National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for thermal requirements capacity

  1. Capacity Requirements to Support Inter-Balancing Area Wind Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2009-07-01

    Paper examines the capacity requirements that arise as wind generation is integrated into the power system and how those requirements change depending on where the wind energy is delivered.

  2. EVALUATION OF REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DWPF HIGHER CAPACITY CANISTER

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.; Estochen, E.; Jordan, J.; Kesterson, M.; Mckeel, C.

    2014-08-05

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is considering the option to increase canister glass capacity by reducing the wall thickness of the current production canister. This design has been designated as the DWPF Higher Capacity Canister (HCC). A significant decrease in the number of canisters processed during the life of the facility would be achieved if the HCC were implemented leading to a reduced overall reduction in life cycle costs. Prior to implementation of the change, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct an evaluation of the potential impacts. The specific areas of interest included loading and deformation of the canister during the filling process. Additionally, the effect of the reduced wall thickness on corrosion and material compatibility needed to be addressed. Finally the integrity of the canister during decontamination and other handling steps needed to be determined. The initial request regarding canister fabrication was later addressed in an alternate study. A preliminary review of canister requirements and previous testing was conducted prior to determining the testing approach. Thermal and stress models were developed to predict the forces on the canister during the pouring and cooling process. The thermal model shows the HCC increasing and decreasing in temperature at a slightly faster rate than the original. The HCC is shown to have a 3°F ΔT between the internal and outer surfaces versus a 5°F ΔT for the original design. The stress model indicates strain values ranging from 1.9% to 2.9% for the standard canister and 2.5% to 3.1% for the HCC. These values are dependent on the glass level relative to the thickness transition between the top head and the canister wall. This information, along with field readings, was used to set up environmental test conditions for corrosion studies. Small 304-L canisters were filled with glass and subjected to accelerated environmental testing for 3 months. No evidence of

  3. World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

  4. Plug and Process Loads Capacity and Power Requirements Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppy, M.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-09-01

    This report addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that would help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. Limited initial data, however, suggest that actual PPL densities in leased buildings are substantially lower. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems. Better guidance will enable improved sizing and design of these systems, decrease upfront capital costs, and allow systems to operate more energy efficiently. The main focus of this report is to provide industry with reliable, objective third-party guidance to address the information gap in typical PPL densities for commercial building tenants. This could drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands.

  5. Method for determining thermal conductivity and thermal capacity per unit volume of earth in situ

    DOEpatents

    Poppendiek, Heinz F.

    1982-01-01

    A method for determining the thermal conductivity of the earth in situ is based upon a cylindrical probe (10) having a thermopile (16) for measuring the temperature gradient between sets of thermocouple junctions (18 and 20) of the probe after it has been positioned in a borehole and has reached thermal equilibrium with its surroundings, and having means (14) for heating one set of thermocouple junctions (20) of the probe at a constant rate while the temperature gradient of the probe is recorded as a rise in temperature over several hours (more than about 3 hours). A fluid annulus thermally couples the probe to the surrounding earth. The recorded temperature curves are related to the earth's thermal conductivity, k.sub..infin., and to the thermal capacity per unit volume, (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin., by comparison with calculated curves using estimates of k.sub..infin. and (.gamma.c.sub.p).sub..infin. in an equation which relates these parameters to a rise in the earth's temperature for a known and constant heating rate.

  6. City of Dubuque- Solar Thermal Licensing Requirement

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Installers are also required to obtain a permit before altering or installing a system. Application details are available on the program website.

  7. Negative thermal expansion and anomalies of heat capacity of LuB50 at low temperatures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Novikov, V. V.; Zhemoedov, N. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Mitroshenkov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-07-20

    Heat capacity and thermal expansion of LuB50 boride were experimentally studied in the 2–300 K temperature range. The data reveal an anomalous contribution to the heat capacity at low temperatures. The value of this contribution is proportional to the first degree of temperature. It was identified that this anomaly in heat capacity is caused by the effect of disorder in the LuB50 crystalline structure and it can be described in the soft atomic potential model (SAP). The parameters of the approximation were determined. The temperature dependence of LuB50 heat capacity in the whole temperature range was approximated by the summore » of SAP contribution, Debye and two Einstein components. The parameters of SAP contribution for LuB50 were compared to the corresponding values for LuB66, which was studied earlier. Negative thermal expansion at low temperatures was experimentally observed for LuB50. The analysis of the experimental temperature dependence for the Gruneisen parameter of LuB50 suggested that the low-frequency oscillations, described in SAP mode, are responsible for the negative thermal expansion. As a result, the glasslike character of the behavior of LuB50 thermal characteristics at low temperatures was confirmed.« less

  8. Negative thermal expansion and anomalies of heat capacity of LuB 50 at low temperatures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Novikov, V. V.; Zhemoedov, N. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Mitroshenkov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-07-20

    Heat capacity and thermal expansion of LuB50 boride were experimentally studied in the 2300 K temperature range. The data reveal an anomalous contribution to the heat capacity at low temperatures. The value of this contribution is proportional to the first degree of temperature. It was identified that this anomaly in heat capacity is caused by the effect of disorder in the LuB50crystalline structure and it can be described in the soft atomic potential model (SAP). The parameters of the approximation were determined. The temperature dependence of LuB50 heat capacity in the whole temperature range was approximated by the sum ofmoreSAP contribution, Debye and two Einstein components. The parameters of SAP contribution for LuB50 were compared to the corresponding values for LuB66, which was studied earlier. Negative thermal expansion at low temperatures was experimentally observed for LuB50. The analysis of the experimental temperature dependence for the Gruneisen parameter of LuB50 suggested that the low-frequency oscillations, described in SAP mode, are responsible for the negative thermal expansion. Thus, the glasslike character of the behavior of LuB50 thermal characteristics at low temperatures was confirmed.less

  9. Heat capacities of solid polymers (The Advanced THermal Analysis System, ATHAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, B.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal properties of solid, linear macromolecules are accessible through heat capacity measurements from about 10 K to the glass transition. By measuring and collecting data on over 150 polymers, a data bank was established and used as a base for detailed correlation with an approximate frequency spectrum for the polymers. Besides assessment of the entropy at zero kelvin of disordered polymers, this heat capacity knowledge has helped in the elucidation of partial phase transitions and conformationally disordered crystal phases. A link has also been established to measurements of mobility through solid state nuclear magnetic resonance. Most recently heat capacity measurements have been linked to full dynamic simulations of crystal segments of 1900 chain atoms. Questions of disorder and anharmonicity can thus be analyzed. The work is summarized as the Advanced Thermal Analysis System, ATHAS. 27 refs., 26 figs.

  10. Analytical evaluation of thermal conductance and heat capacities of one-dimensional material systems

    SciTech Connect

    Saygi, Salih

    2014-02-15

    We theoretically predict some thermal properties versus temperature dependence of one dimensional (1D) material nanowire systems. A known method is used to provide an efficient and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. Predicted formulas are expressed in terms of Bloch-Grneisen functions and Debye functions. Computing results has proved that the expressions are in excellent agreement with the results reported in the literature even if it is in very low dimension limits of nanowire systems. Therefore the calculation method is a fully predictive approach to calculate thermal conductivity and heat capacities of nanowire material systems.

  11. Heat capacity and thermal expansion of icosahedral lutetium boride LuB66

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V V; Avdashchenko, D V; Matovnikov, A V; Mitroshenkov, N V; Bud’ko, S L

    2014-01-07

    The experimental values of heat capacity and thermal expansion for lutetium boride LuB66 in the temperature range of 2-300 K were analysed in the Debye-Einstein approximation. It was found that the vibration of the boron sub-lattice can be considered within the Debye model with high characteristic temperatures; low-frequency vibration of weakly connected metal atoms is described by the Einstein model.

  12. Better Building Alliance, Plug and Process Loads in Commercial Buildings: Capacity and Power Requirement Analysis (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This brochure addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that can help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. This brochure should be used to make these decisions so systems can operate more energy efficiently; upfront capital costs will also decrease. This information can also be used to drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands. It should enable brokers and tenants to agree about lower PPL capacities. Owner-occupied buildings will also benefit. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems.

  13. Thermal conditions and functional requirements for molten fuel containment

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, C.S.; Torri, A.

    1980-05-01

    This paper discusses the configuration and functional requirements for the molten fuel containment system (MFCS) in the GCFR demonstration plant design. Meltdown conditions following a loss of shutdown cooling (LOSC) accident were studied to define the core debris volume for a realistic meltdown case. Materials and thicknesses of the molten fuel container were defined. Stainless steel was chosen as the sacrificial material and magnesium oxide was chosen as the crucible material. Thermal conditions for an expected quasi-steady state were analyzed. Highlights of the functional requirements which directly affect the MFCS design are discussed.

  14. Templated assembly of photoswitches significantly increases the energy-storage capacity of solar thermal fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kucharski, TJ; Ferralis, N; Kolpak, AM; Zheng, JO; Nocera, DG; Grossman, JC

    2014-04-13

    Large-scale utilization of solar-energy resources will require considerable advances in energy-storage technologies to meet ever-increasing global energy demands. Other than liquid fuels, existing energy-storage materials do not provide the requisite combination of high energy density, high stability, easy handling, transportability and low cost. New hybrid solar thermal fuels, composed of photoswitchable molecules on rigid, low-mass nanostructures, transcend the physical limitations of molecular solar thermal fuels by introducing local sterically constrained environments in which interactions between chromophores can be tuned. We demonstrate this principle of a hybrid solar thermal fuel using azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes. We show that, on composite bundling, the amount of energy stored per azobenzene more than doubles from 58 to 120 kJ mol(-1), and the material also maintains robust cyclability and stability. Our results demonstrate that solar thermal fuels composed of molecule-nanostructure hybrids can exhibit significantly enhanced energy-storage capabilities through the generation of template-enforced steric strain.

  15. Negative thermal expansion and anomalies of heat capacity of LuB50 at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V. V.; Zhemoedov, N. A.; Matovnikov, A. V.; Mitroshenkov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, S. V.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2015-07-20

    Heat capacity and thermal expansion of LuB50 boride were experimentally studied in the 2–300 K temperature range. The data reveal an anomalous contribution to the heat capacity at low temperatures. The value of this contribution is proportional to the first degree of temperature. It was identified that this anomaly in heat capacity is caused by the effect of disorder in the LuB50 crystalline structure and it can be described in the soft atomic potential model (SAP). The parameters of the approximation were determined. The temperature dependence of LuB50 heat capacity in the whole temperature range was approximated by the sum of SAP contribution, Debye and two Einstein components. The parameters of SAP contribution for LuB50 were compared to the corresponding values for LuB66, which was studied earlier. Negative thermal expansion at low temperatures was experimentally observed for LuB50. The analysis of the experimental temperature dependence for the Gruneisen parameter of LuB50 suggested that the low-frequency oscillations, described in SAP mode, are responsible for the negative thermal expansion. As a result, the glasslike character of the behavior of LuB50 thermal characteristics at low temperatures was confirmed.

  16. Analysis of Large- Capacity Water Heaters in Electric Thermal Storage Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Alan L.; Anderson, David M.; Winiarski, David W.; Carmichael, Robert T.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Fisher, Andrew R.

    2015-03-17

    This report documents a national impact analysis of large tank heat pump water heaters (HPWH) in electric thermal storage (ETS) programs and conveys the findings related to concerns raised by utilities regarding the ability of large-tank heat pump water heaters to provide electric thermal storage services.

  17. Relative Economic Merits of Storage and Combustion Turbines for Meeting Peak Capacity Requirements under Increased Penetration of Solar Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, Paul; Diakov, Victor; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Batteries with several hours of capacity provide an alternative to combustion turbines for meeting peak capacity requirements. Even when compared to state-of-the-art highly flexible combustion turbines, batteries can provide a greater operational value, which is reflected in a lower system-wide production cost. By shifting load and providing operating reserves, batteries can reduce the cost of operating the power system to a traditional electric utility. This added value means that, depending on battery life, batteries can have a higher cost than a combustion turbine of equal capacity and still produce a system with equal or lower overall life-cycle cost. For a utility considering investing in new capacity, the cost premium for batteries is highly sensitive to a variety of factors, including lifetime, natural gas costs, PV penetration, and grid generation mix. In addition, as PV penetration increases, the net electricity demand profile changes, which may reduce the amount of battery energy capacity needed to reliably meet peak demand.

  18. THERMAL STUDY OF THE DIII-D MACHINE HEAT REMOVAL CAPACITY

    SciTech Connect

    YIP,H; ADERSON,P.M; HOLTROP,K.L; HARRISON,S

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 With each plasma shot, the DIII-D tokamak dissipates 0.5 to 1.0 GJ of energy. Plasma shots may occur as frequently as every ten minutes, and the energy is removed in the form of heat by a cooling water system. to remove heat from the machine, cooling water circulates through each major heat source. These sources include the power supplies, motor/generator, rf current drives, neutral beam power supplies, magnetic field coils, and vacuum vessel. The cooling water system consists of isolated primary and secondary cooling loops separated by intermediate heat exchangers. As future DIII-D plans include operation during summer months and longer pulse duration, the cooling system's overall heat removal capability and performance efficiency must be assessed. Temperature and flow data from around the DIII-D facility are collected by a programmable logic controller (PLC); the data are used to analyze the heat generating sources, the heat transfer rate to intermediate heat exchangers, and the ultimate heat rejection to the environment via the cooling towers. A comparison of the original DIII-D machine design versus the actual performance determines the margin of heat removal capacity. projections of the heat removal rate for various longer plasma shots are made. Improvements in design and/or operational procedure will be necessary to attain the desired pulse duration.

  19. Thermal management in heavy vehicles : a review identifying issues and research requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M. W.

    1999-01-15

    Thermal management in heavy vehicles is cross-cutting because it directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, engine/component life, driver comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and aerodynamics. It follows that thermal management is critical to the design of large (class 6-8) trucks, especially in optimizing for energy efficiency and emissions reduction. Heat rejection requirements are expected to increase, and it is industry's goal to develop new, innovative, high-performance cooling systems that occupy less space and are lightweight and cost-competitive. The state of the art in heavy vehicle thermal management is reviewed, and issues and research areas are identified.

  20. HybridPlan: A Capacity Planning Technique for Projecting Storage Requirements in Hybrid Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngjae; Gupta, Aayush; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Piotr, Berman; Sivasubramaniam, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Economic forces, driven by the desire to introduce flash into the high-end storage market without changing existing software-base, have resulted in the emergence of solid-state drives (SSDs), flash packaged in HDD form factors and capable of working with device drivers and I/O buses designed for HDDs. Unlike the use of DRAM for caching or buffering, however, certain idiosyncrasies of NAND Flash-based solid-state drives (SSDs) make their integration into hard disk drive (HDD)-based storage systems nontrivial. Flash memory suffers from limits on its reliability, is an order of magnitude more expensive than the magnetic hard disk drives (HDDs), and can sometimes be as slow as the HDD (due to excessive garbage collection (GC) induced by high intensity of random writes). Given the complementary properties of HDDs and SSDs in terms of cost, performance, and lifetime, the current consensus among several storage experts is to view SSDs not as a replacement for HDD, but rather as a complementary device within the high-performance storage hierarchy. Thus, we design and evaluate such a hybrid storage system with HybridPlan that is an improved capacity planning technique to administrators with the overall goal of operating within cost-budgets. HybridPlan is able to find the most cost-effective hybrid storage configuration with different types of SSDs and HDDs

  1. Analysis of Plug Load Capacities and Power Requirements in Commercial Buildings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-08-01

    Plug and process load power requirements are frequently overestimated because designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' data, or design assumptions are high because information is not available. This generally results in oversized heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; increased initial construction costs; and increased energy use caused by inefficiencies at low, part-load operation. Rightsizing of chillers in two buildings reduced whole-building energy use by 3%-4%. If an integrated design approach could enable 3% whole-building energy savings in all U.S. office buildings stock, it could save 34 TBtu of site energy per year.

  2. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI workshop on transient thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, D.

    1997-07-01

    This is a report on the CSNI Workshop on Transient Thermal-Hydraulic and Neutronic Codes Requirements held at Annapolis, Maryland, USA November 5-8, 1996. This experts` meeting consisted of 140 participants from 21 countries; 65 invited papers were presented. The meeting was divided into five areas: (1) current and prospective plans of thermal hydraulic codes development; (2) current and anticipated uses of thermal-hydraulic codes; (3) advances in modeling of thermal-hydraulic phenomena and associated additional experimental needs; (4) numerical methods in multi-phase flows; and (5) programming language, code architectures and user interfaces. The workshop consensus identified the following important action items to be addressed by the international community in order to maintain and improve the calculational capability: (a) preserve current code expertise and institutional memory, (b) preserve the ability to use the existing investment in plant transient analysis codes, (c) maintain essential experimental capabilities, (d) develop advanced measurement capabilities to support future code validation work, (e) integrate existing analytical capabilities so as to improve performance and reduce operating costs, (f) exploit the proven advances in code architecture, numerics, graphical user interfaces, and modularization in order to improve code performance and scrutibility, and (g) more effectively utilize user experience in modifying and improving the codes.

  3. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels ... Catalytic Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (Barrels per Stream Day) Cracking Thermal ...

  4. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels ... Catalytic Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (Barrels per Stream Day) Cracking Thermal ...

  5. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-08-01

    An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

  6. Technical support document for proposed 1994 revision of the MEC thermal envelope requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the development of the proposed revision of the Council of American Building Officials` (CABO) 1994 supplement to the 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for maximum component U{sub 0}-value. The 1994 amendments to the 1993 MEC were established in last year`s code change cycle and did not change the envelope requirements. The research underlying the proposed MEC revision was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Standards program. The goal of this research was to develop revised guidelines based on an objective methodology that determines the most cost-effective (least total cost) combination of energy conservation measures (ECMs) (insulation levels and window types) for residential buildings. This least-cost set of ECMs was used as a basis for proposing revised MEC maximum U{sub 0}-values (thermal transmittances). ECMs include window types (for example, double-pane vinyl) and insulation levels (for example, R-19) for ceilings, walls, and floors.

  7. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  8. Consequences of proposed changes to Clean Water Act thermal discharge requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Moses, D.O.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes three studies that examined the economic and environmental impact on the power industry of (1) limiting thermal mixing zones to 1,000 feet, and (2) eliminating the Clean Water Act (CWA) {section}316(1) variance. Both of these proposed changes were included in S. 1081, a 1991 Senate bill to reauthorize the CWA. The bill would not have provided for grandfathering plants already using the variance or mixing zones larger than 1000 feet. Each of the two changes to the existing thermal discharge requirements were independently evaluated. Power companies were asked what they would do if these two changes were imposed. Most plants affected by the proposed changes would retrofit cooling towers and some would retrofit diffusers. Assuming that all affected plants would proportionally follow the same options as the surveyed plants, the estimated capital cost of retrofitting cooling towers or diffusers at all affected plants ranges from $21.4 to 24.4 billion. Both cooling towers and diffusers exert a 1%-5.8% energy penalty on a plant`s output. Consequently, the power companies must generate additional power if they install those technologies. The estimated cost of the additional power ranges from $10 to 18.4 billion over 20 years. Generation of the extra power would emit over 8 million tons per year of additional carbon dioxide. Operation of the new cooling towers would cause more than 1.5 million gallons per minute of additional evaporation. Neither the restricted mixing zone size nor the elimination of the {section}316(1) variance was adopted into law. More recent proposed changes to the Clean Water Act have not included either of these provisions, but in the future, other Congresses might attempt to reintroduce these types of changes.

  9. Thermal Management Using Carbon Nanotubes - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Management Using Carbon Nanotubes Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Technology Marketing SummaryOptimal thermal management, especially in such cases as microelectronic packaging, requires thermal interface material with high heat carrying capacity. Although individual carbon nanotubes exhibit high thermal conductivity, aggregate forms of nanotubes lose this property due to processing

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vacuum State/Refiner/Location Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Barrels per Operating Idle Operating Idle Downstream Charge Capacity Thermal Cracking Delayed Fluid Coking Visbreaking Other/Gas Calendar Day Stream Day Distillation Coking Oil Table 3. Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2016 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 131,675 0 140,500 0 47,000 32,000 0 0 0

  11. Panel results of the solar thermal program research requirement assessment review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-11-01

    The objectives of the assessment were to identify: research needs by topic and activity, relative priority of research needs, options for performing needed research, potential performers, costs and duration of R and D activities, gaps and duplications within the R and D program, and activities underway that appear to be of low priority. To achieve these objectives, research programs of the Division of Solar Thermal Technologies within the Office of Renewable Energy and Conservation and the Materials and Advanced Energy Programs of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences were reviewed. Several recent assessments of solar thermal research needs made within the past two years by various groups were also reviewed, and the key research issues and needs were extracted. The primary results from the assessment are a set of prioritized activities to meet the most important research needs for solar thermal technologies. These activities belong to four disciplines: materials science, thermal science, thermochemistry, and engineering. Further, priorities associated with the needs for research result from the various activities allow the recommended activities to be grouped into two categories; a core group which should be at the heart of any future program developed by the department, and a set of important needs that should, at least, find their way into a program at some time during its existence. The recommended research program is outlined, and the complete set of ranked research needs is listed.

  12. Economic and environmental impacts of proposed changes to Clean Water Act thermal discharge requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper examines the economic and environmental impact to the power industry of limiting thermal mixing zones to 1000 feet and eliminating the Clean Water Act {section}316(a) variance. Power companies were asked what they would do if these two conditions were imposed. Most affected plants would retrofit cooling towers and some would retrofit diffusers. Assuming that all affected plants would proportionally follow the same options as the surveyed plants, the estimated capital cost of retrofitting cooling towers or diffusers at all affected plants exceeds $20 billion. Since both cooling towers and diffusers exert an energy penalty on a plant`s output, the power companies must generate additional power. The estimated cost of the additional power exceeds $10 billion over 20 years. Generation of the extra power would emit over 8 million tons per year of additional carbon dioxide. Operation of the new cooling towers would cause more than 1.5 million gallons per minute of additional evaporation.

  13. Interface requirements to couple thermal-hydraulic codes to severe accident codes: ATHLET-CD

    SciTech Connect

    Trambauer, K.

    1997-07-01

    The system code ATHLET-CD is being developed by GRS in cooperation with IKE and IPSN. Its field of application comprises the whole spectrum of leaks and large breaks, as well as operational and abnormal transients for LWRs and VVERs. At present the analyses cover the in-vessel thermal-hydraulics, the early phases of core degradation, as well as fission products and aerosol release from the core and their transport in the Reactor Coolant System. The aim of the code development is to extend the simulation of core degradation up to failure of the reactor pressure vessel and to cover all physically reasonable accident sequences for western and eastern LWRs including RMBKs. The ATHLET-CD structure is highly modular in order to include a manifold spectrum of models and to offer an optimum basis for further development. The code consists of four general modules to describe the reactor coolant system thermal-hydraulics, the core degradation, the fission product core release, and fission product and aerosol transport. Each general module consists of some basic modules which correspond to the process to be simulated or to its specific purpose. Besides the code structure based on the physical modelling, the code follows four strictly separated steps during the course of a calculation: (1) input of structure, geometrical data, initial and boundary condition, (2) initialization of derived quantities, (3) steady state calculation or input of restart data, and (4) transient calculation. In this paper, the transient solution method is briefly presented and the coupling methods are discussed. Three aspects have to be considered for the coupling of different modules in one code system. First is the conservation of masses and energy in the different subsystems as there are fluid, structures, and fission products and aerosols. Second is the convergence of the numerical solution and stability of the calculation. The third aspect is related to the code performance, and running time.

  14. Format requirements of thermal neutron scattering data in a nuclear data format to succeed the ENDF format

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    2014-03-31

    In November 2012, the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup 38 (WPEC-SG38) began with the task of developing a nuclear data format and supporting infrastructure to replace the now nearly 50 year old ENDF format. The first step in this process is to develop requirements for the new format and infrastructure. In this talk, I will review the status of ENDF's Thermal Scattering Law (TSL) formats as well as support for this data in the GND format (from which the new format is expected to evolve). Finally, I hope to begin a dialog with members of the thermal neutron scattering community so that their data needs can be accurately and easily accommodated by the new format and tools, as captured by the requirements document. During this discussion, we must keep in mind that the new tools and format must; Support what is in existing data files; Support new things we want to put in data files; and Be flexible enough for us to adapt it to future unanticipated challenges.

  15. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  16. In-country and lending institution environmental requirements for thermal power plants in the Philippines and India

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, A.T.; Khanna, R.

    1996-11-01

    Diverse environmental reviews and approvals are required by both Government and non-government organizations (NGOs) for licensing or permitting of major thermal power plants in Asia; specifically, India and Philippines. The number and type of approvals required for a specific project vary depending on site characteristics, fuel source, project-specific design and operating parameters as well as type of project financing. A model 400 MW coal-fired project located in Asia is presented to illustrate the various lender and host country environmental guidelines. A case study of the environmental reviews and approvals for Ogden Quezon Power, Inc. Project (Quezon Province, Republic of the Philippines) is also included. A list of acronyms is provided at the paper`s end. As independent power project (IPP) developers seek financing for these capital-intensive infrastructure projects, a number of international finance/lending institutions are likely to become involved. Each lender considers different environmental aspects of a project. This paper compares relevant environmental requirements of various lenders which finance IPPs and their interest in a project`s environmental review. Finally, the authors of this paper believe that the environmental review process can bring together many parties involved with IPP development, including local and central governments, non government organizations, various lenders (such as multilateral and export credit agencies) as well as project proponents. Environmental review provides input opportunity for interested and affected parties. Airing environmental issues in open forums such as public hearings or meetings helps ensure projects are not evaluated without public input.

  17. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense statistics for...

  18. CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-11-30

    The CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer is a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application that determines the most economic amount of capacity of distributed generation and thermal utilization equipment (e.g., absorption chillers) to install for any user-defined set of load and cost data. Installing the optimum amount of capacity is critical to the life-cycle economic viability of a distributed generation/cooling heat and power (CHP) application. Using advanced optimization algorithms, the software accesses the loads, utility tariffs, equipment costs,more » etc., and provides to the user the most economic amount of system capacity to install.« less

  19. CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer Software

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-30

    The CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer is a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application that determines the most economic amount of capacity of distributed generation and thermal utilization equipment (e.g., absorption chillers) to install for any user-defined set of load and cost data. Installing the optimum amount of capacity is critical to the life-cycle economic viability of a distributed generation/cooling heat and power (CHP) application. Using advanced optimization algorithms, the software accesses the loads, utility tariffs, equipment costs, etc., and provides to the user the most economic amount of system capacity to install.

  20. EIS-0171: Pacificorp Capacity Sale

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) EIS assesses the proposed action of providing surplus power from its facilites to PacifiCorp in response to its request for a continued supply of firm capacity. BPA has surplus electrical capacity (peakload energy) that BPA projects will not be required to meet its existing obligations.

  1. Determining Optimal Equipment Capacities in Cooling, Heating and Power (CHP) Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DeVault, Robert C; Hudson II, Carl Randy

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of potential cooling, heating and power (CHP) applications requires an assessment of the operations and economics of a particular system in meeting the electric and thermal demands of a specific end-use facility. A key determinate in whether a candidate system will be economic is the proper selection of equipment capacities. A methodology to determine the optimal capacities for CHP prime movers and absorption chillers using nonlinear optimization algorithms has been coded into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tool that performs the capacity optimization and operations simulation. This paper presents details on the use and results of this publicly available tool.

  2. Coupled optical/thermal/fluid analysis and design requirements for operation and testing of a supercritical CO2 solar receiver.

    SciTech Connect

    Khivsara, Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have evaluated closed-loop supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) Brayton cycles to be a higher energy-density system in comparison to conventional superheated steam Rankine systems. At turbine inlet conditions of 923K and 25 MPa, high thermal efficiency (~50%) can be achieved. Achieving these high efficiencies will make concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies a competitive alternative to current power generation methods. To incorporate a s-CO2 Brayton power cycle in a solar power tower system, the development of a solar receiver capable of providing an outlet temperature of 923 K (at 25 MPa) is necessary. To satisfy the temperature requirements of a s-CO2 Brayton cycle with recuperation and recompression, it is required to heat s-CO2 by a temperature of ~200 K as it passes through the solar receiver. Our objective was to develop an optical-thermal-fluid model to design and evaluate a tubular receiver that will receive a heat input ~1 MWth from a heliostat field. We also undertook the documentation of design requirements for the development, testing and safe operation of a direct s-CO2 solar receiver. The main purpose of this document is to serve as a reference and guideline for design and testing requirements, as well as to address the technical challenges and provide initial parameters for the computational models that will be employed for the development of s-CO2 receivers.

  3. Parametric study of a silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycle -- The influence of thermal capacitance and heat exchanger UA-values on cooling capacity, power density, and COP

    SciTech Connect

    Boelman, E.C.; Saha, B.B.; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    The influence of heat exchanger UA-values (adsorber/desorber, evaporator, and condenser) is investigated for an adsorption chiller, with consideration given to the thermal capacitance of the adsorber/desorber by means of a lumped-parameter cycle simulation model developed by the authors and co-workers for the single-stage silica gel-water adsorption chiller. The closed-cycle-type chiller, for use in air conditioning, is driven by low-grade waste heat (85 C [185 F]) and cooled by water at 31 C (88 F) and operates on relatively short cycle times (420 seconds adsorption/desorption; 30 second adsorber/desorber sensible cooling and heating). The results showed cycle performance to be considerably affected by the thermal capacitance and UA-value of the adsorber/desorber, which is attributed to the severe sensible cooling/heating requirements resulting from batched cycle operation. The model is also sensitive to the evaporator UA-value--but to a lesser extent. The condenser UA-value is the least sensitive parameter due to the working pair adsorption behavior in the temperature range defined for desorption and condensation.

  4. ,"U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)","U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)","U.S. Refinery Thermal ...

  5. FAQs about Storage Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook

    about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or ... Do I have to report storage capacity every month? No, only report storage capacity with ...

  6. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Madaeni, S. H.; Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2011-06-01

    This study estimates the capacity value of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant at a variety of locations within the western United States. This is done by optimizing the operation of the CSP plant and by using the effective load carrying capability (ELCC) metric, which is a standard reliability-based capacity value estimation technique. Although the ELCC metric is the most accurate estimation technique, we show that a simpler capacity-factor-based approximation method can closely estimate the ELCC value. Without storage, the capacity value of CSP plants varies widely depending on the year and solar multiple. The average capacity value of plants evaluated ranged from 45%?90% with a solar multiple range of 1.0-1.5. When introducing thermal energy storage (TES), the capacity value of the CSP plant is more difficult to estimate since one must account for energy in storage. We apply a capacity-factor-based technique under two different market settings: an energy-only market and an energy and capacity market. Our results show that adding TES to a CSP plant can increase its capacity value significantly at all of the locations. Adding a single hour of TES significantly increases the capacity value above the no-TES case, and with four hours of storage or more, the average capacity value at all locations exceeds 90%.

  7. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Heat Transfer Fluid Requirements and Characteristics for Coupling A Hydrogen Production Plant to a High-Temperature Nuclear Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis; C. H. Oh; R. B. Barner; D. F. Wilson

    2005-06-01

    The Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the hightemperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant, may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. Seven possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermalhydraulic and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermalhydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The

  8. Tanker navigation safety standards: 20 year tanker size/capacity trend analysis. A study required by section 4111(b)(11) of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    A study was performed to evaluate the size, cargo capacity, and flag nation of tankers transporting oil or hazardous substances on the navigable waters and the waters of the Exclusive Economic Zone by: (1) identifying changes occurring in such size and cargo capacity and in vessel navigation and technology over the 20 year period from 1970 to 1990; and (2) evaluating the extent to which the risks or difficulties associated with tanker navigation, vessel traffic control, accidents, oil spills, and the containment and cleanup of such spills are influenced by or related to an increase in the tanker size and cargo capacity.

  9. Refinery Capacity Report

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries by PAD District as of January 1, 2006 PDF 9 Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries by PAD District as of January 1, 2006 PDF 10...

  10. The NASA CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.; Dudenhoefer, J.; Juhasz, A.; Schwarze, G.; Patterson, R.; Ferguson, D.; Titran, R.; Schmitz, P.; Vandersande, J.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop technology for military and civil applications. Starting in 1986, NASA has funded a technology program to maintain the momentum of promising aerospace technology advancement started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the changes for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for a wide range of future space applications. The elements of the CSTI High Capacity Power Project include Systems Analysis, Stirling Power Conversion, Thermoelectric Power Conversion, Thermal Management, Power Management, Systems Diagnostics, Environmental Interactions, and Material/Structural Development. Technology advancement in all elements is required to provide the growth capability, high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall project with develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems compatible with the SP-100 reactor which facilitates operation during lunar and planetary day/night cycles as well as allowing spacecraft operation at any attitude or distance from the sun. Significant accomplishments in all of the project elements will be presented, along with revised goals and project timelines recently developed.

  11. WINDExchange: Potential Wind Capacity

    WindExchange

    Potential Wind Capacity Potential wind capacity maps are provided for a 2014 industry standard wind turbine installed on a 110-m tower, which represents plausible current technology options, and a wind turbine on a 140-m tower, which represents near-future technology options. For more detailed information regarding the assumptions and calculations behind the wind potential capacity maps, see the Energy Department's Enabling Wind Power Nationwide report. Enlarge image This map shows the wind

  12. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Capacity Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working...

  13. Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of ...

  14. Variable capacity gasification burner

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, D.I.

    1985-03-05

    A variable capacity burner that may be used in gasification processes, the burner being adjustable when operating in its intended operating environment to operate at two different flow capacities, with the adjustable parts being dynamically sealed within a statically sealed structural arrangement to prevent dangerous blow-outs of the reactants to the atmosphere.

  15. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  16. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Babac, Gulru; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a Knudsen heat capacity as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  17. High current capacity electrical connector

    DOEpatents

    Bettis, Edward S.; Watts, Harry L.

    1976-01-13

    An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table 6. Operable Crude Oil and Downstream Charge Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1987 to (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) January 1, 2016 JAN 1, ...

  19. Refinery Capacity Report

    Reports and Publications

    2016-01-01

    Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions. The Refinery Capacity Report does not contain working and shell storage capacity data. This data is now being collected twice a year as of March 31 and September 30 on the Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report", and is now released as a separate report Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity.

  20. Forward capacity market CONEfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, James F.

    2010-11-15

    In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

  1. Value of solar thermal industrial process heat

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.R.; Fassbender, L.L.; Chockie, A.D.

    1986-03-01

    This study estimated the value of solar thermal-generated industrial process heat (IPH) as a function of process heat temperature. The value of solar thermal energy is equal to the cost of producing energy from conventional fuels and equipment if the energy produced from either source provides an equal level of service. This requirement put the focus of this study on defining and characterizing conventional process heat equipment and fuels. Costs (values) were estimated for 17 different design points representing different combinations of conventional technologies, temperatures, and fuels. Costs were first estimated for median or representative conditions at each design point. The cost impact of capacity factor, efficiency, fuel escalation rate, and regional fuel price differences were then evaluated by varying each of these factors within credible ranges.

  2. Determining the Capacity Value of Wind: An Updated Survey of Methods and Implementation; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Porter, K.

    2008-06-01

    This paper summarizes state and regional studies examining the capacity value of wind energy, how different regions define and implement capacity reserve requirements, and how wind energy is defined as a capacity resource in those regions.

  3. Chaninik Wind Group: Harnessing Wind, Building Capacity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chaninik Wind Group: Harnessing Wind, Building Capacity Installation of Village Energy Information System Smart Grid Controller, Thermal Stoves and Meters to Enhance the Efficiency of Wind- Diesel Hybrid Power Generation in Tribal Regions of Alaska Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review November 16-20, 2009 The Chananik Wind Group Our goal is to become the "heartbeat of our region." Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review November 16-20, 2009 Department of Energy

  4. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  5. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  6. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  7. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    District and State Production Capacity Alkylates Aromatics Asphalt and Road Oil Isomers Lubricants Marketable Petroleum Coke Sulfur (short tons/day) Hydrogen (MMcfd) Table 2. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2016 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a 83,429 10,111 26,500 92,765 21,045 21,120 69 1,159 PAD District I Delaware 11,729 5,191 0 6,000 0 13,620 40 596 New Jersey 29,200 0 70,000 4,000 12,000 7,500 26 280 Pennsylvania

  8. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alkylates Aromatics Road Oil and Lubricants Petroleum Coke (MMcfd) Hydrogen Sulfur (short tons/day) Production Capacity Asphalt Isomers Marketable Table 7. Operable Production Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1987 to January 1, 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a JAN 1, 1987 974 287 788 326 250 364 2,569 23,806 JAN 1, 1988 993 289 788 465 232 368 2,418 27,639 JAN 1, 1989 1,015 290 823 469 230 333 2,501 28,369 JAN 1, 1990 1,030 290 844 456 232 341 2,607 24,202

  9. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

  10. An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    California Independent System Operator (CAISO) Scenarios Scenario Region Incremental Capacity (MW) Biomass Biogas Geo- thermal Small Hydro Solar Photovoltaics (PV) Distributed ...

  11. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enclosed modes have less capacity to dissipate heat than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain. Thermal analysis has identified important ...

  12. Working Gas Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 2015 Working Gas Capacity (billion cubic feet) ≥ 100 75 to 99 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Figure 15. Locations of existing natural gas underground storage fields in the United States, 2015 50 to 74 Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-191, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." Reservoir Type Sites = Depleted Field 329 = Salt Cav

  13. An assessment of the effect on Olkiluoto repository capacity achievable with advanced fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Juutilainen, P.; Viitanen, T.

    2013-07-01

    Previously a few scenarios have been simulated for transition from thermal to fast reactor fleet in Finland in order to determine how much the transuranic inventory could be reduced with the partitioning and transmutation (P-T) technologies. Those calculations, performed with COSI6 code developed by CEA, are extended in the present study, in which the effect of P-T on the capacity of the planned final disposal repository at Olkiluoto (Finland) is evaluated by taking into account the created fission products and transuranic residuals from the reprocessing operations. The decay heat is assumed to be the most restrictive factor in defining the waste disposal packing density. The repository capacity evaluation of this study is based on the comparison of the decay heats produced by the deposited waste in various scenarios. The reference scenario of this article involves only Light Water Reactors (LWR) in an open fuel cycle. The capacity requirement of the geological repository is estimated in a few closed fuel cycle scenarios, all including actinide transmutation with Fast Reactors (FR). The comparison between the P-T scenarios and reference is based on the decay heat production of the deposited waste. The COSI6 code is used for simulations to provide the repository decay heat curves. Applying the closed fuel cycle would change the disposal concept and schedule, because of which it is not quite straightforward to assess the impact of P-T on the capacity. However, it can be concluded that recycling the transuranic nuclides probably decreases the required volume for the disposal, but thermal dimensioning analysis is needed for more specific conclusions.

  14. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd) New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 12. Refinery Sales During 2015 CHS Inc./CHS McPherson Refinery Inc. CHS Inc./NCRA 9/15 McPherson, KS 86,000 PBF Energy Co LLC/Chalmette Refining LLC Chalmette Refining LLC 11/15 Chalmette, LA 192,500 bbl/cd= Barrels per calendar day Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report" and Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery

  15. Refinery Capacity Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics Isobutane Lubricants Isomers Isopentane and Isohexane Asphalt and Road Oil Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen (MMcfd) Sulfur (short tons per day) Table 4. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2016 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) Isooctane a ..................................................................... Alabama 0 0 15,000 1,150 4,200 0 7,120 40 228 0 Hunt Refining Co 0 0 15,000 0 4,200 0 7,120

  16. Thermal-sprayed, thin-film pyrite cathodes for thermal batteries -- Discharge-rate and temperature studies in single cells

    SciTech Connect

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; DAI,JINXIANG; XIAO,T. DANNY; REISNER,DAVID

    2000-05-25

    Using an optimized thermal-spray process, coherent, dense deposits of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) with good adhesion were formed on 304 stainless steel substrates (current collectors). After leaching with CS{sub 2} to remove residual free sulfur, these served as cathodes in Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells. The cells were tested over a temperature range of 450 C to 550 C under baseline loads of 125 and 250 mA/cm{sup 2}, to simulate conditions found in a thermal battery. Cells built with such cathodes outperformed standard cells made with pressed-powder parts. They showed lower interracial resistance and polarization throughout discharge, with higher capacities per mass of pyrite. Post-treatment of the cathodes with Li{sub 2}O coatings at levels of >7% by weight of the pyrite was found to eliminate the voltage transient normally observed for these materials. Results equivalent to those of standard lithiated catholytes were obtained in this manner. The use of plasma-sprayed cathodes allows the use of much thinner cells for thermal batteries since only enough material needs to be deposited as the capacity requirements of a given application demand.

  17. Water holding capacities of fly ashes: Effect of size fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, A.; Rano, R.

    2007-07-01

    Water holding capacities of fly ashes from different thermal power plants in Eastern India have been compared. Moreover, the effect of size fractionation (sieving) on the water holding capacities has also been determined. The desorption rate of water held by the fly ash fractions at ambient temperature (25-30{sup o}C) has been investigated. The effect of mixing various size fractions of fly ash in increasing the water holding capacities of fly ash has been studied. It is observed that the fly ash obtained from a thermal power plant working on stoker-fired combustor has the highest water holding capacity, followed by the one that works on pulverized fuel combustor. Fly ash collected from super thermal power plant has the least water holding capacity (40.7%). The coarser size fractions of fly ashes in general have higher water holding capacities than the finer ones. An attempt has been made to correlate the results obtained, with the potential use in agriculture.

  18. Thermal Sciences

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Sciences NETL's Thermal Sciences competency provides the scientific, engineering, and technology development community with innovative and efficient approaches to measure, harness, and convert thermal energy. Research includes sensors, advanced energy concepts, and thermodynamic optimization, specifically: Sensors and Diagnostics Advanced sensor and diagnostic technology to develop and evaluate advanced methods for non-intrusive measurement and measurement in extreme environments.

  19. NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Thermal Management

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Management Infrared image of rectangular battery cell. Infrared thermal image of a lithium-ion battery cell with poor terminal design. Graph of relative capacity (ranging from .75 to 1) of battery in percent over time (ranging from 0 to 15 years) for three different climates (represented by Minneapolis, Houston and Phoenix) compared to a range of temperatures in 5-degree Celsius increments over 15 years. Trend lines from upper left to lower right reflect diminished capacity over time and

  20. Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    D. Y. Goswami

    2012-09-04

    The objective of this project is to research and develop a thermal energy storage system (operating range 3000C ???¢???????? 450 0C ) based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale base-load concentrated solar power plant requirements at much lower system costs compared to the existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The major focus of this program is to develop suitable encapsulation methods for existing low-cost phase change materials that would provide a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage to be integrated in solar thermal power plants. This project proposes a TES system concept that will allow for an increase of the capacity factor of the present CSP technologies to 75% or greater and reduce the cost to less than $20/kWht.

  1. Electricity storage using a thermal storage scheme

    SciTech Connect

    White, Alexander

    2015-01-22

    The increasing use of renewable energy technologies for electricity generation, many of which have an unpredictably intermittent nature, will inevitably lead to a greater demand for large-scale electricity storage schemes. For example, the expanding fraction of electricity produced by wind turbines will require either backup or storage capacity to cover extended periods of wind lull. This paper describes a recently proposed storage scheme, referred to here as Pumped Thermal Storage (PTS), and which is based on “sensible heat” storage in large thermal reservoirs. During the charging phase, the system effectively operates as a high temperature-ratio heat pump, extracting heat from a cold reservoir and delivering heat to a hot one. In the discharge phase the processes are reversed and it operates as a heat engine. The round-trip efficiency is limited only by process irreversibilities (as opposed to Second Law limitations on the coefficient of performance and the thermal efficiency of the heat pump and heat engine respectively). PTS is currently being developed in both France and England. In both cases, the schemes operate on the Joule-Brayton (gas turbine) cycle, using argon as the working fluid. However, the French scheme proposes the use of turbomachinery for compression and expansion, whereas for that being developed in England reciprocating devices are proposed. The current paper focuses on the impact of the various process irreversibilities on the thermodynamic round-trip efficiency of the scheme. Consideration is given to compression and expansion losses and pressure losses (in pipe-work, valves and thermal reservoirs); heat transfer related irreversibility in the thermal reservoirs is discussed but not included in the analysis. Results are presented demonstrating how the various loss parameters and operating conditions influence the overall performance.

  2. Extension - Upgrading Methane Using Ultra-Fast Thermal Swing Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2008-08-11

    The need for cost effective technologies for upgrading coal mine methane to pipeline quality natural gas is becoming ever greater. The current work presents and investigates a new approach to reduce the impact of the most costly step in the conventional technology, nitrogen rejection. The proposed approach is based on the Velocys microchannel platform, which is being developed to commercialize compact and cost efficient chemical processing technology. For this separation, ultra fast thermal swing sorption is enabled by the very high rates of heat and mass transfer inherent in microchannel processing. In a first phase of the project solid adsorbents were explored. Feasibility of ultrafast thermal swing was demonstrated but the available adsorbents had insufficient differential methane capacity to achieve the required commercial economics. In a second phase, ionic liquids were adopted as absorbents of choice, and experimental work and economic analyses, performed to gauge their potential, showed promise for this novel alternative. Final conclusions suggest that a combination of a required cost target for ionic liquids or a methane capacity increase or a combination of both is required for commercialization.

  3. An Analysis of Plug Load Capacities and Power Requirements in...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... References ASHRAE. 2005. 2005 ASHRAE Handbook-Fundamentals, Chapter 18. ASHRAE. 2009. 2009 ASHRAE Handbook-Fundamentals, Chapter 18. CBEA (Commercial Buildings Energy Alliance). ...

  4. High capacity oil burner

    SciTech Connect

    Pedrosa, O.A. Jr.; Couto, N.C.; Fanqueiro, R.C.C.

    1983-11-01

    The present invention relates to a high capacity oil burner comprising a cylindrical atomizer completely surrounded by a protective cylindrical housing having a diameter from 2 to 3 times greater than the diameter of said atomizer; liquid fuels being injected under pressure into said atomizer and accumulating within said atomizer in a chamber for the accumulation of liquid fuels, and compressed air being injected into a chamber for the accumulation of air; cylindrical holes communicating said chamber for the accumulation of liquid fuels with the outside and cylindrical holes communicating said chamber for the accumulation of air with said cylindrical holes communicating the chamber for the accumulation of liquids with the outside so that the injection of compressed air into said liquid fuel discharge holes atomizes said fuel which is expelled to the outside through the end portions of said discharge holes which are circumferentially positioned to be burnt by a pilot flame; said protecting cylindrical housing having at its ends perforated circular rings into which water is injected under pressure to form a protecting fan-like water curtain at the rear end of the housing and a fan-like water curtain at the flame to reduce the formation of soot; the burning efficiency of said burner being superior to 30 barrels of liquid fuel per day/kg of the apparatus.

  5. Adaptive capacity and its assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, Nathan L.

    2011-04-20

    This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

  6. Property:USGSMeanCapacity | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    USGSMeanCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name USGSMeanCapacity Property Type String Description Mean capacity potential at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal...

  7. Analysis of Off-Board Powered Thermal Preconditioning in Electric Drive Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, R. A.; Brooker, A. D.; Ramroth, L.; Rugh , J.; Smith, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    Following a hot or cold thermal soak, vehicle climate control systems (air conditioning or heat) are required to quickly attain a cabin temperature comfortable to the vehicle occupants. In a plug-in hybrid electric or electric vehicle (PEV) equipped with electric climate control systems, the traction battery is the sole on-board power source. Depleting the battery for immediate climate control results in reduced charge-depleting (CD) range and additional battery wear. PEV cabin and battery thermal preconditioning using off-board power supplied by the grid or a building can mitigate the impacts of climate control. This analysis shows that climate control loads can reduce CD range up to 35%. However, cabin thermal preconditioning can increase CD range up to 19% when compared to no thermal preconditioning. In addition, this analysis shows that while battery capacity loss over time is driven by ambient temperature rather than climate control loads, concurrent battery thermal preconditioning can reduce capacity loss up to 7% by reducing pack temperature in a high ambient temperature scenario.

  8. DE-SOL-0008449 REPORTING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    System shall have the capacity to contain all documents, including task orders, proposals, reporting requirements and other documents related to taskdelivery orders awarded under ...

  9. Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Hydrotreating NaphthaReformer Feed Charge Cap (BSD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Hydrotreating...

  10. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  11. Residential solar-absorption chiller thermal dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, J.M.; Wood, B.D.; McNeill, B.W.

    1981-03-01

    Research is reported on the transient performance of a commercial residential 3 ton lithium bromide-water absorption chiller designed for solar firing. Emphasis was placed on separating the chiller response from that of the entire test facility so that its transient response could solely be observed and quantified. It was found that the entire system time response and thermal capacitance has a major impact on performance degradation due to transient operation. Tests run to ascertain computer algorithms which simulate system isolated chiller performance, revealed processes hitherto undocumented. Transient operation is simulated by three distinct algorithms associated with the three phases of chiller operation. The first phase is start up time. It was revealed during testing that the time required to reach steady state performance values, when the chiller was turned on, was a linear function of steady state water supply temperatures. The second phase is quasi steady state performance. Test facility's performance compared favorably with the manufacturer's published data. The third phase is the extra capacity produced during spin down. Spin down occurs when the hot water supply pump is turned off while the other system pumps remain operating for a few minutes, thus allowing extra chiller capacity to be realized. The computer algorithms were used to generate plots which show the operational surface of an isolated absorption chiller subjected to off design and transient operation.

  12. Reductive Capacity Measurement of Waste Forms for Secondary Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jungseok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-09-28

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  13. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  14. Stand Alone Battery Thermal Management System

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Brad

    2015-09-30

    The objective of this project is research, development and demonstration of innovative thermal management concepts that reduce the cell or battery weight, complexity (component count) and/or cost by at least 20%. The project addresses two issues that are common problems with current state of the art lithium ion battery packs used in vehicles; low power at cold temperatures and reduced battery life when exposed to high temperatures. Typically, battery packs are “oversized” to satisfy the two issues mentioned above. The first phase of the project was spent making a battery pack simulation model using AMEsim software. The battery pack used as a benchmark was from the Fiat 500EV. FCA and NREL provided vehicle data and cell data that allowed an accurate model to be created that matched the electrical and thermal characteristics of the actual battery pack. The second phase involved using the battery model from the first phase and evaluate different thermal management concepts. In the end, a gas injection heat pump system was chosen as the dedicated thermal system to both heat and cool the battery pack. Based on the simulation model. The heat pump system could use 50% less energy to heat the battery pack in -20°C ambient conditions, and by keeping the battery cooler at hot climates, the battery pack size could be reduced by 5% and still meet the warranty requirements. During the final phase, the actual battery pack and heat pump system were installed in a test bench at DENSO to validate the simulation results. Also during this phase, the system was moved to NREL where testing was also done to validate the results. In conclusion, the heat pump system can improve “fuel economy” (for electric vehicle) by 12% average in cold climates. Also, the battery pack size, or capacity, could be reduced 5%, or if pack size is kept constant, the pack life could be increased by two years. Finally, the total battery pack and thermal system cost could be reduced 5% only if the

  15. Mercury reduction studies to facilitate the thermal decontamination of phosphor powder residues from spent fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alves Durao, Walter; Andreva de Castro, Camila; Carvalhinho Windmoeller, Claudia

    2008-11-15

    This work investigates the thermal release of mercury from phosphor powder of spent fluorescent lamps. The treatment conditions and the ability of various reducing agents (primarily sodium borohydride) to lower the overall heating temperature required to improve the release of Hg have been evaluated. Hg species in samples were monitored in a thermal desorption atomic absorption spectrometer system, and total mercury was analyzed in a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometer. Sodium borohydride was the best reducing agent among the ones studied. However, citric acid presented a high capacity to weaken mercury bonds with the matrix. When the sample was crushed with sodium borohydride for 40 min in a mass ratio of 10:1 (sample:reducing agent) and submitted to thermal treatment at 300 deg. C for 2 h, the concentration of mercury in a phosphor powder sample with 103 mg kg{sup -1} of mercury reached 6.6 mg kg{sup -1}.

  16. NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, M.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation describes NREL's Battery Thermal Test Facility and identifies test requirements and equipment and planned upgrades to the facility.

  17. Intracavity adaptive correction of a 10 kW, solid-state, heat-capacity laser.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Johansson, E M; Dane, C B; Fochs, S N; Brase, J M

    2004-01-12

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL), under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large aperture (100 cm{sup 2}), confocal, unstable resonator requiring near-diffraction-limited beam quality. There are two primary sources of the aberrations in the system: residual, static aberrations from the fabrication of the optical components and predictable, time-dependent, thermally-induced index gradients within the gain medium. A deformable mirror placed within the cavity is used to correct the aberrations that are sensed externally with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. Although it is more challenging than external correction, intracavity correction enables control of the mode growth within the resonator, resulting in the ability to correct a more aberrated system longer. The overall system design, measurement techniques and correction algorithms are discussed. Experimental results from initial correction of the static aberrations and dynamic correction of the time-dependent aberrations are presented.

  18. COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Prepared by Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy MAR 06 MARCH 2006 Since 1999, the Department of Energy has worked with the National Urban Internet and others to create community capacity through technology.  Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Table of Contents Message from the Environmental Justice Program Manager . . . . . . . . 3

  19. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 1, Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public.

  20. Draft environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

  1. Thermal Transistor for Energy Smart Buildings

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Transistor for Energy Smart Buildings Thermal Transistor for Energy Smart Buildings Assumptions & Limitations: * Current LANL prototype: ~50 cm 2 active area. Assume it can be scaled to sq.ft size relevant for applications * Switching requires ~200 Volts but only draws a few µA. The associated drive electronics comprises only off-the- shelf components. Thermally adaptive devices and systems may be a game changer in energy efficiency, buildings and beyond: * Thermally agile walls can

  2. Thermal battery

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.T.; Winchester, C.S.; Jolson, J.D.

    1989-06-20

    A thermal battery is described comprising at least one electrochemical cell comprising an anode of alkali metal, alkaline earth metal or alloys thereof, a fusible salt electrolyte, a fluorocarbon polymer or fluorochlorocarbon polymer depolarizer, and means for heating the cell to melt the electrolyte.

  3. What can recycling in thermal reactors accomplish?

    SciTech Connect

    Piet, Steven J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2007-07-01

    Thermal recycle provides several potential benefits when used as stop-gap, mixed, or backup recycling to recycling in fast reactors. These three roles involve a mixture of thermal and fast recycling; fast reactors are required to some degree at some time. Stop-gap uses thermal reactors only until fast reactors are adequately deployed and until any thermal-recycle-only facilities have met their economic lifetime. Mixed uses thermal and fast reactors symbiotically for an extended period of time. Backup uses thermal reactors only if problems later develop in the fast reactor portion of a recycling system. Thermal recycle can also provide benefits when used as pure thermal recycling, with no intention to use fast reactors. However, long term, the pure thermal recycling approach is inadequate to meet several objectives. (authors)

  4. Thermal battery for portable climate control

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S; Li, XS; Yang, S; Kim, H; Umans, A; McKay, IS; Wang, EN

    2015-07-01

    Current technologies that provide climate control in the transportation sector are quite inefficient. In gasoline-powered vehicles, the use of air-conditioning is known to result in higher emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants apart from decreasing the gas-mileage. On the other hand, for electric vehicles (EVs), a drain in the onboard electric battery due to the operation of heating and cooling system results in a substantial decrease in the driving range. As an alternative to the conventional climate control system, we are developing an adsorption-based thermal battery (ATB), which is capable of storing thermal energy, and delivering both heating and cooling on demand, while requiring minimal electric power supply. Analogous to an electrical battery, the ATB can be charged for reuse. Furthermore, it promises to be compact, lightweight, and deliver high performance, which is desirable for mobile applications. In this study, we describe the design and operation of the ATB-based climate control system. We present a general theoretical framework to determine the maximum achievable heating and cooling performance using the ATB. The framework is then applied to study the feasibility of ATB integration in EVs, wherein we analyze the use of NaX zeolite-water as the adsorbent-refrigerant pair. In order to deliver the necessary heating and cooling performance, exceeding 2.5 kW h thermal capacity for EVs, the analysis determines the optimal design and operating conditions. While the use of the ATB in EVs can potentially enhance its driving range, it can also be used for climate control in conventional gasoline vehicles, as well as residential and commercial buildings as a more efficient and environmentally-friendly alternative. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spray dryer capacity stretched 50%

    SciTech Connect

    Paraskevas, J.

    1983-01-01

    This article describes plant equipment modifications which has resulted in a 50% increase in spray drying capacity. The installation of a new atomizer and screening system in NL Chemicals' Newberry Springs plant which produces natural clays for use as rheological additives in industrial coatings, cosmetics and other products, resulted in a 50% increase in spray drying capacity. Energy consumption per pound of product was reduced by 7%, and product quality improved. This was achieved in less than three months at an investment of less than 10% of what an additional spray dryer would have cost.

  6. Reporting Requirements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reporting Requirements Reporting Requirements Contacts Director Albert Migliori Deputy Franz Freibert 505 667-6879 Email Professional Staff Assistant Susan Ramsay 505 665 0858...

  7. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ... 11:44:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...

  8. Optimizing areal capacities through understanding the limitations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Optimizing areal capacities through understanding the limitations of lithium-ion electrodes Increasing the areal capacity or electrode thickness in lithium ion batteries is ...

  9. Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Name Worldwide...

  10. Property:Capacity | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Capacity Property Type Quantity Description Potential electric energy generation, default units of megawatts. Use this property...

  11. Investigation of Morphology and Hydrogen Adsorption Capacity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Morphology and Hydrogen Adsorption Capacity of Disordered Carbons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Investigation of Morphology and Hydrogen Adsorption Capacity of ...

  12. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ... 7:00:58 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...

  13. Programmatic status of NASA`s CSTI high capacity power Stirling Space Power Converter Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    An overview is presented of the NASA Lewis Research Center Free-Piston Stirling Space Power Converter Technology Development Program. This work is being conducted under NASA`s Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The goal of the CSTI High Capacity Power element is to develop the technology base needed to meet the long duration, high capacity power requirements for future NASA space initiatives. Efforts are focused upon increasing system thermal and electric energy conversion efficiency at least fivefold over current SP-100 technology, and on achieving systems that are compatible with space nuclear reactors. This paper will discuss the status of test activities with the Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Design deficiencies are gradually being corrected and the power converter is now outputting 11.5 kWe at a temperature ratio of 2 (design output is 12.5 kWe). Detail designs have been completed for the 1050 K Component Test Power Converter (CTPC). The success of these and future designs is dependent upon supporting research and technology efforts including heat pipes, gas bearings, superalloy joining technologies and high efficiency alternators. This paper also provides an update of progress in these technologies.

  14. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  15. Capacity Utilization Study for Aviation Security Cargo Inspection Queuing System

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, Glenn O; Olama, Mohammed M; Lake, Joe E; Brumback, Daryl L

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct performance evaluation study for an aviation security cargo inspection queuing system for material flow and accountability. The queuing model employed in our study is based on discrete-event simulation and processes various types of cargo simultaneously. Onsite measurements are collected in an airport facility to validate the queuing model. The overall performance of the aviation security cargo inspection system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, throughput, capacity utilization, subscribed capacity utilization, resources capacity utilization, subscribed resources capacity utilization, and number of cargo pieces (or pallets) in the different queues. These metrics are performance indicators of the system s ability to service current needs and response capacity to additional requests. We studied and analyzed different scenarios by changing various model parameters such as number of pieces per pallet, number of TSA inspectors and ATS personnel, number of forklifts, number of explosives trace detection (ETD) and explosives detection system (EDS) inspection machines, inspection modality distribution, alarm rate, and cargo closeout time. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures should reduce the overall cost and shipping delays associated with new inspection requirements.

  16. Package-interface thermal switch

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, N.L.

    1995-05-24

    The package-interface thermal switch (PITS) is an active temperature control device for modulating the flow of thermal energy from satellite equipment, such as electronic modules or batteries, to the satellite mounting deck which serves as a heat sink. PITS comprises a mounting bolt made of a shaped memory alloy (SMA) actuating bolt and a non-metallic rod with a helical spring surrounding it forming a mounting bolt for a satellite equipment package. At least four mounting bolts are used for installing the equipment package and are preloaded to a predetermined stress representing the desired thermal conductance between the heat sink and the package. The SMA actuating bolt is in thermal contact with the component or package and expands or contracts as the result of changing package temperature and the helical return spring forces against the SMA actuating bolt portion of the PITS, increasing (hot-on`1 condition) or decreasing (cold-off condition) the pressure of the package against the mounting deck. As the PITS changes its total length, the thermal conductance between the two objects is increased or decreased. Thus thermal conductance changes as a direct function of package temperature, resulting in active temperature control. The simple design of the PITS reduces the cost and weight of the thermal control subsystem in satellites and its high reliability eliminates the requirement for thermal design verification testing.

  17. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    DOEpatents

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  18. winter_capacity_2010.xls

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Table 4.B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2010 Actual, 2011-2015 Projected (Megawatts and Percent) Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/2002 2002/2003 2003/2004 2004/2005 2005/2006 2006/2007 2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 2010/ 2011 2011/2012E 2012/2013E 2013/2014E 2014/2015E 2015/2016E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 44,196 44,750 45,350

  19. High capacity immobilized amine sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Soong, Yee; Filburn, Thomas

    2007-10-30

    A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

  20. Animation Requirements

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Animations include dynamic elements such as interactive images and games. For developing animations, follow these design and coding requirements.

  1. Modeling The Potential For Thermal Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Stackhouse, Jr., Paul W.

    2010-10-25

    In this paper we explore the tradeoffs between thermal storage capacity, cost, and other system parameters in order to examine possible evolutionary pathways for thermal Concen-trating Solar Power (CSP) technologies. A representation of CSP performance that is suit-able for incorporation into economic modeling tools is developed. We find that, as the fraction of electricity supplied by CSP technologies grows, the application of thermal CSP technologies might progress from current hybrid plants, to plants with a modest amount of thermal storage, and potentially even to plants with sufficient thermal storage to provide base load generation capacity. The representation of CSP cost and performance developed here was implemented in the ObjECTS MiniCAM long-term integrated assessment model. Datasets for global solar resource characteristics as applied to CSP technology were also developed. The regional and global potential of thermal CSP technologies is examined.

  2. Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster 2007 SOW

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, M

    2007-03-22

    The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program (formerly know as Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, ASCI) has led the world in capability computing for the last ten years. Capability computing is defined as a world-class platform (in the Top10 of the Top500.org list) with scientific simulations running at scale on the platform. Example systems are ASCI Red, Blue-Pacific, Blue-Mountain, White, Q, RedStorm, and Purple. ASC applications have scaled to multiple thousands of CPUs and accomplished a long list of mission milestones on these ASC capability platforms. However, the computing demands of the ASC and Stockpile Stewardship programs also include a vast number of smaller scale runs for day-to-day simulations. Indeed, every 'hero' capability run requires many hundreds to thousands of much smaller runs in preparation and post processing activities. In addition, there are many aspects of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) that can be directly accomplished with these so-called 'capacity' calculations. The need for capacity is now so great within the program that it is increasingly difficult to allocate the computer resources required by the larger capability runs. To rectify the current 'capacity' computing resource shortfall, the ASC program has allocated a large portion of the overall ASC platforms budget to 'capacity' systems. In addition, within the next five to ten years the Life Extension Programs (LEPs) for major nuclear weapons systems must be accomplished. These LEPs and other SSP programmatic elements will further drive the need for capacity calculations and hence 'capacity' systems as well as future ASC capability calculations on 'capability' systems. To respond to this new workload analysis, the ASC program will be making a large sustained strategic investment in these capacity systems over the next ten years, starting with the United States Government Fiscal Year 2007 (GFY07). However, given the growing need for 'capability' systems as

  3. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Thermal...

    Energy Saver

    the importance of thermal bypass air barriers, which led to their inclusion in ... Air sealing of the home's thermal enclosure has been required by the energy code for many ...

  4. Thermal network reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for reducing the number of elements required in a thermal network representation of a building. The method is based on matching the actual building response at two frequencies, the diurnal response and 3-day response. The procedure provides a straightforward methodology for combining all the various materials inside a discrete building zone into a few nodes while retaining a high degree of accuracy in the dynamic response. An example is given showing a comparison between a large network and the reduced network.

  5. Thermal network reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    A method is presented for reducing the number of elements required in a thermal network representation of a building. The method is based on matching the actual building response at two frequencies, the diurnal response and 3-day response. The procedure provides a straightforward methodology for combining all the various materials inside a discrete building zone into a few nodes while retaining a high degree of accuracy in the dynamic response. An example is given showing a comparison between a large network and the reduced network.

  6. A thermal battery operational reliability evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Herzberg, M.; Jaeger, M.; Shalev, H.

    1994-12-31

    A thermal battery is a one shot device. Its overall reliability is given as the product of its technical and operational reliability. This work evaluates operational reliability. The operational reliability for various performance requirements was estimated by analyzing data received from qualification tests of a certain thermal battery. A lower bound of its operational reliability was evaluated by use of the statistical tolerance method for each specific electrical performance requirement. A conservative overall lower bound for the operational reliability of the thermal battery was calculated as the product of the individual operational reliability estimates corresponding to each performance requirement.

  7. Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    R. Panneer Selvam; Hale, Micah; Strasser, Matt

    2013-03-31

    Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 °C to 600 °C) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal. Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal. The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES

  8. Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

    1995-08-01

    The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

  9. Competition Requirements

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Chapter 6.1 (January 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3.

  10. Reporting Requirements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reporting Requirements Reporting Requirements Contacts Director Albert Migliori Deputy Franz Freibert 505 667-6879 Email Professional Staff Assistant Susan Ramsay 505 665 0858 Email The Fellow will be required to participate in the Actinide Science lecture series by both attending lectures and presenting a scientific lecture on actinide science in this series. Submission of a viewgraph and brief write-up of the project. Provide metrics information as requested. Submission of an overview article

  11. Competition Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ---------------------------------------- Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal

  12. Video Requirements

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    All EERE videos, including webinar recordings, must meet Section 508's requirements for accessibility. All videos should be hosted on the DOE YouTube channel.

  13. Deployment Requirements

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Troy, Michigan June 13, 2014 THIS PRESENTATION DOES NOT CONTAIN ANY PROPRIETARY, CONFIDENTIAL OR OTHERWISE RESTRICTED INFORMATION 2 Outline of talk * SAE 2719 Requirements and ...

  14. Capacity planning in a transitional economy: What issues? Which models?

    SciTech Connect

    Mubayi, V.; Leigh, R.W.; Bright, R.N.

    1996-03-01

    This paper is devoted to an exploration of the important issues facing the Russian power generation system and its evolution in the foreseeable future and the kinds of modeling approaches that capture those issues. These issues include, for example, (1) trade-offs between investments in upgrading and refurbishment of existing thermal (fossil-fired) capacity and safety enhancements in existing nuclear capacity versus investment in new capacity, (2) trade-offs between investment in completing unfinished (under construction) projects based on their original design versus investment in new capacity with improved design, (3) incorporation of demand-side management options (investments in enhancing end-use efficiency, for example) within the planning framework, (4) consideration of the spatial dimensions of system planning including investments in upgrading electric transmission networks or fuel shipment networks and incorporating hydroelectric generation, (5) incorporation of environmental constraints and (6) assessment of uncertainty and evaluation of downside risk. Models for exploring these issues include low power shutdown (LPS) which are computationally very efficient, though approximate, and can be used to perform extensive sensitivity analyses to more complex models which can provide more detailed answers but are computationally cumbersome and can only deal with limited issues. The paper discusses which models can usefully treat a wide range of issues within the priorities facing decision makers in the Russian power sector and integrate the results with investment decisions in the wider economy.

  15. Iran outlines oil productive capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-09

    National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC) tested production limits last month to prove a claim of 4 million bd capacity made at September's meeting of the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Onshore fields account for 3.6 million bd of the total, with offshore fields providing the rest. NIOC plans to expand total capacity to 4.5 million bd by April 1993, consisting of 4 million b/d onshore and 500,000 b/d offshore. Middle East Economic Survey says questions remain about completion dates for gas injection, drilling, and offshore projects, but expansion targets are attainable within the scheduled time. NIOC said some slippage may be unavoidable, but it is confident the objective will be reached by third quarter 1993 at the latest. More than 60 rigs are working or about to be taken under contract to boost development drilling in onshore fields and provide gas injection in some. NIOC has spent $3.2 billion in foreign exchange on the drilling program in the last 2 1/2 years.

  16. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  17. U.S. Refining Capacity Utilization

    Reports and Publications

    1995-01-01

    This article briefly reviews recent trends in domestic refining capacity utilization and examines in detail the differences in reported crude oil distillation capacities and utilization rates among different classes of refineries.

  18. California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity, Wins R&D 100 Award California: Conducting Polymer Binder Boosts Storage Capacity, Wins R&D 100 Award August 19, 2013 - 10:17am ...

  19. Sorbent Material Property Requirements for On-Board Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J-K; Hua, T. Q.

    2015-05-25

    Material properties required for on-board hydrogen storage in cryogenic sorbents for use with automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems are discussed. Models are formulated for physical, thermodynamic and transport properties, and for the dynamics of H-2 refueling and discharge from a sorbent bed. A conceptual storage configuration with in-bed heat exchanger tubes, a Type-3 containment vessel, vacuum insulation and requisite balance-of-plant components is developed to determine the peak excess sorption capacity and differential enthalpy of adsorption for 5.5 wt% system gravimetric capacity and 55% well-to-tank (WTT) efficiency. The analysis also determines the bulk density to which the material must be compacted for the storage system to reach 40 g.L-1 volumetric capacity. Thermal transport properties and heat transfer enhancement methods are analyzed to estimate the material thermal conductivity needed to achieve 1.5 kg.min(-1) H-2 refueling rate. Operating temperatures and pressures are determined for 55% WTT efficiency and 95% usable H-2. Needs for further improvements in material properties are analyzed that would allow reduction of storage pressure to 50 bar from 100 bar, elevation of storage temperature to 175-200 K from 150 K, and increase of WTT efficiency to 57.5% or higher.

  20. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This ...

  1. T10K Change Max Capacity

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2013-08-16

    This command line utility will enable/disable the Oracle StorageTek T10000 tape drive's maximum capacity feature.

  2. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun’ichi

    2015-03-12

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  3. Eligibility Requirements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers » Employee, Retiree Resources » New Hire » Benefits » Eligibility Requirements Eligibility Requirements A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits Office (505) 667-1806 Email Eligible employees The Laboratory offers an extensive benefits package to full and part time employees. Casual employees (excluding High School Coop, Lab Associates and Craft Employees) are eligible to

  4. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  5. Design method addresses subsea pipeline thermal stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Suman, J.C.; Karpathy, S.A. )

    1993-08-30

    Managing thermal stresses in subsea pipelines carrying heated petroleum requires extensive thermal-stress analysis to predict trouble spots and to ensure a design flexible enough to anticipate stresses and expansions. Explored here are various methods for resolving predicaments posed by thermal loads and resulting deformations by keeping the stresses and deformations in the pipeline system within allowable limits. The problems posed by thermal stresses are not unique; the solutions proposed here are. These methods are based on recent work performed for a major Asian subsea pipeline project currently under construction.

  6. An Integrated Analysis of a NERVA Based Nuclear Thermal Propulsion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    require that self-consistent neutronicthermal-hydraulicstress analyses be carried out. ... SYSTEMS; PULSES; REACTOR SAFETY; STRESS ANALYSIS; THERMAL HYDRAULICS; WATER; ...

  7. MHTGR thermal performance envelopes: Reliability by design

    SciTech Connect

    Etzel, K.T.; Howard, W.W.; Zgliczynski, J.B.

    1992-05-01

    This document discusses thermal performance envelopes which are used to specify steady-state design requirements for the systems of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor to maximize plant performance reliability with optimized design. The thermal performance envelopes are constructed around the expected operating point accounting for uncertainties in actual plant as-built parameters and plant operation. The components are then designed to perform successfully at all points within the envelope. As a result, plant reliability is maximized by accounting for component thermal performance variation in the design. The design is optimized by providing a means to determine required margins in a disciplined and visible fashion.

  8. Thermal desorption treatability test conducted with VAC*TRAX Unit

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) treatment standards. In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity, where off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed waste with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of mixed waste. DOE-AL manages nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment units (MTUs) to treat waste at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed wastes must remove the hazardous component (i.e., meet RCRA treatment standards) and contain the radioactive component in a form that will protect the worker, public, and environment. On the basis of the recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO) include thermal desorption (TD), evaporative oxidation, and waste water evaporation.

  9. Examination of Capacity and Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy on Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2008-07-01

    When wind plants serve load within the balancing area, no additional capacity required to integrate wind power into the system. We present some thought experiments to illustrate some implications for wind integration studies.

  10. Solar Thermal Energy Technology; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.E.; Hicks, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Solar Thermal Energy Technology (STT) announces on a bimonthly basis the current worldwide research and development information that would expand the technology base required for the advancement of solar thermal systems as a significant energy source. This publication contains the abstracts of DOE reports, journal articles, conference papers, patents, theses, and monographs added to the Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) during the past two months. Also included are US information obtained through acquisition programs or interagency agreements and international information obtained through the International Energy Agency's Energy Technology Data Exchange or government-to-government agreements. The digests in STT and other citations to information on solar thermal energy date back to 1974.

  11. OSCARS Extends JGI Network Capacity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    OSCARS & JGI Science DMZ Case Studies Multi-facility Workflow Case Study News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Case Studies » OSCARS Case Studies » OSCARS & JGI Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies OSCARS & JGI Science DMZ Case Studies Multi-facility Workflow Case Study Contact Us Technical

  12. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  13. Thermal characterization and properties of a copper-diamond composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pin; Chavez, Thomas P.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Coker, Eric Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The thermal properties of a commercial copper-diamond composite were measured from below -50°C to above 200°C. The results of thermal expansion, heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity were reported. These data were used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the composite as a function of temperature in the thickness direction. These results are compared with estimated values based on a simple mixing rule and the temperature dependence of these physical properties is represented by curve fitting equations. These fitting equations can be used for thermal modeling of practical devices/systems at their operation temperatures. The results of the mixing rule showed a consistent correlation between the amount of copper and diamond in the composite, based on density, thermal expansion, and heat capacity measurements. However, there was a disparity between measured and estimated thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. These discrepancies can be caused by many intrinsic material issues such as lattice defects and impurities, but the dominant factor is attributed to the large uncertainty of the interfacial thermal conductance between diamond and copper.

  14. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Definitions Definitions Since 2006, EIA has reported two measures of aggregate capacity, one based on demonstrated peak working gas storage, the other on working gas design capacity. Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity: This measure sums the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the 5-year range from May 2005 to April 2010, as reported by the operator on the Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." This data-driven estimate

  15. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity With Data for March 2016 | Release Date: May 31, 2016 | Next Release Date: November 30, 2016 Previous Issues Year: March 2016 September 2015 March 2015 September 2014 March 2014 September 2013 March 2013 September 2012 March 2012 September 2011 March 2011 September 2010 Go Containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity

  16. Competition Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ---- ----------------------------------------------- Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) Synopsizing Proposed Non-Competitive Contract Actions Citing the Authority of FAR 6.302-1 [Reference: FAR 5 and DEAR 905] Overview This section discusses publicizing sole source actions as part of the approval of a Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC) using the authority of FAR 6.302-1. Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using

  17. Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity More Documents & Publications THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1234 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 ...

  18. Solar Energy and Capacity Value (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-09-01

    This is a one-page, two-sided fact sheet on the capacity of solar power to provide value to utilities and power system operators.

  19. Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Working Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources ...

  20. Increasing the Capacity of Existing Power Lines

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-01

    The capacity of the grid has been largely unchanged for decades and needs to expand to accommodate new power plants and renewable energy projects.

  1. Property:Cooling Capacity | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Pages using the property "Cooling Capacity" Showing 2 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + 90 + Distributed Generation...

  2. ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Technologies" ,,,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"Energy Sold Back MWh",,,,,"Capacity MW",,,,,"Customers",,,,,"En...

  3. Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs (Redirected from Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs) Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Capacity...

  4. Climate Change Capacity Development (C3D+) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Capacity Development (C3D+) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Climate Change Capacity Development (C3D+) Name Climate Change Capacity Development (C3D+) AgencyCompany...

  5. UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Capacity Building Programme Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Name UNDP-Low Emission Capacity Building Programme AgencyCompany...

  6. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg; George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Sooy, Walter; Sutton, Steven B.

    1996-01-01

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  7. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  8. Concentrated Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage Can Help Utilities'

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bottom Line, Study Shows - News Releases | NREL Concentrated Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage Can Help Utilities' Bottom Line, Study Shows December 20, 2012 The storage capacity of concentrating solar power (CSP) can add significant value to a utility company's optimal mix of energy sources, a new report by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) suggests. The report found that CSP with a six-hour storage capacity can lower peak net loads when the

  9. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  10. REDUCTION CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE AND SALTSTONE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-30

    The duration that saltstone retains its ability to immobilize some key radionuclides, such as technetium (Tc), plutonium (Pu), and neptunium (Np), depends on its capacity to maintain a low redox status (or low oxidation state). The reduction capacity is a measure of the mass of reductants present in the saltstone; the reductants are the active ingredients that immobilize Tc, Pu, and Np. Once reductants are exhausted, the saltstone loses its ability to immobilize these radionuclides. The reduction capacity values reported here are based on the Ce(IV)/Fe(II) system. The Portland cement (198 {micro}eq/g) and especially the fly ash (299 {micro}eq/g) had a measurable amount of reduction capacity, but the blast furnace slag (820 {micro}eq/g) not surprisingly accounted for most of the reduction capacity. The blast furnace slag contains ferrous iron and sulfides which are strong reducing and precipitating species for a large number of solids. Three saltstone samples containing 45% slag or one sample containing 90% slag had essentially the same reduction capacity as pure slag. There appears to be some critical concentration between 10% and 45% slag in the Saltstone formulation that is needed to create the maximum reduction capacity. Values from this work supported those previously reported, namely that the reduction capacity of SRS saltstone is about 820 {micro}eq/g; this value is recommended for estimating the longevity that the Saltstone Disposal Facility will retain its ability to immobilize radionuclides.

  11. Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2008-09-01

    This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the

  12. System requirements specification for a Solar Central Receiver System integrated with a cogeneration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-24

    The characteristics, design and environmental requirements, and economic data are defined for a Solar Central Receiver System Integrated with a Cogeneration Facility for Copper Smelting. The added solar capacity will supply process heat to an existing copper smelting flash furnace of Finnish design as well as providing for the cogeneration of electricity by an added gas turbine system. Heat storage to accommodate periods of low solar insolation is accomplished by the innovative utilization of copper slag in a thermal energy storage system. The proposed modifications and existing site conditions and facilities are described. Applicable standards and codes, publications, reference documentation, and regulatory information are listed. Design and performance requirements to be met by this solar cogeneration facility are outlined, and the environmental criteria applicable to the plant are addressed. The solar cogeneration facility's characteristics and performance data are specified, along with the plant cost and economic data. Simulation models are also described.

  13. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    Reports and Publications

    2016-01-01

    Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity is the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) report containing storage capacity data for crude oil, petroleum products, and selected biofuels. The report includes tables detailing working and net available shell storage capacity by type of facility, product, and Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PAD District). Net available shell storage capacity is broken down further to show the percent for exclusive use by facility operators and the percent leased to others. Crude oil storage capacity data are also provided for Cushing, Oklahoma, an important crude oil market center. Data are released twice each year near the end of May (data for March 31) and near the end of November (data for September 30).

  14. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Rogers, Michael Ray; Judkins, Roddie R.

    2000-01-01

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  15. EEI/DOE Transmission Capacity Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... The projects include: adding static and dynamic reactive support to solve voltage magnitude and voltage drop problems, replacing transformers to remedy thermal overload problems, ...

  16. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Ramana G.

    2013-10-23

    /no-go goals stipulated by the DOE for this project. Energy densities of all salt mixtures were higher than that of the current solar salt. The salt mixtures costs have been estimated and TES system costs for a 2 tank, direct approach have been estimated for each of these materials. All estimated costs are significantly below the baseline system that used solar salt. These lower melt point salts offer significantly higher energy density per volume than solar salt – and therefore attractively smaller inventory and equipment costs. Moreover, a new TES system geometry has been recommended A variety of approaches were evaluated to use the low melting point molten salt. Two novel changes are recommended that 1) use the salt as a HTF through the solar trough field, and 2) use the salt to not only create steam but also to preheat the condensed feedwater for Rankine cycle. The two changes enable the powerblock to operate at 500°C, rather than the current 400°C obtainable using oil as the HTF. Secondly, the use of salt to preheat the feedwater eliminates the need to extract steam from the low pressure turbine for that purpose. Together, these changes result in a dramatic 63% reduction required for 6 hour salt inventory, a 72% reduction in storage volume, and a 24% reduction in steam flow rate in the power block. Round trip efficiency for the Case 5 - 2 tank “direct” system is estimated at >97%, with only small losses from time under storage and heat exchange, and meeting RFP goals. This attractive efficiency is available because the major heat loss experienced in a 2 tank “indirect” system - losses by transferring the thermal energy from oil HTF to the salt storage material and back to oil to run the steam generator at night - is not present for the 2 tank direct system. The higher heat capacity values for both LMP and HMP systems enable larger storage capacities for concentrating solar power.

  17. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K; Cuppett, D; Dyer, D

    2012-01-30

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with Kalwall building panels. An added feature of the Kalwall system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  18. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  19. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  20. thermal energy power conversion

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Solar Thermal Test Facility Nuclear ... Climate & Earth Systems Climate Measurement & Modeling ... Tribal Energy Program Intellectual Property Current EC ...

  1. Thermal model of solar absorption HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bergquam, J.B.; Brezner, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a thermal model that describes the performance of solar absorption HVAC systems. The model considers the collector array, the building cooling and heating loads, the absorption chiller and the high temperature storage. Heat losses from the storage tank and piping are included in the model. All of the results presented in the paper are for an array of flat plate solar collectors with black chrome (selective surface) absorber plates. The collector efficiency equation is used to calculate the useful heat output from the array. The storage is modeled as a non-stratified tank with polyurethane foam insulation. The system is assumed to operate continuously providing air conditioning during the cooling season, space heating during the winter and hot water throughout the year. The amount of heat required to drive the chiller is determined from the coefficient of performance of the absorption cycle. Results are presented for a typical COP of 0.7. The cooling capacity of the chiller is a function of storage (generator) temperature. The nominal value is 190 F (88 C) and the range of values considered is 180 F (82 C) to 210 F (99 C). Typical building cooling and heating loads are determined as a function of ambient conditions. Performance results are presented for Sacramento, CA and Washington, D.C. The model described in the paper makes use of National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) data and results are presented for these two locations. The uncertainties in the NSRDB are estimated to be in a range of 6% to 9%. This is a significant improvement over previously available data. The model makes it possible to predict the performance of solar HVAC systems and calculate quantities such as solar fraction, storage temperature, heat losses and parasitic power for every hour of the period for which data are available.

  2. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4 Average thermal performance rating of solar thermal collectors by type shipped in 2009 ... Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturers Survey." ...

  3. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  4. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  5. WINDExchange: U.S. Installed Wind Capacity

    WindExchange

    Installed Wind Capacity The amount of wind energy available in the United States is continuously growing bringing the nation closer, bit by bit, to the wind energy goals set out in the Wind Vision Report-35% of the nation's end-use electricity demands coming from wind energy by 2050. Use this page to track the United States' installed wind capacity by state and its progression. On the installed capacity map, move the slider below to see the changes in wind energy availability in the states over

  6. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; Russick, Edward M.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  7. Residential Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps Sized to Heating Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Odukomaiya, Adewale; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps are an emerging technology offering significant energy savings potential and improved efficiency. With conventional single-speed systems, it is important to appropriately size heat pumps for the cooling load as over-sizing would result in cycling and insufficient latent capacity required for humidity control. These appropriately sized systems are often under-sized for the heating load and require inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat to meet the heating demand. Variable capacity heat pumps address these shortcomings by providing an opportunity to intentionally size systems for the dominant heating season load without adverse effects of cycling or insufficient dehumidification in the cooling season. This intentionally-sized system could result in significant energy savings in the heating season, as the need for inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat is drastically reduced. This is a continuation of a study evaluating the energy consumption of variable capacity heat pumps installed in two unoccupied research homes in Farragut, a suburb of Knoxville, Tennessee. In this particular study, space conditioning systems are intentionally sized for the heating season loads to provide an opportunity to understand and evaluate the impact this would have on electric resistance heat use and dehumidification. The results and conclusions drawn through this research are valid and specific for portions of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States falling in the mixed-humid climate zone. While other regions in the U.S. do not experience this type of climate, this work provides a basis for, and can help understand the implications of other climate zones on residential space conditioning energy consumption. The data presented here will provide a framework for fine tuning residential building EnergyPlus models that are being developed.

  8. Thermal Effusivity Tomography from Pulsed Thermal Imaging

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2006-12-01

    The software program generates 3D volume distribution of thermal effusivity within a test material from one-sided pulsed thermal imaging data. Thsi is the first software capable of accurate, fast and automated thermal tomographic imaging of inhomogeneous materials to produce 3D images similar to those obtained from 3D X-ray CT (all previous thermal-imaging software can only produce 2D results). Because thermal effusivity is an intrisic material property that is related to material constituent, density, conductivity, etc.,more » quantitative imaging of effusivity allowed direct visualization of material's internal constituent/structure and damage distributions, thereby potentially leading to quantitative prediction of other material properties such as strength. I can be therefre be used for 3D imaging of material structure in fundamental material studies, nondestructive characterization of defects/flaws in structural engineering components, health monitoring of material damage and degradation during service, and medical imaging and diagnostics. This technology is one-sided, non contact and sensitive to material's thermal property and discontinuity. One major advantage of this tomographic technology over x-ray CT and ultrasounds is its natural efficiency for 3D imaging of the volume under a large surface area. This software is implemented with a method for thermal computed tomography of thermal effusivity from one-sided pulsed thermal imaging (or thermography) data. The method is based on several solutions of the governing heat transfer equation under pulsed thermography test condition. In particular, it consists of three components. 1) It utilized the thermal effusivity as the imaging parameter to construct the 3D image. 2) It established a relationship between the space (depth) and the time, because thermography data are in the time domain. 3) It incorporated a deconvolution algorithm to solve the depth porfile of the material thermal effusivity from the measured

  9. HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity Analysis of NERSC Users' Data-Access Habits Reveals Sweet Spot for Short-term Storage October 16, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 ...

  10. Planned Geothermal Capacity | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Map of Development Projects Planned Geothermal Capacity in the U.S. is reported by the Geothermal Energy Association via their Annual U.S. Geothermal Power Production and...

  11. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Utilization rates for crude tank farms equals stocks divided by storage capacity of tanks and underground caverns. It does not include pipeline fill. 2 See http:www.eia.gov...

  12. Capacity Building Project with Howard University

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this initiative is to build community capacity for public participation in environmental and energy decision making. The target communities are those impacted by U.S. Department of...

  13. Texas Number and Capacity of Petroleum Refineries

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Idle 58,500 105,089 373,750 0 42,000 0 1982-2016 Operable (Barrels per Stream Day) ... Downstream Charge Capacity (Barrels per Stream Day) Vacuum Distillation 2,384,900 ...

  14. Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

    2009-07-15

    Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

  15. Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Moens, L.; Blake, D.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

  16. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries - Volume 1: Concepts and Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.B. ); Serot, D.E. ); Kellogg, M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner to allow evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key nonmanufacturing sectors. This volume lays out the general concepts and methods used to develop the emergency operating estimates. The historical analysis of capacity extends from 1974 through 1986. Some nonmanufacturing industries are included. In addition to mining and utilities, key industries in transportation, communication, and services were analyzed. Physical capacity and efficiency of production were measured. 3 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs. (JF)

  17. Thermal Effusivity Tomography from Pulsed Thermal Imaging

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2008-11-05

    The software program generates 3D volume distribution of thermal effusivity within a test material from one—sided pulsed thermal imaging data. Thsi is the first software capable of accurate, fast and automated thermal tomographic imaging of inhomogeneoirs materials to produce 3D images similar to those obtained from 3D X—ray CT (all previous thepnal—imaging software can only produce 20 results) . Because thermal effusivity is an Intrisic material property that is related to material constituent, density, conductivity,more » etc., quantitative imaging of eftusivity allowed direct visualization of material’s internal constituent/structure and damage distributions, thereby potentially leading to quantitative prediction of other material properties such as strength. I can be therefre be used for 3D imaging of material structure in fundamental material studies, nondestructive characterization of defects/flaws in structural engineering components, health monitoring of material damage and degradation during service, and medical imaging and diagnostics. This technology is one—sided, non contact and sensitive to material’s thermal property and discontinuity. One major advantage of this tomographic technology over x-ray CT and ultrasounds is its natural efficiency for 3D imaging of the volume under a large surface area. This software is implemented with a method for thermal computed tomography of thermal effusivity from one—sided pulsed thermal imaging (or thermography) data. The method is based on several solutions of the governing heat transfer equation under pulsed thermography test condition. In particular, it consists of three components. 1) It utilized the thermal effusivity as the imaging parameter to construct the 3D image. 2) It established a relationship between the space (depth) and the time, because thermography data are in the time domain. 3) It incorporated a deconvolution algorithm to solve the depth porfile of the material thermal effusivity from the

  18. W-320 Project thermal modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-18

    This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

  19. REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

    2011-01-28

    Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

  20. Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries NREL Commercialization & Tech Transfer Webinar March 27, 2011 Gi-Heon Kim gi-heon.kim@nrel.gov John Ireland, Kyu-Jin Lee, Ahmad Pesaran Kandler Smith kandler.smith@nrel.gov Source: A123 Source: GM NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Challenges for Large LIB Systems 2 * Li-ion batteries are flammable, require expensive manufacturing to reduce defects * Small-cell protection devices do not work for large systems * Difficult to detect

  1. Want to Put an End to Capacity Markets? Think Real-Time Pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Mark

    2006-07-15

    The amount of generation capacity that must be installed to meet resource adequacy requirements often causes the energy market to be suppressed to the point that it fails to produce sufficient revenues to attract new entry. A significant expansion in the use of real-time pricing can, over time, cause the energy market to become a more bountiful source of revenues for generators, allowing the elimination of the capacity market. (author)

  2. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.B. ); Serot, D.E. ); Kellogg, M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner that allows evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key non-manufacturing sectors. This volume presents tabular and graphical results of the historical analysis and projections for each SIC industry. (JF)

  3. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  4. Refrigerator with variable capacity compressor and cycle priming action through capacity control and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Litch, Andrew D.; Wu, Guolian

    2016-03-15

    A refrigerator appliance (and associated method) that includes a condenser, evaporator and a multi-capacity compressor. The appliance also includes a pressure reducing device arranged within an evaporator-condenser refrigerant circuit, and a valve system for directing or restricting refrigerant flow through the device. The appliance further includes a controller for operating the compressor upon the initiation of a compressor ON-cycle at a priming capacity above a nominal capacity for a predetermined or calculated duration.

  5. Capacity Value of PV and Wind Generation in the NV Energy System

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Diao, Ruisheng; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

    2014-03-21

    Calculation of photovoltaic (PV) and wind power capacity values is important for estimating additional load that can be served by new PV or wind installations in the electrical power system. It also is the basis for assigning capacity credit payments in systems with markets. Because of variability in solar and wind resources, PV and wind generation contribute to power system resource adequacy differently from conventional generation. Many different approaches to calculating PV and wind generation capacity values have been used by utilities and transmission operators. Using the NV Energy system as a study case, this report applies peak-period capacity factor (PPCF) and effective load carrying capability (ELCC) methods to calculate capacity values for renewable energy sources. We show the connection between the PPCF and ELCC methods in the process of deriving a simplified approach that approximates the ELCC method. This simplified approach does not require generation fleet data and provides the theoretical basis for a quick check on capacity value results of PV and wind generation. The diminishing return of capacity benefit as renewable generation increases is conveniently explained using the simplified capacity value approach.

  6. Solid state thermal rectifier

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  7. Thermal performance of a full-scale stratified chilled-water thermal storage tank

    SciTech Connect

    Bahnfleth, W.P.; Musser, A.

    1998-12-31

    The thermal performance of a full-scale 1.47 million gallon (5300 m{sup 3}), 44.5 ft (13.6 m) water-depth, naturally stratified chilled-water thermal storage tank with radial diffusers is analyzed. Controlled, constant inlet flow rate tests covering the full range of the system have been performed for both charge and discharge processes. Thermal performance for these half-cycle tests is quantified using performance metrics similar to the figure of merit (FOM). Lost capacity, a new measure of performance with practical significance, is also presented. Uncertainty analysis shows that under some circumstances, particularly for tall tanks, lost capacity allows thermal performance to be quantified with less experimental uncertainty than FOM. Results of these tests indicate that discharge cycles performance is not as good as charge cycle performance at the same flow rate. However, the half-cycle figure of merit for all cycles tested was in excess of 90%, despite the fact that the inlet Reynolds number exceeded that recommended in the literature by up to a factor of five.

  8. Resolution of thermal-hydraulic safety and licensing issues for the system 80+{sup {trademark}} design

    SciTech Connect

    Carpentino, S.E.; Ritterbusch, S.E.; Schneider, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    The System 80+{sup {trademark}} Standard Design is an evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) with a generating capacity of 3931 MWt (1350 MWe). The Final Design Approval (FDA) for this design was issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in July 1994. The design certification by the NRC is anticipated by the end of 1995 or early 1996. NRC review of the System 80+ design has involved several new safety issues never before addressed in a regulatory atmosphere. In addition, conformance with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) required that the System 80+ plant address nuclear industry concerns with regard to design, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants. A large number of these issues/concerns deals with previously unresolved generic thermal-hydraulic safety issues and severe accident prevention and mitigation. This paper discusses the thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations performed for the System 80+ design to resolve safety and licensing issues relevant to both the Nuclear Stream Supply System (NSSS) and containment designs. For the NSSS design, the Safety Depressurization System mitigation capability and resolution of the boron dilution concern are described. Examples of containment design issues dealing with containment shell strength, robustness of the reactor cavity walls and hydrogen mixing under severe accident conditions are also provided. Finally, the overall approach used in the application of NRC`s new (NUREG-1465) radiological source term for System 80+ evaluation is described. The robustness of the System 80+ containment design to withstand severe accident consequences was demonstrated through detailed thermal-hydraulic analyses and evaluations. This advanced design to shown to meet NRC severe accident policy goals and ALWR URD requirements without any special design features and unnecessary costs.

  9. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    sunshot DOEGO-102012-3669 * September 2012 MOTIVATION All thermal concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar tracking, which involves moving large mirror surfaces...

  10. Sandia Thermal Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2005-11-23

    Thermal analysis in 1-D planar, cylindrical and spherical geometries using control volume finite element spatial discretization with 1st and 2nd order implicit time integrators.

  11. Battery Thermal Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, Aron; Powell, Mitchell; Shi, Ying

    2015-06-09

    This presentation provides an update of NREL's battery thermal characterization efforts for the 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Annual Merit Reviews.

  12. Ambient temperature thermal battery

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, A. N.; Bliss, D. E.; McManis III

    1985-11-26

    An ambient temperature thermal battery having two relatively high temperature melting electrolytes which form a low melting temperature electrolyte upon activation.

  13. An improved absorption generator for solar-thermal powered heat pumps. Part 2: Energy and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.

    1997-12-31

    Solar heated absorption chiller installations have been very expensive for their rating. To enhance collector thermal efficiency the liquid flowing within the collectors must be kept as cool as possible. However, there is also a need to operate the absorption reported earlier. The compromise usually results in poor collector efficiency as well as a relatively poor specific chiller effect. The proposed vortex generator permits a heat pump to operate efficiently with relatively low temperature solar heated fluid (70--80 C). As a result, the collectors are cooler and more efficient. As noted in Part 1, the specific heat pumping capacity is about 27% greater than conventional systems operating at the same reduced generator temperatures. Therefore, a smaller, less expensive chiller is required. The reduced investment in solar arrays and absorption chillers is estimated along with a range of paybacks.

  14. An improved absorption generator for solar-thermal powered heat pumps. Part 1: Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.

    1997-12-31

    Solar heated absorption chiller installations have been, typically, very expensive for their rating. The need to keep the liquid flowing within the collectors as cool as possible to enhance collector thermal efficiency, conflicts with the need to operate the absorption chiller at a higher temperature. The compromise usually results in poor collector efficiency as well as a relatively poor specific chiller effect. The proposed vortex generator permits a heat pump to operate efficiently with relatively low temperature solar heated fluid (70--80 C). As a result, the collectors are cooler and much more efficient. In addition, the specific heat pumping capacity is about 27% greater than conventional systems operating at the same reduced generator temperatures and, therefore, a smaller chiller is required. The economic consequences of these benefits will be presented in Part 2.

  15. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modification of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.

  16. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modificationmore » of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.« less

  17. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Malecha, Richard F. (Naperville, IL); Chilenskas, Albert A. (Chicago, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

  18. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

    1994-09-20

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

  19. HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity HPSS Disk Cache Upgrade Caters to Capacity Analysis of NERSC Users' Data-Access Habits Reveals Sweet Spot for Short-term Storage October 16, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov HPSS 09 vert NERSC users today are benefiting from a business decision made three years ago by the center's Storage Systems Group (SSG) as they were looking to upgrade the High-Performance Storage System (HPSS) disk cache: rather than focus primarily on

  20. Ukraine-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ukraine-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth (Redirected from UNDP-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth in Ukraine) Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Capacity Building...

  1. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

  2. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  3. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

    1984-03-20

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

  4. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.; Elder, Michael G.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

  5. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  6. HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Presentation for ...

  7. Property:Installed Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Installed Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Installed Capacity (MW) Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Insta...

  8. Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia AgencyCompany Organization...

  9. EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building AgencyCompany Organization: United States Environmental...

  10. EPA-GHG Inventory Capacity Building | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Capacity Building) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: US EPA GHG inventory Capacity Building AgencyCompany Organization: United States Environmental Protection...

  11. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes Design and ...

  12. Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in...

    Energy Saver

    Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the ...

  13. Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States 1985...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States 1985 - 2003 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Analysis Publications Natural Gas Productive Capacity for the Lower-48 States 1985 - ...

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Pipeline Capacity and Utilization

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Pipeline Utilization & Capacity About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity & ...

  15. ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity ","In-Service",,"Electrical...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,"Voltage",,,"Capacity ","In-Service",,"Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line ...,"Voltage",,,"Capacity ","In-Service",,"Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line ...

  16. Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production FY 2011

  17. Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production FY 2012

  18. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...

  19. Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Trinidad and Tobago-Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs Jump to: navigation, search Name Building Capacity for Innovative Policy NAMAs AgencyCompany Organization...

  20. Doubling Geothermal Generation Capacity by 2020: A Strategic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Doubling Geothermal Generation Capacity by 2020: A Strategic Analysis Doubling Geothermal Generation Capacity by 2020: A Strategic Analysis PDF icon NREL Doubling Geothermal ...

  1. UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    UNDPEC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Retrieved from...

  2. EC/UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ECUNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDPEC Climate Change Capacity Building Program AgencyCompany Organization The European Union...

  3. Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program AgencyCompany Organization The...

  4. FAO-Capacity Development on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Capacity Development on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Capacity Development on Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization: Food and...

  5. India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Vulnerability Assessment and Enhancing Adaptive Capacities to...

  6. Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets with Wind Power Title Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets with Wind Power Publication...

  8. DOE Issues Enforcement Guidance on Large-Capacity Clothes Washer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Enforcement Guidance on Large-Capacity Clothes Washer Waivers and the Waiver Process DOE Issues Enforcement Guidance on Large-Capacity Clothes Washer Waivers and the Waiver Process...

  9. Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands Employee-Driven Initiative Increases Treatment Capacity, Reduces Clean Water Demands June 30, ...

  10. First Steps Toward Tribal Weatherization - Human Capacity Development...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Toward Tribal Weatherization - Human Capacity Development (DE-PA36-09GO99022) 2006 All ... Weatherization Training Program Phase 1: Development of human capacity to deliver ...

  11. Tunable thermal link

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  12. Thermal treatment wall

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.; Knauss, Kevin G.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  13. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  14. Photodetectors with passive thermal radiation control

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Dodson, Brian W.

    2001-10-02

    A new class of photodetectors which include means for passive shielding against undesired thermal radiation is disclosed. Such devices can substitute in applications currently requiring cooled optical sensors, such as IR detection and imaging. This description is included for purposes of searching, and is not intended to limit or otherwise influence the interpretation of the present invention.

  15. Washington Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    39,210 41,309 43,673 46,900 46,900 46,900 1988-2014 Aquifers 39,210 41,309 43,673 46,900 46,900 46,900 1999-2014 Depleted Fields 0 0 1999-2014 Total Working Gas Capacity 23,514...

  16. Tennessee Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1,200 0 NA NA 1998-2014 Salt Caverns 0 0 1999-2014 Aquifers 0 0 1999-2014 Depleted Fields 1,200 0 0 1999-2014 Total Working Gas Capacity 860 0 0 2008-2014 Salt Caverns 0 0...

  17. Nebraska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 1988-2013 Salt Caverns 0 1999-2012 Depleted Fields 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 34,850 1999-2013 Total Working Gas Capacity 13,619...

  18. Maryland Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1988-2014 Salt Caverns 0 0 1999-2014 Depleted Fields 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 64,000 1999-2014 Total Working Gas Capacity 18,300...

  19. Michigan Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1,066,064 1,071,638 1,075,145 1,075,590 1,075,629 1999-2014 Total Working Gas Capacity 666,636 667,065 672,632 673,200 674,967 675,003 2008-2014 Salt Caverns 2,150 2,159 2,159...

  20. Oklahoma Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    376,435 374,735 375,135 375,135 375,143 375,143 2002-2016 Total Working Gas Capacity 190,955 189,255 189,455 189,455 191,455 191,455 2012-2016 Total Number of Existing Fields 13 13 ...

  1. U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    15,177 15,289 15,373 15,724 16,156 16,433 1985-2015 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 17,575 17,736 17,328 17,818 17,873 18,026 1985-2015 Operating 16,911 16,991 16,656 17,282 ...

  2. Colorado Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    130,186 130,186 130,186 130,186 130,186 130,186 2002-2016 Total Working Gas Capacity 63,774 63,774 63,774 63,774 63,774 63,774 2012-2016 Total Number of Existing Fields 10 10 10 10 10 10

  3. Illinois Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1,004,100 1,004,100 1,004,100 1,004,130 1,004,130 1,004,130 2002-2016 Total Working Gas Capacity 303,613 303,613 303,613 303,613 303,613 303,613 2012-2016 Total Number of Existing Fields 28 28 28 28 28 28

  4. Iowa Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 288,210 2002-2016 Total Working Gas Capacity 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 90,313 2012-2016 Total Number of Existing Fields 4 4 4 4 4 4

  5. Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 2002-2016 Total Working Gas Capacity 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2

  6. Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01

    Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

  7. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    SciTech Connect

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  8. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, Victor; Cole, Wesley; Sullivan, Patrick; Brinkman, Gregory; Margolis, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validity of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.

  9. Retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment scoring interaction report

    SciTech Connect

    Raivo, B.D.; Richardson, J.G.

    1993-11-01

    A retrieval/ex situ thermal treatment technology process for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory transuranic waste pits and trenches is present. A system performance score is calculated, and assumptions, requirements, and reference baseline technologies for all subelements are included.

  10. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.; Goedjen, John G.; Sabol, Stephen M.; Sloan, Kelly M.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  11. An Innovative High Thermal Conductivity Fuel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil A. Khan

    2009-11-21

    Thermal conductivity of the fuel in today's Light Water Reactors, Uranium dioxide, can be improved by incorporating a uniformly distributed heat conducting network of a higher conductivity material, Silicon Carbide. The higher thermal conductivity of SiC along with its other prominent reactor-grade properties makes it a potential material to address some of the related issues when used in UO2 [97% TD]. This ongoing research, in collaboration with the University of Florida, aims to investigate the feasibility and develop a formal methodology of producing the resultant composite oxide fuel. Calculations of effective thermal conductivity of the new fuel as a function of %SiC for certain percentages and as a function of temperature are presented as a preliminary approach. The effective thermal conductivities are obtained at different temperatures from 600K to 1600K. The corresponding polynomial equations for the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities are given based on the simulation results. Heat transfer mechanism in this fuel is explained using a finite volume approach and validated against existing empirical models. FLUENT 6.1.22 was used for thermal conductivity calculations and to estimate reduction in centerline temperatures achievable within such a fuel rod. Later, computer codes COMBINE-PC and VENTURE-PC were deployed to estimate the fuel enrichment required, to maintain the same burnup levels, corresponding to a volume percent addition of SiC.

  12. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers National Solar Thermal Test Facility HomeTag:National Solar Thermal Test Facility Permalink Air Force Research Laboratory Testing ...

  13. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2 Solar thermal collector shipments by type, quantity, revenue, and average price, 2008 ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  14. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1 Distribution of domestic solar thermal collector shipments (thousand square feet) 2008 ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  15. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Annual shipments of solar thermal collectors by type, 2000 - 2009 (thousand square feet) ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  16. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Shipments of solar thermal collectors ranked by origin and destination, 2009 Origin Top ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  17. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Annual shipments of solar thermal collectors by source, 2000 - 2009 Imports Domestically ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  18. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Annual shipments of solar thermal collectors by disposition, 2000 - 2009 (thousand square ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  19. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    7 Percent of solar thermal collector shipments by the 10 largest companies, 2000 - 2009 ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  20. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5 Shipments of complete solar thermal collector systems, 2008 and 2009 Shipment ... Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturers Survey."

  1. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    8 Import shipments of solar thermal collectors by country, 2008 and 2009 (square feet) ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  2. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    7 Import shipments of solar thermal collectors by type, 2000 - 2009 (thousand square feet) ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal ...

  3. Thermal insulations using vacuum panels

    DOEpatents

    Glicksman, Leon R.; Burke, Melissa S.

    1991-07-16

    Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

  4. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers National Solar Thermal Test Facility HomeTag:National Solar Thermal Test Facility Illuminated receiver on top of tower Permalink ...

  5. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary PowerEnergy Conversion EfficiencySolar EnergyConcentrating Solar Power (CSP)National Solar Thermal Test Facility National Solar Thermal Test Facility admin ...

  6. Florida products pipeline set to double capacity

    SciTech Connect

    True, W.R.

    1995-11-13

    Directional drilling has begun this fall for a $68.5 million, approximately 110,000 b/d expansion of Central Florida Pipeline Co.`s refined products line from Tampa to Orlando. The drilling started in August and is scheduled to conclude this month, crossing under seven water bodies in Hillsborough, Polk, and Osceola counties. The current 6 and 10-in. system provides more than 90% of the petroleum products used in Central Florida, according to Central Florida Pipeline. Its additional capacity will meet the growing region`s demand for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. The new pipeline, along with the existing 10-in. system, will increase total annual capacity from 30 million bbl (82,192 b/d) to approximately 70 million bbl (191,781 b/d). The older 6-in. line will be shutdown when the new line is operating fully. The steps of pipeline installation are described.

  7. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, Jon; Braase, Lori; Papesch, Cynthia; Hurley, David; Tonks, Michael; Zhang, Yongfeng; Gofryk, Krzysztof; Harp, Jason; Fielding, Randy; Knight, Collin; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  8. Missouri Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    10,889 11,502 13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 1988-2014 Aquifers 10,889 11,502 13,845 13,845 13,845 13,845 1999-2014 Total Working Gas Capacity 3,040 3,656 6,000 6,000 6,000 6,000...

  9. Alaska Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2013 2014 2015 View History Total Storage Capacity 83,592

  10. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Methodology Methodology Demonstrated Peak Working Gas Capacity Estimates: Estimates are based on aggregation of the noncoincident peak levels of working gas inventories at individual storage fields as reported monthly over a 60-month period ending in April 2010 on Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Natural Gas Underground Storage Report." The months of measurement for the peak storage volumes by facilities may differ; i.e., the months do not necessarily coincide. As such, the noncoincident peak

  11. Pdvsa plans to hike productive capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-13

    This paper reports that Venezuela's state oil company plans to jump its productive capacity by 117,000 b/d to 2.92 million b/d this year. Petroleos de Venezuela also projects sizable increases for oil and gas reserves and plans record spending in 1992. Meantime, Pdvsa is sounding a warning again about the Venezuelan government's excessive tax take amid debate within the company about spending priorities.

  12. Minnesota Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1988-2014 Aquifers 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 7,000 1999-2014 Total Working Gas Capacity 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2008-2014 ...

  13. Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Capacity Value of Concentrating Solar Power Plants Seyed Hossein Madaeni and Ramteen Sioshansi Ohio State University Paul Denholm National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-51253 June 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract

  14. Solar-thermal fluid-wall reaction processing

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Alan W.; Dahl, Jaimee K.; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Bingham, Carl; Buechler, Karen J.; Grothe, Willy

    2006-04-25

    The present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal dissociation reactions requiring rapid-heating and short residence times using solar energy. In particular, the present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal reactions such as dissociation of hydrocarbon containing gases and hydrogen sulfide to produce hydrogen and dry reforming of hydrocarbon containing gases with carbon dioxide. In the methods of the invention where hydrocarbon containing gases are dissociated, fine carbon black particles are also produced. The present invention also provides solar-thermal reactors and solar-thermal reactor systems.

  15. Solar-Thermal Fluid-Wall Reaction Processing

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, A. W.; Dahl, J. K.; Lewandowski, A. A.; Bingham, C.; Raska Buechler, K. J.; Grothe, W.

    2006-04-25

    The present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal dissociation reactions requiring rapid-heating and short residence times using solar energy. In particular, the present invention provides a method for carrying out high temperature thermal reactions such as dissociation of hydrocarbon containing gases and hydrogen sulfide to produce hydrogen and dry reforming of hydrocarbon containing gases with carbon dioxide. In the methods of the invention where hydrocarbon containing gases are dissociated, fine carbon black particles are also produced. The present invention also provides solar-thermal reactors and solar-thermal reactor systems.

  16. Photovoltaic-thermal collectors

    DOEpatents

    Cox, III, Charles H.

    1984-04-24

    A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

  17. Turbine Thermal Management

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine Thermal Management Fact Sheets Research Team Members Key Contacts Turbine Thermal Management The gas turbine is the workhorse of power generation, and technology advances to current land-based turbines are directly linked to our country's economic and energy security. Technical advancement for any type of gas turbine generally implies better performance, greater efficiency, and extended component life. From the standpoint of cycle efficiency and durability, this suggests that a continual

  18. Underhood Thermal Performance

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Underhood Thermal Performance This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - Computational Fluid Dynamics Project Leader Background As vehicle technology advances, automakers need a better understanding of underhood heat loads, especially as they relate to emissions and fuel efficiency. Manufacturers of heavy-duty vehicles and off-road machines have similar concerns. Ineffective underhood thermal management can lead to higher emissions, reduced

  19. FES Requirements Review 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    FES Requirements Review 2014 Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials FAQ for Case Study Authors BER Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews HEP/NP Requirements Review 2013 FES Requirements Review 2014 FES Attendees 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1

  20. BES Requirements Review 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    BES Requirements Review 2014 Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials FAQ for Case Study Authors BER Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews HEP/NP Requirements Review 2013 FES Requirements Review 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 BES Attendees 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1

  1. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C.

    2015-01-31

    concentrator optical efficiency was found to decrease significantly with increasing aperture width beyond 0.5 m due to parasitic waveguide out-coupling loss and low-level absorption that become dominant at larger scale. A heat transfer model was subsequently implemented to predict collector fluid heat gain and outlet temperature as a function of flow rate using the optical model as a flux input. It was found that the aperture width size limitation imposed by the optical efficiency characteristics of the waveguide limits the absolute optical power delivered to the heat transfer element per unit length. As compared to state-of-the-art parabolic trough CPV system aperture widths approaching 5 m, this limitation leads to an approximate factor of order of magnitude increase in heat transfer tube length to achieve the same heat transfer fluid outlet temperature. The conclusion of this work is that scattering solar thermal concentration cannot be implemented at the scale and efficiency required to compete with the performance of current parabolic trough CSP systems. Applied within the alternate context of CPV, however, the results of this work have likely opened up a transformative new path that enables quasi-static, high efficiency CPV to be implemented on rooftops in the form factor of traditional fixed-panel photovoltaics.

  2. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model Preprint Ben Sigrin, Patrick Sullivan, Eduardo Ibanez, and Robert Margolis Presented at the 40th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference (PVSC-40) Denver, Colorado June 8-13, 2014 Conference Paper NREL/CP-6A20-62015 August 2014 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No.

  3. BER Requirements Review 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials FAQ for Case Study Authors BER Requirements Review 2015 BER Attendees 2015 ASCR Requirements...

  4. Requirements for Wind Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In 2015 Oklahoma amended the Oklahoma Wind Energy Development Act. The amendments added new financial security requirements, setback requirements, and notification requirements for wind energy...

  5. Temperature and compression effects on electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling in aluminum and beryllium: Insights from ab initio simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zi; Li, Chuanying; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping; Kang, Wei

    2015-11-15

    Ultrafast laser experiments on metals usually induce a high electron temperature and a low ion temperature and, thus, an energy relaxation process. The electron heat capacity and electron-phonon coupling factor are crucial thermal quantities to describe this process. We perform ab initio theoretical studies to determine these thermal quantities and their dependence on density and electron temperature for the metals aluminum and beryllium. The heat capacity shows an approximately linear dependence on the temperature, similar to free electron gas, and the compression only slightly affects the capacity. The electron-phonon coupling factor increases with both temperature and density, and the change observed for beryllium is more obvious than that for aluminum. The connections between thermal quantities and electronic/atomic structures are discussed in detail, and the different behaviors of aluminum and beryllium are well explained.

  6. Expansion fractionation capacity of the LPG-ULE plant

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, L.M.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Western Division of PDVSA has among other facilities a NGL Fractionation Complex located onshore in Ul'e. The complex consists of three plants, the first and second older plants, LPG-1 and LPG-2, which fractionate the NGL to produce propane, a butane mix and natural gasoline. The third plant, LPG-3, fractionates the butane mix from the LPG-1 and 2 plants to produce iso and normal butane. Several optimization projects already in progress will increase the NGL production to 12,200 b/d. For this reason it was decided to conduct a study of the existing fractionation facilities and utilities systems to determine their capacities. This evaluation revealed that some of the fractionation towers would have some limitations in the processing of the expected additional production. The study recommended an option to increase the capacity of the fractionation towers by lowering their operating pressure, in order to take advantage of relative volatility increase between the key components, which allows easier separation, as well as reducing the heat duty required. The completed study also determined that this option is more economically convenient than the replacement of the existing fractionation towers.

  7. Steady-state low thermal resistance characterization apparatus: The bulk thermal tester

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, Brian R.; Kolly, Manuel; Blasakis, Nicolas; Gschwend, Dominic; Zürcher, Jonas; Brunschwiler, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    The reliability of microelectronic devices is largely dependent on electronic packaging, which includes heat removal. The appropriate packaging design therefore necessitates precise knowledge of the relevant material properties, including thermal resistance and thermal conductivity. Thin materials and high conductivity layers make their thermal characterization challenging. A steady state measurement technique is presented and evaluated with the purpose to characterize samples with a thermal resistance below 100 mm{sup 2} K/W. It is based on the heat flow meter bar approach made up by two copper blocks and relies exclusively on temperature measurements from thermocouples. The importance of thermocouple calibration is emphasized in order to obtain accurate temperature readings. An in depth error analysis, based on Gaussian error propagation, is carried out. An error sensitivity analysis highlights the importance of the precise knowledge of the thermal interface materials required for the measurements. Reference measurements on Mo samples reveal a measurement uncertainty in the range of 5% and most accurate measurements are obtained at high heat fluxes. Measurement techniques for homogeneous bulk samples, layered materials, and protruding cavity samples are discussed. Ultimately, a comprehensive overview of a steady state thermal characterization technique is provided, evaluating the accuracy of sample measurements with thermal resistances well below state of the art setups. Accurate characterization of materials used in heat removal applications, such as electronic packaging, will enable more efficient designs and ultimately contribute to energy savings.

  8. Optical manufacturing requirements for an AVLIS plant

    SciTech Connect

    Primdahl, K.; Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.

    1997-07-14

    A uranium enrichment plant utilizing Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology is currently being planned. Deployment of the Plant will require tens of thousands of commercial and custom optical components and subsystems. The Plant optical system will be expected to perform at a high level of optical efficiency and reliability in a high-average-power-laser production environment. During construction, demand for this large number of optics must be coordinated with the manufacturing capacity of the optical industry. The general requirements and approach to ensure supply of optical components is described. Dynamic planning and a closely coupled relationship with the optics industry will be required to control cost, schedule, and quality.

  9. Sustainable solar thermal power generation (STPG) technologies in Indian context

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    India is a fast developing country. Some of the factors like population growth, industrialization, liberalization in economic policies, green revolution and awareness toward the environment, are increasing the electricity demand rapidly. As per the 14th Power Survey Report, an energy deficit of (+) 9% and peak demand deficit of (+) 18% have been estimated. Keeping in view the liberalization in economic policies, this deficit may be higher by the year 2000 AD. An estimation indicates that India is blessed with solar energy to the tune of 5 x 10{sup 15} kWh/yr. Being clean and inexhaustible source of energy, it can be used for large-scale power generation in the country. Keeping in view the present state-of-art technologies for STPG in MW range, best possible efforts are required to be made by all the concerned, to develop sustainable STPG technology of the future, specially for tropical regions. Standardization of vital equipment is an important aspect. There are a few required criteria like simple and robust technology, its transfer and adaptation in tropical climate conditions; high plant load factor without fossil-fired backup; availability of plant during evening peak and night hours; least use of fragile components, and capacity optimization for MW plants as per solar irradiance and environmental factors. In this paper, efforts have been made to compare the different STPG technologies. On the basis, of literature surveyed and studies carried out by the author, it may be stated that Central Receiver System technologies using molten salt and volumetric air receiver, along with molten salt and ceramic thermal storage respectively seems to be suitable and comparable in Indian context. Performance of SOLAR-TWO and PHOEBUS plants may be decisive.

  10. An examination of capacity and ramping impacts of wind energy on power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Brendan; Milligan, Michael

    2008-08-15

    When wind serves load outside of the host balancing area, there can be additional capacity requirements - mitigated by faster markets and exacerbated by slower markets. A series of simple thought experiments is useful in illustrating the implications for wind integration studies. (author)

  11. Application of Sleeper Cab Thermal Management Technologies to Reduce Idle Climate Control Loads in Long-Haul Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Lustbader, J. A.; Venson, T.; Adelman, S.; Dehart, C.; Yeakel, S.; Castillo, M. S.

    2012-10-01

    Each intercity long-haul truck in the U.S. idles approximately 1,800 hrs per year, primarily for sleeper cab hotel loads. Including workday idling, over 2 billion gallons of fuel are used annually for truck idling. NREL's CoolCab project works closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that keep the cab comfortable with minimized engine idling and fuel use. The impact of thermal load reduction technologies on idle reduction systems were characterized by conducting thermal soak tests, overall heat transfer tests, and 10-hour rest period A/C tests. Technologies evaluated include advanced insulation packages, a solar reflective film applied to the vehicle's opaque exterior surfaces, a truck featuring both film and insulation, and a battery-powered A/C system. Opportunities were identified to reduce heating and cooling loads for long-haul truck idling by 36% and 34%, respectively, which yielded a 23% reduction in battery pack capacity of the idle-reduction system. Data were also collected for development and validation of a CoolCalc HVAC truck cab model. CoolCalc is an easy-to-use, simplified, physics-based HVAC load estimation tool that requires no meshing, has flexible geometry, excludes unnecessary detail, and is less time-intensive than more detailed computer-aided engineering modeling approaches.

  12. Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

  13. Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, R. L.

    1997-09-03

    In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

  14. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  15. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.; Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-07-15

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  16. The Thermal Collector With Varied Glass Covers

    SciTech Connect

    Luminosu, I.; Pop, N.

    2010-08-04

    The thermal collector with varied glass covers represents an innovation realized in order to build a collector able to reach the desired temperature by collecting the solar radiation from the smallest surface, with the highest efficiency. In the case of the thermal collector with variable cover glasses, the number of the glass plates covering the absorber increases together with the length of the circulation pipe for the working fluid. The thermal collector with varied glass covers compared to the conventional collector better meet user requirements because: for the same temperature increase, has the collecting area smaller; for the same collection area, realizes the highest temperature increase and has the highest efficiency. This works is addressed to researchers in the solar energy and to engineers responsible with air-conditioning systems design or industrial and agricultural products drying.

  17. The Thermal Hydraulic Test of the MEGAPIE Cooling System and System Code Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, W.H.; Dementjev, S.; Groeschel, F.; Dierckx, M.

    2006-07-01

    The MEGAPIE project undertaking in Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) aims at design, building, operating and decommissioning a 1 MW liquid-metal spallation target. The design and manufacturing phases are almost finished. The target and the required ancillary systems were installed on a test facility called MEGAPIE Integral Test Stand (MITS). The cooling system is among the ancillary systems being tested. A series of thermal hydraulic tests were conducted for testing the main functions of the cooling system. These tests were focused on obtaining data about the system's stability, cooling capacity, and the transient responses. The consistency of the data was checked by comparing the heat balance between the input and output power of each heat exchanger (HEX) in the system. The main flow in the target can only be determined by the thermal balance because the built in flow meter did not work properly. The steady state pump speed, flow rates, and overall heat transfer coefficients (OHTC) of the whole cooling system were measured and analyzed for characterization of the system. Those results were used to refine numerical model of the system. A special version of RELAP5/Mod3.2.2 implemented with the fluid properties of LBE was used for the simulation study. Two cases of 'beam trip' transients were simulated and compared with test results. The agreements were good in both cases and the main features of the transients were captured by the RELAP5. This was the first step of validating RELAP5 model. (authors)

  18. Optimization of Storage vs. Compression Capacity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage Volume vs. Compression Capacity Amgad Elgowainy Argonne National Laboratory Presentation at CSD Workshop Argonne National Laboratory March 21, 2013 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 135 150 Mass (Kg) Pressure (bar) and Temperature (K) Time (Sec) Low Pressure Cascade Mid Pressure Cascade High Pressure Pressure Mass Temperature Temperature Temperature 2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 0 15 30 45 60 75 90 105 120 135 150 Mass (Kg)

  19. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2013-06-02

    In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

  20. Transmission capacity reservations implemented through a spot market with transmission congestion contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.M.; Hogan, W.W.; Pope, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    The capacity reservation open access transmission tariff proposed by the FERC is entirely compatible with a competitive bulk power market. Using a point-to-point reservation approach that does not depend on tracking actual flows, capacity rights trading could be coordinated through the system operator. The capacity reservations would be fully tradeable and would fully support the competitive market. Open access to the transmission grid is a necessary support of a competitive market in electricity generation and supply. A key ingredient of open access is a system of capacity allocations for use of the transmission grid. A unique characteristic of electricity transmission is seen in the difficulty of defining transmission rights and matching these rights in a meaningful way to the actual use of the system. The old procedures from the era of vertically integrated utilities will not suffice for the new world of unbundling and competition. Strong network interactions coupled with user flexibility and choice require a new system of transmission capacity definition, reservation and use. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has described a system of point-to-point transmission capacity reservations under the Capacity Reservation Open Access Transmission Tariffs (CRT) proposal. The issues addressed under the proposed CRT are important. In the long run, the CRT could be more important than Order 888, and it offers the key ingredients for the future of a competitive electricity market. However, the FERC faces a significant challenge in developing and explaining the CRT ideas. The CRT proposal has been widely read as a narrow, literal prescription requiring seemingly impossible explicit, decentralized trading of physical transmission rights whose ownership and configuration would have to be rearranged constantly to match the dynamic use of the electric system. Viewed from this narrow perspective, the CRT would present, a host of practical difficulties.

  1. Capacity mapping for optimum utilization of pulverizers for coal fired boilers - article no. 032201

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, C.

    2008-09-15

    Capacity mapping is a process of comparison of standard inputs with actual fired inputs to assess the available standard output capacity of a pulverizer. The base capacity is a function of grindability; fineness requirement may vary depending on the volatile matter (VM) content of the coal and the input coal size. The quantity and the inlet will change depending on the quality of raw coal and output requirement. It should be sufficient to dry pulverized coal (PC). Drying capacity is also limited by utmost PA fan power to supply air. The PA temperature is limited by air preheater (APH) inlet flue gas temperature; an increase in this will result in efficiency loss of the boiler. The higher PA inlet temperature can be attained through the economizer gas bypass, the steam coiled APH, and the partial flue gas recirculation. The PS/coal ratioincreases with a decrease in grindability or pulverizer output and decreases with a decrease in VM. The flammability of mixture has to be monitored on explosion limit. Through calibration, the PA flow and efficiency of conveyance can be verified. The velocities of coal/air mixture to prevent fallout or to avoid erosion in the coal carrier pipe are dependent on the PC particle size distribution. Metal loss of grinding elements inversely depends on the YGP index of coal. Variations of dynamic loading and wearing of grinding elements affect the available milling capacity and percentage rejects. Therefore, capacity mapping in necessary to ensure the available pulverizer capacity to avoid overcapacity or undercapacity running of the pulverizing system, optimizing auxiliary power consumption. This will provide a guideline on the distribution of raw coal feeding in different pulverizers of a boiler to maximize system efficiency and control, resulting in a more cost effective heat rate.

  2. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-06-27

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  3. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  4. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  5. Thermal trim for luminaire

    DOEpatents

    Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

    2013-11-19

    A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

  6. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  7. Thermal hydraulics development for CASL

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, Robert B

    2010-12-07

    This talk will describe the technical direction of the Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) Project within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Department of Energy Innovation Hub. CASL is focused on developing a 'virtual reactor', that will simulate the physical processes that occur within a light-water reactor. These simulations will address several challenge problems, defined by laboratory, university, and industrial partners that make up CASL. CASL's T-H efforts are encompassed in two sub-projects: (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (2) Interface Treatment Methods (ITM). The CFD subproject will develop non-proprietary, scalable, verified and validated macroscale CFD simulation tools. These tools typically require closures for their turbulence and boiling models, which will be provided by the ITM sub-project, via experiments and microscale (such as DNS) simulation results. The near-term milestones and longer term plans of these two sub-projects will be discussed.

  8. Thermal properties for the thermal-hydraulics analyses of the BR2 maximum nominal heat flux.

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G. L.

    2011-05-23

    This memo describes the assumptions and references used in determining the thermal properties for the various materials used in the BR2 HEU (93% enriched in {sup 235}U) to LEU (19.75% enriched in {sup 235}U) conversion feasibility analysis. More specifically, this memo focuses on the materials contained within the pressure vessel (PV), i.e., the materials that are most relevant to the study of impact of the change of fuel from HEU to LEU. This section is regrouping all of the thermal property tables. Section 2 provides a summary of the thermal properties in form of tables while the following sections present the justification of these values. Section 3 presents a brief background on the approach used to evaluate the thermal properties of the dispersion fuel meat and specific heat capacity. Sections 4 to 7 discuss the material properties for the following materials: (i) aluminum, (ii) dispersion fuel meat (UAlx-Al and U-7Mo-Al), (iii) beryllium, and (iv) stainless steel. Section 8 discusses the impact of irradiation on material properties. Section 9 summarizes the material properties for typical operating temperatures. Appendix A elaborates on how to calculate dispersed phase's volume fraction. Appendix B shows the evolution of the BR2 maximum heat flux with burnup.

  9. ASCR Requirements Review 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ASCR Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Attendees 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Science Requirements Reviews » Network Requirements Reviews » ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials

  10. Science Requirements Reviews

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Science Requirements Reviews Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1

  11. BER Requirements Review 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    BER Attendees 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Science Requirements Reviews » Network Requirements Reviews » BER Requirements Review 2015 Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials

  12. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  13. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOEpatents

    Kamo, Roy; Kakwani, Ramesh M.; Valdmanis, Edgars; Woods, Melvins E.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  14. Comparing Resource Adequacy Metrics and Their Influence on Capacity Value: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.

    2014-04-01

    Traditional probabilistic methods have been used to evaluate resource adequacy. The increasing presence of variable renewable generation in power systems presents a challenge to these methods because, unlike thermal units, variable renewable generation levels change over time because they are driven by meteorological events. Thus, capacity value calculations for these resources are often performed to simple rules of thumb. This paper follows the recommendations of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation?s Integration of Variable Generation Task Force to include variable generation in the calculation of resource adequacy and compares different reliability metrics. Examples are provided using the Western Interconnection footprint under different variable generation penetrations.

  15. Fail-Safe Designs for Large Capacity Battery Systems - Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Fail-Safe Designs for Large Capacity Battery Systems United States Patent ... Design for Large Capacity Li-Ion Battery Systems Abstract: Fail-safe systems and ...

  16. Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 273,200 273,200 273,200...

  17. Is there life in other markets? BPA explores preschedule capacity

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    capacity 7152014 12:00 AM Tweet Page Content BPA launched a new process this spring to acquire preschedule (day-ahead) capacity from third-party suppliers. The goal was...

  18. AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) AGA Producing Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

  19. Ukraine-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ukraine-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP-Capacity Building for Low Carbon Growth in Ukraine AgencyCompany Organization United Nations...

  20. Development of a high capacity longwall conveyor. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, C

    1982-05-01

    The objectives of this program were to develop, fabricate, and demonstrate a longwall conveying system capable of transporting coal at a rate of 9000 tons/day (1000 tons/hr) and capable of accommodating a surge rate of 20 tons/min. The equipment was required to have the structural durability to perform with an operating availability of 90%. A review of available literature and discussions with longwall operators identified the problem areas of conveyor design that required attention. The conveyor under this contract was designed and fabricated with special attention given to these areas, and also to be easily maintainable. The design utilized twin 300 hp drives and twin inboard 26-mm chain at 270 ft/min; predictions of capacity and reliability based on the design indicating that it would satisfy the program requirements. Conveyor components were critically tested and the complete conveyor was surface-tested, the results verifying the design specifications. In addition, an instrumentation system was developed with analysis by computer techniques to monitor the performance of the conveyor. The conveyor was installed at a selected mine site, and it was the intention to monitor its performance over the entire longwall panel. Monitoring of the conveyor performance was conducted over approximately one-third of the longwall panel, at which point further effort was suspended. However, during the monitored period, data collected from various sources showed the conveyor to have exhibited its capability of transporting coal at the desired rate, and also to have conformed to the program requirements of reliability and availability.

  1. Final Report: DE- FC36-05GO15063, Fundamental Studies of Advanced High-Capacity, Reversible Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Craig; McGrady, Sean; Severa, Godwin; Eliseo, Jennifer; Chong, Marina

    2015-02-08

    The project was component of the US DOE, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The Sandia National Laboratory led center was established to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE/FreedomCAR 2010 and 2015 system targets for hydrogen storage materials. Our approach entailed a wide variety of activities ranging from synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of new candidate hydrogen storage materials; screening of catalysts for high capacity materials requiring kinetics enhancement; development of low temperature methods for nano-confinement of hydrides and determining its effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrides; and development of novel processes for the direct re-hydrogenation of materials. These efforts have resulted in several advancements the development of hydrogen storage materials. We have greatly extended the fundamental knowledge about the highly promising hydrogen storage carrier, alane (AlH₃), by carrying out the first crystal structure determinations and the first determination of the heats of dehydrogenation of β–AlH₃ and γ-AlD₃. A low-temperature homogenous organometallic approach to incorporation of Al and Mg based hydrides into carbon aerogels has been developed that that allows high loadings without degradation of the nano-porous scaffold. Nano-confinement was found to significantly improve the dehydrogenation kinetics but not effect the enthalpy of dehydrogenation. We conceived, characterized, and synthesized a novel class of potential hydrogen storage materials, bimetallic borohydrides. These novel compounds were found to have many favorable properties including release of significant amounts of hydrogen at moderate temperatures (75-190ºC). However, in situ IR studies in tandem with thermal gravimetric analysis have shown that about 0.5 equivalents of diborane are released during the dehydrogenation making re

  2. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  3. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  4. Thermal barrier coating

    DOEpatents

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles; Sabol, Stephen M.; Goedjen, John G.

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  5. Thermal Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  6. Ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.

    1983-03-17

    A brief explanation of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) concept and an estimate of the amount of energy that can be produced from the ocean resource without introducing environmental concerns are presented. Use of the OTEC system to generate electric power and products which can replace fossil fuels is shown. The OTEC program status and its prospects for the future are discussed.

  7. Wind Gains ground, hitting 33 GW of installed capacity

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-15

    The U.S. currently has 33 GW of installed wind capacity. Wind continues to gain ground, accounting for 42 percent of new capacity additions in the US in 2008.Globally, there are now 146 GW of wind capacity with an impressive and sustained growth trajectory that promises to dominate new generation capacities in many developing countries. The U.S., however, lags many European countries, with wind providing roughly 2 percent of electricity generation.

  8. Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt015_es_wise_2012_p.pdf (321.02 KB) More Documents & Publications Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production Expansion of Novolyte Capacity for Lithium Ion Electrolyte Production FY 2011

  9. Doubling Geothermal Generation Capacity by 2020: A Strategic Analysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Doubling Geothermal Generation Capacity by 2020: A Strategic Analysis Doubling Geothermal Generation Capacity by 2020: A Strategic Analysis NREL Doubling Geothermal Capacity.pdf (890.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Geothermal Exploration Policy Mechanisms track 1: systems analysis | geothermal 2015 peer review Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios

  10. Quasi-superactivation for the classical capacity of quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2014-12-04

    The superactivation effect has its roots in the extreme violation of additivity of the channel capacity and enables to reliably transmit quantum information over zero-capacity quantum channels. In this work we demonstrate a similar effect for the classical capacity of a quantum channel which previously was thought to be impossible.

  11. Economic growth, carrying capacity, and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Arrow, K.; Bolin, B.; Costanza, R.; Dasgupta, P.; Folke, C.; Maeler, K.G.; Holling, C.S.; Jansson, B.O.; Levin, S.; Perrings, C.

    1995-04-28

    National and international economic policy has usually ignored the environment. In areas where the environment is beginning to impinge on policy, as in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), it remains a tangential concern, and the presumption is often made that economic growth and economic liberalization (including the liberalization of international trade) are, in some sense, good for the environment. This notion has meant that economy-wide policy reforms designed to promote growth and liberalization have been encouraged with little regard to their environmental consequences, presumably on the assumption that these consequences would either take care of themselves or could be dealt with separately. In this article, we discuss the relation between economic growth and environmental quality, and the link between economic activity and the carrying capacity and resilience of the environment.

  12. Arkansas Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    21,760 21,359 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 1988-2015 Salt Caverns 0 0 0 1999-2015 Aquifers 0 0 0 1999-2015 Depleted Fields 21,760 21,359 21,853 21,853 21,853 21,853 1999-2015 Total Working Gas Capacity 13,898 12,036 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 2008-2015 Salt Caverns 0 0 0 2012-2015 Aquifers 0 0 0 2012-2015 Depleted Fields 13,898 12,036 12,178 12,178 12,178 12,178 2008-2015 Total Number of Existing Fields 2 2 2 2 2 2 1989-2015 Depleted Fields 2 2 2 2 2 2

  13. California Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    542,511 570,511 592,411 599,711 599,711 601,808 1988-2015 Salt Caverns 0 0 0 1999-2015 Aquifers 0 12,000 12,000 12,000 1999-2015 Depleted Fields 542,511 570,511 592,411 587,711 587,711 589,808 1999-2015 Total Working Gas Capacity 311,096 335,396 349,296 374,296 374,296 375,496 2008-2015 Salt Caverns 0 0 0 2012-2015 Aquifers 0 10,000 10,000 10,000 2009-2015 Depleted Fields 311,096 335,396 349,296 364,296 364,296 365,496 2008-2015 Total Number of Existing Fields 13 13 14 14 14 14 1989-2015 Salt

  14. West Virginia Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    531,480 524,324 524,324 524,337 528,637 528,837 1988-2015 Salt Caverns 0 0 0 1999-2015 Aquifers 200 2015-2015 Depleted Fields 531,480 524,324 524,324 524,337 528,637 528,637 1999-2015 Total Working Gas Capacity 260,744 256,692 256,643 258,056 262,305 259,381 2008-2015 Salt Caverns 0 0 0 2012-2015 Aquifers 66 2015-2015 Depleted Fields 260,744 256,692 256,643 258,056 262,305 259,315 2008-2015 Total Number of Existing Fields 32 30 30 30 30 31 1989-2015 Aquifers 1 2015-2015 Depleted Fields 32 30 30

  15. U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Gross Input to Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Units 16,261 16,222 16,477 16,803 16,994 16,975 1985-2016 Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) 18,307 18,320 18,320 18,436 18,436 18,436 1985-2016 Operating 18,072 17,607 18,086 18,194 18,284 18,316 1985-2016 Idle 236 713 234 242 152 120 1985-2016 Operable Utilization Rate (%) 88.8 88.6 89.9 91.1 92.2 92.1 1985-2016 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  16. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple

  17. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  18. Regulators, Requirements, Statutes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Act (CAA) Requirements for air quality and air emissions from facility operations Clean Water Act (CWA) Requirements for water quality and water discharges from facility...

  19. Requirements Review Reports

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Editors, "High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics Network Requirements - Final Report", ESnet Network Requirements Workshop, August 2013, LBNL 6642E Download File: HEP-NP-Net-Req...

  20. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOEpatents

    Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

    1999-07-27

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

  1. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOEpatents

    Morman, James A.; Wei, Thomas Y. C.; Reifman, Jaques

    1999-01-01

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

  2. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1984-03-30

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the controlled source audio frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (1) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (2) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the conate water of the production field; (3) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (4) mathematically comparing the maps from step (1) and step (3) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  3. Thermally conductive cementitious grout for geothermal heat pump systems

    DOEpatents

    Allan, Marita

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive cement-sand grout for use with a geothermal heat pump system. The cement sand grout contains cement, silica sand, a superplasticizer, water and optionally bentonite. The present invention also includes a method of filling boreholes used for geothermal heat pump systems with the thermally conductive cement-sand grout. The cement-sand grout has improved thermal conductivity over neat cement and bentonite grouts, which allows shallower bore holes to be used to provide an equivalent heat transfer capacity. In addition, the cement-sand grouts of the present invention also provide improved bond strengths and decreased permeabilities. The cement-sand grouts can also contain blast furnace slag, fly ash, a thermoplastic air entraining agent, latex, a shrinkage reducing admixture, calcium oxide and combinations thereof.

  4. Methods for enhancing mapping of thermal fronts in oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David O.; Montoya, Paul C.; Wayland, Jr., James R.

    1987-01-01

    A method for enhancing the resistivity contrasts of a thermal front in an oil recovery production field as measured by the CSAMT technique is disclosed. This method includes the steps of: (a) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field; (b) introducing a solution of a dopant material into the production field at a concentration effective to alter the resistivity associated with the thermal front; said dopant material having a high cation exchange capacity which might be selected from the group consisting of montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite clays; said material being soluble in the connate water of the production field; (c) preparing a CSAMT-determined topological resistivity map of the production field while said dopant material is moving therethrough; and (d) mathematically comparing the maps from step (a) and step (c) to determine the location of the thermal front. This method is effective with the steam flood, fire flood and water flood techniques.

  5. Demonstration test of a reformer employing thermal radiation media for multi-megawatt fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Y.; Horie, T.; Ogawa, M.; Mizumoto, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The authors made presentation of functions and roles of the thermal radiation media, extensive test results on the thermal radiation media sample and characteristics of an atmospheric 500kw PAFC model facility together with perspective to a 5MW class dispersed-use plant. This paper outlines the specifications and features of a prototype reformer having a capacity of 650kw class PAFC and configuration of atmospheric 500kw PAFC demonstration plant.

  6. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers National Solar Thermal Test Facility HomeTag:National Solar Thermal Test Facility Molten Nitrate Salt Initial Flow Testing is a ...

  7. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    9 Companies involved in solar thermal collector related activities by type, 2008 and 2009 ... 26 32 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal

  8. Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturing Activities

    Annual Energy Outlook

    8 Employment in the solar thermal collector industry, 2000 - 2009 2000 284 2001 256 2002 ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63A, "Annual Solar Thermal

  9. General volume sizing strategy for thermal storage system using phase change material for concentrated solar thermal power plant

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Xu, Ben; Li, Peiwen; Chan, Cholik; Tumilowicz, Eric

    2014-12-18

    With an auxiliary large capacity thermal storage using phase change material (PCM), Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) is a promising technology for high efficiency solar energy utilization. In a thermal storage system, a dual-media thermal storage tank is typically adopted in industry for the purpose of reducing the use of the heat transfer fluid (HTF) which is usually expensive. While the sensible heat storage system (SHSS) has been well studied, a dual-media latent heat storage system (LHSS) still needs more attention and study. The volume sizing of the thermal storage tank, considering daily cyclic operations, is of particular significance. In thismore » paper, a general volume sizing strategy for LHSS is proposed, based on an enthalpy-based 1D transient model. One example was presented to demonstrate how to apply this strategy to obtain an actual storage tank volume. With this volume, a LHSS can supply heat to a thermal power plant with the HTF at temperatures above a cutoff point during a desired 6 hours of operation. This general volume sizing strategy is believed to be of particular interest for the solar thermal power industry.« less

  10. General volume sizing strategy for thermal storage system using phase change material for concentrated solar thermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ben; Li, Peiwen; Chan, Cholik; Tumilowicz, Eric

    2014-12-18

    With an auxiliary large capacity thermal storage using phase change material (PCM), Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) is a promising technology for high efficiency solar energy utilization. In a thermal storage system, a dual-media thermal storage tank is typically adopted in industry for the purpose of reducing the use of the heat transfer fluid (HTF) which is usually expensive. While the sensible heat storage system (SHSS) has been well studied, a dual-media latent heat storage system (LHSS) still needs more attention and study. The volume sizing of the thermal storage tank, considering daily cyclic operations, is of particular significance. In this paper, a general volume sizing strategy for LHSS is proposed, based on an enthalpy-based 1D transient model. One example was presented to demonstrate how to apply this strategy to obtain an actual storage tank volume. With this volume, a LHSS can supply heat to a thermal power plant with the HTF at temperatures above a cutoff point during a desired 6 hours of operation. This general volume sizing strategy is believed to be of particular interest for the solar thermal power industry.

  11. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Sciences Applications National Solar Thermal Test Facility Nuclear Energy ...

  12. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Joseph P.; Andraka, Charles E.; Lukens, Laurance L.; Moreno, James B.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  13. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.; Deo, M.; Eddings, E.; Sarofim, A.; Gueishen, K.; Hradisky, M.; Kelly, K.; Mandalaparty, P.; Zhang, H.

    2012-01-11

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coal's carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO2 sequestration.

  14. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  15. Thermal synthesis apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R [Idaho Falls, ID; Detering, Brent A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-08-18

    An apparatus for thermal conversion of one or more reactants to desired end products includes an insulated reactor chamber having a high temperature heater such as a plasma torch at its inlet end and, optionally, a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. In a thermal conversion method, reactants are injected upstream from the reactor chamber and thoroughly mixed with the plasma stream before entering the reactor chamber. The reactor chamber has a reaction zone that is maintained at a substantially uniform temperature. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle, which "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage, or is discharged through an outlet pipe without the convergent-divergent nozzle. The desired end products are then separated from the gaseous stream.

  16. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  17. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  18. THERMAL NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1960-01-12

    A novel thermal reactor was designed in which a first reflector formed from a high atomic weight, nonmoderating material is disposed immediately adjacent to the reactor core. A second reflector composed of a moderating material is disposed outwardly of the first reflector. The advantage of this novel reflector arrangement is that the first reflector provides a high slow neutron flux in the second reflector, where irradiation experiments may be conducted with a small effect on reactor reactivity.

  19. Thermal reactor safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  20. High Performance Electrical and Thermal Conductors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    characterize the physical, thermal and electrical properties of covetic materials and ... thermal diffusivity, thermal and electrical conductivities are measured to validate ...

  1. Solar Thermal Electric | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Thermal Electric Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarThermalEl...

  2. Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management

  3. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal ...

  4. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators "This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's ...

  5. Network Requirements Reviews

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviews Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials FAQ for Case Study Authors BER Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site

  6. Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Account Sectors, May 2003 | Department of Energy Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National Account Sectors, May 2003 Market Potential for Advanced Thermally Activated BCHP in Five National Account Sectors, May 2003 Potential distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications in the United States cover a broad spectrum of market segments, from nursing homes requiring a few hundred kilowatts (kW) of power and an economical hot water source

  7. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    DOEpatents

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  8. Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-Ion Battery Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Ireland, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2012-07-15

    A fault leading to a thermal runaway in a lithium-ion battery is believed to grow over time from a latent defect. Significant efforts have been made to detect lithium-ion battery safety faults to proactively facilitate actions minimizing subsequent losses. Scaling up a battery greatly changes the thermal and electrical signals of a system developing a defect and its consequent behaviors during fault evolution. In a large-capacity system such as a battery for an electric vehicle, detecting a fault signal and confining the fault locally in the system are extremely challenging. This paper introduces a fail-safe design methodology for large-capacity lithium-ion battery systems. Analysis using an internal short circuit response model for multi-cell packs is presented that demonstrates the viability of the proposed concept for various design parameters and operating conditions. Locating a faulty cell in a multiple-cell module and determining the status of the fault's evolution can be achieved using signals easily measured from the electric terminals of the module. A methodology is introduced for electrical isolation of a faulty cell from the healthy cells in a system to prevent further electrical energy feed into the fault. Experimental demonstration is presented supporting the model results.

  9. Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss

    DOEpatents

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Wu, Yan

    2010-03-16

    The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

  10. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.F.; Allen, G.C.; Shipers, L.R.; Dobranich, D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Harmon, C.D.; Fan, W.C. ); Todosow, M. )

    1992-09-22

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized.

  11. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Marat Khafizov; Clarissa Yablinsky; Todd Allen; David Hurley

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  12. Vertical barriers with increased sorption capacities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradl, H.B.

    1997-12-31

    Vertical barriers are commonly used for the containment of contaminated areas. Due to the very small permeability of the barrier material which is usually in the order of magnitude of 10-10 m/s or less the advective contaminant transport can be more or less neglected. Nevertheless, there will always be a diffusive contaminant transport through the barrier which is caused by the concentration gradient. Investigations have been made to increase the sorption capacity of the barrier material by adding substances such as organoclays, zeolites, inorganic oxides and fly ashes. The contaminants taken into account where heavy metals (Pb) and for organic contaminants Toluole and Phenantrene. The paper presents results of model calculations and experiments. As a result, barrier materials can be designed {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} depending on the individual contaminant range of each site (e.g. landfills, gasworks etc.). The parameters relevant for construction such as rheological properties, compressive strength and permeability are not affected by the addition of the sorbents.

  13. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software Representation of Limited Rights Data and Restricted Computer Software (44.02 KB) More Documents & Publications CLB-1003.PDF� Intellectual Property Provisions (CSB-1003) Cooperative Agreement Research, Development, or Demonstration Domestic Small Businesses CDLB-1003.PDF�

    Representation of Solar Capacity Value

  14. Thermal control structure and garment

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Cameron, Christopher Stan

    2012-03-13

    A flexible thermally conductive structure. The structure generally includes a plurality of thermally conductive yarns, at least some of which are at least partially disposed adjacent to an elastomeric material. Typically, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive yarns is configured as a sheet. The yarns may be constructed from graphite, metal, or similar materials. The elastomeric material may be formed from urethane or silicone foam that is at least partially collapsed, or from a similar material. A thermal management garment is provided, the garment incorporating a flexible thermally conductive structure.

  15. Thermal management systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2006-12-12

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  16. Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

  17. Photovoltaics for high capacity space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, D.J.

    1988-10-01

    The anticipated energy requirements of future space missions will grow by factors approaching 100 or more, particularly as a permanent manned presence is established in space. The advances that can be expected in solar array performance and lifetime, when coupled with advanced, high energy density storage batteries and/or fuel cells, will continue to make photovoltaic energy conversion a viable power generating option for the large systems of the future. The specific technologies required to satisfy any particular set of power requirements will vary from mission to mission. Nonetheless, in almost all cases the technology push will be toward lighter weight and higher efficiency, whether of solar arrays or storage devices. This paper will describe the content and direction of the current NASA program in space photovoltaic technology. The paper will also discuss projected system level capabilities of photovoltaic power systems in the context of some of the new mission opportunities under study by NASA, such as a manned lunar base, and a manned visit to Mars.

  18. Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-12-31

    EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvements in engine emissions have been obtained, but fuel economy improvements have

  19. Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Requirements Requirements Statutes 42 U.S.C. 4321: National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 42 U.S.C. 4371: Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 1970 42 U.S.C. 7401: Clean Air ...

  20. Requirements Management Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2009-08-13

    This application is a simplified and customized version of the RBA and CTS databases to capture federal, site, and facility requirements, link to actions that must be performed to maintain compliance with their contractual and other requirements.

  1. Development of design basis capacity for SNF project systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pajunen, A.L.

    1996-02-27

    An estimate of the design capacity for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project systems producing Multi-Canister Overpacks is developed based on completing fuel processing in a two year period. The design basis capacity for systems relates the desired annual processing rate to potential operating inefficiencies which may be actually experienced to project a design capacity for systems. The basis for estimating operating efficiency factors is described. Estimates of the design basis capacity were limited to systems actually producing the Multi-Canister Overpack. These systems include Fuel Retrieval, K Basin SNF Vacuum Drying, Canister Storage Building support for Staging and Storage, and Hot Vacuum conditioning. The capacity of other systems are assumed to be derived from these system capacities such that systems producing a Multi-Canister Overpack are not constrained.

  2. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  3. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  4. Thermally switchable dielectrics

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

    2013-04-30

    Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

  5. Response microcantilever thermal detector

    DOEpatents

    Cunningham, Joseph P.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Evans III, Boyd M.

    2004-10-19

    A "folded leg" thermal detector microcantilever constructed of a substrate with at least one leg interposed between a fixed end and a deflective end, each leg having at least three essentially parallel leg segments interconnected on alternate opposing ends and aligned in a serpentine pattern with only the first leg segment attached to the fixed end and only the last leg segment attached to the deflective end. Alternate leg segment are coated on the pentalever with coating applied to the top of the first, third, and fifth leg segments of each leg and to the bottom of the second and fourth leg segments of each leg.

  6. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

    1989-07-18

    A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

  7. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  8. Thermal transient anemometer

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, James L.; Vresk, Josip

    1989-01-01

    A thermal transient anemometer having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe.

  9. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOEpatents

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V.; Bak, Chan S.

    1983-01-01

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  10. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Characterization and Development of Advanced...

  11. Thermomechanical measurements on thermal microactuators. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal and mechanical measurements for the bent-beam polycrystalline silicon thermal ... SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES; SILICON; VALIDATION Microactuators.; Ceramic ...

  12. Locational electricity capacity markets: Alternatives to restore the missing signals

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, Amparo D.; Fraser, Hamish

    2007-03-15

    In the absence of a properly functioning electricity demand side, well-designed capacity payment mechanisms hold more promise for signaling the value of capacity than non-CPM alternatives. Locational CPMs that rely on market-based principles, such as forward capacity auctions, are superior to cost-based payments directed to specific must-run generators, as CPMs at least provide a meaningful price signal about the economic value of resources to potential investors. (author)

  13. HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage | Department of Energy HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Presentation for the high temperature combinatorial screening for high capacity hydrogen storage meeting ht_ucf_raissi.pdf (999.19 KB) More Documents & Publications DetecTape - A Localized Visual Detector for Hydrogen Leaks DetecTape - A Localized Visual Detector for Hydrogen Leaks Webinar

  14. High Capacity Composite Carbon Anodes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Capacity Composite Carbon Anodes High Capacity Composite Carbon Anodes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting es114_pol_2012_o.pdf (2.79 MB) More Documents & Publications High Capacity Composite Carbon Anodes Fabricated by Autogenic Reactions Spherical Carbon Anodes Fabricated by Autogenic Reactions FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D

  15. Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity Better Buildings Residential Network Program Sustainability Peer Exchange Call Series: Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity, Call Slides and Summary, May 8, 2014. Call Slides and Summary (551.65 KB) More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Working with Schools Rainbows and Leprechauns: Finding

  16. PIT Coating Requirements Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MINTEER, D.J.

    2000-10-20

    This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

  17. System Design Description PFP Thermal Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    2000-04-25

    The purpose of this document is to provide a system design description (SDD) and design basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Thermal Stabilization project. The chief objective of the SDD is to document the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) that establish and maintain the facility Safety Envelope necessary for normal safe operation of the facility; as identified in the FSAR, the OSRs, and Safety Assessment Documents (SADs). This safety equipment documentation should satisfy guidelines for the SDD given in WHC-SD-CP-TI-18 1, Criteria for Identification and Control of Equipment Necessary for Preservation of the Safety Envelope and Safe Operation of PFP. The basis for operational, alarm response, maintenance, and surveillance procedures are also identified and justified in this document. This document and its appendices address the following elements of the PFP Thermal Stabilization project: Functional and design requirements; Design description; Safety Envelope Analysis; Safety Equipment Class; and Operational, maintenance and surveillance procedures.

  18. Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes

    DOEpatents

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.; Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  19. Low thermal expansion seal ring support

    DOEpatents

    Dewis, David W.; Glezer, Boris

    2000-01-01

    Today, the trend is to increase the temperature of operation of gas turbine engines. To cool the components with compressor discharge air, robs air which could otherwise be used for combustion and creates a less efficient gas turbine engine. The present low thermal expansion sealing ring support system reduces the quantity of cooling air required while maintaining life and longevity of the components. Additionally, the low thermal expansion sealing ring reduces the clearance "C","C'" demanded between the interface between the sealing surface and the tip of the plurality of turbine blades. The sealing ring is supported by a plurality of support members in a manner in which the sealing ring and the plurality of support members independently expand and contract relative to each other and to other gas turbine engine components.

  20. High Energy Density Thermal Batteries: Thermoelectric Reactors for Efficient Automotive Thermal Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-15

    HEATS Project: Sheetak is developing a new HVAC system to store the energy required for heating and cooling in EVs. This system will replace the traditional refrigerant-based vapor compressors and inefficient heaters used in today’s EVs with efficient, light, and rechargeable hot-and-cold thermal batteries. The high energy density thermal battery—which does not use any hazardous substances—can be recharged by an integrated solid-state thermoelectric energy converter while the vehicle is parked and its electrical battery is being charged. Sheetak’s converters can also run on the electric battery if needed and provide the required cooling and heating to the passengers—eliminating the space constraint and reducing the weight of EVs that use more traditional compressors and heaters.

  1. Spain Installed Wind Capacity Website | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentspain-installed-wind-capacity-website Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Feed-in Tariffs This website presents an...

  2. Tunisia-Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia) Jump to: navigation, search Name Capacity Development for GHG inventories and MRV in Tunisia AgencyCompany Organization...

  3. Indonesia-ECN Capacity building for energy policy formulation...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and...

  4. High Methane Storage Capacity in Aluminum Metal-Organic Frameworks...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    High Methane Storage Capacity in Aluminum Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Felipe Gndara, Hiroyasu Furukawa, Seungkyu Lee, and Omar M. Yaghi, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 136,...

  5. Property:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Offshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric...

  6. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    49thackeray2011o.pdf (1.66 MB) More Documents & Publications Cathodes Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Layered Cathode Materials

  7. "Period","Annual Production Capacity",,"Monthly B100 Production...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Biodiesel production capacity and production" "million gallons" "Period","Annual ... is the industry designation for pure biodiesel; a biodiesel blend contains both pure ...

  8. Table 4. Biodiesel producers and production capacity by state...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Biodiesel producers and production capacity by state, July 2016" "State","Number of ... Administration, Form EIA-22M ""Monthly Biodiesel Production Survey""" "U.S. Energy ...

  9. ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    " ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In-Service Date","Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line Information",,,,"Conductor Characteristics",,,"Circuits...

  10. ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In-Service Date","Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line Information",,,,"Conductor Characteristics",,,"Circuits...

  11. ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"(Various)" ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In-Service",,"Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line Information",,,,"Conductor Characteristics",,,"Circuits...

  12. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United ... Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700 "Nuclear",100334,100266,100755,101004,10116...

  13. GIZ-Best Practices in Capacity Building Approaches | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Building Approaches: Recommendations for the Design of a Long -Term Capacity Building Strategy for the Wind and Solar Sectors by the MEF Working Group AgencyCompany Organization:...

  14. Development of High-Capacity Cathode Materials with Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    & Publications Development of High-Capacity Cathode Materials with Integrated Structures Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Design and Evaluation of High...

  15. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High...

  16. Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from EGS Geothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric...

  17. Additional capacities seen in metal oxide lithium-ion battery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional capacities seen in metal oxide lithium-ion battery electrodes Citation Details ... Language: English Subject: energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), defects, ...

  18. "US Commercial Crude Oil Stocks and Storage Capacity"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oil Stocks and Storage Capacity" "(thousand barrels except where noted)" ,40633,40816,40999,41182,41364,41547,41729,41912,42094,42248,42431 "Commercial Crude Oil ...

  19. Degradation and (de)lithiation processes in the high capacity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Degradation and (de)lithiation processes in the high capacity battery material LiFeBOsubscript 3 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Degradation and ...

  20. Wireless Battery Management System for Safe High-Capacity Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wireless Battery Management System for Safe High-Capacity Energy Storage Citation Details ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 25 ...

  1. Africa Adaptation Programme: Capacity Building Experiences-Improving...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa Language: English Africa Adaptation Programme: Capacity Building Experiences-Improving Access,...

  2. Renewable Motor Fuel Production Capacity Under H.R.4

    Reports and Publications

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes renewable motor fuel production capacity with the assumption that ethanol will be used to meet the renewable fuels standard.

  3. CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    docsresources973TransportNAMACapacity-Building.pdf Cost: Free Language: English CCAP-Data and Capacity Needs for Transportation NAMAs Screenshot References:...

  4. DOE Receives Responses on the Implementation of Large-Capacity...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    establishing alternative test procedures for existing large-capacity residential clothes washer models and units. We received responses from several parties, which can be...

  5. Working and Net Available Shell Storage Capacity as of September...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    and also allows for tracking seasonal shifts in petroleum product usage of tanks and underground storage. Using the new storage capacity data, it will be possible to calculate...

  6. U.S. Geothermal Energy Capacity Grew 6% in 2009

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal energy capacity expanded 6% in the United States in 2009, due to six new geothermal plants which came online, adding 176.68 megawatts (MW).

  7. Development of High-Capacity Cathode Materials with Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es019kang2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of High-Capacity Cathode Materials with Integrated Structures Development of...

  8. First Steps Towards Tribal Weatherization: Human Capacity Development

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Towards Tribal Weatherization: Human Capacity Development October 2011 October 2011 Cook Inlet Tribal Council's Weatherization Apprenticeship October 2011 March 2010 - March 2012 ...

  9. First Steps Towards Tribal Weatherization: Human Capacity Development

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Steps Towards tribal weatherization: human capacity development October 2010 - Cook Inlet Tribal Council Weatherization Apprenticeship March 2010 February 2012 Cook Inlet Tribal ...

  10. Using SiO Anodes for High Capacity, High Rate Electrodes for...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Using SiO Anodes for High Capacity, High Rate Electrodes for Lithium Ion Batteries ... areal capacities and good capacity retention for application in lithium ion batteries. ...

  11. Thermal, chemical, and mechanical cookoff modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    A Thermally Reactive, Elastic-plastic eXplosive code, TREX, has been developed to analyze coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical effects associated with cookoff simulation of confined or unconfined energetic materials. In confined systems, pressure buildup precedes thermal runaway, and unconfined energetic material expands to relieve high stress. The model was developed based on nucleation, decomposition chemistry, and elastic/plastic mechanical behavior of a material with a distribution of internal defects represented as clusters of spherical inclusions. A local force balance, with mass continuity constraints, forms the basis of the model requiring input of temperature and reacted gas fraction. This constitutive material model has been incorporated into a quasistatic mechanics code SANTOS as a material module which predicts stress history associated with a given strain history. The thermal-chemical solver XCHEM has been coupled to SANTOS to provide temperature and reacted gas fraction. Predicted spatial history variables include temperature, chemical species, solid/gas pressure, solid/gas density, local yield stress, and gas volume fraction. One-Dimensional Time to explosion (ODTX) experiments for TATB and PBX 9404 (HMX and NC) are simulated using global multistep kinetic mechanisms and the reactive elastic-plastic constitutive model. Pressure explosions, rather than thermal runaway, result in modeling slow cookoff experiments of confined conventional energetic materials such as TATB. For PBX 9404, pressure explosions also occur at fast cookoff conditions because of low temperature reactions of nitrocellulose resulting in substantial pressurization. A demonstrative calculation is also presented for reactive heat flow in a hollow, propellant-filled, stainless steel cylinder, representing a rocket motor. This example simulation show

  12. RMACS software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Gneiting, B.C.

    1996-10-01

    This document defines the essential user (or functional) requirements of the Requirements Management and Assured Compliance System (RMACS), which is used by the Tank Waste Remediation System program (TWRS). RMACS provides a computer-based environment that TWRS management and systems engineers can use to identify, define, and document requirements. The intent of the system is to manage information supporting definition of the TWRS technical baseline using a structured systems engineering process. RMACS has the capability to effectively manage a complete set of complex requirements and relationships in a manner that satisfactorily assures compliance to the program requirements over the TWRS life-cycle.

  13. Requirement-Reviews.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2 013 Requirements Reviews * 1½-day reviews with each Program Office * Computing and storage requirements for next 5 years * Participants - DOE ADs & Program Managers - Leading scientists using NERSC & key potential users - NERSC staff 2 High Energy Physics Fusion R esearch Reports From 6 Requirements Reviews Have Been Published 3 h%p://www.nersc.gov/science/requirements---reviews/ final---reports/ * Compu<ng a nd s torage requirements f or 2013/2014 * Execu<ve S ummary o f

  14. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  15. Solar thermal power system

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-06-15

    A solar thermal power generator includes an inclined elongated boiler tube positioned in the focus of a solar concentrator for generating steam from water. The boiler tube is connected at one end to receive water from a pressure vessel as well as connected at an opposite end to return steam back to the vessel in a fluidic circuit arrangement that stores energy in the form of heated water in the pressure vessel. An expander, condenser, and reservoir are also connected in series to respectively produce work using the steam passed either directly (above a water line in the vessel) or indirectly (below a water line in the vessel) through the pressure vessel, condense the expanded steam, and collect the condensed water. The reservoir also supplies the collected water back to the pressure vessel at the end of a diurnal cycle when the vessel is sufficiently depressurized, so that the system is reset to repeat the cycle the following day. The circuital arrangement of the boiler tube and the pressure vessel operates to dampen flow instabilities in the boiler tube, damp out the effects of solar transients, and provide thermal energy storage which enables time shifting of power generation to better align with the higher demand for energy during peak energy usage periods.

  16. UPGRADING METHANE USING ULTRA-FAST THERMAL SWING ADSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Lee Tonkovich

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to design and demonstrate an approach to upgrade low-BTU methane streams from coal mines to pipeline-quality natural gas. The objective of Phase I of the project was to assess the feasibility of upgrading low-Btu methane streams using ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA) using Velocys' modular microchannel process technology. The project is on schedule and under budget. For Task 1.1, the open literature, patent information, and vendor contacts were surveyed to identify adsorbent candidates for experimental validation and subsequent demonstration in an MPT-based ultra-fast TSA separation for methane upgrading. The leading candidates for preferential adsorption of methane over nitrogen are highly microporous carbons. A Molecular Gate{trademark} zeolite from Engelhard Corporation has emerged as a candidate. For Task 1.2, experimental evaluation of adsorbents was initiated, and data were collected on carbon (MGN-101) from PICA, Inc. This carbon demonstrated a preferential capacity for methane over nitrogen, as well as a reasonable thermal swing differential capacity for a 90% methane and 10% nitrogen mixture. A similar methane swing capacity at 2 psig was measured. The mixture composition is relevant because gob gas contains nearly 85% methane and must be purified to 97% methane for pipeline quality.

  17. Thermal properties of U–Mo alloys irradiated to moderate burnup and power

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Pool, Karl N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Smith, Frances N.

    2015-09-01

    A variety of physical and thermal property measurements as a function of temperature and fission density were performed on irradiated U-Mo alloy monolithic fuel samples with a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061. The U-Mo alloy density, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are strongly influenced by increasing burnup, mainly as the result of irradiation induced recrystallization and fission gas bubble formation and coalescence. U-Mo chemistry, specifically Mo content, and specific heat capacity was not as sensitive to increasing burnup. Measurements indicated that thermal conductivity of the U-Mo alloy decreased approximately 30% for a fission density of 2.88 × 1021 fissions cm-3 and approximately 45% for a fission density of 4.08 × 1021 fissions cm-3 from unirradiated values at 200 oC. An empirical thermal conductivity degradation model developed previously and summarized here agrees well with the experimental measurements.

  18. Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

  19. Thermal battery degradation mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Missert, Nancy A.; Brunke, Lyle Brent

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to investigate the effect of accelerated aging on LiSi based anodes in simulated MC3816 batteries. DRIFTS spectra showed that the oxygen, carbonate, hydroxide and sulfur content of the anodes changes with aging times and temperatures, but not in a monotonic fashion that could be correlated to phase evolution. Bands associated with sulfur species were only observed in anodes taken from batteries aged in wet environments, providing further evidence for a reaction pathway facilitated by H2S transport from the cathode, through the separator, to the anode. Loss of battery capacity with accelerated aging in wet environments was correlated to loss of FeS2 in the catholyte pellets, suggesting that the major contribution to battery performance degradation results from loss of active cathode material.

  20. Other Requirements - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Other Requirements by Website Administrator More filters Less filters Other Policy Type Secretarial Memo Program Office Memo Invoked Technical Standards 100 Office of Primary Interest (OPI) Office of Primary Interest (OPI) All AD - Office of Administrative Services AU - Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security CF - Office of the Chief Financial Officer CI - Office of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs CN - Office of Counterintelligence CP - Office of the Press Secretary CR -

  1. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-10

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

  2. Calibrating thermal behavior of electronics

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2016-05-31

    A method includes determining a relationship between indirect thermal data for a processor and a measured temperature associated with the processor, during a calibration process, obtaining the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor, and determining an actual significant temperature associated with the processor during the actual operation using the indirect thermal data for the processor during actual operation of the processor and the relationship.

  3. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS WITH SEISMIC ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; RINKER MW; JOHNSON KI; ABATT FG; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; STOOPS KL

    2009-01-15

    design waste temperature of 350 F and the full 60-year corrosion allowance on the tank wall of 0.060 inch. However, analysis at a more realistic temperature of 250 F or corrosion allowance of 0.025 inch results in an acceptable demand/capacity ratio according to the ASME code criteria. Thus, buckling of the primary tank is judged to be unlikely for the current lack of corrosion in the tanks, and the expectation that the maximum waste temperature will not exceed 210 F. The reinforced concrete structure was evaluated as specified by the American Concrete Institute (ACI) code requirements for nuclear safety-related structures (ACI-349). The demand was demonstrated to be lower than the capacity at all locations. Revision 1 is being issued to document changes to the anchor bolt evaluation. RPP-RPT-32237 Rev. 1, Hanford Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Seismic Project-Increased Liquid Level Analysis for 241AP Tank Farms, described changes to the anchor bolt modeling and evaluation which were implemented in response to the independent reviewer's comments. Similar changes have been made in the bounding tank analysis and are documented in RPP-RPT-28968 Rev. 1. The conclusions of the previous releases of this report remain unchanged.

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    SciTech Connect

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2008-01-21

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  5. Acceptance Priority Ranking & Annual Capacity Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-07-31

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (the Act), assigns the Federal Government the responsibility for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Section 302(a) of the Act authorizes the Secretary to enter into contracts with the owners and generators of commercial spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste. The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (Standard Contract) established the contractual mechanism for the Department's acceptance and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It includes the requirements and operational responsibilities of the parties to the Standard Contract in the areas of administrative matters, fees, terms of payment, waste acceptance criteria, and waste acceptance procedures. The Standard Contract provides for the acquisition of title to the spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste by the Department, its transportation to Federal facilities, and its subsequent disposal.

  6. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  7. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Solar Thermal Test Facility Illuminated receiver on top of tower Permalink Gallery High-Temperature Falling Particle Receiver Reaches New Limits Concentrating Solar Power, ...

  8. Overview of solar thermal technologies

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The solar-thermal overview section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  9. Self-discharge study of Li-alloy/FeS sub 2 thermal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W. ); Smaga, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The capacities of Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2}thermal batteries are influenced by the extent of self-discharge reactions that occur during operation. For some thermal-battery applications involving open-circuit (i.e., wet-stand'') conditions, this self-discharge can result in a significant loss incapacity. A study was undertaken to obtain a better understanding of the factors influencing the self-discharge of thermal cells, such as temperature, electrolyte composition, and processing of the catholyte (i.e., lithiation and fusion). The cells were discharged after prescribed times at open circuit under isothermal conditions and the capacity to a cutoff voltage was measured. Postmortem characterization of the cells was used to correlate the results of the electrochemical experiments. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. IEED Tribal Energy Development to Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs for the U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development, is soliciting grant proposals from Indian tribes to build tribal capacity for energy resource development or management under the Department of the Interior's (DOl's) Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC) grant program.

  11. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  12. Thermally stabilized heliostat

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Alfred J.

    1983-01-01

    An improvement in a heliostat having a main support structure and pivoting and tilting motors and gears and a mirror module for reflecting solar energy onto a collector, the improvement being characterized by an internal support structure within each mirror module and front and back sheets attached to the internal support structure, the front and back sheets having the same coefficient of thermal expansion such that no curvature is induced by temperature change, and a layer of adhesive adhering the mirror to the front sheet. The adhesive is water repellent and has adequate set strength to support the mirror but has sufficient shear tolerance to permit the differential expansion of the mirror and the front sheet without inducing stresses or currature effect. The adhesive also serves to dampen fluttering of the mirror and to protect the mirror backside against the adverse effects of weather. Also disclosed are specific details of the preferred embodiment.

  13. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  14. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.; Moore, Troy K.

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for thermally protecting heat sensitive components of tools. The apparatus comprises a Dewar for holding the heat sensitive components. The Dewar has spaced-apart inside and outside walls, an open top end and a bottom end. An insulating plug is located in the top end. The inside wall has portions defining an inside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar and the outside wall has portions defining an outside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar. A bottom connector has inside and outside components. The inside component sealably engages the inside wall aperture and the outside component sealably engages the outside wall aperture. The inside component is operatively connected to the heat sensitive components and to the outside component. The connections can be made with optical fibers or with electrically conducting wires.

  15. SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Chang, C.C.

    1962-06-12

    A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

  16. Particle-number conservation in static-path approximation for thermal superfluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, K.; Schiller, A.

    2007-12-15

    By applying particle-number projection to the static-path approximation (SPA), the heat capacity and the breakdown of pairing correlations are investigated in the thermally excited, superfluid systems {sup 172}Yb, {sup 94}Mo, and {sup 56}Fe. For the heavy nucleus {sup 172}Yb, the heat capacities in both the SPA and the number-projected SPA (NPSPA) exhibit an S shape; the difference between the SPA and NPSPA heat-capacity curves is not very large and the particle-number projection thereby enhances the S shape already seen in the SPA. The temperature at which the S-shape of heat capacity curve occurs parallels the temperature of the breakdown of pairing correlations as indicated by the effective pairing gap. However, for the comparatively lighter nuclei {sup 94}Mo and {sup 56}Fe, the SPA does not produce an S-shaped heat capacity on its own; only after particle-number projection the S shape appears in the heat-capacity curve. For {sup 94}Mo, we compare the NPSPA result with thermal odd-even mass differences, which are regarded as a direct measure of the pairing gap.

  17. Enhanced capacity and stability for the separation of cesium in electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfic, A.F.; Dickson, S.E.; Kim, Y.; Mekky, W.

    2015-03-15

    Electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) can be used to separate ionic contaminants from industrial wastewater, including that generated by the nuclear industry. The ESIX method involves sequential application of reduction and oxidation potentials to an ion exchange film to induce the respective loading and unloading of cesium. This technology is superior to conventional methods (e.g electrodialysis reversal or reverse osmosis) as it requires very little energy for ionic separation. In previous studies, ESIX films have demonstrated relatively low ion exchange capacities and limited film stabilities over repeated potential applications. In this study, the methodology for the deposition of electro-active films (nickel hexacyanoferrate) on nickel electrodes was modified to improve the ion exchange capacity for cesium removal using ESIX. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the ion exchange capacity and stability. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the modified film surfaces. Additionally, the films were examined for the separation of cesium ions. This modified film preparation technique enhanced the ion exchange capacity and improves the film stability compared to previous methods for the deposition of ESIX films. (authors)

  18. BER Science Network Requirements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Network Requirements Report of the Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop Conducted July 26 and 27, 2007 BER Science Network Requirements Workshop Biological and Environmental Research Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Bethesda, MD - July 26 and 27, 2007 ESnet is funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. Dan Hitchcock is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is operated by

  19. BES Science Network Requirements

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted June 4-5, 2007 BES Science Network Requirements Workshop Basic Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Washington, DC - June 4 and 5, 2007 ESnet is funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. Dan Hitchcock is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which

  20. ESnet Requirements Workshops

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Workshops Summary for Sites Eli Dart, Network Engineer ESnet Network Engineering Group ESnet Site Coordinating Committee Meeting Clemson, SC February 2, 2011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Science Overview ESnet requirements workshops - what are they? Common themes Discussion of subset of requirements learned * Examples of trends * Success stories * Upcoming needs that are currently unmet Thoughts for discussion 2/1/11 2 Lawrence Berkeley

  1. ASCR Requirements Review 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ASCR Program Office. These requirements will serve as input to the ESnet architecture and planning processes, and will help ensure that ESnet continues to provide world-class...

  2. BES Requirements Review 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    BES Program Office. These requirements will serve as input to the ESnet architecture and planning processes, and will help ensure that ESnet continues to provide world-class...

  3. Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE G 424.1-1, Implementation Guide for Use in Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation 1. The USQ ...

  4. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  5. HPC Requirements Reviews

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reviews: Target 2017 Requirements Reviews: Target 2014 Overview Published Reports Case Study FAQs NERSC HPC Achievement Awards Accelerator Science Astrophysics & Cosmology...

  6. Environmental Requirements Management

    SciTech Connect

    Cusack, Laura J.; Bramson, Jeffrey E.; Archuleta, Jose A.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor responsible for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site Central Plateau. As part of this responsibility, the CH2M HILL is faced with the task of complying with thousands of environmental requirements which originate from over 200 federal, state, and local laws and regulations, DOE Orders, waste management and effluent discharge permits, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action documents, and official regulatory agency correspondence. The challenge is to manage this vast number of requirements to ensure they are appropriately and effectively integrated into CH2M HILL operations. Ensuring compliance with a large number of environmental requirements relies on an organization’s ability to identify, evaluate, communicate, and verify those requirements. To ensure that compliance is maintained, all changes need to be tracked. The CH2M HILL identified that the existing system used to manage environmental requirements was difficult to maintain and that improvements should be made to increase functionality. CH2M HILL established an environmental requirements management procedure and tools to assure that all environmental requirements are effectively and efficiently managed. Having a complete and accurate set of environmental requirements applicable to CH2M HILL operations will promote a more efficient approach to: • Communicating requirements • Planning work • Maintaining work controls • Maintaining compliance

  7. Required Annual Notices

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Required Annual Notices The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 (WHCRA) The medical programs sponsored by LANS will not restrict benefits if you or your dependent ...

  8. Residential Solar Permit Requirements

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington's State Building Code sets requirements for the installation, inspection, maintenance and repair of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems. Local jurisdictions have the authority to...

  9. Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The focus of the Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to research, develop, test, and evaluate new techniques for thermal energy storage systems that are relevant to utility-scale concentrating solar power plants. The laboratory holds test systems that can provide heat transfer fluids for the evaluation of heat exchangers and thermal energy storage devices. The existing system provides molten salt at temperatures up to 800 C. This unit is charged with nitrate salt rated to 600 C, but is capable of handling other heat transfer fluid compositions. Three additional test bays are available for future deployment of alternative heat transfer fluids such as hot air, carbon dioxide, or steam systems. The Thermal Systems Process and Components Laboratory performs pilot-scale thermal energy storage system testing through multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiency. The laboratory equipment can also be utilized to test instrument and sensor compatibility with hot heat transfer fluids. Future applications in the laboratory may include the evaluation of thermal energy storage systems designed to operate with supercritical heat transfer fluids such as steam or carbon dioxide. These tests will require the installation of test systems capable of providing supercritical fluids at temperatures up to 700 C.

  10. Lithium thermal targets shot on PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, P.S.; Aubert, J.H.; Baca, P.M.; McNamara, W.F.

    1993-09-01

    Recent lithium ion beam experiments on PBFAII have required intricate targets to measure beam performance and to study target physics issues. Because of the stopping power difference between lithium ions and protons, these targets have presented significantly increased challenges for material preparation and handling compared to previous proton shots. The greatest challenges included complex shaped gold hohlraums, CH foams of densities ranging from 3 to 6 mg/cm3 and vacuum seals covering large areas with a thickness under 1 um. Details regarding assembly and characterization of lithium thermal targets will be described in this poster.

  11. Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical Energy Storage Materials ...

  12. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Hydro Conventional",815,817,824,824,824 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-... Solar includes solar thermal and photovoltaic. MSW Municipal Solid Waste. Totals may not ...

  13. Fail-safe designs for large capacity battery systems - Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels ...

  14. General Responsibilities and Requirements

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09

    The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

  15. Writing testable software requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Knirk, D.

    1997-11-01

    This tutorial identifies common problems in analyzing requirements in the problem and constructing a written specification of what the software is to do. It deals with two main problem areas: identifying and describing problem requirements, and analyzing and describing behavior specifications.

  16. Integrated Management Requirements mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

    1992-06-01

    This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

  17. Integrated Management Requirements mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

    1992-06-01

    This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia`s approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

  18. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-15

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representatives of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agreed closely with the literature values. A distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.

  19. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness formore » extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.« less

  20. Local measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David H.; Schley, Robert S.; Khafizov, Marat; Wendt, Brycen L.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous measurement of local thermal diffusivity and conductivity is demonstrated on a range of ceramic samples. This was accomplished by measuring the temperature field spatial profile of samples excited by an amplitude modulated continuous wave laser beam. A thin gold film is applied to the samples to ensure strong optical absorption and to establish a second boundary condition that introduces an expression containing the substrate thermal conductivity. The diffusivity and conductivity are obtained by comparing the measured phase profile of the temperature field to a continuum based model. A sensitivity analysis is used to identify the optimal film thickness for extracting the both substrate conductivity and diffusivity. Proof of principle studies were conducted on a range of samples having thermal properties that are representative of current and advanced accident tolerant nuclear fuels. It is shown that by including the Kapitza resistance as an additional fitting parameter, the measured conductivity and diffusivity of all the samples considered agree closely with literature values. Lastly, a distinguishing feature of this technique is that it does not require a priori knowledge of the optical spot size which greatly increases measurement reliability and reproducibility.