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Sample records for tidal wetlands coastal

  1. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  2. Contrasting impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.A.; Codi, S.

    1996-12-31

    A localised oil spill was observed on the wetland marshes bordering a tidal creek near Cairns, Queensland in January 1994. Pollution and conservation issues are of paramount public concern in this region which boarders World Heritage Areas of coral reefs and coastal habitats. Local residents observed oil being dumped from a truck which was contracted to of oil the surface of the roads in the contiguous sugar cane farm for dust control. During this incident several truckloads of mixed waste oil were dumped onto a short section of road and into the wetlands. The oil contaminated a band of marsh 15-30 m wide along approximately 200 m of road. Impacted marsh included Melaleuca forest on the high side of the road and intertidal mangroves on the seaward side. The Queensland Department of Environment (QDE) initiated an impact assessment and directed the trucking company to clean up impacted areas. The extent of damage to wetlands from oil spills is related to the amount and type of oil spilled and the sensitivity of the habitats oiled. QDE asked the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences to assist with their study on the fate of the oil in this localised spill. The initial levels of petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sediments reached 17% of the dry weight in heavily impacted areas. Thus levels were similar to those reached after the catastrophic oil spill in Panama. Clean up efforts and natural dissipation processes reduced sediment hydrocarbon loads to nonacutely toxic levels in only 1.5 years in the intertidal mangroves. High levels remain in the Melaleuca sediments. We used internal molecular markers to detail hydrocarbon dissipation vs degradation. This study provides a contrast between impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in deep mud coastal habitats.

  3. A Synthesis of Environmental and Plant Community Data for Tidal Wetland Restoration Planning in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2013-12-01

    This report reanalyzes and synthesizes previously existing environmental and plant community data collected by PNNL at 55 tidal wetlands and 3 newly restored sites in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) between 2005 and 2011. Whereas data were originally collected for various research or monitoring objectives of five studies, the intent of this report is to provide only information that will have direct utility in planning tidal wetland restoration projects. Therefore, for this report, all tidal wetland data on plants and the physical environment, which were originally developed and reported by separate studies, were tabulated and reanalyzed as a whole. The geographic scope of the data collected in this report is from Bonneville Lock and Dam to the mouth of the Columbia River

  4. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that

  5. The dominant processes responsible for subsidence of coastal wetlands in south Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Kuecher, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    Wetland loss in coastal areas of Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana, largely results from two subsurface processes: (1) consolidation of recently deposited Holocene deltaic sediments and (2) active growth faulting. Locally, settlement is high where the thickness of valley fill is great and in broad interdistributary basins where the thickness of consolidation-prone, peaty soils is great. The delta cycle is identified as the fundamental sedimentologic unit that constitutes the lower delta plain. Peaty soils from the waning phase of the delta cycle are identified as the deltaic facies most subject to consolidation settlement. Data indicate direct relationships between the thickness of deltaic sediments in individual delta cycles, and the thickness of peaty soils capping these cycles, with present patterns of coastal tract land loss. In addition, active growth faulting is correlated with new areas of interior tract wetland loss. Consolidation and faulting largely explain the curious nature of wetland loss patterns in south Louisiana. Subsidence in The Netherlands has been attributed to similar causes, i.e. thick deposits of consolidation-prone sediments that accumulate on the downthrown sides of basin margin faults.

  6. Assessment of acreage and vegetation change in Florida`s Big Bend tidal wetlands using satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, E.A.; Stumpf, R.P.

    1997-06-01

    Fluctuations in sea level and impending development on the west coast of Florida have aroused concern for the relatively pristine tidal marshes of the Big Bend. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images for 1986 and 1995 are processed and evaluated for signs of change. The images cover 250 km of Florida`s Big Bend Gulf Coast, encompassing 160,000 acres of tidal marshes. Change is detected using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and land cover classification. The imagery shows negligible net loss or gain in the marsh over the 9-year period. However, regional changes in biomass are apparent and are due to natural disturbances such as low winter temperatures, fire, storm surge, and the conversion of forest to marsh. Within the marsh, the most prominent changes in NDVI and in land cover result from the recovery of mangroves from freezes, a decline of transitional upland vegetation, and susceptibility of the marsh edge and interior to variations in tidal flooding.

  7. tidal turbines

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    tidal turbines - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ...

  8. Tidal Energy Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Renewable Energy » Ocean » Tidal Energy Basics Tidal Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Photo of the ocean rising along the beach. Some of the oldest ocean energy technologies use tidal power. All coastal areas experience two high tides and two low tides over a period of slightly more than 24 hours. For those tidal differences to be harnessed into electricity, the difference between high and low tides must be more than 16 feet (or at least 5 meters). However, there are only about

  9. Geospatial Habitat Analysis in Pacific Northwest Coastal Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Borde, Amy B. ); Thom, Ronald M. ); Rumrill, Steven; Miller, L M.

    2003-08-01

    We assessed historical changes in the location and amount of estuarine habitat in three of the four largest coastal estuaries in the Pacific Northwest (Grays Harbor, Willapa Bay, and Coos Bay) as part of the Pacific Northwest Coastal Ecosystem Regional Study (PNCERS). To accomplish this, navigation charts, hydrographic survey data, maps, and published descriptions were used to gain information on the location of the shoreline, bathymetry, and vegetated habitats, which was then digitized and subjected to geospatial analysis using a geographic information system. In addition, we used present-day elevational boundaries for marshes, flats, and eelgrass meadows to help define habitat areas where they were not indicated on historical maps. The analysis showed that tidal flats have decreased in all study areas; potential eelgrass habitat has increased in Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay and decreased slightly in Coos Bay; tidal wetland area has declined in all three coastal estuaries, with increases in localized areas due to filling and sedimentation; and dramatic changes have occurred at the mouths of Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay. As has been shown before, these data illustrate that direct physical alteration (filling and diking) has resulted in large changes to habitats. However, indirect impacts from forest practices in the watershed, as well as variation in climatic factors and oceanographic processes, may also have contributed to changes. The information provides more evidence for managing estuarine habitats in the region and a employing a historical template to plan habitat restoration in the future.

  10. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Investigations into Wetland Carbon Sequestration as Remediation for Global Warming

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Blanton, Susan L.; Borde, Amy B.; Williams, Greg D.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Huesemann, Michael H.; KW Nehring and SE Brauning

    2002-01-01

    Wetlands can potentially sequester vast amounts of carbon. However, over 50% of wetlands globally have been degraded or lost. Restoration of wetland systems may therefore result in increased sequestration of carbon. Preliminary results of our investigations into atmospheric carbon sequestration by restored coastal wetlands indicate that carbon can be sequestered in substantial quantities in the first 2-50 years after restoration of natural hydrology and sediment accretion processes.

  12. An introduction to coastal geomorphology

    SciTech Connect

    Pethick, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book is an introduction to wave and tidally dominated coastal forms, including beaches, cliffs, dunes, estuaries, mudflats and marshlands. The book emphasises the physical mechanisms by which this variety of landforms is produced and maintained. It introduces the energy outputs - waves, currents, tides - into the coastal 'machine', examines the way in which this energy is converted into water and sediment movement, and leads to an account of coastal landform development.

  13. Estuarine Habitats for Juvenile Salmon in the Tidally-Influenced Lower Columbia River and Estuary : Reporting Period September 15, 2008 through May 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, António M.

    2009-08-02

    This work focuses on the numerical modeling of Columbia River estuarine circulation and associated modeling-supported analyses conducted as an integral part of a multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional effort led by NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. The overall effort is aimed at: (1) retrospective analyses to reconstruct historic bathymetric features and assess effects of climate and river flow on the extent and distribution of shallow water, wetland and tidal-floodplain habitats; (2) computer simulations using a 3-dimensional numerical model to evaluate the sensitivity of salmon rearing opportunities to various historical modifications affecting the estuary (including channel changes, flow regulation, and diking of tidal wetlands and floodplains); (3) observational studies of present and historic food web sources supporting selected life histories of juvenile salmon as determined by stable isotope, microchemistry, and parasitology techniques; and (4) experimental studies in Grays River in collaboration with Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) and the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) to assess effects of multiple tidal wetland restoration projects on various life histories of juvenile salmon and to compare responses to observed habitat-use patterns in the mainstem estuary. From the above observations, experiments, and additional modeling simulations, the effort will also (5) examine effects of alternative flow-management and habitat-restoration scenarios on habitat opportunity and the estuary's productive capacity for juvenile salmon. The underlying modeling system is part of the SATURN1coastal-margin observatory [1]. SATURN relies on 3D numerical models [2, 3] to systematically simulate and understand baroclinic circulation in the Columbia River estuary-plume-shelf system [4-7] (Fig. 1). Multi-year simulation databases of circulation are produced as an integral part of SATURN, and have multiple applications in understanding estuary

  14. Tidal Electric | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tidal Electric Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: SW19 8UY Product: Developed a technology named 'tidal lagoons' to build tidal electric projects. Coordinates:...

  15. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in early life stages of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina serpentina) from a coastal wetland on Lake Ontario, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.A.; Lean, D.R.S.; Carey, J.H.; Brooks, R.J.; Ng, P.

    1995-03-01

    To assess intra-clutch variation in contaminant concentrations in eggs, and to investigate the dynamics of chlorinated hydrocarbon accumulation in embryos of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina), concentrations of p,p{prime}-DDE, hexachlorobenzene, trans-nonachlor, cis-chlordane, and six PCB congeners were measured in eggs, embryos, and hatchlings. Samples were collected from Cootes Paradise, a wetland at the western end of Lake Ontario, Ontario, Canada. The intra-clutch variation in chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations within four snapping turtle clutches was determined by analyzing the first, last, and middle five eggs oviposited in the nest. The first five eggs had the highest mean concentrations of all chlorinated hydrocarbons, wet weight, and egg diameter. On a lipid weight basis, the first five eggs contained the highest concentration of all compounds except total PCBs and cis-chlordane. The concentration of cis-chlordane was the only parameter measured that was significantly different among the three sets of eggs. At hatching, snapping turtles without yolk sacs contained from 55.2 to 90.5% of the absolute amount of organochlorine compounds measured in the egg at oviposition. Eighteen days after hatching, the body burden of PCBs and pesticides decreased to 45.3 to 62.2% of that in the fresh egg. The accumulation of organochlorine chemicals in embryonic turtles peaked at or just before hatching and then declined thereafter, which is consistent with trends reported in developing sea turtles, fish, and birds.

  16. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStrai...

  17. Tidal Flow Turbulence Measurements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and it is a metric in the wind energy industry. For acoustic Dop surements, a noise-corrected expression of ... used to simulate tidal turbine perform quire speci cation ...

  18. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  19. The environmental interactions of tidal and wave energy generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Frid, Chris; Andonegi, Eider; Judd, Adrian; Rihan, Dominic; Rogers, Stuart I.; Kenchington, Ellen

    2012-01-15

    Global energy demand continues to grow and tidal and wave energy generation devices can provide a significant source of renewable energy. Technological developments in offshore engineering and the rising cost of traditional energy means that offshore energy resources will be economic in the next few years. While there is now a growing body of data on the ecological impacts of offshore wind farms, the scientific basis on which to make informed decisions about the environmental effects of other offshore energy developments is lacking. Tidal barrages have the potential to cause significant ecological impacts particularly on bird feeding areas when they are constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Offshore tidal stream energy and wave energy collectors offer the scope for developments at varying scales. They also have the potential to alter habitats. A diversity of designs exist, including floating, mid-water column and seabed mounted devices, with a variety of moving-part configurations resulting in a unique complex of potential environmental effects for each device type, which are discussed to the extent possible. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We review the environmental impacts of tidal barrages and fences, tidal stream farms and wave energy capture devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts on habitats, species and the water column, and effects of noise and electromagnetic fields are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tidal barrages can cause significant impacts on bird feeding areas when constructed at coastal estuaries or bays. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wave energy collectors can alter water column and sea bed habitats locally and over large distances.

  20. Virginia coastal resources management program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Approval of a coastal management plan for coastal land and water use activities on the coast of Virginia is proposed. The coastal management area would embrace all of Tidewater Virginia, approximately 5000 miles long, and would extend to the three-mile outer limit of the United States territorial sea. The core regulatory program would include fisheries management, subaqueous lands management, wetland management, dunes management, nonpoint source pollution control, point source pollution control, shoreline sanitation, and air pollution control. Geographic areas of particular concern would be designated as worthy of special consideration in any planning or management process. These areas would include natural resource areas, such as wetlands, spawning areas, coastal sand dunes, barrier islands, and special wildlife management areas. Natural hazard areas would include areas vulnerable to erosion and areas subject to damage from wind, tides, and storm-related events. Geographic areas of special concern would include those with particular conservation, recreational, ecological, and aesthetic values. Waterfront development areas would include ports, commercial fishing piers, and community waterfronts. Shorefront access planning would provide access to the shoreline and water for recreational activities. Each year, two additional boat ramps would be planned for construction. Energy facility planning would focus on facilities involved in the production of electricity and petroleum, and in the export of coal. Shoreline erosion mitigation planning would identify, control, and mitigate erosion.

  1. Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-30

    Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

  2. Tidal | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing...

  3. Tidal Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto; Palodichuk, Michael; Polagye, Brian; Thomson, James; Chime, Arshiya; Malte, Philip

    2014-03-31

    This technical report contains results on the following topics: 1) Testing and analysis of sub-scale hydro-kinetic turbines in a flume, including the design and fabrication of the instrumented turbines. 2) Field measurements and analysis of the tidal energy resource and at a site in northern Puget Sound, that is being examined for turbine installation. 3) Conceptual design and performance analysis of hydro-kinetic turbines operating at high blockage ratio, for use for power generation and flow control in open channel flows.

  4. TidalStream | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    TidalStream Jump to: navigation, search Name: TidalStream Place: Southam, United Kingdom Zip: CV47 0HF Product: UK-based developer of platforms for tidal turbines. Coordinates:...

  5. Tidal Energy Limited | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Energy Limited (TEL) Place: Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom Zip: CF23 8RS Product: Tidal stream device developer. Coordinates:...

  6. Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tocardo Tidal Energy Ltd Address: De Weel 20 Place: Zijdewind Zip: 1736KB Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and...

  7. Coastal Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2014-12-23

    Book review of Coastal Conservation Edited by Brooke Maslo and Julie L. Lockwood Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2014, 382 pages ISBN 978-1-107-60674-6,

  8. A modeling study of the potential water quality impacts from in-stream tidal energy extraction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system.more » Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. Furthermore, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.« less

  9. Ecological safety of tidal-power projects

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M. P.; Shilin, M. B.

    2010-07-15

    The operating regime of tidal power plants requires ecological monitoring of their associated water area.

  10. Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Stream Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Stream Address: 76 Dukes Ave Place: London Zip: W4 2 AK Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: 01926...

  11. Keep Wetland from Eroding

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    just above the confluence with Los Alamos Canyon, reduces erosion at the foot of the wetlands. August 1, 2013 Entrance of Pueblo Canyon grade-control structure Entrance of Pueblo...

  12. Coastal land loss in Texas - An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Paine, J.G. )

    1990-09-01

    Each year in Texas more than 1,500 acres of prime real estate and productive wetlands are destroyed along the Gulf shoreline and near the bay margins primarily as a result of coastal erosion and submergence. Wetland losses constitute about half of the total land losses. Historical analyses of maps and aerial photographs since the mid-1800s indicate that land losses are accelerating and that human activities are either directly or indirectly responsible for the increased losses, Natural decreases in sediment supply since the modern sea-level stillstand have been exacerbated by (1) river basin projects that reduce the volume of sediment transported to the coast and (2) coastal structures and navigation projects that prevent redistribution of littoral sediments along the coast. Erosion is primarily caused by high wave and current energy combined with an inadequate supply of sediment. Erosion is responsible for higher local rates of land loss than submergence, and the erosion losses are more perceptible, especially after major storms when the greatest losses occur. The principal components of submergence are subsidence and the eustatic rise in sea level. Together these components are recorded by tide gauges as a relative rise in sea level. Submergence converts uplands to wetlands and wetlands to open water. These surficial changes occur mostly on the coastal plain but are also observed on barrier islands and bayhead deltas and within entrenched valleys. Although compactional subsidence is a natural process operating in the Gulf Coast basin, most of the accelerated land-surface subsidence in Texas is attributed to extraction of shallow ground water or production of hydrocarbons at moderate depths. Faults activated by the withdrawal of these fluids concentrate the subsidence near the fault planes. Coastal land losses caused by dredging are less than those caused by erosion and submergence, but they constitute a growing percentage of total land losses.

  13. Modeling of In-stream Tidal Energy Development and its Potential Effects in Tacoma Narrows, Washington, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding and providing proactive information on the potential for tidal energy projects to cause changes to the physical system and to key water quality constituents in tidal waters is a necessary and cost-effective means to avoid costly regulatory involvement and late stage surprises in the permitting process. This paper presents a modeling study for evaluating the tidal energy extraction and its potential impacts on the marine environment in a real world site - Tacoma Narrows of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. An unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, fitted with a module that simulates tidal energy devices, was applied to simulate the tidal energy extracted by different turbine array configurations and the potential effects of the extraction at local and system-wide scales in Tacoma Narrows and South Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated the advantage of an unstructured-grid model for simulating the far-field effects of tidal energy extraction in a large model domain, as well as assessing the near-field effect using a fine grid resolution near the tidal turbines. The outcome shows that a realistic near-term deployment scenario extracts a very small fraction of the total tidal energy in the system and that system wide environmental effects are not likely; however, near-field effects on the flow field and bed shear stress in the area of tidal turbine farm are more likely. Model results also indicate that from a practical standpoint, hydrodynamic or water quality effects are not likely to be the limiting factor for development of large commercial-scale tidal farms. Results indicate that very high numbers of turbines are required to significantly alter the tidal system; limitations on marine space or other environmental concerns are likely to be reached before reaching these deployment levels. These findings show that important information obtained from numerical modeling can be used to inform regulatory and policy processes for tidal energy development.

  14. Category:Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Earth Tidal Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Earth Tidal Analysis page? For detailed information on Earth Tidal Analysis, click here....

  15. MHK Technologies/Deep Gen Tidal Turbines | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Gen Tidal Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Deep Gen Tidal Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal...

  16. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_UW Tidal Resource-Abstract...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    turbine operating in a narrow, tidal channel. The site is a generalized version of Tacoma Narrows, Puget Sound, Washington. The resource is a mixed, mainly semidiurnal tidal...

  17. Safeguarding wetland on Laboratory property

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Safeguarding wetland on Laboratory property Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Safeguarding wetland on Laboratory property Protecting our environment August 1, 2013 The wetlands in Sandia Canyon on Lab property provide a home to a large amount of wildlife. Work is taking place to preserve the area and manage its water supply The wetlands in Sandia Canyon on Lab property

  18. Tidal Generation Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Generation Ltd EMEC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Gen Tidal Turbines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tidal...

  19. Maine Tidal Power Initiative: Environmental Impact Protocols For Tidal Power

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Michael Leroy; Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin; Xue, Huijie; Johnson, Teresa R.

    2014-02-02

    The Maine Tidal Power Initiative (MTPI), an interdisciplinary group of engineers, biologists, oceanographers, and social scientists, has been conducting research to evaluate tidal energy resources and better understand the potential effects and impacts of marine hydro-kinetic (MHK) development on the environment and local community. Project efforts include: 1) resource assessment, 2) development of initial device design parameters using scale model tests, 3) baseline environmental studies and monitoring, and 4) human and community responses. This work included in-situ measurement of the environmental and social response to the pre-commercial Turbine Generator Unit (TGU®) developed by Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) as well as considering the path forward for smaller community scale projects.

  20. Tidally-Induced Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2x105M{circle_dot} swallow a typical 0.6M{circle_dot} white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an Xray flare close to the Eddington limit of L{sub Edd} {approx} 10{sup 41}erg/s (Mbh/1000M{circle_dot}), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  1. ARRAY OPTIMIZATION FOR TIDAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN A TIDAL CHANNEL A NUMERICAL MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea

    2014-04-18

    This paper presents an application of a hydrodynamic model to simulate tidal energy extraction in a tidal dominated estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast. A series of numerical experiments were carried out to simulate tidal energy extraction with different turbine array configurations, including location, spacing and array size. Preliminary model results suggest that array optimization for tidal energy extraction in a real-world site is a very complex process that requires consideration of multiple factors. Numerical models can be used effectively to assist turbine siting and array arrangement in a tidal turbine farm for tidal energy extraction.

  2. Alaska ADEC Wetlands Regulation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wetlands Regulation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Alaska ADEC Wetlands Regulation Author Alaska Division of Water Published Alaska...

  3. Tidal Sails AS | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sails AS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Sails AS Address: Standgaten 130 Place: Haugesund Zip: 5531 Region: Norway Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number: +32 474 98...

  4. Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hydraulic Generators Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Address: 14 Thislesboon Drive Place: Mumbles Zip: SA3 4HY Region: United Kingdom Sector:...

  5. Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC Address: 45 Memorial Circle PO Box 1058 Place: Augusta Zip: 4332 Region: United States Sector: Marine and...

  6. Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Polagye, Brian

    2011-11-01

    This presentation from the Water Peer Review highlights one of the program's marine and hyrokinetics environmental projects to determine the likely acoustic effects from a tidal energy device.

  7. Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area 1980 1980 Reservoir response to...

  8. European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The European Wave and Tidal Energy Conference (EWTEC) series are international, technical and scientific conferences, focussed on ocean renewable energy and widely respected for their commitment to...

  9. Tidal Energy Test Platform | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Test Platform Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Tidal Energy Test Platform Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics...

  10. Wetlands management at CERCLA sites

    SciTech Connect

    Harman, C.R.; Romaine, W.M.; D'Alleinne, C.P. )

    1993-01-01

    Wetlands have historically been viewed as dumping grounds for a wide range of waste products. The uncontrolled introduction of hazardous and toxic waste materials into these sensitive ecosystems has prompted the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to oversee many investigatory and remediation activities in wetlands, as mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). USEPA documents, in fact, note that approximately 72% of the CERCLA sites in USEPA Regions 1,2,3 and 4 are associated, to some degree, with wetlands. However, CERCLA activities in these areas are often complicated by the very regulatory measures designed to preserve and protect wetlands from anthropogenic disturbances. The ability of a Potentially Responsible Party (PRP) to effectively respond to issues at a CERCLA site, while still being responsive to both Federal and State wetlands regulations, requires the utmost in both technical and management expertise.

  11. Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tidal Energy Technology AS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hydra Tidal Energy Technology AS Address: PO Box 399 Place: Harstad Zip: 9484 Region: Norway Sector: Marine and...

  12. Verdant-Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Verdant-Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleVerdant-RooseveltIslandTidalEnergy&oldid680702" ...

  13. MHK Technologies/Sihwa tidal barrage power plant | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sihwa tidal barrage power plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sihwa tidal barrage power plant.jpg Technology Profile...

  14. MHK Technologies/Tidal Delay | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tidal Delay < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Delay.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Woodshed Technologies Ltd...

  15. Severn Tidal Power Group STpg | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Severn Tidal Power Group STpg Jump to: navigation, search Name: Severn Tidal Power Group STpg Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is...

  16. MHK Technologies/Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Uldolmok Pilot Tidal Current Power Plant.jpg...

  17. MHK Technologies/Jiangxia Tidal Power Station | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jiangxia Tidal Power Station < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Jiangxia Tidal Power Station.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  18. High Fidelity Evaluation of Tidal Turbine Performance for Industry...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fidelity Evaluation of Tidal Turbine Performance for Industry Partner - Sandia Energy ... High Fidelity Evaluation of Tidal Turbine Performance for Industry Partner Home...

  19. MHK Technologies/Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tidal Turbine SRTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Scotrenewables Tidal Turbine SRTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  20. MHK Technologies/Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Rotech Tidal Turbine RTT.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization...

  1. MHK Projects/Tidal Generation Ltd EMEC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Overseeing Organization Tidal Generation Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDeep Gen Tidal Turbines Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  2. The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Wash Tidal Barrier Corporation Place: Cambridge, England, United Kingdom Zip: CB24 8RX Product: Company building a tidal barrier...

  3. EO 11990: Protection Of Wetlands

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new...

  4. A Spatially Based Area–Time Inundation Index Model Developed to Assess Habitat Opportunity in Tidal–Fluvial Wetlands and Restoration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ward, Duane L.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrodynamics of tidal wetland areas in the lower Columbia River floodplain and estuary directly affect habitat opportunity for endangered salmonid fishes. Physical and biological structures and functions in the system are directly affected by inundation patterns influenced by tidal cycles, hydropower operations, river discharge, upriver water withdrawals, climate, and physical barriers such as dikes, culverts, and tide gates. Ongoing ecosystem restoration efforts are intended to increase the opportunity for salmon to access beneficial habitats by hydrologically reconnecting main-stem river channels and diked areas within the historical floodplain. To address the need to evaluate habitat opportunity, a geographic information system-based Area-Time Inundation Index Model (ATIIM) was developed. The ATIIM integrates in situ or modeled hourly water-surface elevation (WSE) data and advanced terrain processing of high-resolution elevation data. The ATIIM uses a spatially based wetted-area algorithm to determine site average bankfull elevation, two- and three-dimensional inundation extent, and other site metrics. Hydrological process metrics such as inundation frequency, duration, maximum area, and maximum frequency area can inform evaluation of proposed restoration sites; e.g., determine trade-offs between WSE and habitat opportunity, contrast alternative restoration designs, predict impacts of altered flow regimes, and estimate nutrient and biomass fluxes. In an adaptive management framework, this model can be used to provide standardized site comparisons and effectiveness monitoring of changes in the developmental trajectories of restoration sites. Results are presented for 11 wetlands representative of tidal marshes, tidal forested wetlands, and restoration sites.

  5. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_UW Tidal Resource-Abstract...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Brian Polagye Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center University of Washington, Seattle, WA Introduction Reference Model 1 is a tidal turbine operating in a narrow, ...

  6. 12th Annual Wave & Tidal 2015

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The UK is currently the undisputed global leader in marine energy, with more wave and tidal stream devices installed than the rest of the world combined. This leading position is built on an...

  7. Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

  8. Appendix C. Part 303 Wetland Permit Application, Wetland Impact Assessment and Compensatory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Part 303 Wetland Permit Application, Wetland Impact Assessment and Compensatory Mitigation Proposal DOE/EA-1709 C-1 APPENDIX C. PART 303 WETLAND PERMIT APPLICATION, WETLAND IMPACT ASSESSMENT AND COMPENSATORY MITIGATION PROPOSAL On January 28, 2010, Compact Power, Inc. submitted a Part 303 Wetland Permit Application, which contains a compensatory mitigation proposal, to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and Environment. The application and proposal are contained in this appendix.

  9. Coastal Zone Management Act and related legislation: Revision 3. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-15

    In recognition of the increasing pressures upon the nation`s coastal resources, Congress enacted the Coastal Zone Management Act in 1972. Its purpose is to encourage states to preserve, protect, develop, and, where possible, restore or enhance such valuable natural resources as wetlands, floodplains, estuaries, beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs, as well as the fish and wildlife utilizing those habitats. A unique feature of the Act is that participation by states is voluntary. One key provision for encouraging states to participate is the availability of federal financial assistance to any coastal state or territory, including those on the Great Lakes, which is willing to develop and implement a comprehensive coastal management program. Additionally, the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) was passed in 1983. This report contains the legislative history and statues associated with each Act. Regulations for implementation and other guidance are included.

  10. Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Bruce Albert

    2014-05-07

    , the Project Team developed a conceptual tidal energy project design utilizing ORPC’s TidGen® Power System. While the Project Team has not committed to ORPC technology for future development of a False Pass project, this conceptual design was critical to informing the Project’s economic analysis. The results showed that power from a tidal energy project could be provided to the City of False at a rate at or below the cost of diesel generated electricity and sold to commercial customers at rates competitive with current market rates, providing a stable, flat priced, environmentally sound alternative to the diesel generation currently utilized for energy in the community. The Project Team concluded that with additional grants and private investment a tidal energy project at False Pass is well-positioned to be the first tidal energy project to be developed in Alaska, and the first tidal energy project to be interconnected to an isolated micro grid in the world. A viable project will be a model for similar projects in coastal Alaska.

  11. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  12. Reference Model #1 - Tidal Energy: Resource Dr. Brian Polagye

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 is a tidal turbine operating in a narrow, tidal channel. ... Meteorological currents include wave- and wind-induced ... This also reduces ensemble Doppler noise (n ensemble ) by a ...

  13. MHK Technologies/Tidal Sails | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to wires strung across the tidal stream at an angle The sails are driven back and forth by the tidal flow between two stations at one of which the generator is installed...

  14. Wetlands and Riparian Zones | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wetlands and Riparian Zones Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWetlandsandRiparianZones&oldid612217...

  15. Hardwood re-sprout control in hydrologically restored Carolina Bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Lee, Justin

    2009-06-01

    Carolina bays are isolated depression wetlands located in the upper coastal plain region of the eastern Unites States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches as a result of agricultural conversion. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna species. Previous bay restoration projects have identified woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. Three bays were hydrologically restored on the Savannah River Site, SC, by plugging drainage ditches. Residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays were harvested and the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change was monitored. A foliar herbicide approved for use in wetlands (Habitat® (Isopropylamine salt of Imazapyr)) was applied on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acer rubrum L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.) sprouting. The effectiveness of the foliar herbicide was tested across a hydrologic gradient in an effort to better understand the relationship between depth and duration of flooding, the intensity of hardwood re-sprout pressure, and the need for hardwood management practices such as herbicide application.

  16. Vermont Wetland General Permit (3-9025) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    authorizing issuance of individual permits for specified activities within certain wetlands and buffers under Vermont's wetlands regulation. Author Vermont Department of...

  17. Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requiremen...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    list of sources that may be used in determining the location of floodplains and wetlands, and allowing floodplain and wetland assessments for actions proposed to be taken...

  18. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Florida)

    SciTech Connect

    Zale, A.V.; Merrifield, S.G. )

    1989-07-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, habitats, and environmental requirements of coastal species of fishes and aquatic invertebrates. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The tarpon and ladyfish are popular gamefishes. Adults spawn offshore. Larval and juvenile stages inhabit coastal marshes and mangroves. Both species are thermophilic (preferring warm water), euryhaline (tolerant of a wide range of salinity), and are capable of surviving at low oxygen concentrations. Wetlands destruction and degradation negatively affect these species by reducing nursery areas. 3 figs.

  19. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  20. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive

  1. International Coastal Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Coastal Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: International Coastal Biofuels Place: Tazewell, Virginia Zip: 24651 Sector: Biofuels Product: International Coastal Biofuels is a...

  2. A coastal hazards data base for the US Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, R.C.; Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US Gulf Coast at risk to sea-level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US Gulf Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data base systems. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data on elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. To allow for the identification of coastlines at risk from sea-level rise, 7 of the 22 original data variables in this data base were classified by vulnerability and used to create 7 relative risk variables. These relative risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a coastal vulnerability index for each grid cell and/or line segment. The data for these 29 variables (i.e., the 22 original variables and 7 risk variables) have been placed into the following data formats: (1) Gridded polygon data for the 22 original data variables. Data include elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. (2) Gridded polygon data for the seven classified risk variables. The risk variables are classified versions of: mean coastal elevation, geology, geomorphology, local subsidence trend, mean shoreline displacement, maximum tidal range, and maximum significant wave height. (3) 1:2,000,000 line segment data containing the 29 data variables (the 22 original data variables and the seven classified risk variables). (4) Supplemental point data for the stations used in calculating the sea-level trend and tidal range data sets. (5) Supplemental line segment data containing a 1:2,000,000 digitized coastline of the US Gulf Coast as defined by this document.

  3. MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Astoria Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMA...

  4. MHK Projects/Cape Islands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Islands Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  5. MHK Projects/Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Town of Wiscasset Tidal Resources < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  6. MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  7. MHK Projects/Angoon Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Angoon Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  8. MHK Projects/Kendall Head Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Kendall Head Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  9. MHK Projects/Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Kingsbridge Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","t...

  10. MHK Projects/Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy RITE < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3",...

  11. MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  12. MHK Projects/Pennamaquan Tidal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Phase Phase ? PermitLicense Buildout (MW) 21 Main Overseeing Organization Pennamaquan Tidal Power LLC Project Licensing FERC License Docket Number P-13884 Environmental...

  13. MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Alaska Tidal Energy Project ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMA...

  14. MHK Projects/Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Portsmouth Area Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3...

  15. MHK Projects/Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Deception Pass Tidal Energy Hydroelectric Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  16. MHK Projects/Edgar Town Nantucket Tidal Energy | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Town Nantucket Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":...

  17. MHK Projects/Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type...

  18. MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    East Foreland Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"...

  19. MHK Projects/Turnagain Arm Tidal | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Turnagain Arm Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP...

  20. MHK Projects/Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  1. MHK Projects/Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Spieden Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3...

  2. MHK Projects/Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Muskeget Channel Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type...

  3. MHK Projects/Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Nantucket Tidal Energy Plant < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  4. MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Avalon Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom...

  5. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goo...

  6. MHK Projects/Highlands Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMA...

  7. MHK Projects/Penobscot Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Penobscot Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  8. MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Treat Island Tidal < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP"...

  9. MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Cook Inlet Tidal Energy < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROA...

  10. MHK Projects/Paimpol Brehat tidal farm | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Paimpol Brehat tidal farm < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  11. MHK Projects/Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Guemes Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3"...

  12. MHK Technologies/Tidal Barrage | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Barrage.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine...

  13. MHK Projects/Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tacoma Narrows Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3"...

  14. MHK Technologies/TidalStar | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search << Return to the MHK database homepage TidalStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Bourne Energy Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine...

  15. List of Tidal Energy Incentives | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Coal with CCS Concentrating Solar Power Energy Storage Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Natural Gas Nuclear Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy BiomassBiogas Hydroelectric...

  16. MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Technology Resource Click here CurrentTidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery Concept Definition Early...

  17. MHK Technologies/Tidal Turbine | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aquascientific Project(s)...

  18. MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream Turbine | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Stream Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization StatoilHydro co owned...

  19. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  20. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  1. Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  2. MHK Projects/Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Project Country Australia Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Clarence Strait Coordinates -12.083533792616, 131.04972839355 Project...

  3. MHK Technologies/Tidal Stream | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery Concept Definition Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The TidalStream SST (Semi-Submersible Turbine) is...

  4. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Project Portugal | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Organization Tidal Energy Pty Ltd Project Technology *MHK TechnologiesDavidson Hill Venturi DHV Turbine Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See...

  5. MHK Projects/Seaflow Tidal Energy System | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    been operating the Seaflow Tidal Energy System project since May 2003. This was an experimental test rig - the successor, SeaGen is intended for commercial applications Project...

  6. Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Marketing Summaries (13) Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles ...

  7. Application of EPA wetland research program approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolka, R., K.; Trettin, C., C.; Nelson, E., A.; Barton, C., D.; Fletcher, D., E.

    2002-01-01

    Kolka, R.K., C.C. Trettin, E.A. Nelson, C.D. Barton, and D.E. Fletcher. 2002. Application of the EPA Wetland Research Program Approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment. J. Env. Monitoring & Restoration 1(1):37-51. Forested wetland restoration assessment is difficult because of the timeframe necessary for the development of a forest ecosystem. The development of a forested wetland ecosystem includes the recovery of hydrology, soils, vegetation, and faunal communities. To assess forested wetland restoration projects, measures need to be developed that are sensitive to early changes in community development and are predictive of future conditions. In this study we apply the EPS's Wetland Research Program's (WRP) approach to assess the recovery of two thermally altered riparian wetland systems in South Carolina. In one of the altered wetland systems, approximately 75% of the wetland was planted with bottomland tree seedlings in an effort to hasten recovery. Individual studies addressing hydrology, soils, vegetation, and faunal communities indicate variable recovery responses.

  8. New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources New Interactive Map Reveals U.S. Tidal Energy Resources July 7, 2011 - 10:50am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams | Source: Georgia Institute of Technology Michael Reed Michael Reed Director, Technical and

  9. Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collar, Craig

    2015-09-14

    This document represents the final report for the Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, located in Puget Sound, Washington, United States. The Project purpose was to license, permit, and install a grid-connected deep-water tidal turbine array (two turbines) to be used as a platform to gather operational and environmental data on tidal energy generation. The data could then be used to better inform the viability of commercial tidal energy generation from technical, economic, social, and environmental standpoints. This data would serve as a critical step towards the responsible advancement of commercial scale tidal energy in the United States and around the world. In late 2014, Project activities were discontinued due to escalating costs, and the DOE award was terminated in early 2015. Permitting, licensing, and engineering design activities were completed under this award. Final design, deployment, operation, and monitoring were not completed. This report discusses the results and accomplishments achieved under the subject award.

  10. Executive Order 11990: Protection Of Wetlands

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new...

  11. EO 11990: Protection Of Wetlands (1977)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new...

  12. Vermont Wetland Rules | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Abstract It is the policy of the State of Vermont to identify and protect significant wetlands and the values and functions which they serve in such a manner that the goal of no...

  13. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  14. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R. E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  15. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa

  16. Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-05-01

    This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

  17. Vermont Wetlands Contact and Inquiry Portal | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wetlands Contact and Inquiry Portal Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Vermont Wetlands Contact and Inquiry Portal Abstract A developer...

  18. Tidal energy site resource assessment in the East River tidal strait, near Roosevelt Island, New York, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S.; Colby, Jonathan

    2014-06-22

    This study demonstrates a site resource assessment to examine the temporal variation of the mean current, turbulence intensities, and power densities for a tidal energy site in the East River tidal strait. These variables were derived from two-months of acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements at the design hub height of the Verdant Power Gen5 hydrokinetic turbine. The study site is a tidal strait that exhibits semi-diurnal tidal current characteristics, with a mean horizontal current speed of 1.4 m s-1, and turbulence intensity of 15% at a reference mean current of 2 m s-1. Flood and ebb flow directions are nearly bi-directional, with higher current magnitude during flood tide, which skews the power production towards the flood tide period. The tidal hydrodynamics at the site are highly regular, as indicated by the tidal current time series that resembles a sinusoidal function. This study also shows that the theoretical force and power densities derived from the current measurements can significantly be influenced by the length of the time window used for averaging the current data. Furthermore, the theoretical power density at the site, derived from the current measurements, is one order of magnitude greater than that reported in the U.S. national resource assessment. As a result, this discrepancy highlights the importance of conducting site resource assessments based on measurements at the tidal energy converter device scale.

  19. Tidal energy site resource assessment in the East River tidal strait, near Roosevelt Island, New York, New York

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S.; Colby, Jonathan

    2014-06-22

    This study demonstrates a site resource assessment to examine the temporal variation of the mean current, turbulence intensities, and power densities for a tidal energy site in the East River tidal strait. These variables were derived from two-months of acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements at the design hub height of the Verdant Power Gen5 hydrokinetic turbine. The study site is a tidal strait that exhibits semi-diurnal tidal current characteristics, with a mean horizontal current speed of 1.4 m s-1, and turbulence intensity of 15% at a reference mean current of 2 m s-1. Flood and ebb flow directions are nearlymore » bi-directional, with higher current magnitude during flood tide, which skews the power production towards the flood tide period. The tidal hydrodynamics at the site are highly regular, as indicated by the tidal current time series that resembles a sinusoidal function. This study also shows that the theoretical force and power densities derived from the current measurements can significantly be influenced by the length of the time window used for averaging the current data. Furthermore, the theoretical power density at the site, derived from the current measurements, is one order of magnitude greater than that reported in the U.S. national resource assessment. As a result, this discrepancy highlights the importance of conducting site resource assessments based on measurements at the tidal energy converter device scale.« less

  20. EIS-0499: Floodplain and Wetland Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Floodplain and Wetland Assessment EIS-0499: Floodplain and Wetland Assessment Great Northern Transmission Line Project, Minnesota DOE prepared a Floodplain and Wetland Assessment that evaluates the potential floodplain and wetland impacts of a proposal to grant a Presidential permit to Minnesota Power to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a new 500 kilovolt electric transmission system across the U.S.-Canada border. The proposed 220-mile transmission line would cross the border near

  1. Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Floodplain and Wetland Assessment Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability January 2016 Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability January 2016 i Great Northern Transmission Line Floodplain and Wetland Assessment January 2016 Contents 1.0 Introduction

  2. DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy Point absorbers generate electricity by converting the energy in waves using a float that rides the waves and is attached to a moored conversion ...

  3. MHK Projects/Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center TIDEC | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    StateProvince Maine Project Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Coordinates 44.3879, -68.7998 Project Phase Phase 1 Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)...

  4. Pulse Tidal formerly Pulse Generation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    formerly Pulse Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pulse Tidal (formerly Pulse Generation) Place: Hull, England, United Kingdom Zip: HU5 3LP Product: UK-based developer of...

  5. MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Lubec Narrows and Johnson Bay Coordinates 44.8652, -66.9828 Project Phase Phase 1 PermitLicense Buildout...

  6. MHK Technologies/Sabella subsea tidal turbine | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    surface. These turbines are stabilised by gravity andor are anchored according to the nature of the seafloor. They are pre-orientated in the direction of the tidal currents, and...

  7. MHK Technologies/MORILD 2 Floating Tidal Power System | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    based on the same principle as horizontal axis wind turbines. The plant has 4 two-blade underwater turbines and can utilize the energy potential in tidal and ocean currents....

  8. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for ...

  9. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States Final ... Award Number: DE-FG36-08GO18174 Project Title: Assessment of Energy Production Potential ...

  10. Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Marketing Summaries (13) Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Browse

  11. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Marketing Inc. | Department of Energy 2 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc. Application from Tidal to export electric energy to Canada. EA-422 Tidal Energy Mktg. (CN).pdf (282.23 KB) More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No.

  12. ARM - Lesson Plans: Coastal Erosion

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Coastal Erosion Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Coastal Erosion Objective The objective of this activity is to study the coastal erosion (or deposition) by waves and sea level rise at a particular area. Materials Each student or group of students will need the

  13. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Gornitz, V.M. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); White, T.W. ); Daniels, R.C. )

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude [times] 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  14. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.; Daniels, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude {times} 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  15. Oregon Coastal Management Program | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Coastal Management Program Name: Oregon Coastal Management Program Address: 635 Capitol St. NE Place: Salem, Oregon Zip: 97301-2540...

  16. Coastal Zone Management Act and Regulations

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) of 1972 provides for the management of the nation’s coastal resources, including the Great Lakes.

  17. California Coastal Commission | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Commission Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Coastal Commission Name: California Coastal Commission Address: 45 Fremont Street, Suite 2000 Place: San Francisco,...

  18. Coastal Conservation League | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Conservation League Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Coastal Conservation League Name: Coastal Conservation League Address: 328 East Bay Street PO Box 1765 Place: Charleston,...

  19. Coastal Zone Management Act | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    and the National Estuarine Research Reserve System. The 34 coastal programs aim to balance competing land and water issues in the coastal zone, while estuarine reserves serve...

  20. NATIONAL GEODATABASE OF TIDAL STREAM POWER RESOURCE IN USA

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brennan T; Neary, Vincent S; Stewart, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    A geodatabase of tidal constituents is developed to present the regional assessment of tidal stream power resource in the USA. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speeds and water level surfaces. The performance of the numerical model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed by an independent validation. The geodatabase is published on a public domain via a spatial database engine with interactive tools to select, query and download the data. Regions with the maximum average kinetic power density exceeding 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), total surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth greater than 5 m are defined as hotspots and documented. The regional assessment indicates that the state of Alaska (AK) has the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL).

  1. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.; Bohlen, C.

    1995-08-01

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  2. TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A

  3. Discovery of a tidal dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiel-Wroczy?ski, B.; Soida, M.; Urbanik, M.; Bomans, D. J. E-mail: soida@oa.uj.edu.pl E-mail: bomans@astro.rub.de

    2014-05-10

    We report the discovery of a dwarf galaxy in the Leo Triplet. Analysis of the neutral hydrogen distribution shows that it rotates independently of the tidal tail of NGC 3628, with a radial velocity gradient of 35-40 km s{sup 1} over approximately 13 kpc. The galaxy has an extremely high neutral gas content, accounting for a large amount of its total dynamic mass and suggesting a low amount of dark matter. It is located at the tip of the gaseous tail, which strongly suggests a tidal origin. If this is the case, it would be one of the most confident and nearest (to the Milky Way) detections of a tidal dwarf galaxy and, at the same time, the object most detached from its parent galaxy (?140 kpc) of this type.

  4. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Stephen B; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy,; Roland, I; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    and foundation scouring. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, cooperating with SMAST, developed an oceanographic model to predict changes in sediment transport as a result of the proposed tidal energy project. Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies prepared background material on protected species - including whales, seals, and sea turtles - in the project area and implemented an initial tagging program to record location specific information on seals and sea turtles. HMMH communicated research plans and findings with local stakeholder groups, state and federal resource agency staff, and the ocean power industry. The information is being used to prepare environmental permit applications and obtain approvals for project construction.

  5. Potential of phytoremediation as a means for habitat restoration and cleanup of petroleum contaminated wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qianxin; Mendelssohn, A.

    1996-12-31

    Oil spills in coastal wetlands often kill vegetation and leave oil in the wetland sediment for many years. The potential of phytoremediation as a means for habitat restoration and cleanup of oiled marshes was studied with marsh mesocosms. Soil sods of Spartina alterniflora and Spartina patens (common coastal marsh grasses) were dosed at the rates of 0, 4, 8, 16 and 24 1 m{sup {minus}2} of south Louisiana crude oil. Plant mortality occurred at high oil dosages (8 1 m{sup {minus}2} and above). Two years after application of the oil to the soil sods, these two Spartina species were transplanted into oiled and unoiled sods to determine the potential for habitat restoration and oil phytoremediation. Fertilizer (at rates of 666 kg N/ha, 272 kg P/ha and 514 kg K/Ha) was applied after transplanting. Regrowth biomass of S. alterniflora, S. patens and the combination of these two species was significantly increased by application of fertilizer one year after transplanting. The regrowth biomass was not significantly affected by oil as high as 250 mg g{sup 1} dry soil for combined biomass of the two species and was significantly higher with oil for Spartina alterniflora although the biomass of S. patens was affected at the highest oil content in the soil, suggesting the potential of habitat restoration by transplanting after oil spills. Oil degradation was enhanced by phytoremediation in combination with fertilization. The oil degradation rate was negligible in the absence of vegetation, but it was significantly higher in the presence of transplanted vegetation and fertilizer. Whether increased degradation of residual oil was due to the enhancement of soil microbial activity by the fertilizer or by phytoremediation is presently being investigated.

  6. Biomonitoring of mercury pollution in a wetland near Ravenna, Italy by translocated bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis)

    SciTech Connect

    Cattani, O.; Fabbri, D.; Salvati, M.; Trombini, C.; Vassura, I.

    1999-08-01

    An active biomonitoring experiment using mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) was performed in Pialassa Baiona, a mercury-polluted coastal wetland near Ravenna, Italy. Three stations (A, B, and C) were selected along the south to north axis. Following a 52-d field exposure, organisms transplanted in the southernmost polluted area (station A) showed mean mercury concentration values of 660 ng/g (dry weight), 4.4 times the initial background level, and were still accumulating mercury. Mussels in both the central area (station B) and the northern area (station C) seemed to reach a steady state with mean mercury concentration values of 323 and 412 ng/g, respectively. This field experiment is the first study carried out in the Ravenna wetlands to evaluate mercury bioavailability in this environment. Finally, the efficiency of the population of Mytilus galloprovincialis selected for the field experiment as mercury bioaccumulators was tested in a laboratory experiment that revealed that up to 135 {micro}g/g (dry weight) could be reached after 77 d of exposure to mercury-polluted water.

  7. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Bir, Lawson, Li_2011...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    OMAE2011-50063 STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE COMPOSITE BLADE ABSTRACT This paper describes the structural design of a tidal turbine composite blade. ...

  8. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, ...

  9. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent

    2011-06-29

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  10. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  11. Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) (DOE, 2003) | Department of Energy Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) (DOE, 2003) Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements (10 CFR Parts 1021 and 1022) (DOE, 2003) The Department of Energy (DOE) revised its floodplain and wetland environmental review requirements to add flexibility and remove unnecessary procedural burdens by simplifying DOE public notification

  12. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Marketing Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 | Department of Energy 2 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-422 Tidal Energy Marketing Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 81, No. 133 - July 12, 2016 Application from Tidal to export electric energy. Federal Register Notice. EA-422 Tidal Energy Mktg. CN.pdf (170.02 KB) More Documents & Publications

  13. DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information DOE Science Showcase - Tidal Energy Point absorbers generate electricity by converting the energy in waves using a float that rides the waves and is attached to a moored conversion device. The Department of Energy's Water Power Program Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030, Energy.gov News Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States, Energy Citations Database Georgia Tech's Tidal Energy

  14. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch from South Golden Road to the ...

  15. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and ...

  16. Wetland Permit Application Fees 2015 | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Wetland Permit Application Fees 2015PermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuide...

  17. Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requiremen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (DOE) revised its floodplain and wetland environmental review requirements to add flexibility and remove unnecessary procedural burdens by simplifying DOE public notification...

  18. Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 Tapping into Wave and Tidal Ocean Power: 15% Water Power by 2030 January 27, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database

  19. Microbial diversity and carbon cycling in San Francisco Bay wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Theroux, Susanna; Hartman, Wyatt; He, Shaomei; Tringe, Susannah

    2014-03-21

    Wetland restoration efforts in San Francisco Bay aim to rebuild habitat for endangered species and provide an effective carbon storage solution, reversing land subsidence caused by a century of industrial and agricultural development. However, the benefits of carbon sequestration may be negated by increased methane production in newly constructed wetlands, making these wetlands net greenhouse gas (GHG) sources to the atmosphere. We investigated the effects of wetland restoration on below-ground microbial communities responsible for GHG cycling in a suite of historic and restored wetlands in SF Bay. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with real-time GHG monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of wetland soil microbial communities. The wetland soils harbor diverse communities of bacteria and archaea whose membership varies with sampling location, proximity to plant roots and sampling depth. Our results also highlight the dramatic differences in GHG production between historic and restored wetlands and allow us to link microbial community composition and GHG cycling with key environmental variables including salinity, soil carbon and plant species.

  20. Microbial diversity in restored wetlands of San Francisco Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Theroux, Susanna; Hartman, Wyatt; He, Shaomei; Tringe, Susannah

    2013-12-09

    Wetland ecosystems may serve as either a source or a sink for atmospheric carbon and greenhouse gases. This delicate carbon balance is influenced by the activity of belowground microbial communities that return carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Wetland restoration efforts in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region may help to reverse land subsidence and possibly increase carbon storage in soils. However, the effects of wetland restoration on microbial communities, which mediate soil metabolic activity and carbon cycling, are poorly studied. In an effort to better understand the underlying factors which shape the balance of carbon flux in wetland soils, we targeted the microbial communities in a suite of restored and historic wetlands in the San Francisco Bay-Delta region. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with greenhouse gas monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of the wetland soil microbial communities along biogeochemical and wetland age gradients. Our results show relationships among geochemical gradients, availability of electron acceptors, and microbial community composition. Our study provides the first genomic glimpse into microbial populations in natural and restored wetlands of the San Francisco Bay-Delta region and provides a valuable benchmark for future studies.

  1. QER- Comment of America's Wetland Foundation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for the opportunity to make oral remarks on behalf of the America¹s WETLAND Foundation in New Orleans on May 27, 2014 during the public comment period at the meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). In follow up, attached is a summation of those comments, along with three reports released by the Foundation for your review that will provide information helpful to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me if there are questions or if more information is desired, Sidney Coffee

  2. Columbia Gas preserves wetlands with directional drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Luginbuhl, K.K.; Gartman, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    This paper reviews the use of directional drilling to install a 12 inch natural gas pipeline near Avon, Ohio. As a result of increased demand, the utility decided that it would need additional lines for pressure control with the only feasible route being through a forested and scrub/shrub wetland. This paper reviews the permitting requirements along with the directional drilling design and operation. Unfortunately during drilling, bentonite drilling fluids came to the surface requiring remedial action procedures. The paper then provides a detailed clean up strategy and makes recommendations on how to prevent such a break through in the future.

  3. Revising 10 CFR Part 1022 “Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements”

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Revising 10 CFR Part 1022 “Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements”

  4. California Coastal Act | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: California Coastal ActLegal Abstract California Coastal Act 30000-30900, current through...

  5. Texas GLO Coastal Forms | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Coastal Forms Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Texas GLO Coastal FormsLegal Abstract The Texas General Land Office...

  6. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. I. Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V. E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    A formula for the tidal dissipation rate in a spherical body is derived from first principles to correct some mathematical inaccuracies found in the literature. The development is combined with the Darwin-Kaula formalism for tides. Our intermediate results are compared with those by Zschau and Platzman. When restricted to the special case of an incompressible spherical planet spinning synchronously without libration, our final formula can be compared with the commonly used expression from Peale and Cassen. However, the two turn out to differ, as in our expression the contributions from all Fourier modes are positive-definite, which is not the case with the formula from Peale and Cassen. Examples of the application of our expression for the tidal damping rate are provided in the work by Makarov and Efroimsky (Paper II) published back to back with the current paper.

  7. RBS 1032: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT IN ANOTHER DWARF GALAXY?

    SciTech Connect

    Maksym, W. Peter; Lin, Dacheng; Irwin, Jimmy A.

    2014-09-10

    RBS 1032 is a supersoft (? ? 5), luminous (?10{sup 43} erg s{sup 1}) ROSAT PSPC source which has been associated with an inactive dwarf galaxy at z = 0.026, SDSS J114726.69+494257.8. We have analyzed an XMM-Newton observation that confirms that RBS 1032 is indeed associated with the dwarf galaxy. Moreover, RBS 1032 has undergone a factor of ?100-300 decay since 1990 November. This variability suggests that RBS 1032 may not be a steadily accreting intermediate-mass black hole, but rather an accretion flare from the tidal disruption of a star by the central black hole (which may or may not be intermediate-mass). We suggest that additional tidal disruption events may remain unidentified in archival ROSAT data, such that disruption rate estimates based upon ROSAT All-Sky Survey data may need reconsideration.

  8. EA-1949: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, Puget Sound, WA

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA analyzes the potential environmental effects of a proposal by the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, Washington to construct and operate the Admiralty Inlet Tidal Project. The proposed 680-kilowatt project would be located on the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington, about 1 kilometer west of Whidbey Island, entirely within Island County, Washington. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is the lead agency. The DOE NEPA process for this project has been canceled.

  9. Collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hyodo, Ryuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji

    2014-05-20

    The degree of disruption in collisions in free space is determined by specific impact energy, and the mass fraction of the largest remnant is a monotonically decreasing function of impact energy. However, it has not been shown whether such a relationship is applicable to collisions under the influence of a planet's tidal force, which is important in ring dynamics and satellite accretion. Here we examine the collisional disruption of gravitational aggregates in the tidal environment by using local N-body simulations. We find that outcomes of such a collision largely depend on the impact velocity, the direction of impact, and the radial distance from the planet. In the case of a strong tidal field corresponding to Saturn's F ring, collisions in the azimuthal direction are much more destructive than those in the radial direction. Numerical results of collisions sensitively depend on the impact velocity, and a complete disruption of aggregates can occur even in impacts with velocity much lower than their escape velocity. In such low-velocity collisions, the deformation of colliding aggregates plays an essential role in determining collision outcomes, because the physical size of the aggregate is comparable to its Hill radius. On the other hand, the dependence of collision outcomes on impact velocity becomes similar to the case in free space when the distance from the planet is sufficiently large. Our results are consistent with Cassini observations of the F ring, which suggest ongoing creation and disruption of aggregates within the ring.

  10. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  11. Remote-Sensed Monitoring of Dominant Plant Species Distribution and Dynamics at Jiuduansha Wetland in Shanghai, China

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wenpeng; Chen, Guangsheng; Guo, Pupu; Zhu, Wenquan; Zhang, Donghai

    2015-08-11

    Spartina alterniflora is one of the most hazardous invasive plant species in China. Monitoring the changes in dominant plant species can help identify the invasion mechanisms of S. alterniflora, thereby providing scientific guidelines on managing or controlling the spreading of this invasive species at Jiuduansha Wetland in Shanghai, China. However, because of the complex terrain and the inaccessibility of tidal wetlands, it is very difficult to conduct field experiments on a large scale in this wetland. Hence, remote sensing plays an important role in monitoring the dynamics of plant species and its distribution on both spatial and temporal scales. In this paper, based on multi-spectral and high resolution (<10 m) remote sensing images and field observational data, we analyzed spectral characteristics of four dominant plant species at different green-up phenophases. Based on the difference in spectral characteristics, a decision tree classification was built for identifying the distribution of these plant species. The results indicated that the overall classification accuracy for plant species was 87.17%, and the Kappa Coefficient was 0.81, implying that our classification method could effectively identify the four plant species. We found that the area of Phragmites australi showed an increasing trend from 1997 to 2004 and from 2004 to 2012, with an annual spreading rate of 33.77% and 31.92%, respectively. The area of Scirpus mariqueter displayed an increasing trend from 1997 to 2004 (12.16% per year) and a decreasing trend from 2004 to 2012 (-7.05% per year). S. alterniflora has the biggest area (3302.20 ha) as compared to other species, accounting for 51% of total vegetated area at the study region in 2012. It showed an increasing trend from 1997 to 2004 and from 2004 to 2012, with an annual spreading rate of 130.63% and 28.11%, respectively. As a result, the native species P. australi was surrounded and the habitats of S. mariqueter were occupied by S

  12. Remote-Sensed Monitoring of Dominant Plant Species Distribution and Dynamics at Jiuduansha Wetland in Shanghai, China

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lin, Wenpeng; Chen, Guangsheng; Guo, Pupu; Zhu, Wenquan; Zhang, Donghai

    2015-08-11

    Spartina alterniflora is one of the most hazardous invasive plant species in China. Monitoring the changes in dominant plant species can help identify the invasion mechanisms of S. alterniflora, thereby providing scientific guidelines on managing or controlling the spreading of this invasive species at Jiuduansha Wetland in Shanghai, China. However, because of the complex terrain and the inaccessibility of tidal wetlands, it is very difficult to conduct field experiments on a large scale in this wetland. Hence, remote sensing plays an important role in monitoring the dynamics of plant species and its distribution on both spatial and temporal scales. Inmore » this paper, based on multi-spectral and high resolution (<10 m) remote sensing images and field observational data, we analyzed spectral characteristics of four dominant plant species at different green-up phenophases. Based on the difference in spectral characteristics, a decision tree classification was built for identifying the distribution of these plant species. The results indicated that the overall classification accuracy for plant species was 87.17%, and the Kappa Coefficient was 0.81, implying that our classification method could effectively identify the four plant species. We found that the area of Phragmites australi showed an increasing trend from 1997 to 2004 and from 2004 to 2012, with an annual spreading rate of 33.77% and 31.92%, respectively. The area of Scirpus mariqueter displayed an increasing trend from 1997 to 2004 (12.16% per year) and a decreasing trend from 2004 to 2012 (-7.05% per year). S. alterniflora has the biggest area (3302.20 ha) as compared to other species, accounting for 51% of total vegetated area at the study region in 2012. It showed an increasing trend from 1997 to 2004 and from 2004 to 2012, with an annual spreading rate of 130.63% and 28.11%, respectively. As a result, the native species P. australi was surrounded and the habitats of S. mariqueter were occupied by S

  13. Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project Maine Deploys First U.S. Commercial, Grid-Connected Tidal Energy Project July 24, 2012 - 1:12pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON -- Today, Energy Secretary Steven Chu recognized the nation's first commercial, grid-connected tidal energy project off the coast of Eastport, Maine. Leveraging a $10 million investment from the Energy Department, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC)

  14. MHK Projects/Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Long Island Sound Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemap...

  15. MHK Projects/San Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Juan Channel Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  16. MHK Projects/San Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3",...

  17. MHK Projects/Central Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Province Alaska Project Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Coordinates 59.9669, -152.226 Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization...

  18. MHK Projects/Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Icy Passage Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","t...

  19. MHK Projects/Ward s Island Tidal Power Project | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    s Island Tidal Power Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type"...

  20. MHK Projects/Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","t...

  1. Assessment of Strike of Adult Killer Whales by an OpenHydro Tidal Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Copping, Andrea E.; Watkins, Michael L.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Report to DOE on an analysis to determine the effects of a potential impact to an endangered whale from tidal turbines proposed for deployment in Puget Sound.

  2. MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Country United States Project Resource Click here Current Tidal Project Nearest Body of Water Passamaquoddy Bay Coordinates 44.9062, -66.99 Project Phase Phase 1 Project...

  3. EERE Success Story-Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Endangered Beluga Whales | Department of Energy Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on Endangered Beluga Whales EERE Success Story-Measuring the Impact of Tidal Power Installations on Endangered Beluga Whales April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis With EERE support, Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) is conducting a two-year study on the effects of tidal turbines on endangered beluga whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska-home to some of the greatest tidal energy potential in the United

  4. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_NREL Lawson, Li Y, Sale_2011...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Netherlands OMAE2011-49863 DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION OF A COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL OF A HORIZONTAL-AXIS TIDAL CURRENT TURBINE ABSTRACT This paper describes the ...

  5. MHK Projects/Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Homeowner Tidal Power Elec Gen < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  6. Energy Department Awards More Than $20 Million for Wave and Tidal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (MHK) energy systems, which generate electricity from ocean waves and tidal currents. ... To learn more about how MHK devices capture energy from waves, tides and currents, view ...

  7. All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity to Local Community

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    As progress on a Maine-based tidal energy project moves forward, local community member Gerald Morrison reflects on its impact.

  8. Energy Department Announces Funding for Demonstration and Testing of Advanced Wave and Tidal Energy Technologies

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced $10 million to strengthen the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including wave and tidal energy sources.

  9. Calming the Waters: The Impact of Turbulence on Tidal Energy Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    New research is helping the emerging tidal energy industry learn from their counterparts in the wind industry. By considering the effects of atmospheric turbulence when developing turbine designs,...

  10. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  11. Coiled tubing flowline cuts wetlands disturbance

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, E.A.; Marinello, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    Operators in environmentally sensitive wetland areas of South Louisiana have used jointed, or stickpipe flowlines to transmit oil and gas to and from wellsites and production facilities. Recently, a new method featuring coiled tubing was introduced, using it as a recyclable gas flowline. The coiled tubing method eliminates potential environmental damage that could occur when stickpipe is used and it allows the tubing to be easily recovered and reused when the well is taken out of service. This article describes economic advantages of using coiled tubing and how its use simplified environmental constraints encountered in swamps. It is an expanded version of the authors` presentation to World Oil`s Coiled Tubing Conference, Houston, March, 1993.

  12. FEMA - Executive Order 11990 - Protection of Wetlands 1977 |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    FEMA - Executive Order 11990 - Protection of Wetlands 1977 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Executive OrderExecutive Order: FEMA -...

  13. Title 10 Chapter 37 Wetlands Protection and Water Resources Management...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    37 Wetlands Protection and Water Resources Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 10 Chapter 37...

  14. Argus Energy WV, LLC wins 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-15

    Argus Energy's Kiah Creek Operation has received the 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award presented by the West Virginian Coal Association. The operation was originally a 1267 acre underground mine in the Coalburg seam. Underground mining commenced in 2000 until the end of 2003 with more than two million tons of coal being produced. The creation of the wetlands was achieved during the operations. 8 photos.

  15. Mathematical modeling of stormwater pollution in a tidal embayment

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, K.F.

    1989-01-01

    It has been recognized for many years that stormwater runoff provides a transport mechanism for non-point pollutants into the nation's waterways. As more watershed areas continue to urbanize, greater increases in pollutant loadings will continue to impact the water quality of the receiving water bodies. In many instances, the pollutant impact exceeds the assimilative capacity of the receiving water. To estimate the potential impacts of stormwater pollution, mathematical models are constructed. In this dissertation, mathematical models have been constructed to estimate the non-point pollutant loadings from an urbanizing area as well as to model the assimilative capacity of the receiving tidal embayment system. The models are capable of simulating the hydrologic aspects as well as the water quality cycles of the system as a function of urbanization. In determining the response of the receiving water system to stormwater loadings, the change in receiving water quality is modeled spatially as well as temporally. The overall model is composed of three subsystem models: a stormwater model, a hydrodynamic tidal model, and a receiving water quality model. Construction of the stormwater model is based on STORM (Storage, Treatment, Overflow, Runoff Model) by the US Army Corps of Engineers. A ground water component to the model has been added to adjust the model for application to the study area, Lakes Bay, New Jersey. The tidal model is developed from a pseudo two-dimensional approach. The methodology utilizes the link-node concept to simulate the embayment system. Solutions to equations of motion and continuity are solved using a finite difference method. The receiving water quality model is a two-dimensional time variable water quality model which is based in a finite segment approach.

  16. AmeriFlux US-Myb Mayberry Wetland

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Myb Mayberry Wetland. Site Description - The Mayberry Wetland site is a 300-acre restored wetland on Sherman Island, north of Mayberry Slough, that is on the property of Mayberry Farms and managed by the California Department of Water Resources and Ducks Unlimited. During Summer 2010, the site was restored from a pepperweed and annual grassland pasture to a wetland through a project managed by Bryan Brock (bpbrock@water.ca.gov). A flux tower equipped to analyze energy, H2O, CO2, and CH4 fluxes was installed on October 14, 2010. At the time of installation, flooding of the site had only recently begun after extensive reconstruction of the wetland bathymetry conducted during the summer. Although some small patches of tules remain within the site, the site is a patchwork of deep and shallow open water with some remaining vegetation. Currently, there is an intention to flood-to-kill the current pepperweed and upland grasses and let the wetland plants propagate naturally, so no additional plant manipulation will occur.

  17. OPTICAL TRANSIENTS FROM THE UNBOUND DEBRIS OF TIDAL DISRUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    In the tidal disruption of a star by a black hole, roughly half of the stellar mass becomes bound and falls into the black hole, while the other half is ejected at high velocity. Several previous studies have considered the emission resulting from the accretion of bound material; we consider the possibility that the unbound debris may also radiate once it has expanded and become transparent. We show that the gradual energy input from hydrogen recombination compensates for adiabatic losses over significant expansion factors. The opacity also drops dramatically with recombination, and the internal energy can be radiated by means of a cooling-transparency wave propagating from the surface layers inward. The result is a brief optical transient occurring {approx} 1 week after disruption and lasting 3-5 days with peak luminosities of 10{sup 40}-10{sup 42} ergs s{sup -1}, depending on the mass of the disrupted star. These recombination powered transients should accompany the X-ray/ultraviolet flare from the accretion of bound material, and so may be a useful signature for discriminating tidal disruption events, especially for lower and intermediate mass black holes.

  18. RED CLUMP STARS IN THE SAGITTARIUS TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Wilhelm, Ronald

    2012-07-15

    We have probed a section (l {approx} 150, b {approx} -60) of the trailing tidal arm of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy by identifying a sample of Red Clump (RC) stream stars. RC stars are not generally found in the halo field, but are found in significant numbers in both the Sagittarius galaxy and its tidal streams, making them excellent probes of stream characteristics. Our target sample was selected using photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 6, which was constrained in color to match the Sagittarius RC stars. Spectroscopic observations of the target stars were conducted at Kitt Peak National Observatory using the WIYN telescope. The resulting spectroscopic sample is magnitude limited and contains both main-sequence disk stars and evolved RC stars. We have developed a method to systematically separate these two stellar classes using kinematic information and a Bayesian approach for surface gravity determination. The resulting RC sample allows us to determine an absolute stellar density of {rho} = 2.7 {+-} 0.5 RC stars kpc{sup -3} at this location in the stream. Future measurements of stellar densities for a variety of populations and at various locations along the streams will lead to a much improved understanding of the original nature of the Sagittarius galaxy and the physical processes controlling its disruption and subsequent stream generation.

  19. Detecting wetland changes in Shanghai, China using FORMOSAT and Landsat TM imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Bo; Zhou, Yun-xuan; Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Yuan, Qing

    2015-07-14

    Understanding the state of wetland ecosystems and their changes at the national and local levels is critical for wetland conservation, management, decision-making, and policy development practices. This study analyzed the wetlands in Shanghai, a province-level city, using remote sensing, image processing, and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques based on the Chinese national wetland inventory procedure and standards. FORMOSAT imagery acquired in 2012 and Navy nautical charts of the Yangtze estuarine area were used in conjunction with object-oriented segmentation, expert interpretation, and field validation to determine wetland status. Landsat imagery from 1985, 1995, 2000, 2003 and 2013 as well as social-economic data collected from 1985 to 2013 were used to further assess wetland changes. In 2013, Shanghai contained 376,970.6 ha of wetlands, and 78.8% of all wetlands were in marine or estuarine systems. Estuarine waters comprised the single largest wetland category. Between the first national wetland inventory in 2003 and the second national wetland inventory in 2013, Shanghai lost 50,519.13 ha of wetlands, amounting to a mean annual loss rate of 1.2% or an 11.8% loss over the decade. Declines were proportionately higher in marine and estuarine wetlands, with an annual loss of 1.8%, while there was a sharp increase of 1882.6% in constructed water storage areas for human uses. Diking, filling, impoundment and reclamation, which are all attributable to the economic development and urbanization associated with population increases, were the major factors that explained the gain and loss of wetlands. Additional factors affecting wetland losses and gains include sediment trapping by the hydropower system, which reduces supply to the estuary and erodes wetlands, and sediment trapping by the jetties, spur dikes, and diversion bulwark associated with a navigation channel deepening project, which has the converse effect, increasing saltmarsh wetland area at

  20. Coastal resources management guidelines. Coastal Management Publication No. 2. Renewable Resources Information Series

    SciTech Connect

    Snedaker, S.C.; Getter, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    The guidebook is one in a series of publications being produced for the Agency for International Development (AID) by the National Park Service (NPS). Its purpose is to provide expert guidance in planning and management for sustainable coastal development and for the conservation of coastal resources. In addition to the book the coastal series includes a casebook with eight case studies, a report on institutional arrangements for coastal resource management, and a condensed design aids booklet.

  1. Definition and interpretation of Holocene shorelines in the south Atlantic coastal zone, southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Finkl, C.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    There is a wide variety of contemporary shorelines in southeastern Florida. Distinctive types range from rocky platforms, tidal flats, mangroves and marshes, to sand and gravel beaches. Because the natural sequence of shorelines in the urban coastal corridor from Miami to Palm Beach is partly obscured by dredge and fill operations initiated in the early 1920's, some coastal segments are subject to re-interpretation. Analysis of early aerial photographs, old coastal charts and bore log data indicates a much more complicated sequence of Recent coastlines than is generally appreciated. Before development, much of the coastal zone contained complicated networks of fresh-water marshes and lakes with lagoons, bays, and sounds lying behind extensively developed spits. The larger spits prograded southward (downdrift) forming long coastwise sounds that eventually led into fresh-water marshes such as Lake Mabel (now Port Everglades). When new inlets were cut to link the ICW with the sea, the spits were beheaded to form what are now called barrier islands. After subsequent inlet stabilization with inadequate sand bypassing, some spits became welded to the shore and others eroded away. Extension of boundaries marking the back sides of barriers landward into the marshes, to the position of the ICW, is not only an erroneous definition of barrier island width but dangerous for emergency (storm surge) planning because the barriers were never this wide. Beach ridge plains, ridge and swale topography, dune-covered limestone ridges, and some fossil reefs such as Key Biscayne have in addition been mistakenly identified as barrier islands.

  2. Super massive black hole in galactic nuclei with tidal disruption of stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shiyan; Berczik, Peter; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    Tidal disruption of stars by super massive central black holes from dense star clusters is modeled by high-accuracy direct N-body simulation. The time evolution of the stellar tidal disruption rate, the effect of tidal disruption on the stellar density profile, and, for the first time, the detailed origin of tidally disrupted stars are carefully examined and compared with classic papers in the field. Up to 128k particles are used in simulation to model the star cluster around a super massive black hole, and we use the particle number and the tidal radius of the black hole as free parameters for a scaling analysis. The transition from full to empty loss-cone is analyzed in our data, and the tidal disruption rate scales with the particle number, N, in the expected way for both cases. For the first time in numerical simulations (under certain conditions) we can support the concept of a critical radius of Frank and Rees, which claims that most stars are tidally accreted on highly eccentric orbits originating from regions far outside the tidal radius. Due to the consumption of stars moving on radial orbits, a velocity anisotropy is found inside the cluster. Finally we estimate the real galactic center based on our simulation results and the scaling analysis.

  3. Coastal Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Electric Coop, Inc Place: South Carolina Website: www.coastalelectriccooperative Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCoastal-Electric-Cooperative161384303882752 Outage...

  4. Local Coastal Programs | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    current through August 5, 2014. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013 Legal Citation California Local Coastal Programs updated for 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  5. Coastal Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Coastal Energy Ltd. Place: Kolkata, West Bengal, India Product: Kolkata-based biodiesel production company. Coordinates: 22.52667, 88.34616 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Washington Coastal Zone Management Regulatory Handbook | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Washington Coastal Zone Management Regulatory HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Author Washington...

  7. California Coastal Management Program | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Management Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Coastal Management ProgramLegal Abstract California...

  8. Coastal Development Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Development Permit Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Coastal Development Permit Application Published Publisher Not...

  9. ENHANCED OFF-CENTER STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTIONS BY SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN MERGING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. K.; Chen, Xian E-mail: chenxian@pku.edu.cn

    2013-04-10

    Off-center stellar tidal disruption flares have been suggested to be a powerful probe of recoiling supermassive black holes (SMBHs) out of galactic centers due to anisotropic gravitational wave radiations. However, off-center tidal flares can also be produced by SMBHs in merging galaxies. In this paper, we computed the tidal flare rates by dual SMBHs in two merging galaxies before the SMBHs become self-gravitationally bounded. We employ an analytical model to calculate the tidal loss-cone feeding rates for both SMBHs, taking into account two-body relaxation of stars, tidal perturbations by the companion galaxy, and chaotic stellar orbits in triaxial gravitational potential. We show that for typical SMBHs with masses 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }, the loss-cone feeding rates are enhanced by mergers up to {Gamma} {approx} 10{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, about two orders of magnitude higher than those by single SMBHs in isolated galaxies and about four orders of magnitude higher than those by recoiling SMBHs. The enhancements are mainly due to tidal perturbations by the companion galaxy. We suggest that off-center tidal flares are overwhelmed by those from merging galaxies, making the identification of recoiling SMBHs challenging. Based on the calculated rates, we estimate the relative contributions of tidal flare events by single, binary, and dual SMBH systems during cosmic time. Our calculations show that the off-center tidal disruption flares by un-bound SMBHs in merging galaxies contribute a fraction comparable to that by single SMBHs in isolated galaxies. We conclude that off-center tidal disruptions are powerful tracers of the merging history of galaxies and SMBHs.

  10. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Allan J

    2012-06-26

    Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for

  11. OPTICAL DISCOVERY OF PROBABLE STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Velzen, Sjoert; Farrar, Glennys R.; Gezari, Suvi; Morrell, Nidia; Zaritsky, Dennis; Oestman, Linda; Smith, Mathew; Gelfand, Joseph; Drake, Andrew J.

    2011-11-10

    Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and observed peak luminosities of M{sub g} = -18.3 and -20.4 ({nu}L{sub {nu}} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42}, 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, in the rest frame); their cooling rates are very low, qualitatively consistent with expectations for tidal disruption flares. The properties of the TDE candidates are examined using (1) SDSS imaging to compare them to other flares observed in the search, (2) UV emission measured by GALEX, and (3) spectra of the hosts and of one of the flares. Our pipeline excludes optically identifiable AGN hosts, and our variability monitoring over nine years provides strong evidence that these are not flares in hidden AGNs. The spectra and color evolution of the flares are unlike any SN observed to date, their strong late-time UV emission is particularly distinctive, and they are nuclear at high resolution arguing against these being first cases of a previously unobserved class of SNe or more extreme examples of known SN types. Taken together, the observed properties are difficult to reconcile with an SN or an AGN-flare explanation, although an entirely new process specific to the inner few hundred parsecs of non-active galaxies cannot be excluded. Based on our observed rate, we infer that hundreds or thousands of TDEs will be present in current and next-generation optical synoptic surveys. Using the approach outlined here, a TDE candidate sample with O(1) purity can be selected using geometric resolution and host and flare color alone, demonstrating that a campaign to create a large sample of TDEs, with immediate and detailed multi-wavelength follow-up, is feasible. A by-product of this

  12. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic ...

  13. Washington Coastal Zone Management Webpage | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Washington Coastal Zone Management Webpage Abstract Provides overview of Washington's coastal...

  14. MHK Technologies/Mulitpurpose OTEC Coastal Plant | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Mulitpurpose OTEC Coastal Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Mulitpurpose OTEC Coastal Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  15. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: ... of technically recoverable undiscovered oil are in the ANWR coastal plain, a 5 percent ...

  16. Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shiu, Henry; van Dam, Cornelis P.

    2013-08-22

    A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn

  17. TIDAL HEATING IN A MAGMA OCEAN WITHIN JUPITER’S MOON Io

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Robert H.; Henning, Wade G.; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2015-06-22

    Active volcanism observed on Io is thought to be driven by the temporally periodic, spatially differential projection of Jupiter's gravitational field over the moon. Previous theoretical estimates of the tidal heat have all treated Io as essentially a solid, with fluids addressed only through adjustment of rheological parameters rather than through appropriate extension of the dynamics. These previous estimates of the tidal response and associated heat generation on Io are therefore incomplete and possibly erroneous because dynamical aspects of the fluid behavior are not permitted in the modeling approach. Here we address this by modeling the partial-melt asthenosphere as a global layer of fluid governed by the Laplace Tidal Equations. Solutions for the tidal response are then compared with solutions obtained following the traditional solid-material approach. It is found that the tidal heat in the solid can match that of the average observed heat flux (nominally 2.25 W m{sup −2}), though only over a very restricted range of plausible parameters, and that the distribution of the solid tidal heat flux cannot readily explain a longitudinal shift in the observed (inferred) low-latitude heat fluxes. The tidal heat in the fluid reaches that observed over a wider range of plausible parameters, and can also readily provide the longitudinal offset. Finally, expected feedbacks and coupling between the solid/fluid tides are discussed. Most broadly, the results suggest that both solid and fluid tidal-response estimates must be considered in exoplanet studies, particularly where orbital migration under tidal dissipation is addressed.

  18. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L.

    1997-08-01

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  19. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Project | Department of Energy Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy Project Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy Project Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal Energy Project 01_puget_snopud_presentation.pptx (4.28 MB) More Documents & Publications Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced

  20. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power | Department of Energy Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power 16_life_revision_previsic_update.ppt (2.64 MB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review

  1. A coastal hazards data base for the U.S. West Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Gornitz, V.M. |; Beaty, T.W.; Daniels, R.C.

    1997-12-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US West Coast that are at risk to sea-level rise. This data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US West Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data bases. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data variables from the following seven data sets: elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. One variable from each data set was classified according to its susceptibility to sea-level rise and/or erosion to form 7 relative risk variables. These risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI). Algorithms used to calculate several CVIs are listed within this text.

  2. Conceptual Assessment Framework for Forested Wetland Restoration: The Pen Branch Experience. Restoration of a Severely Impacted Riparian Wetland System - The Pen Branch Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kolka, R.; Nelson, E.A.; Trettin, C.C.

    2000-10-01

    Development of an assessment framework and indicators can be used to evaluate effectiveness of wetland restoration. Example of these include index of biotic integrity and the hydrogeomorphic method. Both approaches provide qualitative ranks. We propose a new method based on the EPA wetland research program. Similar to other methods, indexes are compared to reference communities; however, the comparisons are quantitative. In this paper we discuss the results of our framework using the Pen Branch riparian wetland system as an example.

  3. AmeriFlux US-Tw4 Twitchell East End Wetland

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Tw4 Twitchell East End Wetland. Site Description - The Twitchell East End Wetland is a newly constructed restored wetland on Twitchell Island, CA. This site and the surrounding region are part of the San Joaquin - Sacramento River Delta drained beginning in the 1850's and subsequently used for agriculture. The site was previously a corn field. The wetland was designed to have a mix of vegetated and open water channels and ponds (due to surface elevation differences). Flooding of the wetland was done gradually beginning in January, 2014. Berms wind throughout the wetland to allow vehicle access. Tule and Cattail plant material from a nearby wetland were spread along the berms immediately prior to flooding to facilitate plant establishment and stabilization of the berms from wind/water erosion. The tower was installed on November 25, 2013.

  4. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - summary of seventeen plant-community studies at ten wetland crossings. Topical report, February 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D. |; Shem, L.M.; Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program, Argonne National Laboratory conducted field studies on 10 wetland crossings located in six states to document impacts of natural gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) on 15 wetland plant communities. This study is unique in the number, range, ages, and variety of wetland crossings surveyed and compared. Vegetation data and recorded observations were analyzed to reveal patterns associated with age, installation technology, maintenance practices, and wetland type. This report summarizes the findings of this study. Results revealed that ROWs of pipelines installed according to recent wetland regulations rapidly revegetated with dense and diverse plant communities. The ROW plant communities were similar to those in the adjacent natural areas in species richness, wetland indicator values, and percentages of native species. The ROW plant communities developed from naturally available propagules without fertilization, liming, or artificial seeding. ROWs contributed to increased habitat and plant species diversity in the wetland. There was little evidence that they degrade the wetland by providing avenues for the spread of invasive and normative plant species. Most impacts are temporal in nature, decreasing rapidly during the first several years and more slowly thereafter to the extent permitted by maintenance and other ROW activities.

  5. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, H.F.; Mooers, C.N.K.

    1990-06-01

    The goal of COPS is to couple a program of regular observations to numerical models, through techniques of data assimilation, in order to provide a predictive capability for the US coastal ocean including the Great Lakes, estuaries, and the entire Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The objectives of the program include: determining the predictability of the coastal ocean and the processes that govern the predictability; developing efficient prediction systems for the coastal ocean based on the assimilation of real-time observations into numerical models; and coupling the predictive systems for the physical behavior of the coastal ocean to predictive systems for biological, chemical, and geological processes to achieve an interdisciplinary capability. COPS will provide the basis for effective monitoring and prediction of coastal ocean conditions by optimizing the use of increased scientific understanding, improved observations, advanced computer models, and computer graphics to make the best possible estimates of sea level, currents, temperatures, salinities, and other properties of entire coastal regions.

  6. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  7. Measurement of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares

    SciTech Connect

    Van Velzen, Sjoert

    2014-09-01

    We report an observational estimate of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) in inactive galaxies based on a successful search for these events among transients in galaxies using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82). This search yielded 186 nuclear flares in galaxies, 2 of which are excellent TDF candidates. Because of the systematic nature of the search, the very large number of galaxies, the long time of observation, and the fact that non-TDFs were excluded without resorting to assumptions about TDF characteristics, this study provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the TDF rate. To compute the rate of optical stellar tidal disruption events, we simulate our entire pipeline to obtain the efficiency of detection. The rate depends on the light curves of TDFs, which are presently still poorly constrained. Using only the observed part of the SDSS light curves gives a model-independent upper limit to the optical TDF rate, N-dot <210{sup ?4} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1} (90% CL), under the assumption that the SDSS TDFs are representative examples. We develop three empirical models of the light curves based on the two SDSS light curves and two more recent and better-sampled Pan-STARRS TDF light curves, leading to our best estimate of the rate: N-dot {sub TDF}=(1.5--2.0){sub ?1.3}{sup +2.7}10{sup ?5} yr{sup ?1} galaxy{sup ?1}. We explore the modeling uncertainties by considering two theoretically motivated light curve models, as well as two different relationships between black hole mass and galaxy luminosity, and two different treatments of the cutoff in the visibility of TDFs at large M {sub BH}. From this we conclude that these sources of uncertainty are not significantly larger than the statistical ones. Our results are applicable for galaxies hosting black holes with mass in the range of a few 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} M {sub ?}, and translates to a volumetric TDF rate of (4-8) 10{sup 80.4} yr{sup 1} Mpc

  8. Snohomish PUD No 1 (TRL 7 8 System) - Puget Sound Pilot Tidal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project Sunlight Photonics (TRL 4 System) - Tidal Energy System for On-shore Power ...

  9. Maine Project Takes Historic Step Forward in U.S. Tidal Energy Deployment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A pilot project that will generate electricity from Maine’s ocean tides could be a game-changer for America’s tidal energy industry at-large.

  10. Status of Wave and Tidal Power Technologies for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the status of marine applications for renewable energy as of 2008 from a U.S. perspective. Technologies examined include wave, tidal, and ocean current energy extraction devices.

  11. Simulation of hydrologic influences on wetland ecosystem succession. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pompilio, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    This research focuses on the development of a simulation model to determine the affects of hydrological influences on a wetland ecosystem. The model allows perturbations to the inputs of various wetland data which in turn, influences the successional development of the ecosystem. This research consisted of converting a grassland ecosystem model to one which simulates wetland conditions. The critical factor in determining the success of wetland creation is the hydrology of the system. There are four of the areas of the original model which are affected by the hydrology. The model measures the health or success of the ecosystem through the measurement of the systems gross plant production, the respiration and the net primary production of biomass. Altering the auxiliary variables of water level and the rate of flow through the system explicitly details the affects hydrologic influences on those production rates. Ten case tests depicting exogenous perturbations of the hydrology were run to identify these affects. Although the tests dealt with the fluctuation of water through the system, any one of the auxiliary variables in the model could be changed to reflect site specific data. Productivity, Hazardous material management, Hazardous material pharmacy.

  12. Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy 6 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy Energy Department Invests $16 Million to Harness Wave and Tidal Energy August 29, 2013 - 2:35pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to deploy every available source of American energy, the Energy Department today announced $16 million for seventeen projects to help sustainably and efficiently capture energy from waves, tides and currents.

  13. Coastal Barrier Resources Act | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1982 Legal Citation CBRA, Public Law 97-348 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Coastal...

  14. FAINT TIDAL FEATURES IN GALAXIES WITHIN THE CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, Adam M.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.

    2013-03-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous (M{sub r{sup '}}<-19.3 mag) galaxies in the magnitude range 15.5 mag < r' < 17 mag and in the redshift range 0.04 < z < 0.2. Although we have classified tidal features according to their morphology (e.g., streams, shells, and tails), we do not attempt to interpret them in terms of their physical origin (e.g., major versus minor merger debris). Instead, we provide a catalog that is intended to provide raw material for future investigations which will probe the nature of low surface brightness substructure around galaxies. We find that around 12% of the galaxies in our sample show clear tidal features at the highest confidence level. This fraction rises to about 18% if we include systems with convincing, albeit weaker tidal features, and to 26% if we include systems with more marginal features that may or may not be tidal in origin. These proportions are a strong function of rest-frame color and of stellar mass. Linear features, shells, and fans are much more likely to occur in massive galaxies with stellar masses >10{sup 10.5} M {sub Sun }, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  15. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in macroinvertebrates living in stormwater wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Karouna, N.K.; Sparling, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    The design of stormwater wetlands and ponds as wildlife habitats has prompted concern over the potential uptake of runoff contaminants by aquatic fauna. Stormwater wetlands provide a diverse array of habitat for aquatic macroinvertebrates. The importance of macroinvertebrates in aquatic communities has been well documented. Aquatic macroinvertebrates also serve as a major food source of many aquatic vertebrates, including fish and birds. The objectives of the study were to: (1) examine the responses of the macroinvertebrate community to water and sediment concentrations of heavy metals, and other water quality parameters; (2) determine whether macroinvertebrates living in stormwater wetlands bioaccumulate significant concentrations of heavy metals; (3) relate the concentrations of heavy metals in sediment, water and macroinvertebrates to land use in the surrounding watershed; (4) determine sediment and water toxicity to macroinvertebrates. Twenty stormwater wetlands, representing four land uses commercial, residential, highway and control, were monitored in this study. Water quality parameters, including pH, DO, turbidity, conductivity, hardness and metal concentrations were monitored bi-weekly for six months. Sediment samples were collected three times during the same period. Macroinvertebrate communities were sampled during alternate weeks after water collections. Ten-day sediment bioassays were conducted using the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Preliminary data analyses have indicated no significant difference in sediment and water metal concentrations between land uses. However, Zn concentrations in macroinvertebrates were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in wetlands serving commercial watersheds than in those serving the remaining three land uses. No differences have been detected in composition of invertebrate communities due to land use category.

  16. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Liu, Yonggang; Hu, Yongyun

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  17. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report, [February 12, 1992--April 30, 1994]- Draft

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.; Costanza, R.

    1994-07-11

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  18. Evolution of accretion disks in tidal disruption events

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Matzner, Christopher D. E-mail: matzner@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-04-01

    During a stellar tidal disruption event (TDE), an accretion disk forms as stellar debris returns to the disruption site and circularizes. Rather than being confined within the circularizing radius, the disk can spread to larger radii to conserve angular momentum. A spreading disk is a source of matter for re-accretion at rates that may exceed the later stellar fallback rate, although a disk wind can suppress its contribution to the central black hole accretion rate. A spreading disk is detectible through a break in the central accretion rate history or, at longer wavelengths, by its own emission. We model the evolution of TDE disk size and accretion rate by accounting for the time-dependent fallback rate, for the influence of wind losses in the early advective stage, and for the possibility of thermal instability for accretion rates intermediate between the advection-dominated and gas-pressure-dominated states. The model provides a dynamic basis for modeling TDE light curves. All or part of a young TDE disk will precess as a solid body because of the Lense-Thirring effect, and precession may manifest itself as a quasi-periodic modulation of the light curve. The precession period increases with time. Applying our results to the jetted TDE candidate Swift J1644+57, whose X-ray light curve shows numerous quasi-periodic dips, we argue that the data best fit a scenario in which a main-sequence star was fully disrupted by an intermediate mass black hole on an orbit significantly inclined from the black hole equator, with the apparent jet shutoff at t = 500 days corresponding to a disk transition from the advective state to the gas-pressure-dominated state.

  19. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.

  20. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Dopplermore » Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.« less

  1. WasteWater Treatment And Heavy Metals Removal In The A-01 Constructed Wetland 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect

    ANNA, KNOX

    2004-08-01

    The A-01 wetland treatment system (WTS) was designed to remove metals from the effluent at the A-01 NPDES outfall. The purpose of research conducted during 2003 was to evaluate (1) the ability of the A-01 wetland treatment system to remediate waste water, (2) retention of the removed contaminants in wetland sediment, and (3) the potential remobilization of these contaminants from the sediment into the water column. Surface water and sediment samples were collected and analyzed in this study.

  2. The global coastal hazards data base

    SciTech Connect

    Gornitz, V. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); White, T.W. )

    1989-01-01

    A rise of sea level between 0.5 and 1.5 m, caused by predicted climate warming in the next century, could jeopardize low-lying radioactive waste disposal sites near the coast, due to permanent and episodic inundation, increased shoreline retreat, and changes in the water table. The effects of global sea level rise on the shoreline will not be spatially uniform. Therefore, site selection will depend on assessment of these differential vulnerabilities, in order to avoid high-risk coasts. The coastal hazards data base described here could provide an appropriate framework. The coastal hazards data base integrates relevant topographic, geologic, geomorphologic, erosional and subsidence information in a Geographic Information System (GIS), to identify high-risk shorelines characterized by low coastal relief, an erodible substrate, present and past evidence of subsidence, extensive shoreline retreat, and high wave/tide energies. Data for seven variables relating to inundation and erosion hazards are incorporated into the ORNL ARC/INFO Geographic Information System (GIS). Data compilation has been completed for the US and is being extended to North America, and ultimately the world. A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) has been designed to flag high risk coastal segments. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Modeling Global Wetlands and Their Methane Emissions | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC)

    Summary To study the importance of wetlands in the global water and carbon cycles, a variety of hydrological and biogeochemical models have been developed over the last three ...

  4. AmeriFlux US-Tw1 Twitchell Wetland West Pond

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Tw1 Twitchell Wetland West Pond. Site Description - The Twitchell Wetland site is a 7.4-acre restored wetland on Twitchell Island, that is managed by the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In the fall of 1997, the site was permanently flooded to a depth of approximately 25 cm. The wetland was almost completely covered by cattails and tules by the third growing season. A flux tower equipped to analyze energy, H2O, CO2, and CH4 fluxes was installed on May 17, 2012.

  5. TNRC 33 - Management of Coastal Public Land | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    33 - Management of Coastal Public Land Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: TNRC 33 - Management of Coastal...

  6. Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-06-05

    Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

  7. BINARY DISRUPTION BY MASSIVE BLACK HOLES: HYPERVELOCITY STARS, S STARS, AND TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Brown, Warren R. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-04-20

    We examine whether disrupted binary stars can fuel black hole growth. In this mechanism, tidal disruption produces a single hypervelocity star (HVS) ejected at high velocity and a former companion star bound to the black hole. After a cluster of bound stars forms, orbital diffusion allows the black hole to accrete stars by tidal disruption at a rate comparable to the capture rate. In the Milky Way, HVSs and the S star cluster imply similar rates of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3} yr{sup -1} for binary disruption. These rates are consistent with estimates for the tidal disruption rate in nearby galaxies and imply significant black hole growth from disrupted binaries on 10 Gyr timescales.

  8. Gravitational waves from the collision of tidally disrupted stars with massive black holes

    SciTech Connect

    East, William E.

    2014-11-10

    We use simulations of hydrodynamics coupled with full general relativity to investigate the gravitational waves produced by a star colliding with a massive black hole when the star's tidal disruption radius lies far outside of the black hole horizon. We consider both main-sequence and white-dwarf compaction stars, and nonspinning black holes, as well as those with near-extremal spin. We study the regime in between where the star can be accurately modeled by a point particle, and where tidal effects completely suppress the gravitational wave signal. We find that nonnegligible gravitational waves can be produced even when the star is strongly affected by tidal forces, as well as when it collides with large angular momentum. We discuss the implications that these results have for the potential observation of gravitational waves from these sources with future detectors.

  9. Tidal dissipation in a homogeneous spherical body. II. Three examples: Mercury, Io, and Kepler-10 b

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Valeri V.; Efroimsky, Michael E-mail: michael.efroimsky@usno.navy.mil

    2014-11-01

    In Efroimsky and Makarov (Paper I), we derived from the first principles a formula for the tidal heating rate in a homogeneous sphere, compared it with the previously used formulae, and noted the differences. Now we present case studies: Mercury, Kepler-10 b, and a triaxial Io. A sharp frequency dependence of k {sub 2}/Q near spin-orbit resonances yields a sharp dependence of k {sub 2}/Q (and, therefore, of tidal heating) upon the spin rate. Thereby physical libration plays a major role in tidal heating of synchronously rotating planets. The magnitude of libration in the spin rate being defined by the planet's triaxiality, the latter becomes a factor determining the dissipation rate. Other parameters equal, a strongly triaxial synchronized body generates more heat than a similar body of a more symmetrical shape. After an initially triaxial object melts and loses its triaxiality, dissipation becomes less intensive; the body can solidify, with the tidal bulge becoming a new figure with triaxiality lower than the original. We derive approximate expressions for the dissipation rate in a Maxwell planet with the Maxwell time longer than the inverse tidal frequency. The expressions derived pertain to the 1:1 and 3:2 resonances and a nonresonant case; so they are applicable to most close-in super-Earths detected. In these planets, the heating outside synchronism is weakly dependent on the eccentricity and obliquity, provided both these parameters's values are moderate. According to our calculation, Kepler-10 b could hardly survive the intensive tidal heating without being synchronized, circularized, and reshaped through a complete or partial melt-down.

  10. CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.

    2010-07-19

    The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during

  11. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy’s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program’s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental

  12. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field

  13. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  14. Specifically Designed Constructed Wetlands: A Novel Treatment Approach for Scrubber Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Rodgers Jr; James W. Castle; Chris Arrington: Derek Eggert; Meg Iannacone

    2005-09-01

    A pilot-scale wetland treatment system was specifically designed and constructed at Clemson University to evaluate removal of mercury, selenium, and other constituents from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to measure performance of a pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system in terms of decreases in targeted constituents (Hg, Se and As) in the FGD wastewater from inflow to outflow; (2) to determine how the observed performance is achieved (both reactions and rates); and (3) to measure performance in terms of decreased bioavailability of these elements (i.e. toxicity of sediments in constructed wetlands and toxicity of outflow waters from the treatment system). Performance of the pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems was assessed using two criteria: anticipated NPDES permit levels and toxicity evaluations using two sentinel toxicity-testing organisms (Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas). These systems performed efficiently with varied inflow simulations of FGD wastewaters removing As, Hg, and Se concentrations below NPDES permit levels and reducing the toxicity of simulated FGD wastewater after treatment with the constructed wetland treatment systems. Sequential extraction procedures indicated that these elements (As, Hg, and Se) were bound to residual phases within sediments of these systems, which should limit their bioavailability to aquatic biota. Sediments collected from constructed wetland treatment systems were tested to observe toxicity to Hyalella azteca or Chironomus tetans. Complete survival (100%) was observed for H. azteca in all cells of the constructed wetland treatment system and C. tentans had an average of 91% survival over the three treatment cells containing sediments. Survival and growth of H. azteca and C. tentans did not differ significantly between sediments from the constructed wetland treatment system and controls. Since the sediments of the constructed

  15. OCCULTATION OF THE T TAURI STAR RW AURIGAE A BY ITS TIDALLY DISRUPTED DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Siverd, Robert J.; Cargile, Phillip; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2013-11-01

    RW Aur A is a classical T Tauri star, believed to have undergone a reconfiguration of its circumstellar environment as a consequence of a recent flyby of its stellar companion, RW Aur B. This interaction stripped away part of the circumstellar disk of RW Aur A, leaving a tidally disrupted ''arm'' and a short truncated circumstellar disk. We present photometric observations of the RW Aur system from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope survey showing a long and deep dimming that occurred from 2010 September until 2011 March. The dimming has a depth of ?2 mag, a duration of ?180 days, and was confirmed by archival observations from American Association of Variable Star Observers. We suggest that this event is the result of a portion of the tidally disrupted disk occulting RW Aur A, specifically a fragment of the tidally disrupted arm. The calculated transverse linear velocity of the occulter is in excellent agreement with the measured relative radial velocity of the tidally disrupted arm. Using simple kinematic and geometric arguments, we show that the occulter cannot be a feature of the RW Aur A circumstellar disk, and we consider and discount other hypotheses. We also place constraints on the thickness and semimajor axis of the portion of the arm that occulted the star.

  16. TIDAL INTERACTION AS THE ORIGIN OF EARLY-TYPE DWARF GALAXIES IN GROUP ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Ree, Chang H.

    2014-11-20

    We present a sample of dwarf galaxies that suffer ongoing disruption by the tidal forces of nearby massive galaxies. By analyzing structural and stellar population properties using the archival imaging and spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we find that they are likely a ''smoking gun'' example of the formation through tidal stirring of early-type dwarf galaxies (dEs) in the galaxy group environment. The inner cores of these galaxies are fairly intact and the observed light profiles are well fit by the Srsic functions while the tidally stretched stellar halos are prominent in the outer parts. They are all located within a sky-projected distance of 50 kpc from the centers of the host galaxies and no dwarf galaxies have relative line-of-sight velocities larger than 205 km s{sup 1} to their hosts. We derive the Composite Stellar Population properties of these galaxies by fitting the SDSS optical spectra to a multiple-burst composite stellar population model. We find that these galaxies accumulate a significant fraction of stellar mass within the last 1 Gyr and contain a majority stellar population with an intermediate age of 2 to 4 Gyr. Based on this evidence, we argue that tidal stirring, particularly through the galaxy-galaxy interaction, might have an important role in the formation and evolution of dEs in the group environment where the influence of other gas stripping mechanism might be limited.

  17. Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

  18. Energy Department Awards More Than $20 Million for Wave and Tidal Energy Projects

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced 10 organizations selected to receive more than $20 million in funding for new research, development, and demonstration projects that advance and monitor marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy systems, which generate electricity from ocean waves and tidal currents.

  19. The record of sea level rise by tidal sand bodies of the English Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Berne, S; Lericolais, G. (Ifremer, Plouzane, (France)); Lafont, F. (Universite d'Orsay (France))

    1990-05-01

    Improvements of very high resolution seismic reflection provide new information about internal structures of modern sand bodies. This allows us to reconstruct their recent history, which is related to the Holocene sea level rise. A major distinction is found between inner shelf sand bodies, dominated by autocyclic processes, and outer shelf sand bodies, where allocyclic processes are invoked to explain the apparent contradiction between internal structures and present-day dynamics. On the inner shelf, evidence of the migration of tidal dunes (sand waves) has been obtained by repeated surveys using accurate positioning systems. Major bounding surfaces are thought to result from the action of tidal current and/or from episodic storms. A rough estimation of the age of these sand bodies can be proposed. On the outer shelf, some dunes of the English Channel exhibit cross-beds indicative of a past net bed-load transport at the opposite of present days dynamics, inherited from different tidal conditions when sea level was between 20 and 40 m lower. Some large tidal sand banks (e.g., the Sark Bank near the Channel Islands) display a more complicated pattern. The upper part of the sand bank is the result of the migration of very large dunes climbing at positive angles, whereas the lower part shows major erosional surfaces, attributed to the action of storms during lower sea levels.

  20. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30

    Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic

  1. Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Worthington, Monty

    2014-02-05

    Cook Inlet, Alaska is home to some of the greatest tidal energy resources in the U.S., as well as an endangered population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas). Successfully permitting and operating a tidal power project in Cook Inlet requires a biological assessment of the potential and realized effects of the physical presence and sound footprint of tidal turbines on the distribution, relative abundance, and behavior of Cook Inlet beluga whales. ORPC Alaska, working with the Project Team—LGL Alaska Research Associates, University of Alaska Anchorage, TerraSond, and Greeneridge Science—undertook the following U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study to characterize beluga whales in Cook Inlet – Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with the Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project (Project). ORPC Alaska, LLC, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, (collectively, ORPC). ORPC is a global leader in the development of hydrokinetic power systems and eco-conscious projects that harness the power of ocean and river currents to create clean, predictable renewable energy. ORPC is developing a tidal energy demonstration project in Cook Inlet at East Foreland where ORPC has a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) preliminary permit (P-13821). The Project collected baseline data to characterize pre-deployment patterns of marine mammal distribution, relative abundance, and behavior in ORPC’s proposed deployment area at East Foreland. ORPC also completed work near Fire Island where ORPC held a FERC preliminary permit (P-12679) until March 6, 2013. Passive hydroacoustic devices (previously utilized with bowhead whales in the Beaufort Sea) were adapted for study of beluga whales to determine the relative abundance of beluga whale vocalizations within the proposed deployment areas. Hydroacoustic data collected during the Project were used to characterize the ambient acoustic environment of the project site pre-deployment to inform the

  2. THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF GIANT STARS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO THE FLARING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico E-mail: jfg@ucolick.org

    2012-10-01

    Sun-like stars are thought to be regularly disrupted by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) within galactic nuclei. Yet, as stars evolve off the main sequence their vulnerability to tidal disruption increases drastically as they develop a bifurcated structure consisting of a dense core and a tenuous envelope. Here we present the first hydrodynamic simulations of the tidal disruption of giant stars and show that the core has a substantial influence on the star's ability to survive the encounter. Stars with more massive cores retain large fractions of their envelope mass, even in deep encounters. Accretion flares resulting from the disruption of giant stars should last for tens to hundreds of years. Their characteristic signature in transient searches would not be the t {sup -5/3} decay typically associated with tidal disruption events, but a correlated rise over many orders of magnitude in brightness on timescales of months to years. We calculate the relative disruption rates of stars of varying evolutionary stages in typical galactic centers, then use our results to produce Monte Carlo realizations of the expected flaring event populations. We find that the demographics of tidal disruption flares are strongly dependent on both stellar and black hole mass, especially near the limiting SMBH mass scale of {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. At this black hole mass, we predict a sharp transition in the SMBH flaring diet beyond which all observable disruptions arise from evolved stars, accompanied by a dramatic cutoff in the overall tidal disruption flaring rate. Black holes less massive than this limiting mass scale will show observable flares from both main-sequence and evolved stars, with giants contributing up to 10% of the event rate. The relative fractions of stars disrupted at different evolutionary states can constrain the properties and distributions of stars in galactic nuclei other than our own.

  3. Wetlands for Industrial Wastewater Treatment at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, J.B.

    2002-02-28

    The A-01 effluent outfall, which collects both normal daily process flow and stormwater runoff from a industrial park area, did not meet the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit limits for metals, toxicity, and total residual chlorine at the outfall sampling point. Copper was the constituent of primary concern and the effluent consistently failed to meet that NPDES limit. Installation of a constructed wetland system including a basin to manage stormwater surges was required to reduce the problematic constituent concentrations to below the NPDES permit limits before the effluent reaches the sampling point. Both bench-scale and on-site pilot scale physical models were constructed to refine and optimize the preliminary design as well as demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach prior to construction, which was completed in October 2000. The constructed treatment wetlands system has prov en its ability to treat industrial wastewaters containing metals with low O and M costs since there are no mechanical parts. With an anticipated life of over 50 years, this system is exceptionally cost effective.

  4. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 1: Strategic summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    The proposed COPS (Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems) program is concerned with combining numerical models with observations (through data assimilation) to improve our predictive knowledge of the coastal ocean. It is oriented toward applied research and development and depends upon the continued pursuit of basic research in programs like COOP (Coastal Ocean Processes); i.e., to a significant degree it is involved with ``technology transfer`` from basic knowledge to operational and management applications. This predictive knowledge is intended to address a variety of societal problems: (1) ship routing, (2) trajectories for search and rescue operations, (3) oil spill trajectory simulations, (4) pollution assessments, (5) fisheries management guidance, (6) simulation of the coastal ocean`s response to climate variability, (7) calculation of sediment transport, (8) calculation of forces on structures, and so forth. The initial concern is with physical models and observations in order to provide a capability for the estimation of physical forces and transports in the coastal ocean. For all these applications, there are common needs for physical field estimates: waves, tides, currents, temperature, and salinity, including mixed layers, thermoclines, fronts, jets, etc. However, the intent is to work with biologists, chemists, and geologists in developing integrated multidisciplinary prediction systems as it becomes feasible to do so. From another perspective, by combining observations with models through data assimilation, a modern approach to monitoring is provided through whole-field estimation.

  5. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  6. Wetland survey of selected areas in the K-24 Site Area of responsibility

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.A.; Awl, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    In accordance with DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, wetland surveys were conducted in selected areas within the K-25 Area of Responsibility during the summer of 1994. These areas are Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, the K-770 OU, Duct Island Peninsula, the Powerhouse area, and the K-25 South Corner. Previously surveyed areas included in this report are the main plant area of the K-25 Site, the K-901 OU, the AVLIS site, and the K-25 South Site. Wetland determinations were based on the USACE methodology. Forty-four separate wetland areas, ranging in size from 0.13 to 4.23 ha, were identified. Wetlands were identified in all of the areas surveyed with the exception of the interior of the Duct Island Peninsula and the main plant area of the K-25 Site. Wetlands perform functions such as floodflow alteration, sediment stabilization, sediment and toxicant retention, nutrient transformation, production export, and support of aquatic species and wildlife diversity and abundance. The forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent wetlands identified in the K-25 area perform some or all of these functions to varying degrees.

  7. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-10-15

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health--changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and other conditions unfavorable to propagation of the most desirable moist soil plants. Hence, the implementation of a program to monitor annual changes in the most common moist soil plants might serve as an index of habitat health and sustainability. Our review of the current scientific and popular literature failed to identify a good, comprehensive field guide that could be used to calibrate and verify high resolution remote sensing imagery, that we had started to use to develop maps of wetland moist soil plants in the Grassland Water District. Since completing the guide it has been used to conduct ground truthing field surveys using the California Native Plant Society methodology in 2004. Results of this survey and a previous wetland plant survey in 2003 are published in a companion LBNL publication summarizing 4 years of fieldwork to advance the science of real-time wetland salinity management.

  8. Freshwater wetlands, urban stormwater, and nonpoint pollution control: A literature review and annotated bibliography (revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Stockdale, E.C.

    1991-02-01

    The literature review and annotated bibliography contained in the document were first printed as two separate documents in 1986 at the beginning of a long-term research program titled the Puget Sound Wetlands and Stormwater Management Research Program. The review was conducted to determine the extent of information available on the long-term ecological impacts of stormwater on wetlands and, conversely, the ability of wetlands to improve the water quality of urban stormwater. The two reports have now been combined, and updated with the most recent literature. The revised report also briefly discusses the status of the Wetlands Research Program currently underway. The subject of the report is complex and diverse. For that reason the annotated bibliography in Part II contains references from the entire spectrum of wetland literature, including: urban runoff control technology, cumulative impacts, stormwater and wastewater treatment, functions and values, wetland creation, best management practices, and general wetland ecology. Most of the entrees contain abstracts. Where possible, the original author abstract or introduction was included.

  9. Corrosion prevention of Oregon's reinforced coastal bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cryer. C.B; Gallardo, M. L.

    2004-06-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) maintains more than 120 coastal bridges; many are reinforced concrete structures over 15 m (50 ft) in length. Twelve of these bridges are historic structures. Oregon DOT is concerned about the ongoing deterioration of these bridges, rising maintenance and repair costs, and the need to protect Oregons large investment in coastal bridges. Over 80,000 m2 (850,000 ft2) of coastal bridge surface have been repaired and protected from further chloride-induced corrosion damage by using conductive coating anodes. Most of the anode area is thermal-sprayed (TS) Zn. Other anode materials include TS Ti, Zn-hydrogel, and conductive carbon paint. TS Zn anodes are estimated to have a service life exceeding 25 years but exhibit increasing anode polarization with age. Catalyzed TS Ti anodes develop no significant anode polarization and have exhibited stable long-term performance over 8 years of service. Galvanic Zn-hydrogel anodes produce a stable protection current with no evidence of aging effects over 6 years of service. The conductive carbon paint anode operates at a low anode current density and consumption rate with a low rate of acidification at the anode-concrete interface, which has contributed to a stable protection current over 17 years of service.

  10. Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

    1996-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Residence Times of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead in Off-Channel Tidal Freshwater Habitats, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    We estimated seasonal residence times of acoustic-tagged juvenile salmonids in off-channel, tidal freshwater habitats of the Columbia River near the Sandy River delta (rkm 198; 2007, 2008, 2010, and 2011) and Cottonwood Island (rkm 112; 2012).

  12. Coastal Carolina Clean Power CCCP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Carolina Clean Power CCCP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Coastal Carolina Clean Power (CCCP) Place: Kenansville, North Carolina Sector: Biomass Product: Kenansville-based...

  13. EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Section 6217 Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section 6217 Webpage...

  14. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, ...

  15. Oregon Coastal Management Program Website | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Program Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Coastal Management Program Website Abstract Provides information on...

  16. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Glossary ANILCA: Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act ANS: ...

  17. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil ...

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the ...

  19. CONSTRAINING TIDAL DISSIPATION IN STARS FROM THE DESTRUCTION RATES OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Penev, Kaloyan; Jackson, Brian; Spada, Federico; Thom, Nicole

    2012-06-01

    We use the distribution of extrasolar planets in circular orbits around stars with surface convective zones detected by ground-based transit searches to constrain how efficiently tides raised by the planet are dissipated on the parent star. We parameterize this efficiency as a tidal quality factor (Q{sub *}). We conclude that the population of currently known planets is inconsistent with Q{sub *} < 10{sup 7} at the 99% level. Previous studies show that values of Q{sub *} between 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7} are required in order to explain the orbital circularization of main-sequence low-mass binary stars in clusters, suggesting that different dissipation mechanisms might be acting in the two cases, most likely due to the very different tidal forcing frequencies relative to the stellar rotation frequency occurring for star-star versus planet-star systems.

  20. Tidal disruptions in circumbinary disks. II. Observational signatures in the reverberation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Brem, P.; Amaro-Seoane, P.; Cuadra, J.; Komossa, S.

    2014-09-10

    Supermassive binary black holes (SMBBHs) with sub-pc separations form in the course of galaxy mergers, if both galaxies harbor massive black holes. Clear observational evidence for them however still eludes us. We propose a novel method of identifying these systems by means of reverberation mapping their circumbinary disk after a tidal disruption event has ionized it. The tidal disruption of a star at the secondary leads to strong asymmetries in the disk response. We model the shape of the velocity-delay maps for various toy disk models and more realistic gas distributions obtained by smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The emissivity of the ionized disk is calculated with Cloudy. We find peculiar asymmetries in the maps for off center ionizing sources that may help us constrain geometrical parameters of a circumbinary disk such as semimajor axis and orbital phase of the secondary, as well as help strengthen the observational evidence for sub-parsec SMBBHs as such.

  1. LINE-PROFILE VARIABILITY FROM TIDAL FLOWS IN ALPHA VIRGINIS (SPICA)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, David; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Moreno, Edmundo E-mail: kuhn@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2009-10-10

    We present the results of high precision, high-resolution (R approx 68,000) optical observations of the short-period (4 days) eccentric binary system Alpha Virginis (Spica) showing the photospheric line-profile variability that in this system can be attributed to non-radial pulsations driven by tidal effects. Although scant in orbital-phase coverage, the data provide signal-to-noise ratio > 2000 line profiles at full spectral resolution in the wavelength range DELTAlambda4000-8500 A, allowing a detailed study of the night-to-night variability as well as changes that occur on approx2 hr timescale. Using an ab initio theoretical calculation, we show that the line-profile variability can arise as a natural consequence of surface flows that are induced by the tidal interaction.

  2. TRENDS IN DWARF EARLY-TYPE KINEMATICS WITH CLUSTER-CENTRIC RADIUS DRIVEN BY TIDAL STIRRING

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, A. J.; Toloba, E.; Simon, J. D.; Mayer, L.; Guhathakurta, P.

    2015-02-01

    We model the dynamics of dwarf early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster when subject to a variety of environmental processes. We focus on how these processes imprint trends in the dynamical state (rotational versus pressure support as measured by the λ{sub Re/2}{sup ∗} statistic) with projected distance from the cluster center, and compare these results to observational estimates. We find a large scatter in the gradient of λ{sub Re/2}{sup ∗} with projected radius. A statistical analysis shows that models with no environmental effects produce gradients as steep as those observed in none of the 100 cluster realizations we consider, while in a model incorporating tidal stirring by the cluster potential 34% of realizations produce gradients as steep as that observed. Our results suggest that tidal stirring may be the cause of the observed radial dependence of dwarf early-type dynamics in galaxy clusters.

  3. Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

    2014-04-30

    Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

  4. Broadband Acoustic Environment at a Tidal Energy Site in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-04-04

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines. Several monitoring technologies are being considered to determine the presence of SRKW near the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for determining design and operational specifications of these technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array from three different cruises during high tidal period in February, May, and June 2011. The ambient noise level decreases approximately 25 dB re 1 μPa per octave from frequency ranges of 1 kHz to 70 kHz, and increases approximately 20 dB re 1 μPa per octave for the frequency from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. The difference of noise pressure levels in different months varies from 10 to 30 dB re 1 μPa for the frequency range below 70 kHz. Commercial shipping and ferry vessel traffic were found to be the most significant contributors to sound pressure levels for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 70 kHz, and the variation could be as high as 30 dB re 1 μPa. These noise level measurements provide the basic information for designing and evaluating both active and passive monitoring systems proposed for deploying and operating for tidal power generation alert system.

  5. Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

  6. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch from South Golden Road to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s South Table Mountain Complex, Golden, Colorado.

  7. This fact sheet describes wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    wetlands in and around Monticello, Utah, and what the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is doing to restore wetlands that are adversely affected by Monticello cleanup project activities. The purpose of the Monticello cleanup projects is to minimize risks to the public and the environment from exposure to uranium mill tailings and radon gas. The cleanup is being performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), also known as Superfund.

  8. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah

    2012-01-01

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  9. EIS-0486: Notice of Intent and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Involvement | Department of Energy Notice of Intent and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement EIS-0486: Notice of Intent and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to prepare an EIS to assess the potential environmental impacts of participating with Clean Line Energy Partners LLC (Clean Line) in the proposed Plains & Eastern Project. The proposed project would

  10. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  11. Microclimate Corrosion Effects in Coastal Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S. Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Cramer, S.D.

    1996-03-24

    The Albany Research Center is conducting atmospheric corrosion research in coastal environments to improve the performance of materials in the Nation's infrastructure. The corrosion of bare metals, and of painted, thermal-sprayed, and galvanized steels are presented for one-year exposures at sites located on bridges and utility poles along the Oregon coast. The effects of microclimates (for example distance from the ocean, high wind zones, and salt-fog prone regions) are examined in conjunction with sample orientation and sheltered/unsheltered comparisons. An atmospheric corrosion model examines the growth and dissolution of corrosion product layers to arrive at a steady-state thickness and corrosion rate.

  12. Coastal ecosystems of the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, R.C.; Markovits, P.S.; Kirkwood, J.B.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to provide training on recent developments in understanding coastal ecosystems in the southeastern United States for Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) field personnel and other natural resource managers in the region. Major emphasis was given to three types of systems: marshes, mangroves, and sea grasses. Other systems such as coral reefs, mud flats, bottomland hardwoods, and estuaries were discussed in less detail. Twenty-three papers were presented during the workshop. One of these was abstracted and indexed individually for EDB/ERA.

  13. CRC handbook of coastal processes and erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Komar, P.D.

    1983-01-01

    This text includes the following contents: Beach Processes - Erosion - An Introduction. Edge Waves and the Configuration of the Shoreline. Morphodynamics of Beaches and Surf Zones in Australia. The Erosion of Siletz Spit, Oregon. Barrier Islands. Patterns and Prediction of Shoreline Change. Models for Beach Profile Response. Erosion on the Great Lakes Due to Changes in the Water Level. Coastal Erosion in Response to the Construction of Jetties and Breakwaters. Computer Models of Shoreline Changes. Principles of Beach Nourishment. Processes of Sea Cliff and Platform Erosion. Beach Processes and Sea Cliff Erosion in San Diego County, California. Erosion of the United States Shoreline. Index.

  14. AmeriFlux US-ORv Olentangy River Wetland Research Park

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bohrer, Gil [The Ohio State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ORv Olentangy River Wetland Research Park. Site Description - The ORWRP site is a 21-ha large-scale, long-term wetland campus facility that is owned by Ohio State University. It is designed to provide teaching, research, and service related to wetland and river science and ecological engineering. The site has been developed in several phases: Phase 1 (1992 - 1994) - Construction of two 2.5-acre deepwater marshes and a river water delivery system began, with pumps installed on the floodplain to bring water from the Olentangy River. In May 1994, one wetland was planted with marsh vegetation, while the other remained as an unplanted control; Phase 2 (1994 - 1999) - Development of a research and teaching infrastructure took place with the construction of boardwalks, a pavilion, and a compound. The creation of the 7-acre naturally flooded oxbow was also included; Phase 3 (2000 - 2003) - As a research building was created, three additional wetlands were created in the vicinity of the building, including a stormwater wetland that receives runoff from the roof of the building; Phase 4 - The current phase involves research access to the Olentangy River.

  15. EIS-0467: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Acquisition of a Natural Gas Pipeline and Natural Gas Utility Service at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA, and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement

  16. Patterns in wetland microbial community composition and functional gene repertoire associated with methane emissions

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; McFarland, Jack W.; Anderson, Frank E.; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Tremblay, Julien; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Waldrop, Mark P.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Tringe, Susannah G.

    2015-05-19

    Wetland restoration on peat islands previously drained for agriculture has potential to reverse land subsidence and sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide as peat accretes. However, the emission of methane could potentially offset the greenhouse gas benefits of captured carbon. As microbial communities play a key role in governing wetland greenhouse gas fluxes, we are interested in how microbial community composition and functions are associated with wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, and methane emission, which is critical to modeling the microbial component in wetland methane fluxes and to managing restoration projects for maximal carbon sequestration. Here, we couple sequence-based methods with biogeochemical and greenhouse gas measurements to interrogate microbial communities from a pilot-scale restored wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, revealing considerable spatial heterogeneity even within this relatively small site. A number of microbial populations and functions showed strong correlations with electron acceptor availability and methane production; some also showed a preference for association with plant roots. Marker gene phylogenies revealed a diversity of major methane-producing and -consuming populations and suggested novel diversity within methanotrophs. Methanogenic archaea were observed in all samples, as were nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria, indicating that no single terminal electron acceptor was preferred despite differences in energetic favorability and suggesting spatial microheterogeneity and microniches. Notably, methanogens were negatively correlated with nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria and were most abundant at sampling sites with high peat accretion and low electron acceptor availability, where methane production was highest. Wetlands are the largest nonanthropogenic source of atmospheric methane but also a key global carbon reservoir. Characterizing belowground microbial communities

  17. Patterns in wetland microbial community composition and functional gene repertoire associated with methane emissions

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    He, Shaomei; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; McFarland, Jack W.; Anderson, Frank E.; Pati, Amrita; Huntemann, Marcel; Tremblay, Julien; Glavina del Rio, Tijana; Waldrop, Mark P.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; et al

    2015-05-19

    Wetland restoration on peat islands previously drained for agriculture has potential to reverse land subsidence and sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide as peat accretes. However, the emission of methane could potentially offset the greenhouse gas benefits of captured carbon. As microbial communities play a key role in governing wetland greenhouse gas fluxes, we are interested in how microbial community composition and functions are associated with wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, and methane emission, which is critical to modeling the microbial component in wetland methane fluxes and to managing restoration projects for maximal carbon sequestration. Here, we couple sequence-based methods with biogeochemical and greenhousemore » gas measurements to interrogate microbial communities from a pilot-scale restored wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, revealing considerable spatial heterogeneity even within this relatively small site. A number of microbial populations and functions showed strong correlations with electron acceptor availability and methane production; some also showed a preference for association with plant roots. Marker gene phylogenies revealed a diversity of major methane-producing and -consuming populations and suggested novel diversity within methanotrophs. Methanogenic archaea were observed in all samples, as were nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria, indicating that no single terminal electron acceptor was preferred despite differences in energetic favorability and suggesting spatial microheterogeneity and microniches. Notably, methanogens were negatively correlated with nitrate-, sulfate-, and metal-reducing bacteria and were most abundant at sampling sites with high peat accretion and low electron acceptor availability, where methane production was highest. Wetlands are the largest nonanthropogenic source of atmospheric methane but also a key global carbon reservoir. Characterizing belowground microbial

  18. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

  19. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  20. METAL REMOVAL FROM PROCESS AND STORMWATER DISCHARGES BY CONSTRUCTED TREATMENT WETLANDS

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, ERIC

    2004-11-02

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater and stormwater which passes through a wetland treatment system (WTS) prior to discharge. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to the design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland and has a retention time of approximately 48 hours. Sampling conducted during the fourth year of operation validated continued wetland performance, and assessed the fate of a larger suite of metals present in the water. Copper and mercury removal efficiencies were still very high, both in excess of 80 per cent removal from the water after passage through the wetland system. Lead removal from the water by the system was 83 per cent, zinc removal was 60 per cent, and nickel was generally unaffected. Nitrates entering into the wetland cells are almost immediately removed from the water column and generally no nitrates are discharged from the A cells. The wetland cells are very anaerobic and the sediments have negative redox potentials. As a result, manganese and iron mineral phases in the sediments have been reduced to soluble forms and increase in the water during passage through the wetland system. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is also increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Operation and maintenance of the system is minimal, and consists of checking for growth of the vegetation and free flow of the water through the system.

  1. Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

  2. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

    2011-12-17

    The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

  3. High-resolution velocimetry in energetic tidal currents using a convergent-beam acoustic Doppler profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Sellar, Brian; Harding, Samuel F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2015-07-16

    An array of convergent acoustic Doppler velocimeters has been developed and tested for the high resolution measurement of three-dimensional tidal flow velocities in an energetic tidal site. This configuration has been developed to increase spatial resolution of velocity measurements in comparison to conventional acoustic Doppler profilers (ADPs) which characteristically use diverging acoustic beams emanating from a single instrument. This is achieved using converging acoustic beams with a sample volume at the focal point of 0.03 m3. The array is also able to simultaneously measure three-dimensional velocity components in a profile throughout the water column, and as such is referred to herein as a converging-beam acoustic Doppler profiler (CADP). Mid-depth profiling is achieved through integration of the sensor platform with the operational Alstom 1MW DeepGen-IV Tidal Turbine. This proof-of-concept paper outlines system configuration and comparison to measurements provided by co-installed reference instrumentation. Comparison of CADP to standard ADP velocity measurements reveals a mean difference of 8 mm/s, standard deviation of 18 mm/s, and order-of-magnitude reduction in realizable length-scale. CADP focal point measurements compared to a proximal single-beam reference show peak cross-correlation coefficient of 0.96 over 4.0 s averaging period and a 47% reduction in Doppler noise. The dual functionality of the CADP as a profiling instrument with a high resolution focal point make this configuration a unique and valuable advancement in underwater velocimetry enabling improved turbulence, resource and structural loading quantification and validation of numerical simulations. Alternative modes of operation have been implemented including noise-reducing bi-static sampling. Since waves are simultaneously measured it is expected that derivatives of this system will be a powerful tool in wave-current interaction studies.

  4. Energy Department Announces $8 Million to Develop Advanced Components for Wave, Tidal, and Current Energy Systems

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today announced $8 million in available funding to spur innovation in next-generation marine and hydrokinetic control and component technologies. In the United States, waves, tides, and ocean currents represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource that could provide clean, affordable energy to homes and businesses across the country's coastal regions.

  5. Coastal-zone biogeochemical dynamics under global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, F.T.; Ver, L.M.; Lerman, A.

    2000-03-01

    The coastal zone, consisting of the continental shelves to a depth of 200 meters, including bays, lagoons, estuaries, and near-shore banks, is an environment that is strongly affected by its biogeochemical and physical interactions with reservoirs in the adjacent domains of land, atmosphere, open ocean, and marine sediments. Because the coastal zone is smaller in volume and area coverage relative to the open ocean, it traditionally has been studied as an integral part of the global oceans. In this paper, the authors show by numerical modeling that it is important to consider the coastal zone as an entity separate from the open ocean in any assessment of future Earth-system response under human perturbation. Model analyses for the early part of the 21st century suggest that the coastal zone plays a significant modifying role in the biogeochemical dynamics of the carbon cycle and the nutrient cycles coupled to it. This role is manifested in changes in primary production, storage, and/or export of organic matter, its remineralization, and calcium carbonate precipitation--all of which determine the state of the coastal zone with respect to exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Under a scenario of future reduced or complete cessation of the thermohaline circulation (THC) of the global oceans, coastal waters become an important sink for atmospheric CO{sub 2}, as opposed to the conditions in the past and present, when coastal waters are believed to be a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Profound changes in coastal-zone primary productivity underscore the important role of phosphorus as a limiting nutrient. In addition, calculations indicate that the saturation state of coastal waters with respect to carbonate minerals will decline by {approximately}15% by the year 2030. Any future slowdown in the THC of the oceans will increase slightly the rate of decline in saturation state.

  6. WETCHIMP-WSL: Intercomparison of wetland methane emissions models over West Siberia

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bohn, T. J.; Melton, J. R.; Ito, A.; Kleinen, T.; Spahni, R.; Stocker, B. D.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, X.; Schroeder, R.; Glagolev, M. V.; et al

    2015-06-03

    Wetlands are the world's largest natural source of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. The strong sensitivity of methane emissions to environmental factors such as soil temperature and moisture has led to concerns about potential positive feedbacks to climate change. This risk is particularly relevant at high latitudes, which have experienced pronounced warming and where thawing permafrost could potentially liberate large amounts of labile carbon over the next 100 years. However, global models disagree as to the magnitude and spatial distribution of emissions, due to uncertainties in wetland area and emissions per unit area and a scarcity of in situ observations.more » Recent intensive field campaigns across the West Siberian Lowland (WSL) make this an ideal region over which to assess the performance of large-scale process-based wetland models in a high-latitude environment. Here we present the results of a follow-up to the Wetland and Wetland CH4 Intercomparison of Models Project (WETCHIMP), focused on the West Siberian Lowland (WETCHIMP-WSL). We assessed 21 models and 5 inversions over this domain in terms of total CH4 emissions, simulated wetland areas, and CH4 fluxes per unit wetland area and compared these results to an intensive in situ CH4 flux data set, several wetland maps, and two satellite surface water products. We found that (a) despite the large scatter of individual estimates, 12-year mean estimates of annual total emissions over the WSL from forward models (5.34 ± 0.54 Tg CH4 yr⁻¹), inversions (6.06 ± 1.22 Tg CH4 yr⁻¹), and in situ observations (3.91 ± 1.29 Tg CH4 yr⁻¹) largely agreed; (b) forward models using surface water products alone to estimate wetland areas suffered from severe biases in CH4 emissions; (c) the interannual time series of models that lacked either soil thermal physics appropriate to the high latitudes or realistic emissions from unsaturated peatlands tended to be dominated by a single environmental driver

  7. WETCHIMP-WSL: Intercomparison of wetland methane emissions models over West Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, T. J.; Melton, J. R.; Ito, A.; Kleinen, T.; Spahni, R.; Stocker, B. D.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, X.; Schroeder, R.; Glagolev, M. V.; Maksyutov, S.; Brovkin, V.; Chen, G.; Denisov, S. N.; Eliseev, A. V.; Gallego-Sala, A.; McDonald, K. C.; Rawlins, M. A.; Riley, W. J.; Subin, Z. M.; Tian, H.; Zhuang, Q.; Kaplan, J. O.

    2015-06-03

    Wetlands are the world's largest natural source of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas. The strong sensitivity of methane emissions to environmental factors such as soil temperature and moisture has led to concerns about potential positive feedbacks to climate change. This risk is particularly relevant at high latitudes, which have experienced pronounced warming and where thawing permafrost could potentially liberate large amounts of labile carbon over the next 100 years. However, global models disagree as to the magnitude and spatial distribution of emissions, due to uncertainties in wetland area and emissions per unit area and a scarcity of in situ observations. Recent intensive field campaigns across the West Siberian Lowland (WSL) make this an ideal region over which to assess the performance of large-scale process-based wetland models in a high-latitude environment. Here we present the results of a follow-up to the Wetland and Wetland CH4 Intercomparison of Models Project (WETCHIMP), focused on the West Siberian Lowland (WETCHIMP-WSL). We assessed 21 models and 5 inversions over this domain in terms of total CH4 emissions, simulated wetland areas, and CH4 fluxes per unit wetland area and compared these results to an intensive in situ CH4 flux data set, several wetland maps, and two satellite surface water products. We found that (a) despite the large scatter of individual estimates, 12-year mean estimates of annual total emissions over the WSL from forward models (5.34 ± 0.54 Tg CH4 yr⁻¹), inversions (6.06 ± 1.22 Tg CH4 yr⁻¹), and in situ observations (3.91 ± 1.29 Tg CH4 yr⁻¹) largely agreed; (b) forward models using surface water products alone to estimate wetland areas suffered from severe biases in CH4 emissions; (c) the interannual time series of models that lacked either soil thermal physics appropriate to the high latitudes or realistic emissions from

  8. Evaluating the Potential for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices to Act as Artificial Reefs or Fish Aggregating Devices. Based on Analysis of Surrogates in Tropical, Subtropical, and Temperate U.S. West Coast and Hawaiian Coastal Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Sharon H.; Hamilton, Christine D.; Spencer, Gregory C.; Ogston, Heather O.

    2015-05-12

    Wave energy converters (WECs) and tidal energy converters (TECs) are only beginning to be deployed along the U.S. West Coast and in Hawai‘i, and a better understanding of their ecological effects on fish, particularly on special-status fish (e.g., threatened and endangered) is needed to facilitate project design and environmental permitting. The structures of WECs and TECs placed on to the seabed, such as anchors and foundations, may function as artificial reefs that attract reef-associated fishes, while the midwater and surface structures, such as mooring lines, buoys, and wave or tidal power devices, may function as fish aggregating devices (FADs), forming the nuclei for groups of fishes. Little is known about the potential for WECs and TECs to function as artificial reefs and FADs in coastal waters of the U.S. West Coast and Hawai‘i. We evaluated these potential ecological interactions by reviewing relevant information about fish associations with surrogate structures, such as artificial reefs, natural reefs, kelps, floating debris, oil and gas platforms, marine debris, anchored FADs deployed to enhance fishing opportunities, net-cages used for mariculture, and piers and docks. Based on our review, we postulate that the structures of WECs and TECs placed on or near the seabed in coastal waters of the U.S. West Coast and Hawai‘i likely will function as small-scale artificial reefs and attract potentially high densities of reef-associated fishes (including special-status rockfish species [Sebastes spp.] along the mainland), and that the midwater and surface structures of WECs placed in the tropical waters of Hawai‘i likely will function as de facto FADs with species assemblages varying by distance from shore and deployment depth. Along the U.S. West Coast, frequent associations with midwater and surface structures may be less likely: juvenile, semipelagic, kelp-associated rockfishes may occur at midwater and surface structures of WECs in coastal waters of

  9. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaff, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.65.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (UC bond distance at ~2.88 ), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  10. Evaluation of wetland methane emissions across North America using atmospheric data and inverse modeling

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Miller, Scot M.; Commane, Roisin; Melton, Joe R.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Benmergui, Joshua; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Michalak, Anna M.; Sweeney, Colm; Worthy, Doug E. J.

    2016-03-02

    Existing estimates of methane (CH4) fluxes from North American wetlands vary widely in both magnitude and distribution. In light of these differences, this study uses atmospheric CH4 observations from the US and Canada to analyze seven different bottom-up, wetland CH4 estimates reported in a recent model comparison project. We first use synthetic data to explore whether wetland CH4 fluxes are detectable at atmospheric observation sites. We find that the observation network can detect aggregate wetland fluxes from both eastern and western Canada but generally not from the US. Based upon these results, we then use real data and inverse modelingmore » results to analyze the magnitude, seasonality, and spatial distribution of each model estimate. The magnitude of Canadian fluxes in many models is larger than indicated by atmospheric observations. Many models predict a seasonality that is narrower than implied by inverse modeling results, possibly indicating an oversensitivity to air or soil temperatures. The LPJ-Bern and SDGVM models have a geographic distribution that is most consistent with atmospheric observations, depending upon the region and season. Lastly, these models utilize land cover maps or dynamic modeling to estimate wetland coverage while most other models rely primarily on remote sensing inundation data.« less

  11. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulating the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.

  12. Spectroscopic evidence of uranium immobilization in acidic wetlands by natural organic matter and plant roots

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L₃-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ~2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore » the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was two orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was re-oxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  13. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N. W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  14. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  15. The potential of wetlands for mitigating adverse effects of agricultural drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, G.S.

    1995-12-01

    Agricultural runoff has been clearly identified as a major contributor to the failure of much of the surface water in the United States to meet designated use objectives. Control of agricultural drainage is very problematic. The agriculture industry strongly resists mandated controls, and warns of potential catastrophic consequences in food shortages should production methods be altered. Yet concern grows over the long and short term impact of a variety of contaminants - particularly sediments, nutrients, and pesticides - released to our waters as part of normal agricultural practices. For quite some time, wetlands have been explored for their potential in treating sewage (from both municipal and private systems) and acid mine drainage. Much less work has been done looking at the potential for wetlands to treat agricultural drainage. yet, wetlands may offer tremendous potential for mitigating problems of agricultural runoff while offering farmers desirable (or at least acceptable) uses of marginal land. This paper has two objectives. First, the opportunities for wetlands to be used as agricultural drainage treatment facilities are described. Processes are identified which trap or degrade pollutants, with particular attention given to long-term environmental fate. Second, an experimental wetlands system recently developed in Northwest Ohio is used as an example of system implementation. Emphasis will be given to how the system was developed to optimize pollutant removal within the physical constraints of the site. Preliminary performance data with respect to water quality changes will also be presented.

  16. DOE's Deep Capabilities and Wide Possibilities Highlighted at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    environmental chemistry, integrated coastal ocean modeling, wetland and coastal ecology, ecosystem modeling, biotechnology, remote sensing and national and homeland security. ...

  17. Tidal sampler

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, David W.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for pumping a sample of water or other liquid that uses the energy generated from the rise and fall of the liquid level to force a sample of the liquid into a collection vessel. A suction vessel and booster vessel with interconnecting tubing and check valves are responsive to an oscillating liquid level to pump a portion of said liquid into a collection vessel.

  18. GRB060218 AS A TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A WHITE DWARF BY AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbakov, Roman V.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Pe'er, Asaf; Haas, Roland; Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo

    2013-06-01

    The highly unusual pair of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB060218 and an associated supernova, SN2006aj, has puzzled theorists for years. A supernova shock breakout and a jet from a newborn stellar mass compact object have been proposed to explain this pair's multiwavelength signature. Alternatively, we propose that the source is naturally explained by another channel: the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). This tidal disruption is accompanied by a tidal pinching, which leads to the ignition of a WD and a supernova. Some debris falls back onto the IMBH, forms a disk, which quickly amplifies the magnetic field, and launches a jet. We successfully fit soft X-ray spectra with the Comptonized blackbody emission from a jet photosphere. The optical/UV emission is consistent with self-absorbed synchrotron emission from the expanding jet front. The temporal dependence of the accretion rate M-dot (t) in a tidal disruption provides a good fit to the soft X-ray light curve. The IMBH mass is found to be about 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} in three independent estimates: (1) fitting the tidal disruption M-dot (t) to the soft X-ray light curve, (2) computing the jet base radius in a jet photospheric emission model, and (3) inferring the mass of the central black hole based on the host dwarf galaxy's stellar mass. The position of the supernova is consistent with the center of the host galaxy, while the low supernova ejecta mass is consistent with that of a WD. The high expected rate of tidal disruptions in dwarf galaxies is consistent with one source observed by the Swift satellite over several years at a distance of 150 Mpc measured for GRB060218. Encounters with WDs provide much fuel for the growth of IMBHs.

  19. Tidal evolution of the spin-orbit angle in exoplanetary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yuxin; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Hirano, Teruyuki; Fujii, Yuka; Masuda, Kento

    2014-03-20

    The angle between the stellar spin and the planetary orbit axes (the spin-orbit angle) is supposed to carry valuable information concerning the initial condition of planetary formation and subsequent migration history. Indeed, current observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect have revealed a wide range of spin-orbit misalignments for transiting exoplanets. We examine in detail the tidal evolution of a simple system comprising a Sun-like star and a hot Jupiter adopting the equilibrium tide and the inertial wave dissipation effects simultaneously. We find that the combined tidal model works as a very efficient realignment mechanism; it predicts three distinct states of the spin-orbit angle (i.e., parallel, polar, and antiparallel orbits) for a while, but the latter two states eventually approach the parallel spin-orbit configuration. The intermediate spin-orbit angles as measured in recent observations are difficult to obtain. Therefore the current model cannot reproduce the observed broad distribution of the spin-orbit angles, at least in its simple form. This indicates that the observed diversity of the spin-orbit angles may emerge from more complicated interactions with outer planets and/or may be the consequence of the primordial misalignment between the protoplanetary disk and the stellar spin, which requires future detailed studies.

  20. A tidal disruption event in a nearby galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Donato, D.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Kutyrev, A.; Landt, H.; Butler, N. R.

    2014-02-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 keV flux declined by a factor of ?2300 over a time span of 6 yr, following a power-law decay with index ?2.44 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of ?20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kT ? 0.09 keV (?10{sup 6} K). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1? level with the cluster (z = 0.062476). We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log (M {sub BH}/M {sub ?}) ? 5.5 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  1. A STATISTICAL METHOD FOR MEASURING THE GALACTIC POTENTIAL AND TESTING GRAVITY WITH COLD TIDAL STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Penarrubia, Jorge; Walker, Matthew G.

    2012-11-20

    We introduce the Minimum Entropy Method, a simple statistical technique for constraining the Milky Way gravitational potential and simultaneously testing different gravity theories directly from 6D phase-space surveys and without adopting dynamical models. We demonstrate that orbital energy distributions that are separable (i.e., independent of position) have an associated entropy that increases under wrong assumptions about the gravitational potential and/or gravity theory. Of known objects, 'cold' tidal streams from low-mass progenitors follow orbital distributions that most nearly satisfy the condition of separability. Although the orbits of tidally stripped stars are perturbed by the progenitor's self-gravity, systematic variations of the energy distribution can be quantified in terms of the cross-entropy of individual tails, giving further sensitivity to theoretical biases in the host potential. The feasibility of using the Minimum Entropy Method to test a wide range of gravity theories is illustrated by evolving restricted N-body models in a Newtonian potential and examining the changes in entropy introduced by Dirac, MONDian, and f(R) gravity modifications.

  2. OBLIQUITIES OF HOT JUPITER HOST STARS: EVIDENCE FOR TIDAL INTERACTIONS AND PRIMORDIAL MISALIGNMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Arriagada, Pamela; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Hirano, Teruyuki; Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel D.

    2012-09-20

    We provide evidence that the obliquities of stars with close-in giant planets were initially nearly random, and that the low obliquities that are often observed are a consequence of star-planet tidal interactions. The evidence is based on 14 new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (for the systems HAT-P-6, HAT-P-7, HAT-P-16, HAT-P-24, HAT-P-32, HAT-P-34, WASP-12, WASP-16, WASP-18, WASP-19, WASP-26, WASP-31, Gl 436, and Kepler-8), as well as a critical review of previous observations. The low-obliquity (well-aligned) systems are those for which the expected tidal timescale is short, and likewise the high-obliquity (misaligned and retrograde) systems are those for which the expected timescale is long. At face value, this finding indicates that the origin of hot Jupiters involves dynamical interactions like planet-planet interactions or the Kozai effect that tilt their orbits rather than inspiraling due to interaction with a protoplanetary disk. We discuss the status of this hypothesis and the observations that are needed for a more definitive conclusion.

  3. KOI-54: THE KEPLER DISCOVERY OF TIDALLY EXCITED PULSATIONS AND BRIGHTENINGS IN A HIGHLY ECCENTRIC BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Aerts, Conny; Zima, Wolfgang; Brown, Timothy M.; Brugamyer, Erik; Cochran, William D.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Kurtz, D. W.; Latham, David W.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Allen, Christopher; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Howell, Steve B.; Gautier, Thomas N.

    2011-11-01

    Kepler observations of the star HD 187091 (KIC 8112039, hereafter KOI-54) revealed a remarkable light curve exhibiting sharp periodic brightening events every 41.8 days with a superimposed set of oscillations forming a beating pattern in phase with the brightenings. Spectroscopic observations revealed that this is a binary star with a highly eccentric orbit, e = 0.83. We are able to match the Kepler light curve and radial velocities with a nearly face-on (i = 5.{sup 0}5) binary star model in which the brightening events are caused by tidal distortion and irradiation of nearly identical A stars during their close periastron passage. The two dominant oscillations in the light curve, responsible for the beating pattern, have frequencies that are the 91st and 90th harmonic of the orbital frequency. The power spectrum of the light curve, after removing the binary star brightening component, reveals a large number of pulsations, 30 of which have a signal-to-noise ratio {approx}>7. Nearly all of these pulsations have frequencies that are either integer multiples of the orbital frequency or are tidally split multiples of the orbital frequency. This pattern of frequencies unambiguously establishes the pulsations as resonances between the dynamic tides at periastron and the free oscillation modes of one or both of the stars. KOI-54 is only the fourth star to show such a phenomenon and is by far the richest in terms of excited modes.

  4. Milky Way mass and potential recovery using tidal streams in a realistic halo

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaca, Ana; Geha, Marla; Kpper, Andreas H. W.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Diemand, Jrg; Hogg, David W.

    2014-11-01

    We present a new method for determining the Galactic gravitational potential based on forward modeling of tidal stellar streams. We use this method to test the performance of smooth and static analytic potentials in representing realistic dark matter halos, which have substructure and are continually evolving by accretion. Our FAST-FORWARD method uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to compare, in six-dimensional phase space, an 'observed' stream to models created in trial analytic potentials. We analyze a large sample of streams that evolved in the Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, which represents a realistic Galactic halo potential. The recovered potential parameters are in agreement with the best fit to the global, present-day VL2 potential. However, merely assuming an analytic potential limits the dark matter halo mass measurement to an accuracy of 5%-20%, depending on the choice of analytic parameterization. Collectively, the mass estimates using streams from our sample reach this fundamental limit, but individually they can be highly biased. Individual streams can both under- and overestimate the mass, and the bias is progressively worse for those with smaller perigalacticons, motivating the search for tidal streams at galactocentric distances larger than 70 kpc. We estimate that the assumption of a static and smooth dark matter potential in modeling of the GD-1- and Pal5-like streams introduces an error of up to 50% in the Milky Way mass estimates.

  5. Using gaps in N-body tidal streams to probe missing satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Ngan, W. H. W.; Carlberg, R. G.

    2014-06-20

    We use N-body simulations to model the tidal disruption of a star cluster in a Milky-Way-sized dark matter halo, which results in a narrow stream comparable to (but slightly wider than) Pal-5 or GD-1. The mean Galactic dark matter halo is modeled by a spherical Navarro-Frenk-White potential with subhalos predicted by the ΛCDM cosmological model. The distribution and mass function of the subhalos follow the results from the Aquarius simulation. We use a matched filter approach to look for 'gaps' in tidal streams at 12 length scales from 0.1 kpc to 5 kpc, which appear as characteristic dips in the linear densities along the streams. We find that, in addition to the subhalos' perturbations, the epicyclic overdensities (EOs) due to the coherent epicyclic motions of particles in a stream also produce gap-like signals near the progenitor. We measure the gap spectra—the gap formation rates as functions of gap length—due to both subhalo perturbations and EOs, which have not been accounted for together by previous studies. Finally, we project the simulated streams onto the sky to investigate issues when interpreting gap spectra in observations. In particular, we find that gap spectra from low signal-to-noise observations can be biased by the orbital phase of the stream. This indicates that the study of stream gaps will benefit greatly from high-quality data from future missions.

  6. A scaling relation of the evolving tidal fields in a ?CDM cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Springel, Volker, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: volker@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    We report the finding of a scaling relation among the cosmic-web anisotropy parameter A, the linear density rms fluctuation ?(r) and the linear growth factor D(z). Using the tidal field derived from the Millennium Simulation on 512{sup 3} grids at z = 0,2,5 and 127, we calculate the largest eigenvalues ? of the local tidal tensor at each grid resolution and measure its distance-averaged two-point correlation function, ?{sub ?}, as a function of the cosines of polar angles cos ? in the local principal axis frame. We show that ?{sub ?} is quite anisotropic, increasing toward the directions of minimal matter compression, and that the anisotropy of ?{sub ?} increases as the redshift z decreases and as the upper distance cutoff r{sub c} decreases. Fitting the numerical results to an analytic fitting model ?{sub ?}(cos ?)?(1+Acos {sup n}?){sup ?1}, it is found that the best fit value of A, dubbed the cosmic-web anisotropy parameter, varies systematically with ?(r{sub c}) and D(z), allowing us to determine the simple empiral scaling relation A(r{sub c},z) = 0.8 D{sup 0.76}(z) ?(r{sub c})

  7. Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 2007–2010

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

    2011-03-01

    The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192–208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

  8. Certification of Consistency with Washington's Coastal Zone Management...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Coastal Zone Management Program for Federally Funded ActivitiesLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not...

  9. In Situ Remediation of {sup 137}Cs Contaminated Wetlands Using Naturally Occurring Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    1999-08-11

    Cesium-137 has contaminated a large area of the wetlands on the Savannah River Site. Remediation of the contaminated wetlands is problematic because current techniques destroy the sensitive ecosystem and generate a higher dose to workers. To address this problem, we proposed a non-trusive, in situ technology to sequester 137Cs in sediments. One intention of this study was to provide information regarding a go/no go decision for future work. Since the proof-of-concept was successful and several minerals were identified as potential candidates for this technology, a go decision was made.

  10. Recoding of the stop codon UGA to glycine by a BD1-5/SN-2 bacterium and niche partitioning between Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria in a tidal sediment microbial community naturally selected in a laboratory chemostat

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, Anna; Hamann, Emmo; Sharma, Ritin; Geelhoed, Jeanine; Hargesheimer, Theresa; Kraft, Beate; Meyer, Volker; Lenk, Sabine; Osmers, Harald; Wu, Rong; Makinwa, Kofi; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Tegetmeyer, Halina; Strouss, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Sandy coastal sediments are global hot spots for microbial mineralization of organic matter and denitrification. These sediments are characterized by advective pore water flow, tidal cycling and an active and complex microbial community. Metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities sampled from such sediments showed that potential sulfuroxidizing Gammaproteobacteria and members of the enigmaticBD1-5/ SN-2 candidatephylumwereabundantinsitu (>10% and 2% respectively). By mimicking the dynamic oxic/anoxic environmental conditions of the sedimentin a laboratory chemostat, a simplified microbial community was selected from the more complex inoculum. Metagenomics, proteomics and fluorescenceinsituhybridization showed that this simplified community contained both a potential sulfuroxidizing Gamma proteobacteria (at 24 2% abundance) and a member of the BD1-5 / SN-2candidatephylum (at 7 6%abundance). Despite the abundant supply of organic substrates to the chemostat, proteomic analysis suggested that the selected gamma proteobacterium grew partially auto trophically and performed hydrogen/formate oxidation. The enrichment of a member of the BD1-5/SN-2candidatephylum enabled, for the first time, direct microscopic observation by fluorescent insitu hybridization and the experimental validation of the previously predicted translation of the stop codon UGA into glycine.

  11. STAR FORMATION AND DUST OBSCURATION IN THE TIDALLY DISTORTED GALAXY NGC 2442

    SciTech Connect

    Pancoast, Anna; Sajina, Anna; Lacy, Mark; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Rho, Jeonghee

    2010-11-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the morphological distribution and level of star formation and dust obscuration in the nearby tidally distorted galaxy NGC 2442. Spitzer images in the IR at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 {mu}m and GALEX images at 1500 A and 2300 A allow us to resolve the galaxy on scales between {approx}240 and 600 pc. We supplement these with archival data in the B, J, H, and K bands. We use the 8 {mu}m, 24 {mu}m, and FUV (1500 A) emission to study the star formation rate (SFR). We find that, globally, these tracers of star formation give a range of results of {approx}6-11 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, with the dust-corrected FUV giving the highest value of SFR. We can reconcile the UV- and IR-based estimates by adopting a steeper UV extinction curve that lies in between the starburst (Calzetti) and Small Magellanic Cloud extinction curves. However, the regions of the highest SFR intensity along the spiral arms are consistent with a starburst-like extinction. Overall, the level of star formation we find is higher than previously published for this galaxy, by about a factor of 2, which, contrary to previous conclusions, implies that the interaction that caused the distorted morphology of NGC 2442 likely also triggered increased levels of star formation activity. We also find marked asymmetry in that the north spiral arm has a noticeably higher SFR than the southern arm. The tip of the southern spiral arm shows a likely tidally distorted peculiar morphology. It is UV bright and shows unusual IRAC colors, consistent with other published tidal features IRAC data. Outside of the spiral arms, we discover what appears to be a superbubble, {approx}1.7 kpc across, which is seen most clearly in the IRAC images. Significant H{alpha}, UV, and IR emission in the area also suggest vigorous ongoing star formation. A known, recent supernova (SN 1999ga) is located at the edge of this superbubble. Although speculative at this stage, this area suggests a large star

  12. EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental AssessmentThis EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions.

  13. A LUMINOUS, FAST RISING UV-TRANSIENT DISCOVERED BY ROTSE: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, J.; Wheeler, J. C.; Chatzopoulos, E.; Marion, G. H.; Yuan, F.; Akerlof, C.; Quimby, R. M.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Guillochon, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on 2009 January 21. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ?10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by {sup 56}Ni{sup 56}Co radioactive decay. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift, the peak magnitude of the OT is close to 22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a Sun-like star by the central supermassive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.

  14. EXTREME CORONAL LINE EMITTERS: TIDAL DISRUPTION OF STARS BY MASSIVE BLACK HOLES IN GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Tinggui; Zhou Hongyan; Wang Huiyuan; Yang Chenwei; Komossa, S.

    2012-04-20

    Tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies is expected to produce unique emission-line signatures, which have not yet been explored adequately. Here we report the discovery of extremely strong coronal lines from [Fe X] up to [Fe XIV] in a sample of seven galaxies (including two recently reported cases), which we interpret as such signatures. This is the first systematic search for objects of this kind, by making use of the immense database of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The galaxies, which are non-active as evidenced by the narrow line ratios, show broad emission lines of complex profiles in more than half of the sample. Both the high-ionization coronal lines and the broad lines are fading on timescales of years in objects observed with spectroscopic follow-ups, suggesting their transient nature. Variations of inferred non-stellar continua, which have absolute magnitudes of at least -16 to -18 mag in the g band, are also detected in more than half of the sample. The coronal line emitters reside in sub-L{sub *} disk galaxies (-21.3 < M{sub i} < -18.5) with small stellar velocity dispersions. The sample seems to form two distinct types based on the presence or absence of the [Fe VII] lines, with the latter having relatively low luminosities of [O III], [Fe XI], and the host galaxies. These characteristics can most naturally be understood in the context of transient accretion onto intermediate-mass black holes at galactic centers following tidal disruption of stars in a gas-rich environment. We estimate the incidence of such events to be around 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1} for a galaxy with -21.3 < M{sub i} < -18.5.

  15. Reservoir facies architecture in a micro-tidal barrier system, Frio formation, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, W.E.

    1984-04-01

    Barrier-bar sand bodies are a complex mosaic of barrier-core, shore-face, inlet-fill, tidal-delta, and back-barrier facies. In addition, sandbody stratigraphy and internal depositional architecture are determined by the progradational, aggradational, or transgressive origin of the barrier complex. The Frio barrier/strandplain system of the middle Texas Gulf Coast has produced more than 3 billion bbl of oil. Examination of the Greta, Glasscock, and 41-A sands in West Ranch field illustrates the variability of barrier reservoirs. Each reservoir is a mosaic of variably interconnected compartments having sheet, tab, pod, or channel geometries. Conventional facies analysis (isolith and log-pattern mapping and limited core examination) combined with semiquantitative delineation of hydrocarbon-saturation distribution using resistivity logs defined the facies components of each reservoir. The 41-A sand consists of juxtaposed progradational barrier-core, inlet-fill, and flood tidal-delta units. The Glasscock sand is largely a transgressive barrier-flat and washover-fan deposit. The Greta sand is a complex of aggradational barrier-core and inlet-fill facies. Productive attributes of each reservoir are influenced by its facies architecture and attendant relative permeabilities. Natural water drive is ineffective in the volumetrically restricted transgressive Glasscock reservoir. Permeability distribution in the 41-A reservoir is facies defined. Erratic injection response, irregular oil-water contact advance, and variable water/oil ratios observed during the productive history of individual reservoirs document localized facies effects on fluid flow. Spatial variation of the gas/oil ratio may also reflect facies distribution.

  16. Seed germination and root elongation as indicators of exposure of wetland seedlings to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, H.D.; Stokes, S.L.; Hook, D.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    Wetland ecosystems have often been impacted by the addition of hazardous waste materials. Methods are needed to evaluate the effect of these substances on wetland ecosystems and the organisms within them. This study evaluates the response of various wetland plant species to representative contaminants (cadmium, nickel, atrazine, anthracene, and tetrachloroethylene). Species tested include Caphalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), Saururus cernuus (lizard`s tail), Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Sparganium americanum (bur-reed), and Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash). To the authors` knowledge these species have rarely if ever been used in toxicological assays. The endpoints used are germination and root elongation. Preliminary studies using a petri dish system have shown decreased germination at the highest metal concentration (50mg/L) and decreased root elongation in the higher metal concentrations (10, 25, and 50mg/L). Interference from the carrier was observed in the organic tests. Root elongation studies using the metals are being continued using tubes with various sand and vermiculite mixes into which freshly germinated seeds are placed. Species with the best responses will be tested in the field at the Savannah River Site, SC, and also with fuel oil. Lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus sativus) are being tested alongside the wetland species as reference organisms for which tests are well established.

  17. DOE Gives $150,000 for Wetland Restoration and Environmental Education Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Officials from DOE and TDEC sign an agreement for a $150,000 Supplemental Environmental Project. The agreement selects a project that will construct artificial wetlands to improve the area’s wildlife habitat and educate local middle school, high school, and undergraduate students.

  18. Uranium redistribution due to water table fluctuations in sandy wetland mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Gilson, Emily R.; Huang, Shan; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Qafoku, Odeta; Peacock, Aaron D.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2015-10-20

    In order to better understand the fate and stability of immobilized uranium (U) in wetland sediments, and how intermittent dry periods affect U stability, we dosed saturated wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl acetate for 4 months before imposing a short drying and rewetting period. Concentrations of U in mesocosm effluent increased after drying and rewetting, but the cumulative amount of U released following the dry period constituted less than 1% of the total U immobilized in the soil during the 4 months prior. This low level of remobilization suggests, and XAS analyses confirm, that microbial reduction was not the primary means of U immobilization, as the U immobilized in mesocosms was primarily U(VI) rather than U(IV). Drying followed by re-wetting caused a redistribution of U downward in the soil profile and on to root surfaces. While the U on roots before drying was primarily associated with minerals, the U that relocated to the roots during drying and rewetting was bound diffusely to root surfaces. Results show that short periods of drought conditions in a wetland, which expose reduced sediments to air, may impact U distribution, but these conditions may not cause large releases of soil-bound U from planted wetlands to surface waters.

  19. RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2013-06-17

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  20. DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes.

  1. Coastal ocean current response to storm winds

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.L.

    1982-03-20

    Design of offshore structures requires knowledge of the appropriate current profile to be used in conjunction with the design wave. Accurate determination of the current profile will depend on reliable current models. Vertical transfer of momentum in storm-driven current models is commonly treated either by using eddy viscosity or by assuming 'slab-like' mixed layer flow. These two fundamentally different approaches predict different current speeds and profiles during severe storms. The existing data base is inadequate to determine which approach is better, but most existing data sets are subject to one or more of four limitations that can lead one improperly to interpret the data as supporting the existence of current velocity shear in otherwise uniform mixed layers. One-dimensional slab models are found to compare favorably with observed wind-driven currents at the Ocean Test Structure in the Gulf of Mexico (deployed in 20 m deep water). By using some reasonably simple assumptions, these slab models are able to replicate many of the significantly features of the wide range of different responses. The character of the response appears to depend on an interaction of stratification and topography. Barotropic responses are characteristic of typical coastal responses; current oriented longshore and are in phase with the wind. Baroclinic responses are dominantly inertial as might be expected in the deep sea, but with an additional near-bottom cross-shore counter flow. The structure of one observed barotropic response is compared to detail to predictions of both slab and eddy viscosity models and found consistent with a slab model and inconsistent with eddy viscosity models. Shear observed during this event was not significantly different from zero, but was significantly below estimated shear predictions of four eddy viscosity models given the peak 0.4 N/m/sup 2/ wind stress.

  2. Perceptions of risk among households in two Australian coastal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Elrick-Barr, Carmen E.; Smith, Timothy F.; Thomsen, Dana C.; Preston, Benjamin L.

    2015-04-20

    There is limited knowledge of risk perceptions in coastal communities despite their vulnerability to a range of risks including the impacts of climate change. A survey of 400 households in two Australian coastal communities, combined with semi-structured interviews, provides insight into household perceptions of the relative importance of climatic and non-climatic risks and the subsequent risk priorities that may inform household adaptive action. In contrast to previous research, the results demonstrated that geographic location and household characteristics might not affect perceptions of vulnerability to environmental hazards. However, past experience was a significant influence, raising the priority of environmental concerns. Overall, the results highlight the priority concerns of coastal households (from finance, to health and environment) and suggest to increase the profile of climate issues in coastal communities climate change strategies need to better demonstrate links between climate vulnerability and other household concerns. Moreover, promoting generic capacities in isolation from understanding the context in which households construe climate risks is unlikely to yield the changes required to decrease the vulnerability of coastal communities.

  3. Perceptions of risk among households in two Australian coastal communities

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Elrick-Barr, Carmen E.; Smith, Timothy F.; Thomsen, Dana C.; Preston, Benjamin L.

    2015-04-20

    There is limited knowledge of risk perceptions in coastal communities despite their vulnerability to a range of risks including the impacts of climate change. A survey of 400 households in two Australian coastal communities, combined with semi-structured interviews, provides insight into household perceptions of the relative importance of climatic and non-climatic risks and the subsequent risk priorities that may inform household adaptive action. In contrast to previous research, the results demonstrated that geographic location and household characteristics might not affect perceptions of vulnerability to environmental hazards. However, past experience was a significant influence, raising the priority of environmental concerns. Overall,more » the results highlight the priority concerns of coastal households (from finance, to health and environment) and suggest to increase the profile of climate issues in coastal communities climate change strategies need to better demonstrate links between climate vulnerability and other household concerns. Moreover, promoting generic capacities in isolation from understanding the context in which households construe climate risks is unlikely to yield the changes required to decrease the vulnerability of coastal communities.« less

  4. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  5. Establishment of the Northeast Coastal Watershed Geospatial Data Network (NECWGDN)

    SciTech Connect

    Hannigan, Robyn

    2014-02-17

    The goals of NECWGDN were to establish integrated geospatial databases that interfaced with existing open-source (water.html) environmental data server technologies (e.g., HydroDesktop) and included ecological and human data to enable evaluation, prediction, and adaptation in coastal environments to climate- and human-induced threats to the coastal marine resources within the Gulf of Maine. We have completed the development and testing of a "test bed" architecture that is compatible with HydroDesktop and have identified key metadata structures that will enable seamless integration and delivery of environmental, ecological, and human data as well as models to predict threats to end-users. Uniquely this database integrates point as well as model data and so offers capacities to end-users that are unique among databases. Future efforts will focus on the development of integrated environmental-human dimension models that can serve, in near real time, visualizations of threats to coastal resources and habitats.

  6. California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Future Production (Million Barrels) Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) California--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Expected Future Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 22 1980's 23 14 16 17 14 15 15 13 13 11 1990's 12 11 9 10 9 7 9 9 9 31 2000's 27 16 17 15 19 16 22 14 10 10 2010's 11 12 18 13 12

  7. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered

  8. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

    2001-02-21

    This study builds upon earlier research conducted by Southeastern Louisiana University concerning the efficacy of utilizing processed drill cuttings as an alternative substrate source for wetland rehabilitation (wetland creation and restoration). Previous research has indicated that processed drill cuttings exhibit a low degree of contaminant migration from the process drill cuttings to interstitial water and low toxicity, as tested by seven-day mysid shrimp chronic toxicity trials.

  9. Evaluation of Subsurface Flow and Free-water Surface Wetlands Treating NPR-3 Produced Water - Year No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J. E.; Jackson, L. M.

    2001-10-13

    This paper is a summary of some of the activities conducted during the first year of a three-year cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) and Texaco relating to the treatment of produced water by constructed wetlands. The first year of the CRADA is for design, construction and acclimation of the wetland pilot units. The second and third years of the CRADA are for tracking performance of pilot wetlands as the plant and microbial communities mature. A treatment wetland is a proven technology for the secondary and tertiary treatment of produced water, storm water and other wastewaters. Treatment wetlands are typically classified as either free-water surface (FWS) or subsurface flow (SSF). Both FWS and SSF wetlands work well when properly designed and operated. This paper presents a collection of kinetic data gathered from pilot units fed a slipstream of Wyoming (NPR-3) produced water. The pilot units are set up outdoors to test climatic influences on treatment. Monitoring parameters include evapotranspiration, plant growth, temperature, and NPDES discharge limits. The pilot wetlands (FWS and SSF) consist of a series of 100-gal plastic tubs filled with local soils, gravel, sharp sand and native wetland plants (cattail (Typha spp.), bulrush (Scirpus spp.), dwarf spikerush (Eleocharis)). Feed pumps control hydraulic retention time (HRT) and simple water control structures control the depth of water. The treated water is returned to the existing produced water treatment system. All NPDES discharge limits are met. Observations are included on training RMOTC summer students to do environmental work.

  10. Physical and chemical dynamics of the hydrogeologic system in wetlands along the southern shore of Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, P.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Miller Woods wetland system is established in the progradational beach deposits along the shore of Lake Michigan in the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Long-term study of a detailed monitoring network has identified the large and small scale characteristics of the physical and chemical hydrogeology of the wetland system. The wetlands and related ground water display a complex hydrogeologic behavior, the transient nature of which is a function of stresses imposed by climatic factors and evapotranspiration. Transient hydrogeologic features vary in their scale and include mobile hydrologic boundaries that shift through time and space, and individual wetlands that regularly change their hydrologic regime and function within the whole wetland system. A conceptual model is developed that links different types of hydrologic behavior with different physical characteristics imposed by the progradational nature of the wetland system. Most waters in Miller Woods are near neutral pH, calcium bicarbonate type. Smaller-scale variations in the chemistry of bicarbonate, sulfate, and some metals result from micro and macrobiological influences. Observable impacts on water chemistry have occurred in some parts of the study area as a result of a nearby industrial landfill. Concentrations of essentially all ions are enriched, and found at their maximum values in the vicinity of the landfill.

  11. A continuum of H- to He-rich tidal disruption candidates with a preference for E+A galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; De Cia, Annalisa; Tal, David; Sullivan, Mark; Pan, Yen-Chen; Cenko, S. Bradley; Yan, Lin; Yang, Chen-Wei; Howell, D. A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Cohen, Judith G.; Tang, Sumin; Xu, Dong; Sternberg, Assaf; Bloom, Joshua S.; Nugent, Peter E.; and others

    2014-09-20

    We present the results of a Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) archival search for blue transients that lie in the magnitude range between 'normal' core-collapse and superluminous supernovae (i.e., with –21 ≤ M {sub R} {sub (peak)} ≤ – 19). Of the six events found after excluding all interacting Type IIn and Ia-CSM supernovae, three (PTF09ge, 09axc, and 09djl) are coincident with the centers of their hosts, one (10iam) is offset from the center, and a precise offset cannot be determined for two (10nuj and 11glr). All the central events have similar rise times to the He-rich tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, and the event with the best-sampled light curve also has similar colors and power-law decay. Spectroscopically, PTF09ge is He-rich, while PTF09axc and 09djl display broad hydrogen features around peak magnitude. All three central events are in low star formation hosts, two of which are E+A galaxies. Our spectrum of the host of PS1-10jh displays similar properties. PTF10iam, the one offset event, is different photometrically and spectroscopically from the central events, and its host displays a higher star formation rate. Finding no obvious evidence for ongoing galactic nuclei activity or recent star formation, we conclude that the three central transients likely arise from the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole. We compare the spectra of these events to tidal disruption candidates from the literature and find that all of these objects can be unified on a continuous scale of spectral properties. The accumulated evidence of this expanded sample strongly supports a tidal disruption origin for this class of nuclear transients.

  12. Renewables in Alaska Native Villages: Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Funding: Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, AK Bruce Wright, APIA Monty Worthington, ORPC Wright, B. A., J. W. Short, T. J. Weingartner and P. J. Anderson. 2000. The Gulf of Alaska.. Pp 373-384 in Sheppard, C. R. C., ed., Seas at the Millennium: An Environmental, Evaluation Volume I Regional Chapters: Europe, The Americas and Wes Africa. Pergammon Press, Elsevier, Amsterdam. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Regional Energy Summit April 24-25, 2010 Anchorage,

  13. Regulatory effectiveness study for the Armand Bayou Coastal Preserve

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Windsor, D.

    1991-12-01

    The report contains a description and evaluation of essential regulatory activities governing Christmas Bay and its watershed. The report will be used in management planning for the preserve, and will also contribute to the baseline regulatory data for developing the Galveston Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan. A companion report was prepared for the Armand Bayou Coastal Preserve.

  14. Regulatory effectiveness study for the Christmas Bay Coastal Preserve

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.; Windsor, D.

    1991-12-01

    The report contains a description and evaluation of essential regulatory activities governing Armand Bayou and its watershed. The report will be used in management planning for the preserve, and will also contribute to the baseline regulatory data for developing the Galveston Bay Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan. A companion report was prepared for the Christmas Bay Coastal Preserve.

  15. POSSIBLE ORIGIN OF THE G2 CLOUD FROM THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF A KNOWN GIANT STAR BY SGR A*

    SciTech Connect

    Guillochon, James; Loeb, Abraham; MacLeod, Morgan; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2014-05-10

    The discovery of the gas cloud G2 on a near-radial orbit about SgrA* has prompted much speculation on its origin. In this Letter, we propose that G2 formed out of the debris stream produced by the removal of mass from the outer envelope of a nearby giant star. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of the returning tidal debris stream with cooling and find that the stream condenses into clumps that fall periodically onto SgrA*. We propose that one of these clumps is the observed G2 cloud, with the rest of the stream being detectable at lower Br? emissivity along a trajectory that would trace from G2 to the star that was partially disrupted. By simultaneously fitting the orbits of S2, G2, and ?2000 candidate stars, and by fixing the orbital plane of each candidate star to G2 (as is expected for a tidal disruption), we find that several stars have orbits that are compatible with the notion that one of them was tidally disrupted to produce G2. If one of these stars were indeed disrupted, it last encountered SgrA* hundreds of years ago and has likely encountered SgrA* repeatedly. However, while these stars are compatible with the giant disruption scenario given their measured positions and proper motions, their radial velocities are currently unknown. If one of these stars' radial velocity is measured to be compatible with a disruptive orbit, it would strongly suggest that its disruption produced G2.

  16. Tidally distorted exoplanets: Density corrections for short-period hot-Jupiters based solely on observable parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. R.; Watson, C. A.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Moulds, V.; Pollacco, D.; Wheatley, P. J.; Littlefair, S. P.

    2014-07-10

    The close proximity of short-period hot-Jupiters to their parent star means they are subject to extreme tidal forces. This has a profound effect on their structure and, as a result, density measurements that assume that the planet is spherical can be incorrect. We have simulated the tidally distorted surface for 34 known short-period hot-Jupiters, assuming surfaces of constant gravitational equipotential for the planet, and the resulting densities have been calculated based only on observed parameters of the exoplanet systems. Comparing these results to the density values, assuming the planets are spherical, shows that there is an appreciable change in the measured density for planets with very short periods (typically less than two days). For one of the shortest-period systems, WASP-19b, we determine a decrease in bulk density of 12% from the spherical case and, for the majority of systems in this study, this value is in the range of 1%-5%. On the other hand, we also find cases where the distortion is negligible (relative to the measurement errors on the planetary parameters) even in the cases of some very short period systems, depending on the mass ratio and planetary radius. For high-density gas planets requiring apparently anomalously large core masses, density corrections due to tidal deformation could become important for the shortest-period systems.

  17. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    SciTech Connect

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  18. Wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry: Assessment, conclusions, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkey, P.L.; Sundell, R.C.; Bailey, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    Wetland mitigation banks are already in existence in the United States, and the number is increasing. To date, most of these banks have been created and operated for mitigation of impacts arising from highway or commercial development and have not been associated with the oil and gas industry. Argonne National Laboratory evaluated the positive and negative aspects of wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry by examining banks already created for other uses by federal, state, and private entities. Specific issues addressed in this study include (1) the economic, ecological, and technical effectiveness of existing banks; (2) the changing nature of local, state, and federal jurisdiction; and (3) the unique regulatory and jurisdictional problems affecting bank developments associated with the oil and gas industry.

  19. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S; Gunawan, Budi

    2011-09-01

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  20. TURBOVELOCITY STARS: KICKS RESULTING FROM THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF SOLITARY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Manukian, Haik; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2013-07-10

    The centers of most known galaxies host supermassive black holes (SMBHs). In orbit around these black holes are a centrally concentrated distribution of stars, both in single and in binary systems. Occasionally, these stars are perturbed onto orbits that bring them close to the SMBH. If the star is in a binary system, the three-body interaction with the SMBH can lead to large changes in orbital energy, depositing one of the two stars on a tightly-bound orbit, and its companion into a hyperbolic orbit that may escape the galaxy. In this Letter, we show that the disruption of solitary stars can also lead to large positive increases in orbital energy. The kick velocity depends on the amount of mass the star loses at pericenter, but not on the ratio of black hole to stellar mass, and are at most the star's own escape velocity. We find that these kicks are usually too small to result in the ejection of stars from the Milky Way, but can eject the stars from the black hole's sphere of influence, reducing their probability of being disrupted again. We estimate that {approx} 10{sup 5} stars, {approx} 1% of all stars within 10 pc of the galactic center, are likely to have had mass removed by the central black hole through tidal interaction, and speculate that these 'turbovelocity' stars will at first be redder, but eventually bluer, and always brighter than their unharassed peers.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR A MILKY WAY TIDAL STREAM REACHING BEYOND 100 kpc

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Mahabal, A.; Donalek, C.; Williams, R.; Catelan, M.; Torrealba, G.; Prieto, J. L.; Larson, S.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E.

    2013-03-10

    We present the analysis of 1207 RR Lyrae found in photometry taken by the Catalina Survey's Mount Lemmon telescope. By combining accurate distances for these stars with measurements for {approx}14,000 type-ab RR Lyrae from the Catalina Schmidt telescope, we reveal an extended association that reaches Galactocentric distances beyond 100 kpc and overlaps the Sagittarius stream system. This result confirms earlier evidence for the existence of an outer halo tidal stream resulting from a disrupted stellar system. By comparing the RR Lyrae source density with that expected based on halo models, we find the detection has {approx}8{sigma} significance. We investigate the distances, radial velocities, metallicities, and period-amplitude distribution of the RR Lyrae. We find that both radial velocities and distances are inconsistent with current models of the Sagittarius stream. We also find tentative evidence for a division in source metallicities for the most distant sources. Following prior analyses, we compare the locations and distances of the RR Lyrae with photometrically selected candidate horizontal branch stars and find supporting evidence that this structure spans at least 60 Degree-Sign of the sky. We investigate the prospects of an association between the stream and the unusual globular cluster NGC 2419.

  2. Water gate array for current flow or tidal movement pneumatic harnessing system

    DOEpatents

    Gorlov, Alexander M.

    1991-01-01

    The invention, which provides a system for harnessing power from current flow or tidal movement in a body of water, comprises first and second hydro-pneumatic chambers each having ingress and egress below the water surface near the river or ocean floor and water gates operative to open or seal the ports to the passage of water. In an exemplary embodiment, the gates are sychronized by shafts so that the ingress ports of each chamber are connected to the egress ports of each other chamber. Thus, one set of gates is closed, while the other is open, thereby allowing water to flow into one chamber and build air pressure therein and allowing water to flow out of the other chamber and create a partial vacuum therein. A pipe connects the chambers, and an air turbine harnesses the air movement within the pipe. When water levels are equilibrated, the open set of gates is closed by a counterweight, and the other set is allowed to open by natural force of the water differential. The water gates may be comprised of a plurality of louvers which are ganged for simultaneous opening and closing. The system is designed to operate with air turbines or other pneumatic devices. Its design minimizes construction cost and environmental impact, yet provides a clean renewable energy source.

  3. Hyperaccretion during tidal disruption events: Weakly bound debris envelopes and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2014-02-01

    After the destruction of the star during a tidal disruption event (TDE), the cataclysmic encounter between a star and the supermassive black hole (SMBH) of a galaxy, approximately half of the original stellar debris falls back onto the hole at a rate that can initially exceed the Eddington limit by orders of magnitude. We argue that the angular momentum of this matter is too low to allow it to attain a disk-like configuration with accretion proceeding at a mildly super-Eddington rate, the excess energy being carried away by a combination of radiative losses and radially distributed winds. Instead, we propose that the infalling gas traps accretion energy until it inflates into a weakly bound, quasi-spherical structure with gas extending nearly to the poles. We study the structure and evolution of such 'zero-Bernoulli accretion' flows as a model for the super-Eddington phase of TDEs. We argue that such flows cannot stop extremely super-Eddington accretion from occurring, and that once the envelope is maximally inflated, any excess accretion energy escapes through the poles in the form of powerful jets. We compare the predictions of our model to Swift J1644+57, the putative super-Eddington TDE, and show that it can qualitatively reproduce some of its observed features. Similar models, including self-gravity, could be applicable to gamma-ray bursts from collapsars and the growth of SMBH seeds inside quasi-stars.

  4. Domestic wastewater treatment using tidal-flow cinder bed with Cyperus alternifolius

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.Y.; Tsang, Y.F.; Chua, H.

    2008-07-01

    A lab-scale vertical flow cinder bed was set up to treat domestic wastewater. Cinder, which is a common coal waste from electricity generation, was used as the filter medium in the six vertical flow column beds in this study. Three of the six columns were planted with umbrella grass (Cyperus alternifolius) to mimic a wetland system and to investigate the effects of plant on the pollutant removal efficiencies of the column bed systems. The six column beds were divided into three groups, operating with different durations of wet and dry periods. Group 2 column beds, with 4 hours wet periods and 4 hours dry periods, showed the highest carbonaceous removal. Similar ammonia nitrogen removal efficiencies were demonstrated in column beds of group 2 and in column beds of group 3 (6 hours wet periods and 2 hours dry periods). Phosphorus removal efficiencies were not significantly different in all groups of column bed. No significant differences in pollutant removal were observed between planted and unplanted column beds in this study (p > 0.05).

  5. Wetland Survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley Groundwater Operable Units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.

    1993-01-01

    This wetland survey report regarding wetlands within Melton Valley and Bethel Valley areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This work was done under Work Breakdown Structure number 1.4.12.6.1.15.41. This document provides the Environmental Restoration program with information on the results of the wetland survey conducted during fiscal year 1995. it includes information on the physical characteristics, location, approximate size, and classification of wetland areas identified during the field survey.

  6. Peroxidase activity as an indicator of exposure of wetland seedlings to metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, H.D.; Klaine, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The enzyme peroxidase has been found to increase quantitatively in several aquatic plant species in response to increasing exposure to various contaminants. In this study, a number of wetland species are tested for their usefulness as bioindicators of metal exposure using the peroxidase assay. Woody species tested include Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum), Fraxinus pennsylvanica (green ash), and Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush), while herbaceous species include Saururus cernuus (lizard`s tail) and Sparganium americanum (bur-reed). The assay has been optimized for all of these species. In all cases the pH optimum has been found to be either 5.5 or 6.0 and the substrate optimum is 2.8 or 1.4mM hydrogen peroxide. There is considerable variation in baseline peroxidase activity among the species when tested under their optimal assay conditions. These species are being dosed with copper, nickel, and cadmium in order to determine whether a response elicited. Seedlings will be dosed using both petri dish culture conditions and test tubes filled with vermiculite and sand combinations. The peroxidase response will be compared to germination and root elongation endpoints. Lettuce (Lactuca saliva) and radish (Raphanus sativus) are being tested alongside the wetland species as reference organisms for which background data is available. The wetland species tested in the present study have rarely if ever been used in toxicological studies.

  7. Subtask 1.22 - Microbial Cycling of CH4, CO2, and N2O in a Wetlands Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dingyi Ye; Bethany Kurz; Marc Kurz

    2008-12-31

    Soil microbial metabolic activities play an important role in determining CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems. To verify and evaluate CO{sub 2} sequestration potential by wetland restoration in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR), as well as to address concern over restoration effects on CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions, laboratory and in situ microcosm studies on microbial cycling of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O were initiated. In addition, to evaluate the feasibility of the use of remote sensing to detect soil gas flux from wetlands, a remote-sensing investigation was also conducted. Results of the laboratory microcosm study unequivocally proved that restoration of PPR wetlands does sequester atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Under the experimental conditions, the simulated restored wetlands did not promote neither N{sub 2}O nor CH{sub 4} fluxes. Application of ammonia enhanced both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission, indicating that restoration of PPR wetlands may reduce both N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} emission by cutting N-fertilizer input. Enhancement of CO{sub 2} emission by the N-fertilizer was observed, and this observation revealed an overlooked fact that application of N-fertilizer may potentially increase CO{sub 2} emission. In addition, the CO{sub 2} results also demonstrate that wetland restoration sequesters atmospheric carbon not only by turning soil conditions from aerobic to anoxic, but also by cutting N-fertilizer input that may enhance CO{sub 2} flux. The investigation on microbial community structure and population dynamics showed that under the experimental conditions restoration of the PPR wetlands would not dramatically increase population sizes of those microorganisms that produce N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}. Results of the in situ study proved that restoration of the PPR wetland significantly reduced CO{sub 2} flux. Ammonia enhanced the greenhouse gas emission and linearly correlated to the CO{sub 2} flux within the

  8. ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, Ronald L.; Haven, Kendall F.; Cherniss, Jennifer

    1980-09-01

    This paper addresses the energy-related acti ties in the Pacific Coastal Zone within the context of the absence of a coastal-specific energy policy. First, the present and projected coastal energy activities are described in order to establish a perspective of the importance of the coastal zone to energy development. transport, and use. Next, the state and federal decision-making processes relevant to coastal energy activities are summarized for the purpose of defining the institutional framework that has been constructed to respond to coastal energy issues. Finally, the functional areas not currently being adequately addressed are identified; and an associate role, which ensures both comprehensive evaluation and sound development of regional coastal energy resources, is defined for the DOE Office of Environment.

  9. Spitzer view of massive star formation in the tidally stripped Magellanic Bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Kawamura, Akiko; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Seale, Jonathan P.; Shiao, Bernie; Sewiło, Marta; Whitney, Barbara A.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Fukui, Yasuo; Madden, Suzanne C.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2014-04-20

    The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper, we present an analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., in situ, current massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using Spitzer mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are ∼10 M {sub ☉}, <<45 M {sub ☉} found in the LMC. The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears to be decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and line-of-sight extinction. Circumstellar envelopes are evidently more porous or clumpy in the Bridge's low-metallicity environment. Second, we have used whole samples of YSOs in the LMC and the Bridge to estimate the probability of finding YSOs at a given H I column density, N(H I). We found that the LMC has ∼3 × higher probability than the Bridge for N(H I) >12 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2}, but the trend reverses at lower N(H I). Investigating whether this lower efficiency relative to H I is due to less efficient molecular cloud formation or to less efficient cloud collapse, or to both, will require sensitive molecular gas observations.

  10. CONSTRAINTS ON THE LIFETIMES OF DISKS RESULTING FROM TIDALLY DESTROYED ROCKY PLANETARY BODIES

    SciTech Connect

    Girven, J.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Brinkworth, C. S.; Hoard, D. W.; Farihi, J.; Koester, D.

    2012-04-20

    Spitzer IRAC observations of 15 metal-polluted white dwarfs reveal infrared excesses in the spectral energy distributions of HE 0110-5630, GD 61, and HE 1349-2305. All three of these stars have helium-dominated atmospheres, and their infrared emissions are consistent with warm dust produced by the tidal destruction of (minor) planetary bodies. This study brings the number of metal-polluted, helium and hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs surveyed with IRAC to 53 and 38, respectively. It also nearly doubles the number of metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs found to have closely orbiting dust by Spitzer. From the increased statistics for both atmospheric types with circumstellar dust, we derive a typical disk lifetime of log [t{sub disk}(yr)] = 5.6 {+-} 1.1 (ranging from 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} yr). This assumes a relatively constant rate of accretion over the timescale where dust persists, which is uncertain. We find that the fraction of highly metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs that have an infrared excess detected by Spitzer is only 23%, compared to 48% for metal-polluted hydrogen-rich white dwarfs, and we conclude from this difference that the typical lifetime of dusty disks is somewhat shorter than the diffusion timescales of helium-rich white dwarf. We also find evidence for higher time-averaged accretion rates onto helium-rich stars compared to the instantaneous accretion rates onto hydrogen-rich stars; this is an indication that our picture of evolved star-planetary system interactions is incomplete. We discuss some speculative scenarios that can explain the observations.

  11. Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2011-09-01

    In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  12. Marine kelp: energy resource in the coastal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R.L.; Haven, K.F.

    1980-11-01

    An ocean farm system is described. The analysis of the ocean farm system includes a description of the types of impacts that might occur if large scale operations become available, such as the production of environmental residuals, conflicts with the fishing and shipping industries, and other legal/institutional impacts. A discussion is given of the relationship of the marine biomass concept and coastal zone management plans.

  13. Tectonic control of coastal onlap cycles, southwest Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Armentrout, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    Local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves for 14 sections define three Cenozoic depositional onlap-offlap cycles separated by regionally significant unconformities. A paleoclimatic curve for western Oregon and Washington, based on paleoecologic data sets, demonstrates that the local transgressions are coincident with cool climates and the regressions with warm climates, and are therefore not driven by glacioeustatic cycles. Comparison of the local coastal onlap and paleobiobathymetric curves with the global Cenozoic Cycle Chart (modified Exxon Sea Level Chart - May, 1986) further demonstrates the uniqueness of the western Washington curves. The global Cenozoic cycle Chart curve represents coastal onlap and sea level curves based on integration of both climate and tectonic variations. The non-parallel cycle pattern for southwest Washington suggests a unique tectonically forced system. Evidence derived from stratigraphic sequences, igneous rock geochemistry, radiometric dating, remnant magnetic patterns, sandstone provenance studies, and paleogeographic reconstructions is used to identify the tectonic events controlling the local depositional cycles. The principal events are (1) middle Eocene accretion of a seamount chain; (2) early-late Eocene westward relocation of subduction; (3) late Eocene onset of Cascade arc volcanism; (4) late-early Miocene plate readjustment due to back-arc extension in the Columbia River Plateau and Great Basin; and (5) late Pliocene to early Pleistocene northeast compression forced by continued subduction of remnants of the Kula Plate beneath North America.

  14. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models.

  15. ON THE EFFICIENCY OF THE TIDAL STIRRING MECHANISM FOR THE ORIGIN OF DWARF SPHEROIDALS: DEPENDENCE ON THE ORBITAL AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF THE PROGENITOR DISKY DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Callegari, Simone; Mayer, Lucio; Moustakas, Leonidas A. E-mail: lokas@camk.edu.pl E-mail: lucio@phys.ethz.ch

    2011-01-10

    The tidal stirring model posits the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) via the tidal interactions between late-type, rotationally supported dwarfs and Milky-Way-sized host galaxies. Using a comprehensive set of collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate the efficiency of the tidal stirring mechanism for the origin of dSphs. In particular, we examine the degree to which the tidal field of the primary galaxy affects the sizes, masses, shapes, and kinematics of the disky dwarfs for a range of dwarf orbital and structural parameters. Our study is the first to employ self-consistent, equilibrium models for the progenitor dwarf galaxies constructed from a composite distribution function and consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in massive, cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. Exploring a wide variety of dwarf orbital configurations and initial structures, we demonstrate that in the majority of cases the disky dwarfs experience significant mass loss and their stellar distributions undergo a dramatic morphological, as well as dynamical, transformation. Specifically, the stellar components evolve from disks to bars and finally to pressure-supported, spheroidal systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the Local Group (LG) and similar environments. The self-consistency of the adopted dwarf models is crucial for confirming this complex transformation process via tidally induced dynamical instabilities and impulsive tidal heating of the stellar distribution. Our results suggest that such tidal transformations should be common occurrences within the currently favored cosmological paradigm and highlight the key factor responsible for an effective metamorphosis to be the strength of the tidal shocks at the pericenters of the orbit. We also demonstrate that the combination of short orbital times and small pericentric distances, characteristic of dwarfs being accreted by their hosts at high redshift

  16. Illuminating massive black holes with white dwarfs: orbital dynamics and high-energy transients from tidal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Morgan; Goldstein, Jacqueline; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Guillochon, James; Samsing, Johan

    2014-10-10

    White dwarfs (WDs) can be tidally disrupted only by massive black holes (MBHs) with masses less than ?10{sup 5} M {sub ?}. These tidal interactions feed material to the MBH well above its Eddington limit, with the potential to launch a relativistic jet. The corresponding beamed emission is a promising indication of an otherwise quiescent MBH of relatively low mass. We show that the mass transfer history, and thus the light curve, is quite different when the disruptive orbit is parabolic, eccentric, or circular. The mass lost each orbit exponentiates in the eccentric-orbit case, leading to the destruction of the WD after several tens of orbits. We examine the stellar dynamics of clusters surrounding MBHs to show that single-passage WD disruptions are substantially more common than repeating encounters. The 10{sup 49} erg s{sup 1} peak luminosity of these events makes them visible to cosmological distances. They may be detectible at rates of as many as tens per year by instruments like Swift. In fact, WD-disruption transients significantly outshine their main-sequence star counterparts and are the tidal interaction most likely to be detected arising from MBHs with masses less than 10{sup 5} M {sub ?}. The detection or nondetection of such WD-disruption transients by Swift is, therefore, a powerful tool to constrain the lower end of the MBH mass function. The emerging ultralong gamma-ray burst class of events all have peak luminosities and durations reminiscent of WD disruptions, offering a hint that WD-disruption transients may already be present in existing data sets.

  17. Global Coastal Carbon Program Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Coastal Carbon Data Project. The coastal regions data are very important for the understanding of carbon cycle on the continental margins. The Coastal Project data include the bottle (discrete) and surface (underway) carbon-related measurements from coastal research cruises, the data from time series cruises, and coastal moorings. The data from US East Coast, US West Coast, and European Coastal areas are available. CDIAC provides a map interface with vessel or platform names. Clicking on the name brings up information about the vessel or the scientific platform, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, when available, and the links to the data files themselves.

  18. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal

  19. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 3. Summary The 1.5 million-acre coastal plain of the 19 million-acre Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the largest unexplored, potentially productive geologic onshore basin in the United States. The primary area of the coastal plain is the 1002 Area of ANWR established when ANWR was created. A decision on permitting the exploration and development

  20. Constructed Wetlands for Removal of Heavy Metals from NPDES Outfall Effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.

    2002-08-29

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River Technology Center. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, necessitating treatment of nearly one million gallons of water each day plus storm runoff to meet compliance standards. A conceptual design for a constructed treatment wetland was developed as the most cost-effective alternative. A pilot study was conducted using mesocosms to confirm that the design concept would reduce copper to acceptable levels. After treatment in the mesocosms, effluent copper concentrations were routinely below permit limits, even though the influent concentrations varied widely.

  1. Agriculture, greenhouse, wetland and other beneficial uses of geothermal fluids and heat

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.C.

    1981-04-05

    The status for related beneficial uses including agriculture, greenhousing, and geothermal wetlands is presented. Data published for the geothermal fluids found in areas of China have been examined and compared with the geothermal fluids used in the agriculture evaluations in the United States. This comparison indicates that the geothermal fluids found in parts of China are similar to those used in the US agriculture experiments. Greenhousing is addressed largely from the standpoint of hardware systems and technology being employed or being proposed in the United States.

  2. Characterization of Contaminant Levels in the P-Area Wetland System | SREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Characterization of Contaminant Levels in the P-Area Wetland System Biota: David Scott, Larry Bryan, David Kling, and Stacey Lance Soils: John Seaman and Julian Singer fresh ash Fresh ash at D-Area The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has a strong research history on the ecological effects of contaminants on the Savannah River Site (SRS), including the effects of coal combustion wastes (CCW). Coal-fired facilities have been in operation on the SRS since the early 1950s and

  3. A comparison of cloud properties at a coastal and inland site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    have examined differences in cloud liquid water paths (LWPs) at a coastal (Barrow) and an ... KEYWORDS: arctic clouds, cloud liquid water, microwave radiometer, ECMWF model, ...

  4. Optimization of the phase angle in ideal Stirling engines using the concept of tidal and ancillary domains

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, T.

    1996-12-31

    In a parallel publication (Finkelstein, 1996), a new analysis of the ideal loss-less Stirling Cycle Machine was presented based upon the concept of overlapping Tidal and Ancillary domains. This has led to the definition of the following two dimensionless parameters: (1) the specific performance {Pi} for the unified measure of output for engines, refrigerators and heat pumps, and (2) the Tidal Compression Ratio {Kappa}, which is akin to the Compression Ratio in internal combustion machines and uniquely defines the operational characteristics of any Stirling Cycle Machine. An analysis to replace the alternative traditional Schmidt equation was presented and a new expression for the general performance of practical Stirling engines was derived from the first principles. An analytical optimization of the volumes of the three internal heat exchangers was also included. In this present paper, which is an extension of the above analysis, these new equations for the performance are utilized for an analytical optimization of the phase angles. It is shown that the optimum phase lead of the expansion space and the optimum phase lag of the compression space for an ideal isothermal machine is precisely {pi}/4 for all possible machines. This is independent of the previous conclusion that the pressure vector should have a zero phase lag or lead.

  5. THE IMPACT OF BOUND STELLAR ORBITS AND GENERAL RELATIVITY ON THE TEMPORAL BEHAVIOR OF TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lixin; Escala, Andres; Coppi, Paolo

    2013-09-20

    We have carried out general relativistic particle simulations of stars tidally disrupted by massive black holes. When a star is disrupted in a bound orbit with moderate eccentricity instead of a parabolic orbit, the temporal behavior of the resulting stellar debris changes qualitatively. The debris is initially all bound, returning to pericenter in a short time about the original stellar orbital timescale. The resulting fallback rate can thus be much higher than the Eddington rate. Furthermore, if the star is disrupted close to the hole, in a regime where general relativity is important, the stellar and debris orbits display general relativistic precession. Apsidal precession can make the debris stream cross itself after several orbits, likely leading to fast debris energy dissipation. If the star is disrupted in an inclined orbit around a spinning hole, nodal precession reduces the probability of self-intersection, and circularization may take many dynamical timescales, delaying the onset of flare activity. An examination of the particle dynamics suggests that quasi-periodic flares with short durations, produced when the center of the tidal stream passes pericenter, may occur in the early-time light curve. The late-time light curve may still show power-law behavior which is generic to disk accretion processes. The detection triggers for future surveys should be extended to capture such 'non-standard' short-term flaring activity before the event enters the asymptotic decay phase, as this activity is likely to be more sensitive to physical parameters such as the black hole spin.

  6. Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.

  7. Subsidence in geopressured geothermal resource test sites: Monitoring assessment combining geodetic leveling and tidal control stations in southwestern Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.E.; John, C.J. ); Trahan, D.B. )

    1989-09-01

    The Louisiana Geological Survey has an ongoing environmental monitoring program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, at geopressured geothermal prospect well sites in southwestern Louisiana. This paper presents the results from monitoring subsidence at some of these reservoir sites. Over 1,000 km of first-order surveys and data from several NOAA and US Army Corps of Engineers tidal control stations were examined to determine regional trends. Tidal records were used to examine the history of sea level with respect to the land surface. Relative rates of land subsidence can be determined by comparing rates of water level rise over time with rates of rise from a stable craton. Regional subsidence ranges from 3 to 5 mm/year. First-order bench-mark networks established at Parcperdue, Sweet Lake, and Gladys McCall prospects were used to determine local trends of subsidence. Repeated leveling surveys before, during, and after fluid withdrawal from Parcperdue and Gladys McCall indicate that an increase in subsidence was observed during the drilling of the wells. Data suggest subsidence was possibly due to surface loading by heavy drilling equipment. Historical leveling in the Sweet Lake region indicates differential compaction between sediments as a possible cause for subsidence. However, in all cases, virtually no increase in subsidence was observed during and after times of fluid withdrawal.

  8. Domoic acid production near California coastal upwelling zones, June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Trainer, V L. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Adams, Nicolaus G. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Bill, Brian D. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Stehr, Carla M. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Wekell, John C. (National Marine Fisheries Service); Moeller, Peter (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Busman, Mark (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Woodruff, Dana L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-01-01

    Sea lion mortalities in central California during May and June 1998 were traced to their ingestion of sardines and anchovies that had accumulated the neurotoxin domoic acid. The detection of toxin in urine, feces, and stomach contents of several sea lions represents the first proven occurrence of domoic acid transfer through the food chain to a marine mammal. The pennate diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis, were the dominant, toxin-producing phytoplankton constituting algal blooms near Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Oceano Dunes, areas where sea lions with neurological symptoms stranded. Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia were also found near Morrow Bay, Point Conception, Point Arguello, and Santa Barbara, demonstrating that these species were widespread along the central California coast in June 1998. Measurements of domoic acid during three cruises in early June showed the highest cellular toxin levels in P. multiseries near Point A?o Nuevo and in P. australis from Morro w Bay. Maximum cellular domoic acid levels were observed within 20 km of the coast between 0 and 5 m depth, although toxin was also measured to depths of 40 m. Hydrographic data indicated that the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxic cells were positioned in water masses associated with upwelling zones near coastal headlands. Nutrient levels at these sites were less than those typically measured during periods of active upwelling, due to the 1998 El Ni?o event. The flow of cells and/or nutrients from coastal headlands into embayments where cells can multiply in a stratified environment is a possible mechanism of bloom development along the central California coast. This coupling of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia growth near upwelling zones with physical processes involved in cell transport will be understood only when long-term measurements are made at several key coastal locations, aiding in our capability to predict domoic-acid producing algal blooms.

  9. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-12-31

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  10. Monitoring seasonal and annual wetland changes in a freshwater marsh with SPOT HRV data

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven dates of SPOT HRV data along with near-concurrent vertical aerial photographic and phenological data for 1987, 1988, and 1989 were evaluated to determine seasonal and annual changes in a 400-hectare, southeastern freshwater marsh. Early April through mid-May was the best time to discriminate among the cypress (Taxodium distichum)/water tupelo (Nyssa acquatica) swamp forest and the non-persistent (Ludwigia spp.) and persistent (Typha spp.) stands in this wetlands. Furthermore, a ten-fold decrease in flow rate from 11 cubic meters per sec (cms) in 1987 to one cms in 1988 was recorded in the marsh followed by a shift to drier wetland communities. The Savannah River Site (SRS), maintained by the US Department of Energy, is a 777 km{sup 2} area located in south central South Carolina. Five tributaries of the Savannah River run southwest through the SRS and into the floodplain swamp of the Savannah River. This paper describes the use of SPOT HRV data to monitor seasonal and annual trends in one of these swamp deltas, Pen Branch Delta, during a three-year period, 1987--1989.

  11. Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Lease Condensate New Field Discoveries CA, Coastal Region Onshore Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve

  12. Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Proved Nonproducing Reserves of Lease Condensate CA, Coastal Region

  13. Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3 2 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 6 2 6 0 0 0 2010's 1 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  14. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 27 1980's 26 30 34 32 28 28 26 24 22 24 1990's 25 22 19 14 12 9 9 11 13 10 2000's 10 13 12 11 10 18 9 12 11 12 2010's 12

  15. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 1 3 1 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  16. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 5 2 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No

  17. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 23 0 5 2 7 1 60 6 6 0 2010's 0 0 0 1 52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  18. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 47 1980's -31 10 44 -2 -42 -4 -4 -17 -5 8 1990's 6 18 -11 -59 4 -15 15 10 6 -3 2000's -1 3 2 6 -4 73 -64 2 1 2 2010's 2 15 2 -8 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  19. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1 1980's 3 11 23 7 13 10 1 2 1 5 1990's 16 1 0 1 1 1 1 16 0 56 2000's 0 0 3 0 3 6 5 0 0 0 2010's 0 1 1 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  20. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 49 1980's 38 29 26 27 81 20 22 15 24 14 1990's 36 32 11 6 8 24 5 16 54 10 2000's 15 64 4 31 10 13 12 22 72 14 2010's 17 31 17 15 23 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  1. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 60 1980's 44 33 41 44 50 40 58 36 27 38 1990's 34 27 17 17 25 11 9 9 48 84 2000's 14 15 21 12 32 32 29 33 21 42 2010's 38 21 157 14 24 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  2. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 3 2 3 0 70 4 6 0 2010's 1 0 0 1 56 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015

  3. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 18 2010's 18 20 22 23 23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  4. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Acquisitions (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Acquisitions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 2 2010's 154 0 2 39 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  5. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Adjustments (Million Barrels) Adjustments (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Adjustments (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1 2010's 0 -3 2 -6 6 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  6. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Extensions (Million Barrels) Extensions (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Extensions (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 1 1 1 1 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate

  7. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Decreases (Million Barrels) Decreases (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Decreases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 4 2010's 39 10 16 19 25 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus

  8. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Increases (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Revision Increases (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 105 2010's 40 118 90 26 37 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil

  9. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Sales (Million Barrels) Sales (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves Sales (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 1 0 1 39 53 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Reserves Sale

  10. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 22 0 5 2 7 1 58 6 6 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 49 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves

  11. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 30 25 1980's -44 23 41 -4 -68 -5 -3 -14 -5 2 1990's 5 16 6 -20 4 -13 8 18 -42 -11 2000's 30 2 2 5 -3 72 -62 3 0 2 2010's 1 13 1 -11 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  12. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 29 28 28 1980's 27 31 34 34 28 28 26 24 23 23 1990's 23 20 20 17 16 14 13 17 12 8 2000's 10 12 11 11 10 18 9 12 11 12 2010's 12 11 11 12 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  13. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 0 0 1980's 1 3 1 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  14. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 36 32 45 1980's 44 33 28 29 78 22 27 15 23 13 1990's 34 31 15 6 17 34 9 19 48 10 2000's 14 61 4 30 9 13 12 26 69 14 2010's 16 31 16 14 24 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 25 44 56 1980's 40 32 38 50 46 37 54 34 27 36 1990's 32 33 16 26 33 19 16 10 44 69 2000's 14 14 21 13 32 31 28 32 21 41 2010's 38 20 150 13 23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  16. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 3 2 3 0 70 4 6 0 2010's 1 0 0 0 53 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales

  17. California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 22 1980's 23 14 16 17 15 16 15 13 13 11 1990's 12 12 10 12 11 8 9 9 9 31 2000's 27 16 17 15 19 16 22 14 10 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  18. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Estimated Production from Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 3 1980's 3 3 2 4 2 2 1 2 2 1 1990's 0 0 2 4 5 6 5 6 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  19. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  20. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; --

  1. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring

  2. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 10 1980's -10 2 -3 -1 -29 0 -1 1 1 -6 1990's -1 1 15 39 1 4 -4 9 -46 0 2000's 0 0 0 -1 0 -1 0 0 0 1 2010's 0 0 0 0 9 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  3. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 5 1980's 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 10 5 3 5 2 3 7 1 1 0 1990's 0 2 5 1 11 13 5 6 0 2 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 2010's 0 1 0 0 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  5. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 0 1980's 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 2 0 1990's 0 8 0 11 9 9 8 2 1 0 2000's 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2010's 1 0 1 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  6. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date:

  7. California - Coastal Region Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 CA, Coastal Region Onshore Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and

  8. California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 303 282 269 - = No

  9. California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) California - Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 341 2010's 478 564 620 599 587 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease

  10. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 334 350 365 1980's 299 306 362 381 265 256 255 238 215 222 1990's 217 216 203 189 194 153 156 164 106 192 2000's 234 177 190 167 189 268 206 205 146 163 2010's 173 165 290 266 261 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 395 1980's 330 325 384 405 284 277 275 255 232 238 1990's 232 231 215 201 205 163 168 176 118 233 2000's 244 185 197 174 196 277 214 212 151 169 2010's 180 173 305 284 277 - = No Data Reported;

  12. California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 88 1980's 65 60 59 61 28 23 14 12 12 5 1990's 4 11 19 66 60 54 48 47 2 0 2000's 0 0 0 1 8 8 6 1 1 1 2010's 2 1 2 2 8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  13. Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens Bosarge Family Education Center

    Building Catalog

    Boothbay, ME The Bosarge Family Education Center offers the Gardens a unique opportunity to educate, influence and inspire the public regarding environmental sustainable living practices. The building is a new ~8000 SF Education Center adjacent to the existing Visitors Center in Boothbay ME, owned by Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens (CMBG). This project provides an important addition to CMBG's environmental programming and expands the Gardens' public image. It houses administrative office space as well as flexible and adaptable classroom space that can also be used for various events and gatherings. 02/09/2015 - 11:44

  14. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to

  15. THE DYNAMICS, APPEARANCE, AND DEMOGRAPHICS OF RELATIVISTIC JETS TRIGGERED BY TIDAL DISRUPTION OF STARS IN QUIESCENT SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    De Colle, Fabio; Guillochon, James; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico E-mail: jfg@ucolick.org E-mail: enrico@ucolick.org

    2012-12-01

    We examine the consequences of a model in which relativistic jets can be triggered in quiescent massive black holes when a geometrically thick and hot accretion disk forms as a result of the tidal disruption of a star. To estimate the power, thrust, and lifetime of the jet, we use the mass accretion history onto the black hole as calculated by detailed hydrodynamic simulations of the tidal disruption of stars. We go on to determine the states of the interstellar medium in various types of quiescent galactic nuclei, and describe how this external matter can affect jets propagating through it. We use this information, together with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the structure of the relativistic flow, to study the dynamics of the jet, the propagation of which is regulated by the density stratification of the environment and by its injection history. The breaking of symmetry involved in transitioning from one to two dimensions is crucial and leads to qualitatively new phenomena. At early times, as the jet power increases, the high pressure of the cocoon collimates the jet, increasing its shock velocity as compared to that of spherical models. We show that small velocity gradients, induced near or at the source, steepen into internal shocks and provide a source of free energy for particle acceleration and radiation along the jet's channel. The jets terminate at a working surface where they interact strongly with the surrounding medium through a combination of shock waves and instabilities; a continuous flow of relativistic fluid emanating from the nucleus supplies this region with mass, momentum, and energy. Information about the t {sup -5/3} decrease in power supply propagates within the jet at the internal sound speed. As a result, the internal energy at the jet head continues to accumulate until long after the peak feeding rate is reached. An appreciable time delay is thus expected between peaks in the short-wavelength radiation emanating near the jet

  16. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  17. Constructed wetlands for municipal solid waste landfill leachate treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peverly, J.; Sanford, W.E.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    1993-11-01

    In 1989, the US Geological Survey and Cornell University, in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Tompkins County Solid Waste Department, began a three-year study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Ithaca, New York, to test the effectiveness of leachate treatment with constructed wetlands and to examine the associated treatment processes. Specific objectives of the study were to examine: treatment efficiency as function of substrate composition and grain size, degree of plant growth, and seasonal changes in evapotranspiration rates and microbial activity; effects of leachate and plant growth on the hydraulic characteristics of the substrate; and chemical, biological, and physical processes by which nutrients, metals, and organic compounds are removed from leachate as it flows through the substrate. A parallel study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Fenton, New York was conducted by researchers at Cornell University, Ithaca College, and Hawk Engineering (Trautmann and others, 1989). Results are described.

  18. Vegetation of plowed and unplowed playa lake wetlands in southwestern Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, S.L.; Buckley, J.E.

    1995-12-01

    Playa lakes are shallow, circular basins within the High Plains that were formed by wind during the Pleistocene Era. These basins are often referred to as {open_quotes}buffalo wallows{close_quotes} by local residents. When rainfall occurs, playas pond water, allowing formation of hydric soils and wetland vegetation. Playa provide excellent waterfowl habitat and are second only to the Gulf Coast in importance as winter habitat for birds in the Central Flyway. Highly variable climatic conditions along with extensive changes in surrounding hydrology on agricultural lands contribute to alternating wet and dry cycles within the playas. As a result, the vegetative mixture of the playas can change drastically from one season to another.

  19. Effects of highway runoff on the quality of water and bed sediments of two wetlands in central Florida. Report of Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a study of the effects of highway runoff on the chemical quality of water and bed sediments of a cypress wetland and a freshwater marsh in central Florida indicate that detention of the runoff prior to release into the wetland reduces concentrations of automobile-related chemicals in the water and bed sediments in the wetland. Detention of highway runoff for the cypress wetland occurs in a 68- by 139-foot detention pond, and in a 12- by 25-foot trash retainer for the freshwater marsh. Results from the study indicate that detention structures, larger than the trash retainer at the freshwater marsh, may cause sufficient sorption and settling of substances contained in highway runoff.

  20. Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changchun [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Sun, Xiaoxin [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Sun, Li [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Miao, Yuqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, Xianwei [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Guo, Yuedong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2012-01-01

    The permafrost carbon climate feedback is one of the major mechanisms in controlling the climate ecosystem interactions in northern high latitudes. Of this feedback, methane (CH4) emission from natural wetlands is critically important due to its high warming potential. The freeze thaw transition has been confirmed to play an important role in annual CH4 budget, yet the magnitude of this effect is uncertain. An intensive field campaign was carried out in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China to estimate the CH4 emission in the spring freeze thaw transition period. The observation concluded that a large CH4 source was caused by spring thaw; the maximum hourly emission rate was 48.6 g C m 2 h 1, more than three orders of the regularly observed CH4 emission rate in the growing season. In some sporadically observed 'hot spots', the spring thawing effect contributed to a large CH4 source of 31.3 10.1 g C m 2, which is approximately 80% of the previously calculated annual CH4 emission in the same study area. If our results are typical for natural wetlands in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region, we estimate a global CH4 source strength of 0.5 1.0 Tg C (1 Tg =1012 g) caused by spring thaw in the Northern Hemisphere permafrost region in the year 2011. Combining with available satellite and flask data, a regional extrapolation reaches a temporal pattern of CH4 emission during 2003 2009 which is consistent with recently observed changes in atmospheric CH4 concentration in the high latitudes. This suggests that the CH4 emission upon spring thaw in the high latitudes might be enhanced by the projected climate warming. These findings indicate that the spring thawing effect is an important mechanism in the permafrost carbon climate feedback and needs to be incorporated in Earth system models.

  1. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  2. Chemical Properties of Pore Water and Sediment at Three Wetland Sites Near the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Friday, G.P.

    2001-05-15

    In 1980, vegetative stress and arboreal mortality in wetland plant communities down-gradient from the F- and H-Area seepage basins were detected using aerial imagery. By 1988, approximately six acres in H-Area and four acres in F-Area had been adversely impacted. Today, wetland plant communities have become well established at the H-Area tree-kill zone.

  3. Geology and geochemistry of crude oils, Bolivar coastal fields, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Bockmeulen, H.; Barker, C.; Dickey, P.A.

    1983-02-01

    The Bolivar Coastal Fields (BCF) are located on the eastern margin of Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. They form the largest oil field outside of the Middle East and contain mostly heavy oil with a gravity less than 22/sup 0/ API. Thirty crude oils from the BCF were collected along two parallel and generally southwest-northeast trends. These oils were characterized by their API gravity, percent saturates, aromatics, NSO and asphalitic compounds, gas chromatograms for whole oils, C/sub 4/-C/sub 7/ fractions, and aromatics. Also, 24 associated waters were sampled and analyzed for Ca/sup + +/, Mg/sup + +/, Na/sup +/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup - -/, SO/sub 4//sup - -/, pH, and total dissolved solids (TDS). The geological and geochemical significances of these analyses are discussed with particular emphasis on the genesis of the petroleum.

  4. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 23 0 1 1980's 5 3 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1990's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  5. California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 9 2 6 1980's 3 10 27 6 12 9 1 2 1 5 1990's 15 1 0 3 1 1 1 15 0 46 2000's 0 0 3 0 8 6 5 0 0 0 2010's 0 1 1 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next

  6. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Little Timber Creek Crossing, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Topical report, August 1991--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.; Van Dyke, G.D. |

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents results of a survey conducted over the period of August 5--7, 1991, at the Little Timber Creek crossing in Gloucester County, New Jersey, where three pipelines, constructed in 1950, 1960, and 1990, cross the creek and associated wetlands. The old side of the ROW, created by the installation of the 1960 pipeline, was designed to contain a raised peat bed over the 1950 pipeline and an open-water ditch over the 1960 pipeline. The new portion of the ROW, created by installation of the 1990 pipeline, has an open-water ditch over the pipeline (resulting from settling of the backfill) and a raised peat bed (resulting from rebound of compacted peat). Both the old and new ROWs contain dense stands of herbs; the vegetation on the old ROW was more similar to that in the adjacent natural area than was vegetation in the new ROW. The ROW increased species and habitat diversity in the wetlands. It may contribute to the spread of purple loosestrife and affect species sensitive to habitat fragmentation.

  7. Composite refraction-reflection stack sections: Tracing faults in the Atlantic coastal plain sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.E.; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.

    1993-05-01

    Seismic data from the Atlantic Coastal Plain are reprocessed and composite refraction-reflection stack sections produced to investigate basement faults that penetrate upward into Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments in South Carolina. Reprocessing recovered reflections from within the deep crust to the Moho as well as from within thin veneer (300) of the Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments. One of the major objectives of this paper is to discuss the use of shallow refracted arrivals to construct a composite refraction- reflection stack that allows better imaging of the subsurface at shallow depths.

  8. Amended Notice of Intent To Modify the Scope of the EIS and Conduct Additional Public Scoping Meetings, and Notice of Floodplains and Wetlands Involvement for the Northern Pass Project: Federal Register Notice VOlume 78, No. 173- September 6, 2013

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy announces its intent to modify the scope of the Northern Pass Transmission Line Project Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS–0463) and to conduct additional public scoping meetings. Because the proposed Federal action may involve floodplains and wetlands, the draft EIS will include a floodplains and wetlands assessment as appropriate, and the final EIS and/or Record of Decision will include a floodplains and wetlands statement of findings.

  9. Restored Drill Cuttings for Wetlands Creation: Results of Mesocosm Approach to Emulate Field Conditions Under Varying Salinity and Hydrologic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, Mark W.; Shaffer, Gary P.; Willis, Jonathan M.; DesRoches, Dennis J.

    2002-06-03

    Both interstitial water and plant tissue associated with the DC-A substrate exhibited low metal concentrations. Also in agreement with the previous study, plant performance in the DC-A substrate was found to be comparable to plant performance in the dredge spoil and topsoil substrates. This was extremely important because it indicated that the drill cuttings themselves served as an excellent substrate for wetland plant growth, but that the processing and stabilization techniques and drilling fluid formulations required further refinement.

  10. Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan. Topical report, October 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rastorfer, J.R.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zellmer, S.D.; Wilkey, P.L.

    1995-04-01

    This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth wetland sites mapped Lenawee soils were selected in Midland County, Michigan: Site 1, a younger stand subjected to recent selective logging, and Site 2, a more mature stand. The collection of ecological data to analyze plant succession on the right-of-way (ROW) and the effects of the developing ROW plant communities on adjacent forest communities was initiated in 1989. Cover class estimates were made for understory and ROW plant species on the basis of 1 {times} 1{minus}m quadrats. Individual stem diameters and species counts were recorded for overstory plants in 10{minus}m quadrats. Although long-term studies have not been completed, firm baseline data were established for comparative analyses with future sampling. Current data indicate that vegetation became well-established on the ROW within one year and subsequently increased in coverage. About 65% of the species were wetland indicators, and the dominants included seeded and natural invading species; nevertheless, some elements of the original flora regenerated and persist. The plants of the ecotone understories of both sites changed from their original composition as a result of the installation of the gas pipeline. Although some forest species persist at both sites, the ecotone of Site I was influenced more by the seeded species, whereas the natural invaders were more important at Site 2.

  11. Coastal Sensitivity to Sea Level: Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to coastal sensitivity to sea level includes: • A Coastal Hazards Data Base for the U.S. East Coast (1992) • A Coastal Hazards Data Base for the U.S. Gulf Coast (1993) • A Coastal Hazards Data Base for the U.S. West Coast (1997)

  12. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  13. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

    2008-03-18

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

  14. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole

    2008-03-17

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish

  15. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 2. Analysis Discussion Resource Assessment The USGS most recent assessment of oil and gas resources of ANWR Coastal Plain (The Oil and Gas Resource Potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 Area, Alaska, Open File Report 98-34, 1999) provided basic information used in this study. A prior assessment was completed in 1987 by the USGS.

  16. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Executive Summary This Service Report, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment, was prepared for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources at the request of Chairman Frank H. Murkowski in a letter dated March 10, 2000. The request asked the Energy Information

  17. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Preface Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment is a product of the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Reserves and Production Division. EIA, under various programs, has assessed foreign and domestic oil and gas resources, reserves, and production potential. As a policy-neutral

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment References Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2000, DOE/EIA-0383(2000) (Washington, DC, December 1999), Table A11. Energy Information Administration, Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, SR/RNGD/87-01 (Washington, DC, September 1987). U.S. Department of Interior, Arctic National

  19. Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)

    SciTech Connect

    Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional

  20. IS THERE AN INTERMEDIATE MASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN THE GALACTIC CENTER: IMPRINTS ON THE STELLAR TIDAL-DISRUPTION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xian; Liu, F. K. E-mail: fkliu@pku.edu.cn

    2013-01-10

    It has been suggested that an intermediate-massive black hole (IMBH) with mass 10{sup 3-5} M {sub Sun} could fall into the galactic center (GC) and form a massive black hole binary (MBHB) with the central supermassive black hole, but current observations are not sensitive to constrain all mass and distance ranges. Motivated by the recent discovery that MBHBs could enhance the rate of tidal-disruption events (TDEs) of stellar objects, we investigate the prospect of using stellar-disruption rate to probe IMBHs in the GC. We incorporated the perturbation by an IMBH into the loss-cone theory and calculated the stellar-disruption rates in the GC. We found that an IMBH heavier than 2000 M {sub Sun} could distinguishably enhance the stellar-disruption rate. By comparing observations of Sgr A* with the fall-back model for stellar debris, we suggested that the TDE rate in our Galaxy should not significantly exceed 0.002 yr{sup -1}, therefore a fraction of the parameter space for the IMBH, concentrating at the high-mass end, can already be excluded. To derive constraint in the remaining parameter space, it is crucial to observationally confirm or reject the stellar-disruption rate between 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, and we discussed possible strategies to make such measurements.

  1. TIDAL DISRUPTIONS OF WHITE DWARFS FROM ULTRA-CLOSE ENCOUNTERS WITH INTERMEDIATE-MASS SPINNING BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Roland; Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo; Shcherbakov, Roman V.

    2012-04-20

    We present numerical relativity results of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs from ultra-close encounters with a spinning, intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH). These encounters require a full general relativistic treatment of gravity. We show that the disruption process and prompt accretion of the debris strongly depend on the magnitude and orientation of the black hole (BH) spin. However, the late-time accretion onto the BH follows the same decay, M-dot {proportional_to} t{sup -5/3}, estimated from Newtonian gravity disruption studies. We compute the spectrum of the disk formed from the fallback material using a slim disk model. The disk spectrum peaks in the soft X-rays and sustains Eddington luminosity for 1-3 yr after the disruption. For arbitrary BH spin orientations, the disrupted material is scattered away from the orbital plane by relativistic frame dragging, which often leads to obscuration of the inner fallback disk by the outflowing debris. The disruption events also yield bursts of gravitational radiation with characteristic frequencies of {approx}3.2 Hz and strain amplitudes of {approx}10{sup -18} for galactic IMBHs. The optimistic rate of considered ultra-close disruptions is consistent with no sources found in the ROSAT all-sky survey. Future missions like Wide-Field X-ray Telescope could observe dozens of events.

  2. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Mi. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines (HATTs). First, an HATT blade was designed using the blade element momentum method in conjunction with a genetic optimization algorithm. Several unstructured computational grids were generated using this blade geometry and steady CFD simulations were used to perform a grid resolution study. Transient simulations were then performed to determine the effect of time-dependent flow phenomena and the size of the computational timestep on the numerical solution. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  3. A TWO-COMPONENT JET MODEL FOR THE TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT SWIFT J164449.3+573451

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dangbo; Pe'er, Asaf; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    We analyze both the early- and late-time radio and X-ray data of the tidal disruption event (TDE) Swift J1644+57. The data at early times (≲ 5 days) necessitate separation of the radio and X-ray emission regions, either spatially or in velocity space. This leads us to suggest a two-component jet model, in which the inner jet is initially relativistic with Lorentz factor Γ ≈ 15, while the outer jet is trans-relativistic, with Γ ≲ 1.2. This model enables a self-consistent interpretation of the late-time radio data, both in terms of peak frequency and flux. We solve the dynamics, radiative cooling, and expected radiation from both jet components. We show that while during the first month synchrotron emission from the outer jet dominates the radio emission, at later times, radiation from ambient gas collected by the inner jet dominates. This provides a natural explanation to the observed re-brightening, without the need for late-time inner engine activity. After 100 days, the radio emission peak is in the optically thick regime, leading to a decay of both the flux and peak frequency at later times. Our model's predictions for the evolution of radio emission in jetted TDEs can be tested by future observations.

  4. Silicate grout curtains behaviour for the protection of coastal aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Elektorowicz, M.; Chifrina, R.; Hesnawi, R.

    1997-12-31

    Tests were performed to evaluate the behaviour of silicate grout with different reagents (ethylacetate - formamide SA and calcium chloride SC) in pure silica sand and natural soils from coastal areas containing organic matter, clayey soil and silica sand. The grouted specimens were tested with simulated fresh and salt water. The setting process during chemical grouting in the soil and sand was studied. The grouting of soil and sand with SA caused a transfer to the environment of some compounds: sodium formate, sodium acetate, ammonia and part of the initial ethylacetate and formamide. This process had a tendency to decrease for approximately 4 months. The stability of specimens was low. The grouting of soil and sand with SC caused no significant contamination of the environment. The increase of pH of environmental water was even less than with SA grouting. Also, the stability of specimens is higher in comparison with SA grouting. Salt water protected the specimens grouted with SA and SC from destruction and prevented contamination.

  5. Carbon paint anode for reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cryer, C.B.; Laylor, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Solvent-based acrylic carbon paint anodes were installed on the north approach spans of the Yaquina Bay Bridge (Newport OR) in 1985. The anodes continue to perform satisfactorily after more than 15 years service. The anodes were inexpensive to apply and field repairs are easily made. Depolarization potentials are consistently above 100 mV with long-term current densities around 2 mA/m 2. Bond strength remains adequate, averaging 0.50 MPa (73 psi). Some deterioration of the anode-concrete interface has occurred in the form of cracks and about 4% of the bond strength measurements indicated low or no bond. Carbon anode consumption appears low. The dominant long-term anode reaction appears to be chlorine evolution, which results in limited further acidification of the anode-concrete interface. Chloride profiles were depressed compared to some other coastal bridges suggesting chloride extraction by the CP system. Further evidence of outward chloride migration was a flat chloride profile between the anode and the outer rebar.

  6. How are coastal households responding to climate change?

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Elrick-Barr, Carmen E.; Smith, Timothy F.; Preston, Benjamin L.; Thomsen, Dana C.; Baum, Scott

    2016-06-13

    In Australia, shared responsibility is a concept advocated to promote collective climate change adaptation by multiple actors and institutions. However, a shared response is often promoted in the absence of information regarding actions currently taken; in particular, there is limited knowledge regarding action occurring at the household scale. To address this gap, we examine household actions taken to address climate change and associated hazards in two Australian coastal communities. Mixed methods research is conducted to answer three questions: (1) what actions are currently taken (mitigation, actions to lobby for change or adaptation to climate impacts)? (2) why are these actionsmore » taken (e.g. are they consistent with capacity, experience, perceptions of risk); and (3) what are the implications for adaptation? We find that households are predominantly mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and that impact orientated adaptive actions are limited. Coping strategies are considered sufficient to mange climate risks, proving a disincentive for additional adaptive action. Influencing factors differ, but generally, risk perception and climate change belief are associated with action. Furthermore, the likelihood of more action is a function of homeownership and a tendency to plan ahead. Addressing factors that support or constrain household adaptive decision-making and action, from the physical (e.g. homeownership) to the social (e.g. skills in planning and a culture of adapting to change) will be critical in increasing household participation in adaptation.« less

  7. Volatilization of organotin compounds from estuarine and coastal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Amouroux, D.; Tessier, E.; Donard, O.F.X.

    2000-03-15

    The occurrence and speciation of volatile tin compounds (Sn) have been investigated in a contaminated area of the Arcachon Bay (SW France) and in the water column of the Scheldt (Belgium/Netherlands) and Gironde (SW France) estuaries. This paper describes the application of a multi-isotope analytical method, using gas chromatography and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Analytes were collected by cryogenic trapping of the gaseous species. This trapping has allowed the authors to probe volatile tin compounds by detecting both {sup 118}Sn and {sup 120}Sn isotopes. Volatile organic tin compounds have been determined in both sediment and water. They could result from both natural methylation and hybridization processes of inorganic tin and from anthropogenic butyltin derivatives released from ship antifouling paintings which have accumulated in sediments. The most ubiquitous species were found to be the methylated forms of butyltin derivatives. These results suggest that biological and/or chemical methylation mechanisms are likely to occur in sediments and to lead to remobilization of tin species into the water column and subsequently to the atmosphere. Finally, sediment-water and water-atmosphere fluxes have been calculated to assess the potential impact of these processes on the fate of organotin compounds in coastal environments.

  8. Groundwater Discharge along a Channelized Coastal Plain Stream

    SciTech Connect

    LaSage, Danita M; Sexton, Joshua L; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Fryar, Alan E; Greb, Stephen F

    2015-10-01

    In the Coastal Plain of the southeastern USA, streams have commonly been artificially channelized for flood control and agricultural drainage. However, groundwater discharge along such streams has received relatively little attention. Using a combination of stream- and spring-flow measurements, spring temperature measurements, temperature profiling along the stream-bed, and geologic mapping, we delineated zones of diffuse and focused discharge along Little Bayou Creek, a channelized, first-order perennial stream in western Kentucky. Seasonal variability in groundwater discharge mimics hydraulic-head fluctuations in a nearby monitoring well and spring-discharge fluctuations elsewhere in the region, and is likely to reflect seasonal variability in recharge. Diffuse discharge occurs where the stream is incised into the semi-confined regional gravel aquifer, which is comprised of the Mounds Gravel. Focused discharge occurs upstream where the channel appears to have intersected preferential pathways within the confining unit. Seasonal fluctuations in discharge from individual springs are repressed where piping results in bank collapse. Thereby, focused discharge can contribute to the morphological evolution of the stream channel.

  9. Quantifying the role of degasification subsidence in wetland loss -- Mississippi delta plain

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, L.D.; Johnson, D.O.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Isaacson, H.R.; Penland, S.; Connor, P.F.

    1991-03-01

    Modem and ancient delta plains in Louisiana that border the northern Gulf of Mexico are undergoing unprecedented rates of land loss. Subsidence due to compaction and loss of pore water is believed to be one of the primary land loss factors, whereas subsidence due to gas emission is generally believed to play a significant role only in the upper one or two meters of a wetland. Evidence to the contrary is presented here that suggests that degasification subsidence is a more important mechanism contributing to land loss than previously thought. In addition, potential degasification subsidence can be quantified if the depression from normal compressional and shear wave velocities is known. Velocity reductions of 30 to 75% from compressional wave velocity in water and extending to depths of tens of meters have been observed in a saltwater marsh in Louisiana. An order of magnitude reduction in velocity has been observed previously in gas-rich sediments on the adjacent continental shelf, where biogenic gas is observed to depths of 1 km or more. The ratio of normal to depressed compressional wave velocities is used to calculate potential degasification subsidence.

  10. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  11. The ultraviolet-bright, slowly declining transient PS1-11af as a partial tidal disruption event

    SciTech Connect

    Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Kamble, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Czekala, I.; Dittmann, J.; Drout, M.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Marion, G. H.; Narayan, G.; Gezari, S.; Rest, A.; Riess, A. G.; Chomiuk, L.; Huber, M. E.; Lawrence, A.; and others

    2014-01-01

    We present the Pan-STARRS1 discovery of the long-lived and blue transient PS1-11af, which was also detected by Galaxy Evolution Explorer with coordinated observations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band. PS1-11af is associated with the nucleus of an early type galaxy at redshift z = 0.4046 that exhibits no evidence for star formation or active galactic nucleus activity. Four epochs of spectroscopy reveal a pair of transient broad absorption features in the UV on otherwise featureless spectra. Despite the superficial similarity of these features to P-Cygni absorptions of supernovae (SNe), we conclude that PS1-11af is not consistent with the properties of known types of SNe. Blackbody fits to the spectral energy distribution are inconsistent with the cooling, expanding ejecta of a SN, and the velocities of the absorption features are too high to represent material in homologous expansion near a SN photosphere. However, the constant blue colors and slow evolution of the luminosity are similar to previous optically selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The shape of the optical light curve is consistent with models for TDEs, but the minimum accreted mass necessary to power the observed luminosity is only ?0.002 M {sub ?}, which points to a partial disruption model. A full disruption model predicts higher bolometric luminosities, which would require most of the radiation to be emitted in a separate component at high energies where we lack observations. In addition, the observed temperature is lower than that predicted by pure accretion disk models for TDEs and requires reprocessing to a constant, lower temperature. Three deep non-detections in the radio with the Very Large Array over the first two years after the event set strict limits on the production of any relativistic outflow comparable to Swift J1644+57, even if off-axis.

  12. Final Scientific/Technical Report: National Institute for Climatic Change Research Coastal Center

    SciTech Connect

    Tornqvist, Torbjorn; Chambers, Jeffrey

    2014-01-07

    It is widely recognized that coastal environments are under particular threat due to changes associated with climate change. Accelerated sea-level rise, in some regions augmented by land subsidence, plus the possibility of a changing storm climate, renders low-lying coastal landscapes and their ecosystems vulnerable to future change. This is a pressing problem, because these ecosystems commonly rank as some of the most valuable on the planet. The objective of the NICCR Coastal Center was to support basic research that aims at reducing uncertainty about ecosystem changes during the next century, carried out along the U.S. coastlines. The NICCR Coastal Center has funded 20 projects nationwide (carried out at 27 institutions) that addressed numerous aspects of the problems outlined above. The research has led to a variety of new insights, a significant number of which published in elite scientific journals. It is anticipated that the dissemination of this work in the scientific literature will continue for several more years, given that a number of projects have only recently reached their end date. In addition, NICCR funds have been used to support research at Tulane University. The lion’s share of these funds has been invested in the development of unique facilities for experimental research in coastal ecosystems. This aspect of the work could have a lasting impact in the future.

  13. Phytoaccumulation of trace elements by wetland plants: 3. Uptake and accumulation of ten trace elements by twelve plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.H.; Zayed, A.; Zhu, Y.L.; Yu, M.; Terry, N.

    1999-10-01

    Interest is increasing in using wetland plants in constructed wetlands to remove toxic elements from polluted wastewater. To identify those wetland plants that hyperaccumulate trace elements, 12 plant species were tested for their efficiency to bioconcentrate 10 potentially toxic trace elements including As, b, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, and Se. Individual plants were grown under carefully controlled conditions and supplied with 1 mg L{sup {minus}1} of each trace element individually for 10 d. Except B, all elements accumulated to much higher concentrations in roots than in shoots. Highest shoot tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW) of the various trace elements were attained by the following species: umbrella plant (Cyperus alternifolius L.) for Mn (198) and Cr (44); water zinnia (Wedelia trilobata Hitchc.) for Cd (148) and Ni (80); smartweed (Polygonum hydropiperoides Michx.) for Cu (95) and Pb (64); water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) for Hg (92), As (34), and Se (39); and mare's tail (hippuris vulgaris L.) for B (1132). Whereas, the following species attained the highest root tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW); stripped rush (Baumia rubiginosa) for Mn (1683); parrot's feather (Myriophyllum brasiliense Camb.) for Cd (1426) and Ni (1077); water lettuce for Cu (1038), Hg (1217), and As (177); smartweed for Cr (2980) and Pb (1882); mare's tail for B (1277); and monkey flower (Mimulus guttatus Fisch.) for Se (384). From a phytoremediation perspective, smartweed was probably the best plant species for trace element removal from wastewater due to its faster growth and higher plant density.

  14. Radar remote sensing of forest and wetland ecosystems in the Central American tropics

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, K.O.; Rey-Benayas, J.M. ); Paris, J.F. . Dept. of Biology)

    1994-05-01

    The authors analyzed airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) imagery of forest, wetland, and agricultural ecosystems in northern Belize, Central America. The analyses are based upon four biophysical Indices derived from the fully polarimetric SAR data: the volume scattering index (VSI), canopy structure index (CSI), biomass index (BMI), calculated from the backscatter magnitude data, and the interaction type index (ITI), calculated from the backscatter phase data. The authors developed a four-level landscape hierarchy based upon clustering analyses of the 12 index parameters from two test site images. Statistical analyses were used to examine the relative importance of the 12 parameters for discriminating ecosystem characteristics at various landscape scales. The authors found that ITI was the most important index (primarily C band = CITI) for level, vegetated terrain at all levels of the hierarchy. BMI was most important for differentiating between vegetated and nonvegetated areas and between sloping and level terrain. These findings indicate that upper canopy spatial characteristics and flooding in marshlands are more important than biomass in differentiating many tropical ecosystems with radar data. The relative importance of the indices varied with vegetation type; for example, PVSI was the most important for distinguishing between upland forests and regrowth, and PCSI was the most important for differentiating swamp forest types. Finally, the authors evaluated the potential of present and future spaceborne SARs for tropical ecosystem studies based on the results. Most of these SARs are single channel system and will provide limited capability for characterizing biomass and structure of tropical vegetation. The SIR-C/X-SAR and proposed EOS SAR are future spaceborne multifrequency fully polarimetric SAR systems, and they will provide a significant contribution to tropical ecosystem studies.

  15. Ground-water chemistry of a fen-wetland complex in northeastern Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Cartwright, K.; Krapac, I.G. ); Nuzzo, V. )

    1992-01-01

    Construction of homes within the watershed of a fen-wetland complex has resulted in encroachment of ground water-borne anthropogenic contaminants into 3 high-quality fens. The study area is located in northeastern Illinois and is situated at the base of a Wisconsinan moraine. The upper 15 to 45 m of glacial drift consists of permeable sand and gravel, overlain by 3 to 6 m of peat and marl. Ground-water samples were collected quarterly for 1.25 years from sand and gravel aquifers, and peat and marl of the fens, and analyzed for inorganic constituents. Density, cover and vigor data on threatened, endangered and selected common plant species in the fens were collected in conjunction with ground-water sampling. Ground water of the complex is of the Ca-HCO[sub 3] to Ca-Mg-HCO[sub 3] type which is typical of ground water of glacial deposits of North America. Contaminant plumes at this site are enriched in Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, NO[sub 3], SO[sub 4], with higher specific conductance and alkalinity. Some recharge areas within the complex yield ground-water samples containing 200--500 mg/L SO[sub 4]. Although this ground water is entering the fens, ground water from peat and marl in the fens contains an order of magnitude lower concentration of SO[sub 4] due to reducing conditions therein. Progressive enrichment of Cl and NO[sub 3], and decrease in Eh is occurring in recharge areas nearest housing developments, suggesting progressive degradation of ground-water quality. Mineral content of ground water appears to have the most significant affect on plant diversity within the fens. A specific conductance of greater than 100 [mu]s/cm in shallow fen ground water correlates well with the encroachment and proliferation of Typha angustifolia L. (narrow-leaf cattail) into areas of highly diverse flora.

  16. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Implementation of the Wetland Mitigation Bank Program at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1205) for the proposed implementation of a wetland mitigation bank program at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings.

  17. HYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATIONS TO DETERMINE THE FEEDING RATE OF BLACK HOLES BY THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF STARS: THE IMPORTANCE OF THE IMPACT PARAMETER AND STELLAR STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2013-04-10

    The disruption of stars by supermassive black holes has been linked to more than a dozen flares in the cores of galaxies out to redshift z {approx} 0.4. Modeling these flares properly requires a prediction of the rate of mass return to the black hole after a disruption. Through hydrodynamical simulation, we show that aside from the full disruption of a solar mass star at the exact limit where the star is destroyed, the common assumptions used to estimate M-dot (t), the rate of mass return to the black hole, are largely invalid. While the analytical approximation to tidal disruption predicts that the least-centrally concentrated stars and the deepest encounters should have more quickly-peaked flares, we find that the most-centrally concentrated stars have the quickest-peaking flares, and the trend between the time of peak and the impact parameter for deeply penetrating encounters reverses beyond the critical distance at which the star is completely destroyed. We also show that the most-centrally concentrated stars produced a characteristic drop in M-dot (t) shortly after peak when a star is only partially disrupted, with the power law index n being as extreme as -4 in the months immediately following the peak of a flare. Additionally, we find that n asymptotes to {approx_equal} - 2.2 for both low- and high-mass stars for approximately half of all stellar disruptions. Both of these results are significantly steeper than the typically assumed n = -5/3. As these precipitous decay rates are only seen for events in which a stellar core survives the disruption, they can be used to determine if an observed tidal disruption flare produced a surviving remnant. We provide fitting formulae for four fundamental quantities of tidal disruption as functions of the star's distance to the black hole at pericenter and its stellar structure: the total mass lost, the time of peak, the accretion rate at peak, and the power-law index shortly after peak. These results should be taken into

  18. Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment Potential Oil Production from the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment 1. Overview of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Background The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area of the Alaska North Slope represents an area of 1.5 million acres. The ANWR Coastal Plain Area includes the 1002 Area, State of Alaska lands to the 3-mile limit from the coast line, and approximately 92,000 acres of Native Inupiat lands.

  19. DISCOVERY OF AN ULTRASOFT X-RAY TRANSIENT SOURCE IN THE 2XMM CATALOG: A TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENT CANDIDATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Dacheng; Webb, Natalie A.; Barret, Didier; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Farrell, Sean A.

    2011-09-01

    We have discovered an ultrasoft X-ray transient source, 2XMMi J184725.1-631724, which was detected serendipitously in two XMM-Newton observations in the direction of the center of the galaxy IC 4765-f01-1504 at a redshift of 0.0353. These two observations were separated by 211 days, with the 0.2-10 keV absorbed flux increasing by a factor of about nine. Their spectra are best described by a model dominated by a thermal disk or a single-temperature blackbody component (contributing {approx}>80% of the flux) plus a weak power-law component. The thermal emission has a temperature of a few tens of eV, and the weak power-law component has a photon index of {approx}3.5. Similar to the black hole X-ray binaries in the thermal state, our source exhibits an accretion disk whose luminosity appears to follow the L{proportional_to}T {sup 4} relation. This would indicate that the black hole mass is about 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} M{sub sun} using the best-fitting inner disk radius. Both XMM-Newton observations show variability of about 21% on timescales of hours, which can be explained as due to fast variations in the mass accretion rate. The source was not detected by ROSAT in an observation in 1992, indicating a variability factor of {approx}>64 over longer timescales. The source was not detected again in X-rays in a Swift observation in 2011 February, implying a flux decrease by a factor of {approx}>12 since the last XMM-Newton observation. The transient nature, in addition to the extreme softness of the X-ray spectra and the inactivity of the galaxy implied by the lack of strong optical emission lines, makes it a candidate tidal disruption event. If this is the case, the first XMM-Newton observation would have been in the rising phase and the second one in the decay phase.

  20. Recovery of contaminated wetland soils at the Savannah River Site by natural rainfall: An experimental, toxicological study

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1990-08-01

    This study was conducted at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Seepage basins at the SRS F-Area received liquid effluent from the 1950s to 1988. This effluent was typically acidic, containing high amounts of total dissolved ions, low levels of tritium and other radioactive elements, and trace levels of various heavy metals. Sodium (from NaOH), and aluminum (from soil matrix reduction due to acid leachate) were at particularly high levels in the outcropping water. The effluent gradually seeped down to the water table and subsequently outcropped along the edge of a forested wetland bordering Four Mile Creek. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the potential for natural remediation of contaminated wetland soils by rainfall. Contaminated soils were collected and leached repeatedly with rainwater. After 6 leachings the leachate was observed to be non-toxic to lettuce seedlings, whereas the initial leachate was very toxic. These results suggest that more detailed studies on leaching as a remediation technique would be beneficial. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.