers-Magnuson, Dirk Dunning, Liz Mattson, Pam Larsen, Ken Niles Some potential questions and areas that the TWC/PIC need to discuss in order to develop a Communica- tions Strategy for the Waste Treatment Plant. These questions represent the data that the TWC/PIC might need in order to provide a plan that will be of value to the Tri-Party Agencies and the Public and Stakeholders.

  15. ch_4

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    40 Affected Environment playas 15 to 20 miles northeast of INTEC, where the water infiltrates. The water in Birch Creek and the Little Lost River is diverted in summer months for irriga- tion prior to reaching INEEL. During periods of unusually high precipitation or rapid snow melt, water from Birch Creek and the Little Lost River may enter INEEL from the northwest and infil- trate the ground, recharging the underlying aquifer. 4.8.1.2 Local Drainage INTEC is located on an alluvial plain

  16. ch_5

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    HLW & FD EIS 5-73 DOE/EIS-0287 tion dose to the nonin- volved worker and maximally exposed offsite individual and the collective dose to the population residing within 50 miles of INTEC. The radiation dose values for the var- ious alternatives were then multiplied by the dose-to-risk conversion factors, which are based on the 1993 Limitations of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (NCRP 1993). DOE has adopted these risk fac- tors of 0.0005 and 0.0004 latent cancer fatality (LCF) for each

  17. Mr. John Kiel

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Kiel ing , Acting Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau De p artm ent of En e rgy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad. New Mexico 8822 1 NOV 2 1 2011 New M exico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East. Building 1 Santa Fe . New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modifica tions to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit , Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dea r Mr. Kielin g: Enclosed are til e following Class 1 Permit Modification Notificatio ns: * Editorial Correction to

  18. Division, NN-43, Office of Arms Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8 10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-10 Edition) § 810.14 Division, NN-43, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. [51 FR 44574, Dec. 10, 1986, as amended at 58 FR 39639, July 16, 1993; 65 FR 16128, Mar. 27, 2000] § 810.14 Additional information. The Department of Energy may at any time require a person engaging in any generally or specifically author- ized activity to submit additional in- formation. § 810.15 Violations. (a) The Atomic Energy Act provides that: (1) Permanent or temporary injunc- tions

  19. Grain Boundary Percolation Modeling of Fission Gas Release in Oxide Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul C. Millett; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner

    2012-05-01

    We present a new approach to fission gas release modeling in oxide fuels based on grain boundary network percolation. The method accounts for variability in the bubble growth and coalescence rates on individual grain boundaries, and the resulting effect on macroscopic fission gas release. Two-dimensional representa- tions of fuel pellet microstructures are considered, and the resulting gas release rates are compared with traditional two-stage Booth models, which do not account for long-range percolation on grain boundary net- works. The results show that the requirement of percolation of saturated grain boundaries can considerably reduce the total gas release rates, particularly when gas resolution is considered.

  20. October 2007 BWXTymes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    7 J a w s o f l i f e a t Y- 12 , p g . 4 , * A l p h a b e t s o u p , p g . 6 * Y- 12 a w a r d w i n n e r s , p g . 8 Y-12: a good environmental steward The Y-12 National Security Complex was recognized for its environmental stewardship and received "Honorable Men- tion for Environmental Achievement" in Environmental Protection magazine's 2007 Facilities of the Year competition. Y-12's commitment to the environment is not a one-time occurrence, but the result of continued

  1. PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    as a i i . : lJIiaSJ :ShUiI,,:;II. Iii II; PROTON RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN 29p LAWRENCE H. JAMES Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory Department of Physics North Carolina State University 1989 - - .. - .. - .. Abstract James, Lawrence Hoy Proton Resonance Spectroscopy in 29 p (Under the direc- tion of Gary E. Mitchell) Proton elastic scattering on 28Si was measured with good beam energy resolution in the proton energy range Ep=1.4 to E =3.75 MeV, and proton inelastic scattering on p 28Si

  2. Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Deployment of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Technologies in South Africa A Summary of the Trust for Conservation Global Cool Cities Alliance Project In 2010, the Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Energy Minister of the Republic of South Africa (RSA) launched the U.S. - RSA Energy Dialogue to facilitate coopera- tion in a number of areas, including energy effciency and renew- able energy. In support of the U.S. - RSA Energy Dialogue, the U.S. Department of

  3. Microsoft Word - NiR.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Side-on Cu-Nitrosyl Coordination by Nitrite Reductase Elitza I. Tocheva and Michael E. P. Murphy Department of Microbiology & Immunology, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the smallest and simplest biologically active molecules. In mammals, NO is produced from arginine by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, and it func- tions in signal transduction and as a cytoprotective or cytotoxic agent. In bacteria, NO is produced by nitrite

  4. Microsoft Word - Rad_Hard_Assurance_Fact_Sheet_SAND2011-0937P_updated_format.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Rad Radiatio Rad-Har systems hardenin Radiat Gamma The Rad includin of Sandi the phys semicon the parts low-dos radiation X-ray R The Rad Sandia a irradiato especiall one of th tube is lo irradiatio wafer-le technolo Sandia's that have Figure 2 Gamma diation on Hardening rd electronic or in close p ng provides a tion Phys a Ray Radi diation Physi ng two 60 Co s ia and comm sical mechan nductor devic s to be tested e-rate irradia n sources sho Radiation S diation Physi also maintain ors use X-ray

  5. BWXTymes, A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex, September 2007

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    7 B e r y l l i u m a n d y o u , p g . 2 , * S n i f f e r s a t w o r k , p g . 3 * A l o c k o n s u c c e s s , p g . 6 The Uranium Processing Facility project team received federal approval on July 25 to begin preliminary design, another major milestone for the new facility. The Y-12 facility will play a major role in helping the National Nuclear Security Administra- tion achieve its Complex 2030 vision of establishing a smaller, more effi cient Nuclear Weapons Complex able to respond to

  6. BWXTymes, October 2004: Y-12 newsletter

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Loudon $31,600 Blount $15,600 Knox $260,300 Anderson $208,600 Roane $67,800 OCTOBER 2004 Out with the old and in with the new A newsletter for the employees and friends of the Y-12 National Security Complex Y-12's 2004 United Way campaign was a resounding success, raising more than $650,000 for local charitable organiza- tions. Included in this amount was a corpo- rate contribution of $40,000. Special events dur- ing the drive included a book fair, a silent online auction, a bake sale, a

  7. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 0. Cooling equipment, number of buildings, 2012 Released: May 2016 Number of buildings (thousand) All buildings Buildings with cooling Cooling equipment (more than one may apply) Resid- ential- type central air condi- tioners Heat pumps Indiv- idual air condi- tioners District chilled water Central chillers Pack- aged air condi- tioning units Swamp coolers Other All buildings 5,557 4,461 1,546 692 709 54 163 1,909 109 Q Building floorspace (square feet)

  8. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Cooling equipment, floorspace, 2012 Released: May 2016 Total floorspace (million square feet) All buildings Buildings with cooling Cooling equipment (more than one may apply) Resid- ential- type central air condi- tioners Heat pumps Indiv- idual air condi- tioners District chilled water Central chillers Pack- aged air condi- tioning units Swamp coolers Other All buildings 87,093 79,294 14,765 12,538 12,420 4,608 17,041 45,153 1,918 328 Building floorspace

  9. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse April 2010

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 KovalevsKy and Fisher receive post- doctoral awards nuclear cross sec- tions For accelera- tor production oF a therapy isotope 3 understanding the pathogenesis oF alzheimer's disease 4 heads up! Ultracold neutron accomplishments at LANSCE The weak nuclear force is one of the four fundamental forces in nature, along with

  10. The Role of The fedeRal PRojecT diRecToR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Role of The fedeRal PRojecT diRecToR: lessons fRom The naTional igniTion faciliTy The national ignition facility (nif) is home of the world's largest laser. With 192 laser beams that can deliver more than 60 times the energy of any previous laser system, NIF represents a significant step in enabling the study of high-energy density science, and should demonstrate fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory for the first time. The design and construction of this unique, highly complex facility

  11. Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2006-01-01

    With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on

  12. GADRAS isotope ID users manual for analysis of gamma-ray measurements and API for Linux and Android .

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.

    2014-05-01

    Isotope identification algorithms that are contained in the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) can be used for real-time stationary measurement and search applications on platforms operating under Linux or Android operating sys-tems. Since the background radiation can vary considerably due to variations in natu-rally-occurring radioactive materials (NORM), spectral algorithms can be substantial-ly more sensitive to threat materials than search algorithms based strictly on count rate. Specific isotopes or interest can be designated for the search algorithm, which permits suppression of alarms for non-threatening sources, such as such as medical radionuclides. The same isotope identification algorithms that are used for search ap-plications can also be used to process static measurements. The isotope identification algorithms follow the same protocols as those used by the Windows version of GADRAS, so files that are created under the Windows interface can be copied direct-ly to processors on fielded sensors. The analysis algorithms contain provisions for gain adjustment and energy lineariza-tion, which enables direct processing of spectra as they are recorded by multichannel analyzers. Gain compensation is performed by utilizing photopeaks in background spectra. Incorporation of this energy calibration tasks into the analysis algorithm also eliminates one of the more difficult challenges associated with development of radia-tion detection equipment.

  13. Improved DC Gun Insulator Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sah, R.; Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Surles-Law, K. E.L.

    2010-05-23

    Many user fa­cil­i­ties such as syn­chrotron ra­di­a­tion light sources and free elec­tron lasers re­quire ac­cel­er­at­ing struc­tures that sup­port elec­tric fields of 10-100 MV/m, es­pe­cial­ly at the start of the ac­cel­er­a­tor chain where ce­ram­ic in­su­la­tors are used for very high gra­di­ent DC guns. These in­su­la­tors are dif­fi­cult to man­u­fac­ture, re­quire long com­mis­sion­ing times, and often ex­hib­it poor re­li­a­bil­i­ty. Two tech­ni­cal ap­proach­es to solv­ing this prob­lem will be in­ves­ti­gat­ed. First­ly, in­vert­ed ce­ram­ics offer so­lu­tions for re­duced gra­di­ents be­tween the elec­trodes and ground. An in­vert­ed de­sign will be pre­sent­ed for 350 kV, with max­i­mum gra­di­ents in the range of 5-10 MV/m. Sec­ond­ly, novel ce­ram­ic man­u­fac­tur­ing pro­cess­es will be stud­ied, in order to pro­tect triple junc­tion lo­ca­tions from emis­sion, by ap­ply­ing a coat­ing with a bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty. The pro­cess­es for cre­at­ing this coat­ing will be op­ti­mized to pro­vide pro­tec­tion as well as be used to coat a ce­ram­ic with an ap­pro­pri­ate gra­di­ent in bulk re­sis­tiv­i­ty from the vac­u­um side to the air side of an HV stand­off ce­ram­ic cylin­der. Ex­am­ple in­su­la­tor de­signs are being com­put­er mod­elled, and in­su­la­tor sam­ples are being man­u­fac­tured and test­ed

  14. TGF-β1-elevated TRPM7 channel regulates collagen expression in hepatic stellate cells via TGF-β1/Smad pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Ling; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Wu, Baoming; Ma, Taotao; Liu, Xuejiao; Zhu, Qian; Zhan, Shuxiang; Li, Jun

    2014-10-15

    Transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into myofibroblasts plays a critical role in the development of liver fibrosis, since myofibroblasts are the key cells responsible for excessive deposition of ECM proteins. Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a non-selective cation channel with protein serine/threonine kinase activity, has been demonstrated to function in the proliferation of activated HSCs. Here, we investigated the functional role of TRPM7 in collagen deposition in activated HSC-T6 cells (a rat hepatic stellate cell line). TRPM7 mRNA and protein were measured by Real-time PCR and Western blot in TGF-β1-activated HSC-T6 cells in vitro. Results demonstrated that TRPM7 protein was dramatically increased in fibrotic human livers. Stimulation of HSC-T6 cells with TGF-β1 increased TRPM7 mRNA and protein level in a time-dependent manner. Nevertheless, TGF-β1-elicited upregulation of TRPM7 in HSC-T6 cells was abrogated by SB431542 (TGF-β1 receptor blocker) or SIS3 (inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation). Additionally, blockade of TRPM7 channels with non-specific TRPM7 blocker 2-APB or synthetic siRNA targeting TRPM7 attenuated TGF-β1-induced expression of myofibroblast markers, as measured by the induction of α-SMA and Col1α1. Silencing TRPM7 also increased the ratio of MMPs/TIMPs by increasing MMP-13 expression and decreasing TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels. Strikingly, phosphorylation of p-Smad2 and p-Smad3, associated with collagen production, was decreased in TRPM7 deficient HSC-T6 cells. These observations suggested that TGF-β1 elevates TRPM7 expression in HSCs via Smad3-dependant mechanisms, which in turn contributes Smad protein phosphorylation, and subsequently increases fibrous collagen expression. Therefore, TRPM7 may constitute a useful target for the treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • Upregulation of TRPM7 protein in human fibrotic livers • Upregulation of TRPM7 by TGF-β1 elicited Smad signaling in HSC-T6 cells

  15. Optimal Control and Coordination of Connected and Automated Vehicles at Urban Traffic Intersections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yue J.; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Cassandras, Christos G.

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of coordinating online a continuous flow of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) crossing two adjacent intersections in an urban area. We present a decentralized optimal control framework whose solution yields for each vehicle the optimal acceleration/deceleration at any time in the sense of minimizing fuel consumption. The solu- tion, when it exists, allows the vehicles to cross the intersections without the use of traffic lights, without creating congestion on the connecting road, and under the hard safety constraint of collision avoidance. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation considering two intersections located in downtown Boston, and it is shown that coordination of CAVs can reduce significantly both fuel consumption and travel time.

  16. ASC Tri-lab Co-design Level 2 Milestone Report 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornung, Rich; Jones, Holger; Keasler, Jeff; Neely, Rob; Pearce, Olga; Hammond, Si; Trott, Christian; Lin, Paul; Vaughan, Courtenay; Cook, Jeanine; Hoekstra, Rob; Bergen, Ben; Payne, Josh; Womeldorff, Geoff

    2015-09-23

    In 2015, the three Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories that make up the Advanced Sci- enti c Computing (ASC) Program (Sandia, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos) collaboratively explored performance portability programming environments in the context of several ASC co-design proxy applica- tions as part of a tri-lab L2 milestone executed by the co-design teams at each laboratory. The programming environments that were studied included Kokkos (developed at Sandia), RAJA (LLNL), and Legion (Stan- ford University). The proxy apps studied included: miniAero, LULESH, CoMD, Kripke, and SNAP. These programming models and proxy-apps are described herein. Each lab focused on a particular combination of abstractions and proxy apps, with the goal of assessing performance portability using those. Performance portability was determined by: a) the ability to run a single application source code on multiple advanced architectures, b) comparing runtime performance between \

  17. Low-temperature Mechanical Properties of Fe-0.06C-18Cr-10Ni-0.4Ti Austenitic Steel Determined Using Ring-Pull Tensile Tests and Microhardness Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neustroev, V. S.; Boev, E. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-08-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels removed from Russian water-cooled VVERs experience irradiation temperatures and He/dpa conditions that are very similar to steels to be used in ITER. Data are presented on the radiation hardening of the Russian analog of AISI 321 at 0.2 to 15 dpa in the range of 285 to 320??. The Russian variant of the ring-pull tensile test was used to obtain mechanical prop-erty data. Microhardness tests on the ring specimens provide useful information throughout the deformed regions, but at high hardening levels caution must be exercised before application of a widely accepted hardness-yield stress correla-tion to prediction of tensile properties. Low-nickel austenitic steels are very prone to form deformation martensite, a phase that increases strongly with the larger deformation levels characteristic of microhardness tests, especially when compared to the 0.2% deformation used to define yield stress.

  18. Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties Of Fe-0.06c-18cr-10ni-0.4ti Austenitic Steel Determined Using Ring-Pull Tensile Tests And Microhardness Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neustroev, V. S.; Boev, E. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-03-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels removed from Russian water-cooled VVERs experience irradia-tion temperatures and He/dpa conditions that are very similar to steels to be used in ITER. Data are presented on the radiation hardening of the Russian analog of AISI 321 at 0.2 to 15 dpa in the range of 285 to 320??. The Russian variant of the ring-pull tensile test was used to obtain mechanical prop-erty data. Microhardness tests on the ring specimens provide useful information throughout the de-formed regions, but at high hardening levels caution must be exercised before application of a widely accepted hardness-yield stress correlation to prediction of tensile properties. Low-nickel austenitic steels are very prone to form deformation martensite, a phase that increases strongly with the larger deformation levels characteristic of microhardness tests, especially when compared to the 0.2% de-formation used to define yield stress.

  19. P U S T O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ."<"! . , . A , * 4 04 04 b ' s- . r EYNOLD; riI,ECTRRCC& l, ENGINEERING CO., INC. P U S T O r - F I L E O O X 1 4 4 0 0 L A S V C G A S . N E V A D A 0 4 1 i 4 l~lr, D, TJ. Ileazdri clca , Dis-ecf;or Radiolo@.cnl 0por;ltinng Divio5.aiz U . S . Atonric Ekier&y Co!lxni.ssion % Nevada Opcxna-tions Office Post Office Box 14 100 La9 Vegaa , I\Jevada 6'91 14 Attention: M r . It, J, ' W 1 . l i t m . n mC)3ECT SHOAL CWLQTJP SURVEY K!FC;i'F. Dear M r . Hendricka: Attached is the

  20. Experimental Evaluation of the Free Piston Engine - Linear Alternator (FPLA).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leick, Michael T.; Moses, Ronald W.

    2015-03-01

    This report describes the experimental evaluation of a prototype free piston engine - linear alternator (FPLA) system developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The opposed piston design wa developed to investigate its potential for use in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). The system is mechanically simple with two - stroke uniflow scavenging for gas exchange and timed port fuel injection for fuel delivery, i.e. no complex valving. Electrical power is extracted from piston motion through linear alternators wh ich also provide a means for passive piston synchronization through electromagnetic coupling. In an HEV application, this electrical power would be used to charge the batteries. The engine - alternator system was designed, assembled and operated over a 2 - year period at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. This report primarily contains a description of the as - built system, modifications to the system to enable better performance, and experimental results from start - up, motoring, and hydrogen combus tion tests.

  1. Java Parallel Secure Stream for Grid Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jie; Akers, Walter; Chen, Ying; Watson, William

    2001-09-01

    The emergence of high speed wide area networks makes grid computing a reality. However grid applications that need reliable data transfer still have difficulties to achieve optimal TCP performance due to network tuning of TCP window size to improve the bandwidth and to reduce latency on a high speed wide area network. This paper presents a pure Java package called JPARSS (Java Par-allel Secure Stream) that divides data into partitions that are sent over several parallel Java streams simultaneously and allows Java or Web applications to achieve optimal TCP performance in a gird environment without the necessity of tuning the TCP window size. Several experimental results are provided to show that using parallel stream is more effective than tuning TCP window size. In addi-tion X.509 certificate based single sign-on mechanism and SSL based connection establishment are integrated into this package. Finally a few applications using this package will be discussed.

  2. Print

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    GFDL GCM Model Output with ARM CMBE Dataset: A First Look Jean-Christophe Golaz, UCAR VSP, GFDL Leo J. Donner and V. Ramaswamy, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ U . S . D E P A R T M E NT O F C O M M E R C E N A TION A L O C E A N I C A N D A T MO S P H E R I C A D M I N I S T R ATIO N What is CMBE? - CMBE (Climate Modeling Best Estimate) is a new ARM dataset specifically designed to evaluate climate models against ARM observations. - CMBE contains best estimates of selected

  3. Evaluating System Parameters on a Dragonfly using Simulation and Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatele, Abhinav; Jain, Nikhil; Livnat, Yarden; Pascucci, Valerio; Bremer, Peer-Timo

    2015-04-24

    The dragon y topology is becoming a popular choice for build- ing high-radix, low-diameter networks with high-bandwidth links. Even with a powerful network, preliminary experi- ments on Edison at NERSC have shown that for communica- tion heavy applications, job interference and thus presumably job placement remains an important factor. In this paper, we explore the e ects of job placement, job sizes, parallel workloads and network con gurations on network through- put to better understand inter-job interference. We use a simulation tool called Damsel y to model the network be- havior of Edison and study the impact of various system parameters on network throughput. Parallel workloads based on ve representative communication patters are used and the simulation studies on up to 131,072 cores are aided by a new visualization of the dragon y network.

  4. In Silico Identification Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangas, Lars J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Isaac, Georgis; Schrom, Brian T.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Wang, Luning; Tan, Li; Lewis, Robert R.; Miller, John H.

    2012-05-15

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has gained importance in the life sciences, yet it is not supported by software tools for high throughput identification of metabolites based on their fragmentation spectra. An algorithm (ISIS: in silico identification software) and its implementation are presented and show great promise in generating in silico spectra of lipids for the purpose of structural identification. Instead of using chemical reaction rate equations or rules-based fragmentation libraries, the algorithm uses machine learning to find accurate bond cleavage rates in a mass spectrometer employing collision-induced dissocia-tion tandem mass spectrometry. A preliminary test of the algorithm with 45 lipids from a subset of lipid classes shows both high sensitivity and specificity.

  5. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, Miquela S.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Vangoethem, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  6. FNCS: A Framework for Power System and Communication Networks Co-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Fuller, Jason C.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Agarwal, Khushbu

    2014-04-13

    This paper describes the Fenix framework that uses a federated approach for integrating power grid and communication network simulators. Compared existing approaches, Fenix al- lows co-simulation of both transmission and distribution level power grid simulators with the communication network sim- ulator. To reduce the performance overhead of time synchro- nization, Fenix utilizes optimistic synchronization strategies that make speculative decisions about when the simulators are going to exchange messages. GridLAB-D (a distribution simulator), PowerFlow (a transmission simulator), and ns-3 (a telecommunication simulator) are integrated with the frame- work and are used to illustrate the enhanced performance pro- vided by speculative multi-threading on a smart grid applica- tion. Our speculative multi-threading approach achieved on average 20% improvement over the existing synchronization methods

  7. Software-defined Quantum Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humble, Travis S; Sadlier, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Quantum communication systems harness modern physics through state-of-the-art optical engineering to provide revolutionary capabilities. An important concern for quantum communication engineering is designing and prototyping these systems to prototype proposed capabilities. We apply the paradigm of software-defined communica- tion for engineering quantum communication systems to facilitate rapid prototyping and prototype comparisons. We detail how to decompose quantum communication terminals into functional layers defining hardware, software, and middleware concerns, and we describe how each layer behaves. Using the super-dense coding protocol as a test case, we describe implementations of both the transmitter and receiver, and we present results from numerical simulations of the behavior. We find that while the theoretical benefits of super dense coding are maintained, there is a classical overhead associated with the full implementation.

  8. Microsoft Word - Panel 5 Disposal Operations Complete.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    th re s c th W se lo o s e U.S. D Carls Waste P.O. B Carls CARL hat disposa epository ar hipment wa "All T redit for this heir dedicat Waste Mana The W even dispo ong and can f the 6.2 m igned in 19 With d quivalent o Department bad Field Of e Isolation P Box 3090 bad, New M DOE in P LSBAD, N.M al operation re complete as emplace RU waste m s accomplis tion to perfo agement Pr WIPP unde sal rooms. n hold appr illion cubic 992, has be disposal op of about fou of Energy ffice Pilot Plant

  9. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulated Siding Retrofit in a Cold Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the U.S. Department of Energy’s team Building America Partner¬ship for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC) worked with Kinsley Construction Company to evaluate the real-world performance of insulated sid¬ing when applied to an existing home. A 1960s home was selected for analysis. It is located in a cold climate (zone 6) where the addition of insulated siding and a carefully detailed water-resistive barrier have the potential to offer significant benefits. In particular, the team quantified building airtightness and heating energy use as a function of outdoor temperatures before and after the installa¬tion of the insulated siding.

  11. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  12. DOE

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    DOE /E/A- 0202( 83//Q J Sh or t-T er m En er gy O ut lo ok a to m Quar terly Proje ction s Febru ary 1983 Ene rgy Info rma tion Adm inist ratio n Was hing ton, D.C. t rt jrt .or t lor t lor t .lor t- ior t- ior t <.o rt ort . m .er m -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -T erm -T erm -T erm Nrm ue rgy En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En

  13. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse December 2010

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 lANsCe-Ns hosts NNsA ACADemiC AlliANCe CeNter oF exCelleNCe leADer 4 Workshop oN isotope hArvestiNg At the FACility For rAre isotope BeAms iN situ ChArACterizA- tioN oF multiphAse polymeriC mAteriAls upoN DeFormAtioN 5 NeutroN sCAtteriNg reveAls the AtomiC motioN iN A NeW ClAss oF CerAmiC- metAl mAteriAls

  14. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse November 2009

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 Vogel receiVes lANsce Director's excelleNce AwArD 2 AccelerAtor struc- ture DeVelopmeNt AND thiN coAtiNg oN Niobium sAmples 3 NANogrAiNs DemoN- strAte extrAorDiNAry thermAl stAbility 3 competitiVe ADsorp- tioN of luNg surfAc- tANt AND AlbumiN 4 heADs up! For more than 15 years, Yusheng Zhao has been on a scientifc journey

  15. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse November 2010

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    10 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Alex's Desk 3 First beAm tests with the time Projection chAmber 4 Discovery oF new Phys- ics in leAD-zirconium- titAnium voltAge bArs 5 los AlAmos lenDs its exPertise to cleAn energy AnD cArbon sequestrAtion Projects 6 electric-FielD moDiFicA- tion oF mAgnetism in A thin Film 7 Aot & lAnsce Division stAFF AwArDeD

  16. A Reduced Order Model of Force Displacement Curves for the Failure of Mechanical Bolts in Tension.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Keegan J.; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2015-12-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry causes issues when generating a mesh of the model. This report will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  17. Tenascin-W inhibits proliferation and differentiation of preosteoblasts during endochondral bone formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Akiyama, Haruhiko . E-mail: hakiyama@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Nakamura, Takashi; Crombrugghe, Benoit de

    2007-05-18

    We identified a cDNA encoding mouse Tenascin-W (TN-W) upregulated by bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp)2 in ATDC5 osteo-chondroprogenitors. In adult mice, TN-W was markedly expressed in bone. In mouse embryos, during endochondral bone formation TN-W was localized in perichondrium/periosteum, but not in trabecular and cortical bones. During bone fracture repair, cells in the newly formed perichondrium/periosteum surrounding the cartilaginous callus expressed TN-W. Furthermore, TN-W was detectable in perichondrium/periosteum of Runx2-null and Osterix-null embryos, indicating that TN-W is expressed in preosteoblasts. In CFU-F and -O cells, TN-W had no effect on initiation of osteogenesis of bone marrow cells, and in MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells TN-W inhibited cell proliferation and Col1a1 expression. In addition, TN-W suppressed canonical Wnt signaling which stimulates osteoblastic differentiation. Our results indicate that TN-W is a novel marker of preosteoblasts in early stage of osteogenesis, and that TN-W inhibits cell proliferation and differentiation of preosteoblasts mediated by canonical Wnt signaling.

  18. Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Hicks

    2011-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

  19. Effects of matrix shrinkage and swelling on the economics of enhanced-coalbed-methane production and CO{sub 2} sequestration in coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorucu, F.B.; Jikich, S.A.; Bromhal, G.S.; Sams, W.N.; Ertekin, T.; Smith, D.H.

    2007-08-15

    In this work, the Palmer-Mansoori model for coal shrinkage and permeability increases during primary methane production was rewritten to also account for coal swelling caused by CO{sub 2} sorption. The generalized model was added to a compositional, dual porosity coalbed-methane reservoir simulator for primary (CBM) and ECBM production. A standard five-spot of vertical wells and representative coal properties for Appalachian coals was used. Simulations and sensitivity analyses were performed with the modified simulator for nine different parameters, including coal seam and operational parameters and economic criteria. The coal properties and operating parameters that were varied included Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, cleat porosity, and injection pressure. The economic variables included CH{sub 4}, price, Col Cost, CO{sub 2} credit, water disposal cost, and interest rate. Net-present value (NPV) analyses of the simulation results included profits resulting from CH{sub 4}, production and potential incentives for sequestered CO{sub 2}, This work shows that for some coal seams, the combination of compressibility, cleat porosity, and shrinkage/swelling of the coal may have a significant impact on project economics.

  20. FEA Simulations of Magnets with Grain Oriented Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte H.

    2012-08-06

    One of the potential successors of the Large Hadron Collider is a Muon Col- lider. Muons are short-lived particles, which therefore require fast acceleration. One potential avenue is a very fast cycling cyclotron, where the bending is sup- plied by a combination of fixed-field superconducting magnets and fast ramping normal conducting iron-cored coils. Due to the high ramping rate (around 1 kHz) eddy current and hysteresis losses are a concern. One way to overcome these is by using grain-oriented soft-iron, which promises superior magnetic properties in the direction of the grains. This note summarizes efforts to include the anisotropic material properties of grain-oriented steel in finite element analysis to predict the behaviour of the dipole magnets for this accelerator. It was found that including anisotropic material properties has a detrimental effect on model convergence. During this study it was not possible to include grain oriented steel with an accuracy necessary to study the field quality of a dipole magnet.

  1. Evolution of the surface area of a snow layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanot, L.; Domine, F.

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric trace gases can partition between the atmosphere and the snow surface. Because snow has a large surface-to-volume ratio, an important interaction potential between ice and atmospheric trace gases exists. Quantifying this partitioning requires the knowledge of the surface area (SA) of snow. Eleven samples were taken from a 50 cm thick snow fall at Col de Porte, near Grenoble (French Alps) between January 20 and February 4, 1998. Fresh snow and 3, 8, and 15-day-old snow were sampled at three different depths. Surface hoar, formed after the fall, was also sampled. Air and surface snow temperature, snow density, and snow fall rate were measured. Snow temperature always remained below freezing. Snow SA was measured using methane adsorption at 77.15 K. Values ranged from 2.25 m{sup 2}/g for fresh snow to 0.25 m{sup 2}/g for surface hoar and surface snow after 15 days. These values are much too high to be explained by the macroscopic aspect of snow crystals, and microstructures such as small rime droplets must have been present. Large decrease in SA with time were observed. The first meter of snowpack had a total surface area of about 50,000 m{sup 2} per m{sup 2} of ground. Reduction in SA will lead to the emission of adsorbed species by the snowpack, with possible considerable increase in atmospheric concentrations.

  2. Localization to Xq22 and clinical update of a family with X-linked recessive mental retardation with progression sensorineural deafness, progressive tapeto-retinal degeneration and dystonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tranebjaerg, L.; Schwartz, C.; Huggins, K.; Barker, D.; Stevenson, R.; Arena, J.F.; Gedde-Dahl, T.; Mikkelsen, M.; Mellgren, S.; Anderson, K. ||||

    1994-07-15

    In a reinvestigation of a six-generation Norwegian family, originally reported with non-syndromic X-linked recessive deafness by Mohr and Mageroy, we have demonstrated several syndromic manifestations. The 10 clinically characterized affected males range in age from 14-61 years, and show progressive mental deterioration and visual disability. Ophthalmological and electrophysiological studies showed myopia, decreased visual acuity, combined cone-rod dystrophy as well as central areolar dystrophy by means of ERG. Brain CT-scans showed cortical and central atrophy without predilection to specific areas. Linkage analysis, using X-chromosomal RFLPs and CA-repeats, yielded a maximum LOD score of 4.37 with linkage to DXS17. DXS17 is localized to Xq22. One recombinant with COL4A5 (deficient in Alport syndrome) was observed. Results from the studies of this family will be important in reclassification of non-syndromic X-linked deafness since the family now represents syndromic deafness and XLMR with a specific phenotype.

  3. EIS No. 20100312 EIS Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, David J

    2010-08-01

    In accordance with Section 309(a) of the Clean Air Act, EPA is required to make its comments on EISs issued by other Federal agencies public. Historically, EPA has met this mandate by publishing weekly notices of availability of EPA comments, which includes a brief summary of EPA's comment letters, in the Federal Register. Since February 2008, EPA has been including its comment letters on EISs on its Web site at: http://www.epa.gov/compliance/nepa/eisdata.html. Including the entire EIS comment letters on the Web site satisfies the Section 309(a) requirement to make EPA's comments on EISs available to the public. Accordingly, on March 31, 2010, EPA discontinued the publication of the notice of availability of EPA comments in the Federal Register. EIS No. 20100312, Draft EIS, NRC, TX, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4, Application for Combined Licenses (COLs) for Construction Permits and Operating Licenses, (NUREG-1943), Hood and Somervell Counties, TX, Comment Period Ends: 10/26/2010.

  4. Impaired osteoblast differentiation in Annexin A2- and -A5-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genetos, Damian C.; Wong, Alice; Weber, Thomas J.; Karin, Norman J.; Yellowley, Clare E.

    2014-09-15

    Annexins are a class of calcium-binding proteins with diverse functions in the regulation of lipid rafts inflammation,fibrinolysis, transcriptional programming and ion transport. Within bone, they are well-characterized as components of mineralizing matrix vesicles, although little else is known as to their function during osteogenesis. We generated annexin A2 (AnxA2)- or annexin A5 (AnxA5)-knockdown pre-osteoblasts, and asked whether proliferation or osteogenic differentiation was altered in knockdown cells, compared to vector controls. We report that DNA content, a marker of proliferation, was significantly reduced in both AnxA2 and AnxA5 knockdown cells. Alkaline phosphatase expression and staining activity were also suppressed in AnxA2- or AnxA5-knockdown after 14 days of culture. The pattern of osteogenic gene expression was altered in knockdown cells, with Col1a1 expressed more rapidly in knock-down cells, compared to controls. In contrast, Runx2, Ibsp, and Bglap all revealed decreased expression after 14 days of culture. Using a murine fracture model, we demonstrate that AnxA2 and AnxA5 are rapidly expressed within the fracture callus. These data demonstrate that AnxA2 and AnxA5 can influence bone formation via regulation of osteoprogenitor proliferation and differentiation in addition to their well-studied function in matrix vesicles.

  5. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8: Solar Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 State Electric Power Residential a Commercial b Industrial b Electric Power Total Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu Alabama 0 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 Alaska 0 (s) 0.0 0.0 0.0 (s) Arizona 3,118 17.0 0.2 0.0 29.7 46.9 Arkansas 0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 California 9,834 85.8 0.9 (s) 93.5 180.3 Colorado 241 5.2 0.1 0.0 2.3 7.6 Connecticut 12 3.6 0.0 0.0 0.1 3.7 Delaware 48 0.7 (s) 0.0 0.5 1.2 Dist. of Col. 0 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 Florida 240 49.3 (s) 0.0 2.3 51.6

  6. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2014 State Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total b Thousand Cords Trillion Btu Alabama 384 7.7 0.9 150.8 5.0 164.4 Alaska 123 2.5 0.8 0.2 0.0 3.5 Arizona 165 3.3 0.4 0.2 3.6 7.4 Arkansas 551 11.0 1.3 68.7 2.6 83.7 California 2,145 42.9 17.1 24.2 78.2 162.5 Colorado 536 10.7 1.3 0.2 1.8 14.0 Connecticut 339 6.8 1.5 2.4 13.1 23.8 Delaware 75 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.7 2.5 Dist. of Col. 1 (s) (s) 0.0 0.0 (s)

  7. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    F29: Wind Energy Consumption Estimates, 2014 State Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu Alabama 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Alaska 0 0 152 152 0.0 0.0 1.4 1.4 Arizona 0 0 468 468 0.0 0.0 4.5 4.5 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 California 3 2 12,988 12,992 (s) (s) 123.5 123.6 Colorado (s) 3 7,365 7,369 (s) (s) 70.0 70.1 Connecticut 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Delaware 5 0 0 5 (s) 0.0 0.0 (s) Dist. of Col. 0 0 0 0 0.0 0.0

  8. Observation of isoprene hydroxynitrates in the southeastern United States and implications for the fate of NOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, F.; McAvey, Kevin; Pratt, Kerri A.; Groff, C. J.; Hostetler, M. A.; Lipton, M. A.; Starn, T. K.; Seeley, J. V.; Bertman, Steven; Teng, A. P.; Crounse, J. D.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Wennberg, P. O.; Misztal, Pawel K.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Koss, A.; Olson, K. F.; de Gouw, J. A.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Feiner, P. A.; Zhang, L.; Miller, D. O.; Brune, W. H.; Shepson, Paul B.

    2015-10-09

    Isoprene hydroxynitrates (IN) are tracers of the photochemical oxidation of isoprene in high NOx environ-ments. Production and loss of IN have a significant influ-ence on the NOx cycle and tropospheric O3 chemistry. To better understand IN chemistry, a series of photochemical re-action chamber experiments was conducted to determine the IN yield from isoprene photooxidation at high NO concentra-tions (> 100 ppt). By combining experimental data and cal-culated isomer distributions, a total IN yield of 9(+4/-3) %was derived. The result was applied in a zero-dimensional model to simulate production and loss of ambient IN ob-served in a temperate forest atmosphere, during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) field campaign, from 27 May to 11 July 2013. The 9 % yield was consistent with the observed IN/(MVK+MACR) ratios observed during SOAS. By comparing field observations with model simulations, we identified NO as the limiting factor for ambient IN produc-tion during SOAS, but vertical mixing at dawn might also contribute (~ 27 %) to IN dynamics. A close examination of isoprene’s oxidation products indicates that its oxidation transitioned from a high-NO dominant chemical regime in the morning into a low-NO dominant regime in the after-noon. A significant amount of IN produced in the morning high NO regime could be oxidized in the low NO regime, and a possible reaction scheme was proposed.

  9. Methodology for Preliminary Design of Electrical Microgrids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Richard P.; Stamp, Jason E.; Eddy, John P.; Henry, Jordan M; Munoz-Ramos, Karina; Abdallah, Tarek

    2015-09-30

    Many critical loads rely on simple backup generation to provide electricity in the event of a power outage. An Energy Surety Microgrid TM can protect against outages caused by single generator failures to improve reliability. An ESM will also provide a host of other benefits, including integration of renewable energy, fuel optimization, and maximizing the value of energy storage. The ESM concept includes a categorization for microgrid value proposi- tions, and quantifies how the investment can be justified during either grid-connected or utility outage conditions. In contrast with many approaches, the ESM approach explic- itly sets requirements based on unlikely extreme conditions, including the need to protect against determined cyber adversaries. During the United States (US) Department of Defense (DOD)/Department of Energy (DOE) Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) effort, the ESM methodology was successfully used to develop the preliminary designs, which direct supported the contracting, construction, and testing for three military bases. Acknowledgements Sandia National Laboratories and the SPIDERS technical team would like to acknowledge the following for help in the project: * Mike Hightower, who has been the key driving force for Energy Surety Microgrids * Juan Torres and Abbas Akhil, who developed the concept of microgrids for military installations * Merrill Smith, U.S. Department of Energy SPIDERS Program Manager * Ross Roley and Rich Trundy from U.S. Pacific Command * Bill Waugaman and Bill Beary from U.S. Northern Command * Melanie Johnson and Harold Sanborn of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Construc- tion Engineering Research Laboratory * Experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  10. Final Report: Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghattas, Omar

    2013-10-15

    The SAGUARO (Scalable Algorithms for Groundwater Uncertainty Analysis and Robust Optimiza- tion) Project focuses on the development of scalable numerical algorithms for large-scale Bayesian inversion in complex systems that capitalize on advances in large-scale simulation-based optimiza- tion and inversion methods. Our research is directed in three complementary areas: efficient approximations of the Hessian operator, reductions in complexity of forward simulations via stochastic spectral approximations and model reduction, and employing large-scale optimization concepts to accelerate sampling. Our efforts are integrated in the context of a challenging testbed problem that considers subsurface reacting flow and transport. The MIT component of the SAGUARO Project addresses the intractability of conventional sampling methods for large-scale statistical inverse problems by devising reduced-order models that are faithful to the full-order model over a wide range of parameter values; sampling then employs the reduced model rather than the full model, resulting in very large computational savings. Results indicate little effect on the computed posterior distribution. On the other hand, in the Texas-Georgia Tech component of the project, we retain the full-order model, but exploit inverse problem structure (adjoint-based gradients and partial Hessian information of the parameter-to- observation map) to implicitly extract lower dimensional information on the posterior distribution; this greatly speeds up sampling methods, so that fewer sampling points are needed. We can think of these two approaches as "reduce then sample" and "sample then reduce." In fact, these two approaches are complementary, and can be used in conjunction with each other. Moreover, they both exploit deterministic inverse problem structure, in the form of adjoint-based gradient and Hessian information of the underlying parameter-to-observation map, to achieve their speedups.

  11. Study of new states in visible light active W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajjad, Ahmed Khan Leghari; Shamaila, Sajjad; Zhang, Jinlong

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel. ? Oxygen vacancies are detected in the form of new linkages as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. ? W, N co-doped titania has new energy states which narrows the band gap effectively. ? Oxygen vacancies are proved to be the cause for high photo catalytic activity. ? W and N co-doping plays the major role to make the composite thermally stable. -- Abstract: The visible light efficient W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} photo catalysts are prepared by solgel method. New linkages of N, W and O are formed as N-Ti-O, N-W-O, Ti-O-N and W-O-N. Electron paramagnetic resonance illustrates the presence of oxygen vacancies in W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} acting as trapping agencies for electrons to produce active species. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of new energy states. New linkages and oxygen vacancies are proved to be the main cause for the improved photo catalytic performances. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} has new energy states which narrow the band gap effectively. W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} is thermally stable and retains its anatase phase up to 900 C. 4.5% W, N co-doped TiO{sub 2} showed superior activity for the degradation of Rhodamine B and 2,4-dichlorophenol as compared to pure titania, Degussa P-25, traditional N-doped TiO{sub 2} and pure WO{sub 3}.

  12. NSRD-06. Computational Capability to Substantiate DOE-HDBK-3010 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, David L.Y.; Brown, Alexander L.

    2015-12-01

    Safety basis analysts throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex rely heavily on the information provided in the DOE Hand book, DOE-HDBK-3010, Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Resp irable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities , to determine source terms. In calcula ting source terms, analysts tend to use the DOE Handbook's bounding values on airbor ne release fractions (ARFs) and respirable fractions (RFs) for various cat egories of insults (representing potential accident release categories). This is typica lly due to both time constraints and the avoidance of regulatory critique. Unfort unately, these bounding ARFs/RFs represent extremely conservative values. Moreover, th ey were derived from very limited small- scale table-top and bench/labo ratory experiments and/or fr om engineered judgment. Thus the basis for the data may not be re presentative to the actual unique accident conditions and configura tions being evaluated. The goal of this res earch is to develop a more ac curate method to identify bounding values for the DOE Handbook using the st ate-of-art multi-physics-based high performance computer codes. This enable s us to better understand the fundamental physics and phenomena associated with the ty pes of accidents for the data described in it. This research has examined two of the DOE Handbook's liquid fire experiments to substantiate the airborne release frac tion data. We found th at additional physical phenomena (i.e., resuspension) need to be included to derive bounding values. For the specific cases of solid powder under pre ssurized condition and mechanical insult conditions the codes demonstrated that we can simulate the phenomena. This work thus provides a low-cost method to establis h physics-justified sa fety bounds by taking into account specific geometri es and conditions that may not have been previously measured and/or are too costly to do so.

  13. Accommodation of GDP-Linked Sugars in the Active Site of GDP-Perosamine Synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Paul D.; Carney, Amanda E.; Holden, Hazel M.

    2009-01-12

    Perosamine (4-amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-mannose), or its N-acetylated form, is one of several dideoxy sugars found in the O-antigens of such infamous Gram-negative bacteria as Vibrio cholerae O1 and Escherichia coli O157:H7. It is added to the bacterial O-antigen via a nucleotide-linked version, namely GDP-perosamine. Three enzymes are required for the biosynthesis of GDP-perosamine starting from mannose 1-phosphate. The focus of this investigation is GDP-perosamine synthase from Caulobacter crescentus, which catalyzes the final step in GDP-perosamine synthesis, the conversion of GDP-4-keto-6-deoxymannose to GDP-perosamine. The enzyme is PLP-dependent and belongs to the aspartate aminotransferase superfamily. It contains the typically conserved active site lysine residue, which forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor. Two crystal structures were determined for this investigation: a site-directed mutant protein (K186A) complexed with GDP-perosamine and the wild-type enzyme complexed with an unnatural ligand, GDP-3-deoxyperosamine. These structures, determined to 1.6 and 1.7 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, revealed the manner in which products, and presumably substrates, are accommodated within the active site pocket of GDP-perosamine synthase. Additional kinetic analyses using both the natural and unnatural substrates revealed that the K{sub m} for the unnatural substrate was unperturbed relative to that of the natural substrate, but the k{sub cat} was lowered by a factor of approximately 200. Taken together, these studies shed light on why GDP-perosamine synthase functions as an aminotransferase whereas another very similar PLP-dependent enzyme, GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose 3-dehydratase or ColD, catalyzes a dehydration reaction using the same substrate.

  14. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Gang; Department of Pathology, Tianjin Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin ; Chen, Jiawei; Deng, Yanqiu; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong; Zhao, Zheng

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. {yields} NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. {yields} Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. {yields} Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. {yields} Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  15. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. - Highlights: • Recycled fin explants outgrow cells bearing stable mesenchymal traits. • Cell production and quality is enhanced in the recycled explant culture system. • Fresh fin primary culture is highly variable and loose epithelial traits over time.

  16. Salinomycin sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells by increasing apoptosis via the prevention of G2 arrest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Yoo, Hye-In; Kang, Han Sung; Ro, Jungsil; Yoon, Sungpil

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes antimitotic drugs-treated cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal sensitizes them by prevention of G2 arrest and reduced cyclin D1 levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sal also sensitizes them by increasing DNA damage and reducing p21 level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low concentration of Sal effectively sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. -- Abstract: Here, we investigated whether Sal could sensitize cancer cells to antimitotic drugs. We demonstrated that Sal sensitized paclitaxcel (PAC)-, docetaxcel (DOC)-, vinblastin (VIN)-, or colchicine (COL)-treated cancer cell lines, suggesting that Sal has the ability to sensitize the cells to any form of microtubule-targeting drugs. Sensitization to the antimitotic drugs could be achieved with very low concentrations of Sal, suggesting that there is a possibility to minimize Sal toxicity associated with human cancer patient treatments. Sensitization by Sal increased apoptosis, which was observed by C-PARP production. Sal sensitized the cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by preventing G2 arrest, suggesting that Sal contributes to the induction of mitotic catastrophe. Sal generally reduced cyclin D1 levels in PAC-, DOC-, and VIN-treated cells. In addition, Sal treatment increased pH2AX levels and reduced p21 levels in antimitotic drugs-treated cells. These observations suggest that the mechanisms underlying Sal sensitization to DNA-damaging compounds, radiation, and microtubule-targeting drugs are similar. Our data demonstrated that Sal sensitizes cancer cells to antimitotic drugs by increasing apoptosis through the prevention of G2 arrest via conserved Sal-sensitization mechanisms. These results may contribute to the development of Sal-based chemotherapy for cancer patients treated with antimitotic drugs.

  17. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  18. Synthesis and Reactivity of Tripodal Complexes Containing Pendant Bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blacquiere, Johanna M.; Pegis, Michael L.; Raugei, Simone; Kaminsky, Werner; Forget, Amelie; Cook, Sarah; Taguchi, Taketo; Borovik, Andrew S.; Mayer, James M.

    2014-09-02

    The synthesis of a new tripodal ligand family is reported, with tertiary-amine groups in the second-coordination sphere. The ligands are tris(amido)amine derivatives, with the pendant amines attached via a peptide coupling strategy. They were designed to be used in new catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), in which the pendant acid/base group could improve catalyst performance. Two members of the new ligand family were each metallated with Co(II) and Zn(II) to afford trigonal monopyramidal complexes. Reaction of the cobalt complexes, [Co(L)]-, with dioxygen reversibly generates a small amount of a Co(III)-superoxo species, which was characterized by EPR. Protonation of the zinc complex Zn[N{CH2CH2NC(O)CH2N(CH2Ph)2}3)-– ([Zn(TNBn)]-) with one equivalent of acid occurs with displacement and dissociation of an amide ligand. Addition of excess acid to the any of the complexes [M(L)]- results in complete proteolysis and formation of the ligands H3L. This decomposition limits the use of these complexes as catalysts for the ORR. An alternative ligand with two pyridyl arms was also prepared but could not be metallated. These studies highlight the importance of stability of the primary-coordination sphere of ORR electrocatalysts to both oxidative and acidic conditions. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  19. Efficient Aho-Corasick String Matching on Emerging Multicore Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste; Secchi, Simone; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel

    2013-12-12

    String matching algorithms are critical to several scientific fields. Beside text processing and databases, emerging applications such as DNA protein sequence analysis, data mining, information security software, antivirus, ma- chine learning, all exploit string matching algorithms [3]. All these applica- tions usually process large quantity of textual data, require high performance and/or predictable execution times. Among all the string matching algorithms, one of the most studied, especially for text processing and security applica- tions, is the Aho-Corasick algorithm. 1 2 Book title goes here Aho-Corasick is an exact, multi-pattern string matching algorithm which performs the search in a time linearly proportional to the length of the input text independently from pattern set size. However, depending on the imple- mentation, when the number of patterns increase, the memory occupation may raise drastically. In turn, this can lead to significant variability in the performance, due to the memory access times and the caching effects. This is a significant concern for many mission critical applications and modern high performance architectures. For example, security applications such as Network Intrusion Detection Systems (NIDS), must be able to scan network traffic against very large dictionaries in real time. Modern Ethernet links reach up to 10 Gbps, and malicious threats are already well over 1 million, and expo- nentially growing [28]. When performing the search, a NIDS should not slow down the network, or let network packets pass unchecked. Nevertheless, on the current state-of-the-art cache based processors, there may be a large per- formance variability when dealing with big dictionaries and inputs that have different frequencies of matching patterns. In particular, when few patterns are matched and they are all in the cache, the procedure is fast. Instead, when they are not in the cache, often because many patterns are matched and the caches are

  20. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakage frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.

  1. A spectral analysis of the domain decomposed Monte Carlo method for linear systems

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Slattery, Stuart R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wilson, Paul P. H.

    2015-09-08

    The domain decomposed behavior of the adjoint Neumann-Ulam Monte Carlo method for solving linear systems is analyzed using the spectral properties of the linear oper- ator. Relationships for the average length of the adjoint random walks, a measure of convergence speed and serial performance, are made with respect to the eigenvalues of the linear operator. In addition, relationships for the effective optical thickness of a domain in the decomposition are presented based on the spectral analysis and diffusion theory. Using the effective optical thickness, the Wigner rational approxi- mation and the mean chord approximation are applied to estimate the leakagemore » frac- tion of random walks from a domain in the decomposition as a measure of parallel performance and potential communication costs. The one-speed, two-dimensional neutron diffusion equation is used as a model problem in numerical experiments to test the models for symmetric operators with spectral qualities similar to light water reactor problems. We find, in general, the derived approximations show good agreement with random walk lengths and leakage fractions computed by the numerical experiments.« less

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Molecular Response of Amine Bases in Organic Solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathmann, Shawn M.; Cho, Herman M.; Chang, Tsun-Mei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Parab, Kshitij K.; Autrey, Thomas

    2014-05-08

    Reorientational correlation times of various amine bases (viz., pyridine, 2,6-lutidene, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine) and organic solvents (dichloromethane, toluene) were determined by solution-state NMR relaxation time measurements and compared with predictions from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The bases and solvents are reagents in complex reactions involving Frustrated Lewis Pairs (FLP), which display remarkable catalytic activity in metal-free H2 scission. The comparison of measured and simulated correlation times is a key test of the ability of recent MD and quantum electronic structure calculations to elucidate the mechanism of FLP activity. Correla- tion times were found to be in the range 1.4-3.4 ps (NMR) and 1.23-5.28 ps (MD) for the amines, and 0.9-2.3 ps (NMR) and 0.2-1.7 ps (MD) for the solvent molecules. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacic Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  3. A New 2D-Transport, 1D-Diffusion Approximation of the Boltzmann Transport equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The work performed in this project consisted of the derivation, implementation, and testing of a new, computationally advantageous approximation to the 3D Boltz- mann transport equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation is the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores and shields, but solving this equation is difficult and costly. The new “2D/1D” approximation takes advantage of a special geometric feature of typical 3D reactors to approximate the neutron transport physics in a specific (ax- ial) direction, but not in the other two (radial) directions. The resulting equation is much less expensive to solve computationally, and its solutions are expected to be sufficiently accurate for many practical problems. In this project we formulated the new equation, discretized it using standard methods, developed a stable itera- tion scheme for solving the equation, implemented the new numerical scheme in the MPACT code, and tested the method on several realistic problems. All the hoped- for features of this new approximation were seen. For large, difficult problems, the resulting 2D/1D solution is highly accurate, and is calculated about 100 times faster than a 3D discrete ordinates simulation.

  4. Stagnation region heat transfer augmentation at very high turbulence levels

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kingery, Joseph E.; Ames, Forrest E.

    2016-08-01

    Current land-based gas turbines are growing in size producing higher approach flow Reynolds numbers at the leading edge of turbine nozzles. These vanes are subjected to high intensity large scale turbulence. This present paper reports on the research which significantly expands the parameter range for stagnation region heat transfer augmenta-tion due to high intensity turbulence. Heat transfer measurements were acquired over two constant heat flux test surfaces with large diameter leading edges (10.16 cm and 40.64 cm). The test surfaces were placed downstream from a new high intensity (17.4%) mock combustor and tested over an eight to one range inmore » approach flow Reynolds number for each test surface. Stagnation region heat transfer augmentation for the smaller (ReD = 15,625–125,000) and larger (ReD = 62,500–500,000) leading edge regions ranged from 45% to 81% and 80% to 136%, respectively. Furthermore, these data also include heat transfer distributions over the full test surface compared with the earlier data acquired at six additional inlet turbulence conditions. These surfaces exhibit continued but more moderate acceleration downstream from the stagnation regions and these data are expected to be useful in testing bypass transition predictive approaches. This database will be useful to gas turbine heat transfer design engineers. [DOI: 10.1115/1.4032677]« less

  5. Arc-sprayed titanium anode for cathodic protection of reinforcing steel in coastal concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Collins, W.K.; Govier, R.D.; Wilson, Rick D.; McGill, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    Stable operation of cobalt (Co) catalyzed thermal-sprayed titanium anodes for cathodic protection (CP) of bridge reinforcing steel was maintained in accelerated tests for a period equivalent to 23 years service at Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) bridge CP conditions. The Co catalyst migrated into the concrete near the anode-concrete interface with electrochemical aging. The titanium anode had a porous heterogeneous structure composed of alpha -Ti containing interstitial O and N, and a fcc phase thought to be Ti(O,N). Splat cooling rates were estimated to be on the order of 10 to 150 K/s, well below those that would lead to rapid solidification. Composition gradients within individual splats resulted in alpha -Ti-rich and Ti(O,N)-rich regions having microstructures produced by equilibrium processes at the solidification front. Use of nitrogen during thermal spraying produced a coating with more uniform composition, less cracking and lower resistivity than using air atomization. Shrouding of the spray gun is recommended for further improvement of anode composition and structure when using nitrogen atomization.

  6. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W; Hodson, Stephen W; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  7. Microgrid cyber security reference architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veitch, Cynthia K.; Henry, Jordan M.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Hart, Derek H.

    2013-07-01

    This document describes a microgrid cyber security reference architecture. First, we present a high-level concept of operations for a microgrid, including operational modes, necessary power actors, and the communication protocols typically employed. We then describe our motivation for designing a secure microgrid; in particular, we provide general network and industrial control system (ICS)-speci c vulnerabilities, a threat model, information assurance compliance concerns, and design criteria for a microgrid control system network. Our design approach addresses these concerns by segmenting the microgrid control system network into enclaves, grouping enclaves into functional domains, and describing actor communication using data exchange attributes. We describe cyber actors that can help mitigate potential vulnerabilities, in addition to performance bene ts and vulnerability mitigation that may be realized using this reference architecture. To illustrate our design approach, we present a notional a microgrid control system network implementation, including types of communica- tion occurring on that network, example data exchange attributes for actors in the network, an example of how the network can be segmented to create enclaves and functional domains, and how cyber actors can be used to enforce network segmentation and provide the neces- sary level of security. Finally, we describe areas of focus for the further development of the reference architecture.

  8. Bayesian Inference for Time Trends in Parameter Values using Weighted Evidence Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Kelly; A. Malkhasyan

    2010-09-01

    There is a nearly ubiquitous assumption in PSA that parameter values are at least piecewise-constant in time. As a result, Bayesian inference tends to incorporate many years of plant operation, over which there have been significant changes in plant operational and maintenance practices, plant management, etc. These changes can cause significant changes in parameter values over time; however, failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework can mask these changes. Failure to question the assumption of constant parameter values, and failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework were noted as important issues in NUREG/CR-6813, performed for the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in 2003. That report noted that in-dustry lacks tools to perform time-trend analysis with Bayesian updating. This paper describes an applica-tion of time-dependent Bayesian inference methods developed for the European Commission Ageing PSA Network. These methods utilize open-source software, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The paper also illustrates an approach to incorporating multiple sources of data via applicability weighting factors that address differences in key influences, such as vendor, component boundaries, conditions of the operating environment, etc.

  9. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, R.D.

    1957-08-27

    A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

  10. FY2008 Report on GADRAS Radiation Transport Methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Harding, Lee; Varley, Eric S.; Hilton, Nathan R.

    2008-10-01

    The primary function of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) is the solution of inverse radiation transport problems, by which the con-figuration of an unknown radiation source is inferred from one or more measured radia-tion signatures. GADRAS was originally developed for the analysis of gamma spec-trometry measurements. During fiscal years 2007 and 2008, GADRAS was augmented to implement the simultaneous analysis of neutron multiplicity measurements. This report describes the radiation transport methods developed to implement this new capability. This work was performed at the direction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development. It was executed as an element of the Proliferation Detection Program's Simulation, Algorithm, and Modeling element. Acronyms BNL Brookhaven National Laboratory CSD Continuous Slowing-Down DU depleted uranium ENSDF Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data Files GADRAS Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software HEU highly enriched uranium LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory NA-22 Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NNDC National Nuclear Data Center NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration ODE ordinary differential equation ONEDANT One-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PARTISN Parallel time-dependent SN PDP Proliferation Detection Program RADSAT Radiation Scenario Analysis Toolkit RSICC Radiation Safety Information Computational Center SAM Simulation, Algorithms, and Modeling SNL Sandia National Laboratories SNM special nuclear material ToRI Table of Radioactive Isotopes URI uniform resource identifier XML Extensible Markup Language

  11. Rechargeable aluminum batteries with conducting polymers as positive electrodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudak, Nicholas S.

    2013-12-01

    This report is a summary of research results from an Early Career LDRD project con-ducted from January 2012 to December 2013 at Sandia National Laboratories. Demonstrated here is the use of conducting polymers as active materials in the posi-tive electrodes of rechargeable aluminum-based batteries operating at room tempera-ture. The battery chemistry is based on chloroaluminate ionic liquid electrolytes, which allow reversible stripping and plating of aluminum metal at the negative elec-trode. Characterization of electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole films revealed doping of the polymers with chloroaluminate anions, which is a quasi-reversible reac-tion that facilitates battery cycling. Stable galvanostatic cycling of polypyrrole and polythiophene cells was demonstrated, with capacities at near-theoretical levels (30-100 mAh g-1) and coulombic efficiencies approaching 100%. The energy density of a sealed sandwich-type cell with polythiophene at the positive electrode was estimated as 44 Wh kg-1, which is competitive with state-of-the-art battery chemistries for grid-scale energy storage.

  12. Exceptional gettering response of epitaxially grown kerfless silicon

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Powell, D. M.; Markevich, V. P.; Hofstetter, J.; Jensen, M. A.; Morishige, A. E.; Castellanos, S.; Lai, B.; Peaker, A. R.; Buonassisi, T.

    2016-02-08

    The bulk minority-carrier lifetime in p- and n-type kerfless epitaxial (epi) crystalline silicon wafers is shown to increase >500 during phosphorus gettering. We employ kinetic defect simulations and microstructural characterization techniques to elucidate the root cause of this exceptional gettering response. Simulations and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) indicate that a high concentra- tion of point defects (likely Pt) is “locked in” during fast (60 C/min) cooling during epi wafer growth. The fine dispersion of moderately fast-diffusing recombination-active point defects limits as-grown lifetime but can also be removed during gettering, confirmed by DLTS measurements. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy indicates metal agglomeratesmore » at structural defects, yet the structural defect density is sufficiently low to enable high lifetimes. Consequently, after phosphorus diffusion gettering, epi silicon exhibits a higher lifetime than materials with similar bulk impurity contents but higher densities of structural defects, including multicrystalline ingot and ribbon silicon materials. As a result, device simulations suggest a solar-cell efficiency potential of this material >23%.« less

  13. Quantifying Scheduling Challenges for Exascale System Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondragon, Oscar; Bridges, Patrick G.; Jones, Terry R

    2015-01-01

    The move towards high-performance computing (HPC) ap- plications comprised of coupled codes and the need to dra- matically reduce data movement is leading to a reexami- nation of time-sharing vs. space-sharing in HPC systems. In this paper, we discuss and begin to quantify the perfor- mance impact of a move away from strict space-sharing of nodes for HPC applications. Specifically, we examine the po- tential performance cost of time-sharing nodes between ap- plication components, we determine whether a simple coor- dinated scheduling mechanism can address these problems, and we research how suitable simple constraint-based opti- mization techniques are for solving scheduling challenges in this regime. Our results demonstrate that current general- purpose HPC system software scheduling and resource al- location systems are subject to significant performance de- ciencies which we quantify for six representative applica- tions. Based on these results, we discuss areas in which ad- ditional research is needed to meet the scheduling challenges of next-generation HPC systems.

  14. A hyper-spherical adaptive sparse-grid method for high-dimensional discontinuity detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guannan; Webster, Clayton G; Gunzburger, Max D; Burkardt, John V

    2014-03-01

    This work proposes and analyzes a hyper-spherical adaptive hi- erarchical sparse-grid method for detecting jump discontinuities of functions in high-dimensional spaces is proposed. The method is motivated by the the- oretical and computational inefficiencies of well-known adaptive sparse-grid methods for discontinuity detection. Our novel approach constructs a func- tion representation of the discontinuity hyper-surface of an N-dimensional dis- continuous quantity of interest, by virtue of a hyper-spherical transformation. Then, a sparse-grid approximation of the transformed function is built in the hyper-spherical coordinate system, whose value at each point is estimated by solving a one-dimensional discontinuity detection problem. Due to the smooth- ness of the hyper-surface, the new technique can identify jump discontinuities with significantly reduced computational cost, compared to existing methods. Moreover, hierarchical acceleration techniques are also incorporated to further reduce the overall complexity. Rigorous error estimates and complexity anal- yses of the new method are provided as are several numerical examples that illustrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  15. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and R- BCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain the flow rate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon valida- tion of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the \\all-or-nothing" phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Lastly, we demonstrated the new methodology for simulating blood flow in ves- sels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis model.

  16. Inflow/outflow boundary conditions for particle-based blood flow simulations: Application to arterial bifurcations and trees

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Lykov, Kirill; Li, Xuejin; Lei, Huan; Pivkin, Igor V.; Karniadakis, George Em; Feng, James

    2015-08-28

    When blood flows through a bifurcation, red blood cells (RBCs) travel into side branches at different hematocrit levels, and it is even possible that all RBCs enter into one branch only, leading to a complete separation of plasma and R- BCs. To quantify this phenomenon via particle-based mesoscopic simulations, we developed a general framework for open boundary conditions in multiphase flows that is effective even for high hematocrit levels. The inflow at the inlet is duplicated from a fully developed flow generated in a pilot simulation with periodic boundary conditions. The outflow is controlled by adaptive forces to maintain themore » flow rate and velocity gradient at fixed values, while the particles leaving the arteriole at the outlet are removed from the system. Upon valida- tion of this approach, we performed systematic 3D simulations to study plasma skimming in arterioles of diameters 20 to 32 microns. For a flow rate ratio 6:1 at the branches, we observed the \\all-or-nothing" phenomenon with plasma only entering the low flow rate branch. We then simulated blood-plasma separation in arteriolar bifurcations with different bifurcation angles and same diameter of the daughter branches. Our simulations predict a significant increase in RBC flux through the main daughter branch as the bifurcation angle is increased. Lastly, we demonstrated the new methodology for simulating blood flow in ves- sels with multiple inlets and outlets, constructed using an angiogenesis model.« less

  17. Symmetrical and Unsymmetrical Fault Currents of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a wind power plant for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. The size of wind power plants (WPPs) keeps getting bigger and bigger. The number of wind plants in the U.S. has increased very rapidly in the past 10 years. It is projected that in the U.S., the total wind power generation will reach 330 GW by 2030. As the importance of WPPs increases, planning engi-neers must perform impact studies used to evaluate short-circuit current (SCC) contribution of the plant into the transmission network under different fault conditions. This information is needed to size the circuit breakers, to establish the proper sys-tem protection, and to choose the transient suppressor in the circuits within the WPP. This task can be challenging to protec-tion engineers due to the topology differences between different types of wind turbine generators (WTGs) and the conventional generating units. This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. Both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are investigated. Three different soft-ware packages are utilized to develop this paper. Time domain simulations and steady-state calculations are used to perform the analysis.

  18. Parallel Breadth-First Search on Distributed Memory Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Computational Research Division; Buluc, Aydin; Madduri, Kamesh

    2011-04-15

    Data-intensive, graph-based computations are pervasive in several scientific applications, and are known to to be quite challenging to implement on distributed memory systems. In this work, we explore the design space of parallel algorithms for Breadth-First Search (BFS), a key subroutine in several graph algorithms. We present two highly-tuned par- allel approaches for BFS on large parallel systems: a level-synchronous strategy that relies on a simple vertex-based partitioning of the graph, and a two-dimensional sparse matrix- partitioning-based approach that mitigates parallel commu- nication overhead. For both approaches, we also present hybrid versions with intra-node multithreading. Our novel hybrid two-dimensional algorithm reduces communication times by up to a factor of 3.5, relative to a common vertex based approach. Our experimental study identifies execu- tion regimes in which these approaches will be competitive, and we demonstrate extremely high performance on lead- ing distributed-memory parallel systems. For instance, for a 40,000-core parallel execution on Hopper, an AMD Magny- Cours based system, we achieve a BFS performance rate of 17.8 billion edge visits per second on an undirected graph of 4.3 billion vertices and 68.7 billion edges with skewed degree distribution.

  19. Mode Initialization for On-line Estimation of Power System Electromechanical Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Trudnowski, Daniel; Pierre, John W.

    2009-03-18

    Measurement-based mode estimation methods are utilized to estimate electromechanical modes of a power system using phasor measurement units (PMU) data. These methods need to extract a certain amount of information before they can give useable mode estimation. Traditionally, the information is gathered solely from measurement data. Priori mode information from other resources (e.g. model eigenvalue analysis, engineering knowledge) are not fully utilized. For real time application, this means that mode estimation takes time to converge. By adding a mode regularization term in the objective function, this paper proposes a mode initialization method to include priori mode information in a regularized robust recursive least squares (R3LS) algorithm for on-line mode estimation. The proposed method is tested using a simple model, a 17 machine model and is shown to be able to shorten the convergence period of the R3LS algorithm. The proposed method is also applied on the measurement data recorded right before a major power outage in the western North American Grid on August 10th 1996 to show its potential applica-tion in detecting an approaching small signal stability problem.

  20. A Summary of Recent Experimental Research on Ion Energy and Charge States of Pulsed Vacuum Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2008-06-16

    The paper reviews the results of vacuum arc experimental investigations made collaboratively by research groups from Berkeley and Tomsk over the last two years, i.e. since the last ISDEIV in 2006. Vacuum arc plasma of various metals was produced in pulses of a few hundred microseconds duration, and the research focussed on three topics: (i) the energy distribution functions for different ion charge states, (ii) the temporal development of the ion charge state distribution, and (iii) the evolution of the mean directed ion velocities during plasma expansion. A combined quadruple mass-to-charge and energy ana-lyzer (EQP by HIDEN Ltd) and a time-of-flight spectrometer were employed. Cross-checking data by those complimen-tary techniques helped to avoid possible pitfalls in interpre-tation. It was found that the ion energy distribution func-tions in the plasma were independent of the ion charge state, which implies that the energy distribution on a substrate are not equal to due to acceleration in the substrate's sheath. In pulsed arc mode, the individual ion charge states fractions showed changes leading to a decrease of the mean charge state toward a steady-state value. This decrease can be re-duced by lower arc current, higher pulse repetition rate and reduced length of the discharge gap. It was also found that the directed ion velocity slightly decreased as the plasma expanded into vacuum.

  1. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low ?- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (?x?100mm ? ?y? 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (?p/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  2. Approaching the Minimum Thermal Conductivity in Rhenium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xi [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Girard, S. N. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Meng, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jin, S [University of Wisconsin, Madison] [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goodenough, J. B. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Zhou, J. S. [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Shi, L [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-01-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) made of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are regarded as promising p-type thermoelectric materials because their complex crystal structure results in low lattice thermal conductivity. It is shown here that the already low thermal conductivity of HMS can be reduced further to approach the minimum thermal conductivity via partial substitu- tion of Mn with heavier rhenium (Re) to increase point defect scattering. The solubility limit of Re in the obtained RexMn1 xSi1.8 is determined to be about x = 0.18. Elemental inhomogeneity and the formation of ReSi1.75 inclusions with 50 200 nm size are found within the HMS matrix. It is found that the power factor does not change markedly at low Re content of x 0.04 before it drops considerably at higher Re contents. Compared to pure HMS, the reduced lattice thermal conductivity in RexMn1 xSi1.8 results in a 25% increase of the peak figure of merit ZT to reach 0.57 0.08 at 800 K for x = 0.04. The suppressed thermal conductivity in the pure RexMn1 xSi1.8 can enable further investigations of the ZT limit of this system by exploring different impurity doping strategies to optimize the carrier concentration and power factor.

  3. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W; Grove, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).

  4. Group Hexavalent Actinide Separations: A New Approach to Used Nuclear Fuel Recycling

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Burns, Jonathan D.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2016-08-17

    Hexavalent Np, Pu, and Am individually, and as a group, have all been cocrystallized with UO2(NO3)2∙ 6H2O, constituting the first demonstration of an An(VI) group cocrystalliza- tion. The hexavalent dioxo cations of Np, Pu, and Am cocrystallize with UO2(NO3)2∙ 6H2O in near proportion with a simple reduction in temperature, while the lower valence states, An(III) and An(IV), are only slightly removed from solution. A separation of An(VI) species from An(III) ions by crystallization has been demonstrated, with an observed separation factor of 14. Separation of An(VI) species from key fission products, 95Zr, 95Nb, 137Cs, and 144Ce, has also been demonstratedmore » by crystallization, with separation factors ranging from 6.5 to 71 in the absence of Am(VI), while in the presence of Am(VI), the separation factors were reduced to 0.99 7.7. One interesting observation is that Am(VI) shows increased stability in the cocrystallized form, with no reduction observed after 13 days, as opposed to in solution, in which >50% is reduced after only 10 days. The ability to cocrystallize and stabilize hexavalent actinides from solution, especially Am(VI), introduces a new separations approach that can be applied to closing the nuclear fuel cycle.« less

  5. SBIR Grant:No-Vibration Agile Cryogenic Optical Refrigerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, Richard

    2013-04-09

    Optical refrigeration is currently the only all-solid-state cryocooling technology that has been demonstrated. Optical cryocoolers are devices that use laser light to cool small crystal or glass cooling elements. The cooling element absorbs the laser light and reradiates it at higher energy, an example of anti-Stokes fluorescence. The dif-ference between the energy of the outgoing and incoming light comes from the thermal energy of the cooling element, which in turn becomes colder. Entitled No-Vibration Agile Cryocoolers using Optical Refrigeration, this Phase I proposal directly addressed the continued development of the optical refrigerator components necessary to transition this scientific breakthrough into National Nu-clear Security Administration (NNSA) sensor applications in line with the objectives of topic 50b. ThermoDynamic Films LLC (TDF), in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), cooled an optical-refrigerator cooling element comprised of an ytterbium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Yb:YLF) crystal from room tempera-ture to 123 K with about 2% efficiency. This is the world record in optical refrigera-tion and an important step toward revolutionizing cryogenic systems for sensor ap-plications. During this period, they also designed and analyzed the crucial elements of a prototype optical refrigerator including the thermal link that connects the cool-ing element with the load.

  6. Synchronization Algorithms for Co-Simulation of Power Grid and Communication Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Laurentiu D.; Fisher, Andrew R.

    2014-09-11

    The ongoing modernization of power grids consists of integrating them with communication networks in order to achieve robust and resilient control of grid operations. To understand the operation of the new smart grid, one approach is to use simulation software. Unfortunately, current power grid simulators at best utilize inadequate approximations to simulate communication networks, if at all. Cooperative simulation of specialized power grid and communication network simulators promises to more accurately reproduce the interactions of real smart grid deployments. However, co-simulation is a challenging problem. A co-simulation must manage the exchange of informa- tion, including the synchronization of simulator clocks, between all simulators while maintaining adequate computational perfor- mance. This paper describes two new conservative algorithms for reducing the overhead of time synchronization, namely Active Set Conservative and Reactive Conservative. We provide a detailed analysis of their performance characteristics with respect to the current state of the art including both conservative and optimistic synchronization algorithms. In addition, we provide guidelines for selecting the appropriate synchronization algorithm based on the requirements of the co-simulation. The newly proposed algorithms are shown to achieve as much as 14% and 63% im- provement, respectively, over the existing conservative algorithm.

  7. AP1000 Design for Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, L.B.; Cummins, W.E.; Winters, J.W.

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are protected from potential security threats through a combination of robust structures around the primary system and other vital equipment, security systems and equipment, and defensive strategy. The overall objective for nuclear power plant security is to protect public health and safety by ensuring that attacks or sabotage do not challenge the ability to safely shutdown the plant or protect from radiological releases. In addition, plants have systems, features and operational strategies to cope with external conditions, such as loss of offsite power, which could be created as part of an attack. Westinghouse considered potential security threats during design of the AP1000 PWR. The differences in plant configuration, safety system design, and safe shutdown equipment between existing plants and AP1000 affect potential vulnerabilities. This paper provides an evaluation of AP1000 with respect to vulnerabilities to security threats. The AP1000 design differs from the design of operating PWRs in the US in the configuration and the functional requirements for safety systems. These differences are intentional departures from conventional PWR designs which simplify plant design and enhance overall safety. The differences between the AP1000 PWR and conventional PWRs can impact vulnerabilities to security threats. The NRC addressed security concerns as part of their reviews for AP1000 Design Certification, and did not identify any security issues of concern. However, much of the detailed security design information for the AP1000 was deferred to the combined Construction and Operating License (COL) phase as many of the security issues are site-specific. Therefore, NRC review of security issues related to the AP1000 is not necessarily complete. Further, since the AP1000 plant design differs from existing PWRs, it is not obvious that the analyses and assessments prepared for existing plants also apply to the AP1000. We conclude that, overall, the AP1000

  8. Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Ruhl; Justin Smith; Sharon Sjostrom; Sheila Haythorthwaite; Terry Hunt

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) a cost sharing contract to evaluate carbon-based sorbents for mercury control on a 600 acfm laboratory-scale particulate control module (PCM). The PCM can be configured as simulate an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet fabric filter, or a reverse-gas fabric filter and is installed on an operating coal-fired power plant. Three different dry carbon-based sorbents were tested this quarter to determine their mercury removal capability in the different configurations. The project is currently in the seventh quarter of an eight-quarter Phase I project. Testing in all configurations is nearly complete. Original plans included the use of an on-line mercury analyzer to collect test data. However, due to very low baseline mercury concentration, on-line measurement did not provide accurate data. The project used a modified MESA method grab sample technique to determine inlet and outlet mercury concentrations. A major concern during sorbent evaluations was the natural ability of the flyash at the test site to remove mercury. This often made determination of sorbent only mercury removal difficult. The PCM was configured as a reverse-gas baghouse and brought online with "clean" flue gas on March 10* at an A/C of 2.0 ft/min. The dustcake forms the filtering media in a reverse gas baghouse. In the absence of flyash, the bags were precoated with a commercially available alumina silicate material to form an inert dustcake. Some baseline tests were completed with clean gas for comparison to clean gas pulse jet tests. The PCM was reconfigured as a TOXECON unit in April 1997 with testing completed in May 1997. TOXECON, an EPIU patented technology, is a pulse-jet baghouse operating at a high A/C ratio downstream of a primary particulate colIector with sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for air toxics removal. Mercury removals of O to 97o/0 were obtained depending on test conditions.

  9. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    that water loss in ERF96 overexpression plants was slower than that in Col wild type plants. Stomatal closure assays indicated that ERF96 overexpression plants had reduced stomatal aperture in the presence of ABA. In conclusion, our results suggest that ERF96 positively regulates ABA responses in Arabidopsis.« less

  10. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    panel of breast cancer cell lines. Subnetwork enrichment of these genes has identifed 35 common regulators with 6 or more predicted markers. In addition to identifying epigenetically regulated genes, we show evidence of differentially expressed methylation patterns between the basal and luminal subtypes. Our results indicate that the proposed computational protocol is a viable platform for identifying epigenetically regulated genes. Our protocol has generated a list of predictors including COL1A2, TOP2A, TFF1, and VAV3, genes whose key roles in epigenetic regulation is documented in the literature. Subnetwork enrichment of these predicted markers further suggests that epigenetic regulation of individual genes occurs in a coordinated fashion and through common regulators.

  11. Identification of a PEAK1/ZEB1 signaling axis during TGFβ/fibronectin-induced EMT in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agajanian, Megan; Runa, Farhana; Kelber, Jonathan A.

    2015-09-25

    Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFβ) is the archetypal member of the TGFβ superfamily of ligands and has pleiotropic functions during normal development, adult tissue homeostasis and pathophysiological processes such as cancer. In epithelial cancers TGFβ signaling can either suppress tumor growth or promote metastasis via the induction of a well-characterized epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) program. We recently reported that PEAK1 kinase mediates signaling cross talk between TGFβ receptors and integrin/Src/MAPK pathways and functions as a critical molecular regulator of TGFβ-induced breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, EMT and metastasis. Here, we examined the breast cancer cell contexts in which TGFβ induces both EMT and PEAK1, and discovered this event to be unique to oncogene-transformed mammary epithelial cells and triple-negative breast cancer cells. Using the Cancer BioPortal database, we identified PEAK1 co-expressors across multiple malignancies that are also common to the TGFβ response gene signature (TBRS). We then used the ScanSite database to identify predicted protein–protein binding partners of PEAK1 and the PEAK1-TBRS co-expressors. Analysis of the Cytoscape interactome and Babelomics-derived gene ontologies for a novel gene set including PEAK1, CRK, ZEB1, IL11 and COL4A1 enabled us to hypothesize that PEAK1 may be regulating TGFβ-induced EMT via its interaction with or regulation of these other genes. In this regard, we have demonstrated that PEAK1 is necessary for TGFβ to induce ZEB1-mediated EMT in the context of fibronectin/ITGB3 activation. These studies and future mechanistic studies will pave the way toward identifying the context in which TGFβ blockade may significantly improve breast cancer patient outcomes. - Highlights: • PEAK1 is upregulated in mammary epithelial cells during TGFβ-induced EMT. • TGFβ-induced EMT upregulates PEAK1 in triple negative breast cancer. • PEAK1 is necessary for TGF

  12. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    water loss in ERF96 overexpression plants was slower than that in Col wild type plants. Stomatal closure assays indicated that ERF96 overexpression plants had reduced stomatal aperture in the presence of ABA. In conclusion, taken together, our results suggest that ERF96 positively regulates ABA responses in Arabidopsis.

  13. The Small Ethylene Response Factor ERF96 is Involved in the Regulation of the Abscisic Acid Response in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Shanda; Tian, Hainan; Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2015-11-26

    that water loss in ERF96 overexpression plants was slower than that in Col wild type plants. Stomatal closure assays indicated that ERF96 overexpression plants had reduced stomatal aperture in the presence of ABA. In conclusion, taken together, our results suggest that ERF96 positively regulates ABA responses in Arabidopsis.« less

  14. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA ; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin; NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, University of Leeds, Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds LS74SA

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  15. Linkage analysis and physical mapping near the gene for x-linked agammaglobulinemia at Xq22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parolini, O.; Lassiter, G.L.; Henry, M.J.; Conley, M.E. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN ); Hejtmancik, J.F. ); Allen, R.C.; Belmont, J.W. ); Barker, D.F. )

    1993-02-01

    The gene for x-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) has been mapped to Xq22. No recombinations have been reported between the gene and the prob p212 at DXS178; however, this probe is informative in only 30-40% of women and the reported flanking markers, DXS3 and DXS94, and 10-15 cM apart. To identify additional probes that might be useful in genetic counseling, we examined 11 polymorphisms that have been mapped to the Xq21.3-q22 region in 13 families with XLA. In addition, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to further characterize the segman of DNA within which the gene for SLA must lie. The results demonstrated that DXS366 and DXS442, which share a 430-kb pulsed-field fragment, could replace DXS3 as proximal flanking markers. Probes at DXS178 and DXS265 identified the same 145-kb pulsed-field fragment, and both loci were contained within a 200-kb YAC identified with the probe p212. A highly polymorphic CA repeat (DCS178CA) was isolated from one end of this YAC and used in linkage analysis. Probes at DXS101 and DXS328 shared several pulsed-field fragments, the smallest of which was 250 kb. No recombinations were seen between XLA and the DXS178-DXS265-DXS178CA complex, DXS101, DXS328, DXS87, or the gene for proteolipid protein (PLP). Key crossovers, when combined with the linkage data from families with Alport syndrome, suggested the following order of loci: cen-DXS3-DXS366-DXS442-(PLP, DXS101, DXS328, DXS178-DXS265-DXS178CA complex, XL)-(DXS87, DXS94)-DXS327-(DXS350, DXS362)-tel. Our studies also limit the segment of DNA within which the XLA gene must lie to the 3- to 4-cM distance between DCS442 and DXS94 and they identify and orient polymorphisms that can be used in genetic counseling not only for XLA but also for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PLP deficiency), Alport syndrome (COL4A5 deficiency), and Fabry disease ([alpha]-galactosidase A difficiency). 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Potential Impacts of Leakage from Black Rock Reservoir on the Hanford Site Unconfined Aquifer: Initial Hypothetical Simulations of Flow and Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.

    2007-03-09

    Initial scoping calculations of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site were carried out for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) to investigate the potential impacts on the Hanford unconfined aquifer that would result from leakage from the proposed Black Rock Reservoir to the west. Although impacts on groundwater flow and contaminant transport were quantified based on numerical simulation results, the investigation represented a qualitative assessment of the potential lateral recharge that could result in adverse effects on the aquifer. Because the magnitude of the potential leakage is unknown, hypothetical bounding calculations were performed. When a quantitative analysis of the magnitude of the potential recharge from Black Rock Reservoir is obtained, the hydrologic impacts analysis will be revisited. The analysis presented in this report represent initial bounding calculations. A maximum lateral recharge (i.e., upland flux) was determined in the first part of this study by executing steady-state flow simulations that raised the water table no higher than the elevation attained in the Central Plateau during the Hanford operational period. This metric was selected because it assumed a maximum remobilization of contaminants that existed under previous fully saturated conditions. Three steady-state flow fields were then used to analyze impacts to transient contaminant transport: a maximum recharge (27,000 acre-ft/yr), a no additional flux (365 acre-ft/yr), and an intermediate recharge case (16,000 acre-ft/yr). The transport behavior of four radionuclides was assessed for a 300 year simulation period with the three flow fields. The four radionuclides are current contaminants of concern (COCs) in the Central Plateau and include tritium, iodine-129, technetium-99, and uranium-238. Transient flow and transport simulations were used to establish hypothetical concentration distributions in the subsurface. Using the simulated concentration distributions in 2005 as

  17. PARFUME Theory and Model basis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darrell L. Knudson; Gregory K Miller; G.K. Miller; D.A. Petti; J.T. Maki; D.L. Knudson

    2009-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. The fuel performance modeling code PARFUME simulates the mechanical, thermal and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation. This report documents the theory and material properties behind vari¬ous capabilities of the code, which include: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) an analytical solution for stresses in the coating layers that accounts for irradiation-induced creep and swelling of the pyrocarbon layers, 3) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 4) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, and kernel migration (or amoeba effect), 5) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 6) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 7) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. The accident condi¬tion entails diffusion of fission products through the particle coating layers and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. This document represents the initial version of the PARFUME Theory and Model Basis Report. More detailed descriptions will be provided in future revisions.

  18. Radiological Monitoring Equipment For Real-Time Quantification Of Area Contamination In Soils And Facility Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. V. Carpenter; Jay A. Roach; John R Giles; Lyle G. Roybal

    2005-09-01

    The environmental restoration industry offers several sys¬tems that perform scan-type characterization of radiologically contaminated areas. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of field systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyse radiological contamination in surface soils. The base system consists of a detector, such as sodium iodide (NaI) spectrometers, a global positioning system (GPS), and an integrated user-friendly computer interface. This mobile concept was initially developed to provide precertifica¬tion analyses of soils contaminated with uranium, thorium, and radium at the Fernald Closure Project, near Cincinnati, Ohio. INL has expanded the functionality of this basic system to create a suite of integrated field-deployable analytical systems. Using its engineering and radiation measurement expertise, aided by computer hardware and software support, INL has streamlined the data acquisition and analysis process to provide real-time information presented on wireless screens and in the form of coverage maps immediately available to field technicians. In addition, custom software offers a user-friendly interface with user-selectable alarm levels and automated data quality monitoring functions that validate the data. This system is deployed from various platforms, depending on the nature of the survey. The deployment platforms include a small all-terrain vehicle used to survey large, relatively flat areas, a hand-pushed unit for areas where manoeuvrability is important, an excavator-mounted system used to scan pits and trenches where personnel access is restricted, and backpack- mounted systems to survey rocky shoreline features and other physical settings that preclude vehicle-based deployment. Variants of the base system include sealed proportional counters for measuring actinides (i.e., plutonium-238 and americium-241) in building demolitions, soil areas, roadbeds, and process line routes at the Miamisburg

  19. Ultrasensitive measurement of MEMS cantilever displacement sensitivity below the shot noise limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pooser, Raphael C; Lawrie, Benjamin J

    2015-01-01

    The displacement of micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMs) cantilevers is used to measure a variety of phe- nomena in devices ranging from force microscopes for single spin detection[1] to biochemical sensors[2] to un- cooled thermal imaging systems[3]. The displacement readout is often performed optically with segmented de- tectors or interference measurements. Until recently, var- ious noise sources have limited the minimum detectable displacement in MEMs systems, but it is now possible to minimize all other sources[4] so that the noise level of the coherent light eld, called the shot noise limit (SNL), becomes the dominant source. Light sources dis- playing quantum-enhanced statistics below this limit are available[5, 6], with applications in gravitational wave astronomy[7] and bioimaging[8], but direct displacement measurements of MEMS cantilevers below the SNL have been impossible until now. Here, we demonstrate the rst direct measurement of a MEMs cantilever displace- ment with sub-SNL sensitivity, thus enabling ultratrace sensing, imaging, and microscopy applications. By com- bining multi-spatial-mode quantum light sources with a simple dierential measurement, we show that sub-SNL MEMs displacement sensitivity is highly accessible com- pared to previous eorts that measured the displacement of macroscopic mirrors with very distinct spatial struc- tures crafted with multiple optical parametric ampliers and locking loops[9]. We apply this technique to a com- mercially available microcantilever in order to detect dis- placements 60% below the SNL at frequencies where the microcantilever is shot-noise-limited. These results sup- port a new class of quantum MEMS sensor whose ulti- mate signal to noise ratio is determined by the correla- tions possible in quantum optics systems.

  20. CFD Modeling and Image Analysis of Exhaled Aerosols due to a Growing Bronchial Tumor: towards Non-Invasive Diagnosis and Treatment of Respiratory Obstructive Diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua A.; Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Wang, Shengyu

    2015-02-06

    Diagnosis and prognosis of tumorigenesis are generally performed with CT, PET, or biopsy. Such methods are accurate, but have the limitations of high cost and posing additional health risks to patients. In this study, we introduce an alternative computer aided diagnostic tool that can locate malignant sites caused by tumorigenesis in a non-invasive and low-cost way. Our hypothesis is that exhaled aerosol distribution is unique to lung structure and is sensitive to airway structure vari-ations. With appropriate approaches, it is possible to locate the disease site, determine the disease severity, and subsequently formulate a targeted drug delivery plan to treat the disease. This study numerically evaluated the feasibility of the proposed breath test in an image-based lung model with varying pathological stages of a bronchial squamous tumor. Large eddy simulations and a Lagran-gian tracking approach were used to model respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Respira-tions of tracer aerosols of 1 m at a flow rate of 20 L/min were simulated, with the distributions of exhaled aerosols recorded on a filter at the mouth exit. Aerosol patterns were quantified with multiple analytical techniques such as concentration disparity, spatial scanning and fractal analysis. We demonstrated that a growing bronchial tumor induced notable variations in both the airflow and exhaled aerosol distribution. These variations became more apparent with increasing tumor severity. The exhaled aerosols exhibited distinctive pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, and multifractal spectrum. Results of this study show that morphometric measures of the exhaled aerosol pattern can be used to detect and monitor the pathological states of respiratory diseases in the upper airway. The proposed breath test also has the potential to locate the site of the disease, which is critical in developing a personalized, site-specific drug de-livery protocol.

  1. HIGHLY ENERGY EFFICIENT D-GLU (DIRECTED-GREEN LIQ-UOR UTILIZATION) PULPING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, Lucian A

    2013-04-19

    Purpose: The purpose of the project was to retrofit the front end (pulp house) of a commercial kraft pulping mill to accommodate a mill green liquor (GL) impregna-tion/soak/exposure and accrue downstream physical and chemical benefits while prin-cipally reducing the energy footprint of the mill. A major player in the mill contrib-uting to excessive energy costs is the lime kiln. The project was intended to offload the energy (oil or natural gas) demands of the kiln by by-passing the causticization/slaking site in the recovery area and directly using green liquor as a pulping medium for wood. Scope: The project was run in two distinct, yet mutually compatible, phases: Phase 1 was the pre-commercial or laboratory phase in which NC State University and the Insti-tute of Paper Science and Technology (at the Georgia Institute of Technology) ran the pulping and associated experiments, while Phase 2 was the mill scale trial. The first tri-al was run at the now defunct Evergreen Pulp Mill in Samoa, CA and lead to a partial retrofit of the mill that was not completed because it went bankrupt and the work was no longer the low-hanging fruit on the tree for the new management. The second trial was run at the MeadWestvaco Pulp Mill in Evedale, TX which for all intents and pur-poses was a success. They were able to fully retrofit the mill, ran the trial, studied the pulp properties, and gave us conclusions.

  2. Modeling Cyber Conflicts Using an Extended Petri Net Formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakrzewska, Anita N; Ferragut, Erik M

    2011-01-01

    When threatened by automated attacks, critical systems that require human-controlled responses have difficulty making optimal responses and adapting protections in real- time and may therefore be overwhelmed. Consequently, experts have called for the development of automatic real-time reaction capabilities. However, a technical gap exists in the modeling and analysis of cyber conflicts to automatically understand the repercussions of responses. There is a need for modeling cyber assets that accounts for concurrent behavior, incomplete information, and payoff functions. Furthermore, we address this need by extending the Petri net formalism to allow real-time cyber conflicts to be modeled in a way that is expressive and concise. This formalism includes transitions controlled by players as well as firing rates attached to transitions. This allows us to model both player actions and factors that are beyond the control of players in real-time. We show that our formalism is able to represent situational aware- ness, concurrent actions, incomplete information and objective functions. These factors make it well-suited to modeling cyber conflicts in a way that allows for useful analysis. MITRE has compiled the Common Attack Pattern Enumera- tion and Classification (CAPEC), an extensive list of cyber attacks at various levels of abstraction. CAPEC includes factors such as attack prerequisites, possible countermeasures, and attack goals. These elements are vital to understanding cyber attacks and to generating the corresponding real-time responses. We demonstrate that the formalism can be used to extract precise models of cyber attacks from CAPEC. Several case studies show that our Petri net formalism is more expressive than other models, such as attack graphs, for modeling cyber conflicts and that it is amenable to exploring cyber strategies.

  3. Ecosystem-scale volatile organic compound fluxes during an extreme drought in a broadleaf temperate forest of the Missouri Ozarks (central USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seco, Roger; Karl, Thomas; Guenther, Alex B.; Hosman, Kevin P.; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Gu, Lianhong; Geron, Chris; Harley, Peter; Kim, Saewung

    2015-07-07

    Considerable amounts and varieties of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are exchanged between vegeta-tion and the surrounding air. These BVOCs play key ecological and atmospheric roles that must be adequately repre-sented for accurately modeling the coupled biosphere–atmosphere–climate earth system. One key uncertainty in existing models is the response of BVOC fluxes to an important global change process: drought. We describe the diur-nal and seasonal variation in isoprene, monoterpene, and methanol fluxes from a temperate forest ecosystem before, during, and after an extreme 2012 drought event in the Ozark region of the central USA. BVOC fluxes were domi-nated by isoprene, which attained high emission rates of up to 35.4 mg m-2h-1 at midday. Methanol fluxes were characterized by net deposition in the morning, changing to a net emission flux through the rest of the daylight hours. Net flux of CO2 reached its seasonal maximum approximately a month earlier than isoprenoid fluxes, which high-lights the differential response of photosynthesis and isoprenoid emissions to progressing drought conditions. Never-theless, both processes were strongly suppressed under extreme drought, although isoprene fluxes remained relatively high compared to reported fluxes from other ecosystems. Methanol exchange was less affected by drought throughout the season, conflrming the complex processes driving biogenic methanol fluxes. The fraction of daytime (7–17 h) assimilated carbon released back to the atmosphere combining the three BVOCs measured was 2% of gross primary productivity (GPP) and 4.9% of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) on average for our whole measurement cam-paign, while exceeding 5% of GPP and 10% of NEE just before the strongest drought phase. The MEGANv2.1 model correctly predicted diurnal variations in fluxes driven mainly by light and temperature, although further research is needed to address model BVOC fluxes

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Richard A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; harkema, J. R.; Kimbell, Julia; Gargas, M. L.; Kinzell, John H.

    2009-06-01

    The percentages of total air?ows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were cal-culated from computational ?uid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These air?ow calcula-tions, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, mon-keys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the ?ne structures of the nasal turbinates and air?ows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired air?ows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (air?ows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These di?erences in regional air?ows can have signi?cant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  5. The Practical Obstacles of Data Transfer: Why researchers still love scp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Hai Ah; Hill, Jason J; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T

    2014-01-01

    The importance of computing facilities is heralded every six months with the announcement of the new Top500 list, showcasing the world s fastest supercomputers. Unfortu- nately, with great computing capability does not come great long-term data storage capacity, which often means users must move their data to their local site archive, to remote sites where they may be doing future computation or anal- ysis, or back to their home institution, else face the dreaded data purge that most HPC centers employ to keep utiliza- tion of large parallel filesystems low to manage performance and capacity. At HPC centers, data transfer is crucial to the scientific workflow and will increase in importance as computing systems grow in size. The Energy Sciences Net- work (ESnet) recently launched its fifth generation network, a 100 Gbps high-performance, unclassified national network connecting more than 40 DOE research sites to support scientific research and collaboration. Despite the tenfold increase in bandwidth to DOE research sites amenable to multiple data transfer streams and high throughput, in prac- tice, researchers often under-utilize the network and resort to painfully-slow single stream transfer methods such as scp to avoid the complexity of using multiple stream tools such as GridFTP and bbcp, and contend with frustration from the lack of consistency of available tools between sites. In this study we survey and assess the data transfer methods pro- vided at several DOE supported computing facilities, includ- ing both leadership-computing facilities, connected through ESnet. We present observed transfer rates, suggested opti- mizations, and discuss the obstacles the tools must overcome to receive wide-spread adoption over scp.

  6. Intrinsic Uncertainties in Modeling Complex Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Curtis S; Bramson, Aaron L.; Ames, Arlo L.

    2014-09-01

    Models are built to understand and predict the behaviors of both natural and artificial systems. Because it is always necessary to abstract away aspects of any non-trivial system being modeled, we know models can potentially leave out important, even critical elements. This reality of the modeling enterprise forces us to consider the prospective impacts of those effects completely left out of a model - either intentionally or unconsidered. Insensitivity to new structure is an indication of diminishing returns. In this work, we represent a hypothetical unknown effect on a validated model as a finite perturba- tion whose amplitude is constrained within a control region. We find robustly that without further constraints, no meaningful bounds can be placed on the amplitude of a perturbation outside of the control region. Thus, forecasting into unsampled regions is a very risky proposition. We also present inherent difficulties with proper time discretization of models and representing in- herently discrete quantities. We point out potentially worrisome uncertainties, arising from math- ematical formulation alone, which modelers can inadvertently introduce into models of complex systems. Acknowledgements This work has been funded under early-career LDRD project %23170979, entitled %22Quantify- ing Confidence in Complex Systems Models Having Structural Uncertainties%22, which ran from 04/2013 to 09/2014. We wish to express our gratitude to the many researchers at Sandia who con- tributed ideas to this work, as well as feedback on the manuscript. In particular, we would like to mention George Barr, Alexander Outkin, Walt Beyeler, Eric Vugrin, and Laura Swiler for provid- ing invaluable advice and guidance through the course of the project. We would also like to thank Steven Kleban, Amanda Gonzales, Trevor Manzanares, and Sarah Burwell for their assistance in managing project tasks and resources.

  7. Tank waste remediation system simulation analysis retrieval model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fordham, R.A.

    1996-09-30

    The goal of simulation was to test tll(., consequences of assumptions. For the TWRS SIMAN Retrieval Model, l@lie specific assumptions are primarily defined with respect to waste processing arid transfer timing. The model tracks 73 chem1913ical constituents from underground waste tanks to glass; yet, the detailed (@hemistrv and complete set of unit operations of the TWRS process flow sheet are represented only at the level necessary to define the waste processing and transfer logic and to estimate the feed composition for the treatment facilities. Tlierefor(,, the model should net be regarded as a substitute for the TWRS process flow sheet. Pra(!ticallv the model functions as a dyrt(imic extension of the flow sheet model. I I The following sections present the description, assunipt@ions, architecture, arid evalua- tion of the TWRS SIMAN Retrieval Model. Section 2 describes the model in terms of an overview of the processes represented. Section 3 presents the assumptions for the simulation model. Specific assumptions 9.tt(l parameter values used in the model are provided for waste retrieval, pretreatment, low-level waste (LLNN7) immobilization, and high-level waste (HLW) immobilization functions. Section 4 describes the model in terms of its functional architec- rare to d(@fine a basis for a systematic evaluation of the model. Finally, Section 5 documents an independent test and evaluation of the niodel`s performance (i.e., the verification and validation). Additionally, Appendix A gives a complete listing of the tank inventory used. Appendix B documents the verification and validation plan that was used for the (Section 5) evaluation work. A description and listing of all the model variables is given in Appendix C along with a complete source listing.

  8. Analyzing the Contribution of Aerosols to an Observed Increase in Direct Normal Irradiance in Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Vignola, F.; Long, Charles N.

    2009-01-22

    Annual average total irradiance increases by 1-2% per decade at three mon- itoring stations in Oregon over the period from 1980 to 2007. Direct normal irradiance measurements increase by 5% per decade over the same time pe- riod. The measurements show no sign of a dimming before 1990. The impact of high concentrations of stratospheric aerosols following the volcanic erup- tions of El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo are clearly seen in the measurements. Removing these years from the annual average all-sky time series reduces the trends in both total and direct normal irradiance. Clear-sky periods from this long direct normal time series are used in conjunction with radiative trans- fer calculations to test whether part of the increase could be caused by an- thropogenic aerosols. All three sites show relatively low clear-sky measure- ments before the eruption of El Chichon in 1982, suggesting higher aerosol loads during this period. After removing the periods most strongly impacted by volcanic eruptions, two of the sites show statistically signicant increases in clear-sky direct normal irradiance from 1987 to 2007. Radiative transfer calculations of the impact of volcanic aerosols and tropospheric water vapor indicate that only about 20% of that clear-sky increase between background aerosol periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo can be explained by these two factors. Thus, a statistically signicant clear-sky trend remains between 1987 and 2007 that is consistent with the hypothesis that at least some of the increase in surface irradiance could be caused by a reduction of anthropogenic aerosols. D

  9. Observing Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the NOνA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xin, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations offers an insight on new physics beyond the Standard Model. The three mixing angles (θ12, θ13 and θ23) and the two mass splittings (Δm2 and Αm2 ) have been measured by different neutrino oscillation experiments. Some other parameters including the mass ordering of different neutrino mass eigenstates and the CP violation phase are still unknown. NOνA is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment, using neutrinos from the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The experiment is equipped with two functionally identical detectors about 810 kilometers apart and 14 mrad off the beam axis. In this configuration, the muon neutrinos from the NuMI beam reach the disappearance maximum in the far detector and a small fraction of that oscillates into electron neutrinos. The sensitivity to the mass ordering and CP viola- tion phase determination is greately enhanced. This thesis presents the νeappearance analysis using the neutrino data collected with the NOνA experiment between February 2014 and May 2015, which corresponds to 3.45 ×1020 protons-on-target (POT). The νe appearance analysis is performed by comparing the observed νe CC-like events to the estimated background at the far detector. The total background is predicted to be 0.95 events with 0.89 originated from beam events and 0.06 from cosmic ray events. The beam background is obtained by extrapolating near detector data through different oscillation channels, while the cosmic ray background is calculated based on out-of-time NuMI trigger data. A total of 6 electron neutrino candidates are observed in the end at the far detector which represents 3.3 σ excess over the predicted background. The NOνA result disfavors inverted mass hierarchy for δcp ϵ [0, 0.6π] at 90% C.L.

  10. Mathematical models for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikin, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    The use of mathematical models in risk assessment results in the proper understanding of many aspects of chemical exposure and allows to make more actual decisions. Our project ISCRA (Integrated Systems of Complex Risk Assessment) has the aim to create integrated systems of algorythms for prediction of pollutants` exposure on human and environmental health and to apply them for environmental monitoring, and decision-making. Mathematical model {open_quotes}MASTER{close_quotes} (Mathematical Algorythm of SimulaTion of Environmental Risk) represents the complex of algorythmical blocks and is intended for the prediction of danger of pollutants` exposure for human and environmental risk. Model LIMES (LIMits EStimation) is developed for prognosis of safety concentrations of pollutants in the environment both in the case of isolated exposure and in the case of complex exposure for concrete location. Model QUANT (QUANtity of Toxicant) represents the multicompartmental physiological pharmacokinetic model describing absorption, distribution, fate, metabolism, and elimination of pollutants in the body of different groups of human population, as a result of the different kind of exposure. Decision support system CLEVER (Complex LEVE1 of Risk) predicts the probability and the degree of development of unfavourable effects as result of exposure of pollutant on human health. System is based on the data of epidemiological and experimental researches and includes several mathematical models for analysis of {open_quotes}dose-time-response{close_quotes} relations and information about clinical symptoms of diseases. Model CEP (Combination Effect Prognosis) contains probabilistic algorythms for forecasting the effect of simultaneous impact of several factors polluting the environment. The result of the program work is the prediction of an independent exposure of two or more factors, and intensification or weakening of exposure in depending on factors` interactions.

  11. Enhanced vector borne disease surveillance of California Culex mosquito populations reveals spatial and species-specific barriers of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanderNoot, Victoria A.; Curtis, Deanna Joy; Koh, Chung-Yan; Brodsky, Benjamin H; Lane, Todd

    2014-08-01

    Monitor i ng in f ectio n s in v ect o rs su c h as m osquit o es, s a nd fl i es, tsetse fl i es, a nd ticks to i denti f y hu m a n path o gens m a y s e r v e as a n ear l y w arn i ng det e ction system t o dir e ct loc a l g o v er n ment dise a se pr e v en t i v e m easu r e s . One major hurdle i n de t ection is the abi l i t y to scre e n l arge n u mbers of v e c t ors for h uman patho g ens w i thout t h e u s e of ge n o t y pe - s p ecific m o lecu l ar tec h nique s . N e x t genera t ion s equ e nc i ng (NG S ) pr o v i des a n unbi a sed p latfo r m capab l e of identi f y i ng k n o w n a n d unk n o w n p ath o ge n s circula t ing w i thin a v e ctor p opul a tion, but utili z ing t h is te c h nolo g y i s tim e - con s u ming a n d cos t l y for v ecto r -b o rne disease su r v e illan c e pr o gra m s. T o addr e s s this w e d e v e lop e d cos t -eff e ct i v e Ilumina(r) R NA- S eq l i bra r y p r epara t ion m e thodol o gies i n con j u n ction w i t h an automa t ed c ompu t at i onal a n a l y sis pipel i n e to ch a racter i ze t h e microbial popula t ions c ircula t i n g in Cu l e x m o squit o e s (Cul e x qui n quef a s c iatu s , C ul e x quinq u efasc i atus / pip i ens co m pl e x h y bri d s, and C u l e x ta r salis ) t hroug h out Californ i a. W e assembled 2 0 n o vel a n d w e l l -do c ume n ted a r b o v i ruses repres e nting mem b e rs of B u n y a v ir i da e , F l a v i virid a e, If a virida e , Meson i v i rida e , Nid o v iri d ae, O rtho m y x o virid a e, Pa r v o v iri d ae, Re o virid a e, R h a b d o v i rid a e, T y m o v iri d ae, a s w ell as s e v e r al u n assi g n e d v irus e s . In addit i o n, w e m app e d mRNA s pecies to d i vergent s peci e s of t r y panos o ma a nd pl a s modium eu k a r yotic parasit e s and cha r a c terized t he p r oka r yot i c microb i al c o mposit i on to i d enti f y bacteri a l tran s c r ipts der i v ed from wolba c hia, clo s tridi u m, m y c oplas m a, fusoba c

  12. A Better Time Now to Consider New Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal, K.

    2004-03-01

    Mr. Christopher Crane, President and Chief Nuclear Officer of Exelon Nuclear was interviewed regarding his views on a series of questions related to the future of the nuclear industry in the United States. His view is that in order for new nuclear power plants to be considered, they must be economically competitive when compared to other baseload generation alternatives. With respect to capital cost, the industry has informally conveyed that overnight capital costs need to be below the range of $1,000-$1,200/kWE. Reactor vendors are working to reduce their first of a kind engineering costs to meet this capital cost threshold. Financing is then the next significant factor, which is complicated by whether the plant is being constructed in a regulated environment where the power company has the security of a regulated rate of return or as a merchant plant where the company assumes the risks and benefits of the proposed investment. With respect to operating and maintenance costs, the nuclear power industry has been dedicated to reducing costs while maintaining or improving safety. There are sound plans for spent fuel and high-level waste disposal, but there is a need to improve public confidence in transportation aspects. Regarding making new plants more attractive to investors, the risk factor has been a concern. The new Part 52 process is designed to help by requiring safety design issues to be identified and resolved prior to the issuance of the Combined Operating License (COL) process. While the revised process appears to be more acceptable from an investment risk perspective, there remains uncertainty in the fact that it has never been demonstrated. Skepticism, too, still exists with regard to building plants on schedule and within budget. Mr. Crane concludes that certain incentives will be needed for ''first movers'' in nuclear investment. These could include production tax credits, investment tax credits, government loan guarantees, and power purchase agreements

  13. Proceedings of the 2006 international congress on advances in nuclear power plants - ICAPP'06

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-07-01

    -generation applications. - 10. Near Term Issues (New) Applies to plants that have a significant percentage of their design completed and to issues related to the deployment of these plants in the near term (next couple years). Includes deployment activities such as licensing of sites / projects (such as ESP / COL activities in US), detailed construction plans, use of 3D models, procurement activities/challenges. - 11. Reactor Physics and Analysis (New) Nuclear design methodology and codes, cross-section libraries and lattice physics, Monte Carlo and deterministic transport calculation. - 12. Space Power and Propulsion Large and small space nuclear power systems, nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal systems, science and technology, missions, life cycle, operation and maintenance, system operation and safety analysis, radiation protection and materials.

  14. Thermoacoustic Thermometry for Nuclear Reactor Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Smith; Dale K. Kotter; Steven L. Garrett; Randall A. Ali

    2013-06-01

    On Friday, March 11, 2011, at 2:46pm (Japan Standard Trme), the Tohoku region on the east coast of northern Japan experi­enced what would become known as the largest earthquake in the country's history at magnitude 9.0 on the Richter scale. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered exten­sive and irreversible damage. Six operating units were at the site, each with a boiling water reactor. When the earthquake struck, three of the six reactors were operating and the others were in a periodic inspection outage phase. In one reactor, all of the fuel had been relocated to a spent fuel pool in the reactor building. The seismic acceleration caused by the earthquake brought the three operating units to an automatic shutdown. Since there was damage to the power transmission lines, the emergency diesel generators (EDG) were automat­ically started to ensure continued cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools. The situation was under control until the tsunami hit about forty-five minutes later with a maximum wave height of approximately 15 meters, which was three times taller than the sea wall of 5m. The influx of water submerged the EDGs, the electrical switchgear, and dc batteries, resulting in the total loss of power to five of the six reactors. The flooding also resulted in the loss of instrumentation that would have other­ wise been used to monitor and control the emergency. The ugly aftermath included high radiation exposure to operators at the nuclear power plants and early contamina­tion of food supplies and water within several restricted areas in Japan, where high radiation levels have rendered them un­safe for human habitation. While the rest of the story will remain a tragic history, it is this part of the series of unfortunate events that has inspired our research. It has indubitably highlighted the need for a novel sensor and instrumentation system that can withstand similar or worse conditions to avoid future catastrophe and assume damage

  15. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

  16. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  17. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques

  18. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31

    focus towards what to observe rather than how to observe in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using sensor teams, system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  19. DUAL-MODE PROPULSION SYSTEM ENABLING CUBESAT EXPLORATION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru; Dr. Steven Howe

    2014-06-01

    It is apparent the cost of planetary exploration is rising as mission budgets declining. Currently small scientific beds geared to performing limited tasks are being developed and launched into low earth orbit (LEO) in the form of small-scale satellite units, i.e., CubeSats. These micro- and nano-satellites are gaining popularity among the university and science communities due to their relatively low cost and design flexibility. To date these small units have been limited to performing tasks in LEO utilizing solar-based power. If a reasonable propulsion system could be developed, these CubeSat platforms could perform exploration of various extra-terrestrial bodies within the solar system engaging a broader range of researchers. Additionally, being mindful of mass, smaller cheaper launch vehicles (~1,000 kgs to LEO) can be targeted. This, in effect, allows for beneficial explora-tion to be conducted within limited budgets. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Re-search (CSNR) are proposing a low mass, radioisotope-based, dual-mode propulsion system capable of extending the exploration realm of these CubeSats out of LEO. The proposed radioisotope-based system would leverage the high specific energies [J/kg] associated with radioisotope materials and enhance their inherent low specific powers [W/g]. This is accomplished by accumulating thermal energy from nuclear decay within a central core over time. This allows for significant amounts of power to be transferred to a flowing gas over short periods of time. In the proposed configuration the stored energy can be utilized in two ways: (1) with direct propellant injection to the core, the energy can be converted into thrust through the use of a converging-diverging nozzle and (2) by flowing a working fluid through the core and subsequent Brayton engine, energy within the core can be converted to electrical energy. The first scenario achieves moderate ranges of thrust, but at a higher Isp than traditional chemical

  20. Greenhouse Gas Source Attribution: Measurements Modeling and Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Najm, Habib N.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; LaFranchi, Brian W.; Ivey, Mark D.; Schrader, Paul E.; Michelsen, Hope A.; Bambha, Ray P.

    2014-09-01

    assimilated meteorology fields, making it possible to perform a hybrid simulation, in which the Eulerian model (CMAQ) can be used to compute the initial condi- tion needed by the Lagrangian model, while the source-receptor relationships for a large state vector can be efficiently computed using the Lagrangian model in its backward mode. In ad- dition, CMAQ has a complete treatment of atmospheric chemistry of a suite of traditional air pollutants, many of which could help attribute GHGs from different sources. The inference of emissions sources using atmospheric observations is cast as a Bayesian model calibration problem, which is solved using a variety of Bayesian techniques, such as the bias-enhanced Bayesian inference algorithm, which accounts for the intrinsic model deficiency, Polynomial Chaos Expansion to accelerate model evaluation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling, and Karhunen-Lo %60 eve (KL) Expansion to reduce the dimensionality of the state space. We have established an atmospheric measurement site in Livermore, CA and are collect- ing continuous measurements of CO2 , CH4 and other species that are typically co-emitted with these GHGs. Measurements of co-emitted species can assist in attributing the GHGs to different emissions sectors. Automatic calibrations using traceable standards are performed routinely for the gas-phase measurements. We are also collecting standard meteorological data at the Livermore site as well as planetary boundary height measurements using a ceilometer. The location of the measurement site is well suited to sample air transported between the San Francisco Bay area and the California Central Valley.

  1. Final report on the Magnetized Target Fusion Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Slough

    2009-09-08

    Nuclear fusion has the potential to satisfy the prodigious power that the world will demand in the future, but it has yet to be harnessed as a practical energy source. The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. It is the contention here that a simpler path to fusion can be achieved by creating fusion conditions in a different regime at small scale (~ a few cm). One such program now under study, referred to as Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), is directed at obtaining fusion in this high energy density regime by rapidly compressing a compact toroidal plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). To make fusion practical at this smaller scale, an efficient method for compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. In one variant of MTF a conducting metal shell is imploded electrically. This radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to provide a suitable target FRC, as well as a simple and robust method for inserting and stopping the FRC within the imploding liner. The timescale for testing and development can be rapidly accelerated by taking advantage of a new facility funded by the Department of Energy. At this facility, two inductive plasma accelerators (IPA) were constructed and tested. Recent experiments with these IPAs have demonstrated the ability to rapidly form, accelerate and merge two hypervelocity FRCs into a compression chamber. The resultant FRC that was formed was hot (T&ion ~ 400 eV), stationary, and stable with a configuration lifetime several times that necessary for the MTF liner experiments. The accelerator length was less than

  2. Phase 1 Development Report for the SESSA Toolkit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Melton, Brad J; Anderson, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The Site Exploitation System for Situational Awareness ( SESSA ) tool kit , developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) , is a comprehensive de cision support system for crime scene data acquisition and Sensitive Site Exploitation (SSE). SESSA is an outgrowth of another SNL developed decision support system , the Building R estoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), a hardware/software solution for data acquisition, data management, and data analysis. SESSA was designed to meet forensic crime scene needs as defined by the DoD's Military Criminal Investigation Organiza tion (MCIO) . SESSA is a very comprehensive toolki t with a considerable amount of database information managed through a Microsoft SQL (Structured Query Language) database engine, a Geographical Information System (GIS) engine that provides comprehensive m apping capabilities, as well as a an intuitive Graphical User Interface (GUI) . An electronic sketch pad module is included. The system also has the ability to efficiently generate necessary forms for forensic crime scene investigations (e.g., evidence submittal, laboratory requests, and scene notes). SESSA allows the user to capture photos on site, and can read and generate ba rcode labels that limit transcription errors. SESSA runs on PC computers running Windows 7, but is optimized for touch - screen tablet computers running Windows for ease of use at crime scenes and on SSE deployments. A prototype system for 3 - dimensional (3 D) mapping and measur e ments was also developed to complement the SESSA software. The mapping system employs a visual/ depth sensor that captures data to create 3D visualizations of an interior space and to make distance measurements with centimeter - level a ccuracy. Output of this 3D Model Builder module provides a virtual 3D %22walk - through%22 of a crime scene. The 3D mapping system is much less expensive and easier to use than competitive systems. This document covers the basic installation and

  3. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond; Doug Adams

    2014-08-01

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the

  4. Synthetic Biology and the U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory System: Challenges and Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Sarah R.; Rodemeyer, Michael; Garfinkel, Michele S.; Friedman, Robert M

    2014-05-01

    engineering techniques will leave many engineered plants without any pre-market regulatory review. Second, the number and diversity of engineered microbes for commercial use will increase in the near future, challenging EPA’s resources, expertise, and perhaps authority to regulate them. For each of these challenges, the report sets out a series of options, including an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of each option from a variety of perspectives, for policy makers to consider. Policy responses will depend on the trade-offs chosen among competing considerations. This report, funded by the Department of Energy with additional funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, is the result of a two-year process that included interviews, commissioned background papers, discussions, and two workshops that sought input from a wide range of experts, including U.S. federal agency regulators, legal and science policy experts, representatives from the biotechnology indus¬try, and non-governmental organiza¬tions. This cross-section of views informed this report, but the conclusions are solely those of the authors. An Executive Summary, full Report, and background papers are available at: http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/synthetic-biology-and-the-us-biotechnology-regulatory-system/overview/

  5. Report on Lessons Learned from the NP 2010 Early Site Permit Program FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-26

    guidance for developing and reviewing ESP applications, issues involving ESP plant parameters, and suggestions for future ESP applicants. The development, submittal, and issuance of these first ESPs under DOE’s NP 2010 program started the momentum to exercise NRC’s new 10 CFR Part 52 licensing process. Several key questions that define critical issues regarding the effectiveness of regulations pertaining to ESPs have been identified and summarized in this report. However, the final resolution of whether the ESP component of the Part 52 process significantly contributes to the predictability in nuclear power plant licensing requires more experience and time, such as the completion of the ongoing combined Construction and Operating License (COL) process for the North Anna and Grand Gulf sites. The three ESP project participants prepared and submitted to DOE lessons learned reports from their experience in developing, submitting, and receiving an ESP. This document summarizes these reports, which are appended hereto. The Nuclear Energy Institute (http://www.nei.org/) and NRC (http://www.nrc.gov/) have also prepared reports regarding their perspectives on lessons learned during the ESP process. Their documents can be accessed on their respective web sites. Following is a summary of the lessons learned from the NP 2010 ESP projects. Effectiveness of the ESP Process: In general, the ESP process is expected (subject to demonstration of the ESP finality provisions in the North Anna and Grand Gulf ESPs) to provide high value for applicants as a site banking and risk mitigation strategy. However, several aspects of the initial process, such as NRC hearings and determining an acceptable approach to the NRC’s Emergency Planning requirements, proved challenging for the applicants. Project Execution: Initial regulatory and industry guidance for planning and executing an ESP application program proved to be insufficient to address NRC’s document review expectations. However

  6. DOE Chair of Excellence in Environmental Disciplines-Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurunganty, Sastry; Loran, Roberto; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Hijazi, Yazan; Nieto, Santander; Gomez, Will A.; Duconge, Jose; Cotto, María del C.; Muniz, Carlos; Diaz, Francisco J.; Neira, Carlos F.; Marquez, Francisco; Del Valle, W.; Thommes, M.

    2014-02-19

    Characterization of low Refractive Index Aerogel Silica for Cherenkov Counters- Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Sub-project PI, Dr. Jose Duconge Sub-project Co-PI, Dr. Santander Nieto Assistant Researcher, Francisco Diaz and Carlos Neira Associate Researchers. The initial aim of this sub-project was changed to the synthesis and characterization of extremely high specific surface area aerogel silica for gas storage. A high specific surface area silica gel that has applications in gas drying, cleaning operation useful in nuclear industry in process was developed. Sub-Project 2: Investigation Study of Magnetic and Electronic Transport Properties at Material Interfaces in Magnetic Multilayer Heterostructure using Gd. – Dr. Yazan Hijazi, Sub-project Co-PI. UT developed the capability and infrastructure to produce high quality thin-film magnetic films and magnetic multilayer structures with fine control over film quality and thickness using sputter deposition capability to perform in-house electric and magnetic characterization of these films. The research experimentally quantified the effect of Gd incorporation within the magnetic multilayer structure and produce magnetic media with exchanged decoupled multilevel magnetic anisotropy. From September 2006 to September 2011 the Massie Chair produced nineteen (19) publications, (including 3 books), five (5) presentations and three (3) international conferences abstracts. A total of fourteen (14) undergraduates and (6) graduate students acquired research experience. Two Ph.D. students presented their dissertations on topics related to nuclear energy and graduated as follows: María Cotto (May 2009) and Eric Calderón (May 2011). Five of the participating undergraduate students graduated: Ramon Polanco (BSME, May 2009), Jason Pérez (BSEE, May 2008), Rafael Colón (BSME, May 2008), Jessenia Marfisi (BS Chemistry, May 2008). Eleven (11) students were sent to National Laboratories (LANL, SNL and LLNL), NNSA and DoE facilities for summer

  7. Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low-Dose, Low-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-11-03

    month after irradiation (IR). At four months post-IR, these animals were comparable to sham-treated controls with regards to the abovementioned structural parameters. Irradation at 1 or 10 cGy did not result in any significant changes in bone structural parameters. (3) Irradiation of 16-wk old male mice with high doses of 56Fe or proton (50 or 200cGy), but not at low doses (5 or 10cGy), showed a similar loss of cancellous BV/TV and trabecular number at five weeks post-IR. (4) Age-related bone loss overtook acute radiation-induced decrements in bone structure within four months post-IR with 100 cGy gamma and 12 months post-IR with 200 cGy iron. Transgenic mice globally overexpressing human catalase gene in mitochondria did not exhibit cancellous bone loss as assessed at four month post-IR with 10 cGy proton, 50 cGy iron, or in combination. (5) The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for loss of bone with radiation are mediated primarily through increased osteoclastogenesis. Our data provide evidence that there are increases in gene expression of TNF alpha and MCP1 in the bone marrow cells 24 hours post-IR and of osteoclastogenic differentiation factor RANKL by day 3. These cytokines in the marrow may stimulate mature osteoclasts or drive osteoclastogenesis from precursors. (6) Osteoblastogenesis from marrow progenitors evaluated ex vivo decreased following whole body 56Fe irradiation at a dose threshold between 20 and 50 cGy whereas osteoclastogenesis ex vivo increased with doses as low as 10cGy two days post-IR of mice. However, the latter finding was not observed in more than a single experiment. (7) Gamma irradiation of cells in vitro requires relatively high doses (200cGy) to disturb normal osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis as evidenced by decrements in mineralized nodule formation, osteoclast counts, and expression of osteoblast related genes such as runx2, col1a1. (8) We also investigated the effect of antioxidants on osteoblastogenesis following

  8. Submerged Medium Voltage Cable Systems at Nuclear Power Plants. A Review of Research Efforts Relevant to Aging Mechanisms and Condition Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jason; Bernstein, Robert; White, II, Gregory Von; Glover, Steven F.; Neely, Jason C.; Pena, Gary; Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Zutavern, Fred J.; Gelbard, Fred

    2015-03-01

    In a submerged environment, power cables may experience accelerated insulation degradation due to water - related aging mechanisms . Direct contact with water or moisture intrusion in the cable insulation s ystem has been identified in the literature as a significant aging stressor that can affect performance and lifetime of electric cables . Progressive reduction of the dielectric strength is commonly a result of water treeing which involves the development of permanent hydrophilic structures in the insulation coinciding with the absorption of water into the cable . Water treeing is a phenomenon in which dendritic microvoids are formed in electric cable insulation due to electrochemic al reactions , electromechanical forces , and diffusion of contaminants over time . These reactions are caused by the combined effect s of water presence and high electrical stress es in the material . Water tree growth follow s a tree - like branching pattern , i ncreasing in volume and length over time . Although these cables can be "dried out," water tree degradation , specifically the growth of hydrophilic regions, is believed to be permanent and typically worsens over time. Based on established research , water treeing or water induced damage can occur in a variety of electric cables including XLPE, TR - XLPE and other insulating materials, such as EPR and butyl rubber . Once water trees or water induced damage form, the dielectric strength of an insulation materia l will decrease gradually with time as the water trees grow in length, which could eventually result in failure of the insulating material . Under wet conditions or i n submerged environments , several environmental and operational parameters can influence w ater tree initiation and affect water tree growth . These parameters include voltage cycling, field frequency, temperature, ion concentration and chemistry, type of insula tion material , and the characteristics of its defects. In this effort, a review of academic

  9. Phase 1 Final Technical Report - MgB2 Synthesis for High Field Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohit Bhatia; Peter McIntyre

    2009-11-02

    boron results in the formation of parasitic phases such as MgB4, MgB7, etc. Such parasitic phases are a primary element of the connectivity problem, in which even though a sample powder may contain grains of high-quality MgB2, adjacent grains are surrounded by intergrowths of parasitic phases so that current trans-port is badly degraded. The best results to date have been obtained using boron powder produced long ago for a rocket propellant development project. The synthesis process was complex and is now largely lost, and the manufacturing equipment has long since been scrapped. The last batch of the powder has been used during recent years to support MgB2 R&D at several labs, but supplies are dwindling. ATC has identified a first application of its plasma torch to synthesize phase-pure amorphous boron flake using a rapid-quench splat technique. Inexpensive technical-grade boron would be purified of contaminants, then dispersed as an aerosol in inert gas and passed through the plasma torch to melt it into a spray. The spray would be splat-condensed on a rotating drum to form pure amorphous flake. The process would begin with technical-grade boron powder, having good stoichiometric purity, nanoscale particles, but significant contamination of MgO and crystalline boron. We used wet chemistry to remove B2O3 completely and reduced the MgO impurity, and analyzed the particle size distribution using a Coulter counter and the phase composition using X-ray diffrac-tion (XRD). The next step will be to build an rf plasma torch with a recirculating single-component aerosol feed and the cooled splat drum and collector, and undertake process devel-opment for amorphous boron powder. This revised goal has two benefits. First, it is an easier technology than our ultimate goal of a multi-component laminar flow torch. We have been counseled by those experienced in plasma torch technology that our ultimate goal will require a torch that should be feasible but has never been attempted. It