National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tact-ful chemical musical

  1. Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations Set to Pop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Music | Jefferson Lab 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations Set to Pop Music Feb. 9 Event at Jefferson Lab Features Chemistry Demonstrations Set to Pop Music NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 2, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's Feb. 9 Science Series event will feature members of the Tidewater Alliance of Chemistry Teachers (TACT) presenting 11 elaborate chemical demonstrations that have been choreographed and set to popular music. The program, titled A TACT-ful Chemical Musical, also

  2. Evaluating musical instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. Murray

    2014-04-01

    Scientific measurements of sound generation and radiation by musical instruments are surprisingly hard to correlate with the subtle and complex judgments of instrumental quality made by expert musicians.

  3. The MUSIC Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Makoto

    2010-03-30

    A new muon channel, MUSIC, is being constructed at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) at Osaka University in Japan. The muon channel utilizes a strong solenoidal magnetic field to collect pions and to transport muons. A large-bore superconducting coil encloses the pion-production target to capture pions with a large solid angle. A long solenoid magnet transports pions and muons with the capability to select the charge and momentum of the particles. The design of the solenoid channel is described in this paper.

  4. Portable musical instrument amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Christian, David E.

    1990-07-24

    The present invention relates to a musical instrument amplifier which is particularly useful for electric guitars. The amplifier has a rigid body for housing both the electronic system for amplifying and processing signals from the guitar and the system's power supply. An input plug connected to and projecting from the body is electrically coupled to the signal amplifying and processing system. When the plug is inserted into an output jack for an electric guitar, the body is rigidly carried by the guitar, and the guitar is operatively connected to the electrical amplifying and signal processing system without use of a loose interconnection cable. The amplifier is provided with an output jack, into which headphones are plugged to receive amplified signals from the guitar. By eliminating the conventional interconnection cable, the amplifier of the present invention can be used by musicians with increased flexibility and greater freedom of movement.

  5. Music of the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Scientists are quite familiar with what a supernova looks like — when these stars are destroyed in the most massive explosions in the universe, they leave their mark as one of the brightest objects in space, at least for several weeks. While the supernova can be seen, it cant be heard, as sound waves cannot travel through space. But what if the light waves emitted by the exploding star and other cosmological phenomena could be translated into sound? Thats the idea behind a Rhythms of the Universe, a musical project to sonify the universe by Grateful Dead percussionist and Grammy award-winning artist Mickey Hart that caught the attention of Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Sounds courtesy of Keith Jackson. Images courtesy of NASA

  6. An abstract approach to music.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.

    1999-04-19

    In this article we have outlined a formal framework for an abstract approach to music and music composition. The model is formulated in terms of objects that have attributes, obey relationships, and are subject to certain well-defined operations. The motivation for this approach uses traditional terms and concepts of music theory, but the approach itself is formal and uses the language of mathematics. The universal object is an audio wave; partials, sounds, and compositions are special objects, which are placed in a hierarchical order based on time scales. The objects have both static and dynamic attributes. When we realize a composition, we assign values to each of its attributes: a (scalar) value to a static attribute, an envelope and a size to a dynamic attribute. A composition is then a trajectory in the space of aural events, and the complex audio wave is its formal representation. Sounds are fibers in the space of aural events, from which the composer weaves the trajectory of a composition. Each sound object in turn is made up of partials, which are the elementary building blocks of any music composition. The partials evolve on the fastest time scale in the hierarchy of partials, sounds, and compositions. The ideas outlined in this article are being implemented in a digital instrument for additive sound synthesis and in software for music composition. A demonstration of some preliminary results has been submitted by the authors for presentation at the conference.

  7. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2013-11-21

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  8. Kids with disabilities inspire a musical instrument

    ScienceCinema

    Daily, Dan; Pfeifer, Kent

    2014-02-10

    The Midiwing is a musical instrument that unites music and computer technology for those who lack the experience, physical ability, or maturity to play music with traditional instruments. To create the instrument, Dan Daily, Director of Musicode Innovations, reworked and recoded Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) technology and introduced ergonomic design. He applied to the New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) Program to receive help when he discovered the microcontroller he used was being phased out. Daily and Kent Pfeifer, an engineer at Sandia National Laboratories and musician himself, partnered to create a new state-of-the-art design.

  9. Chemical Engineering

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARPA-E Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences and Engineering Chemical Sciences ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Chemical Engineering HomeTag:Chemical ...

  10. Source localization using recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1998-03-01

    A new method for source localization is described that is based on a modification of the well known multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm. In classical MUSIC, the array manifold vector is projected onto an estimate of the signal subspace, but errors in the estimate can make location of multiple sources difficult. Recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC uses each successively located source to form an intermediate array gain matrix, and projects both the array manifold and the signal subspace estimate into its orthogonal complement. The MUSIC projection is then performed in this reduced subspace. Using the metric of principal angles, the authors describe a general form of the RAP-MUSIC algorithm for the case of diversely polarized sources. Through a uniform linear array simulation, the authors demonstrate the improved Monte Carlo performance of RAP-MUSIC relative to MUSIC and two other sequential subspace methods, S and IES-MUSIC.

  11. Chemical Recycling | Y-12 National Security Complex

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Recycling Chemical Recycling

  12. Chemical microsensors

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  13. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  14. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  15. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  16. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  17. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  18. Physics of the Blues: Music, Fourier and Wave - Particle Duality

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J. Murray

    2003-10-15

    Art and science are intimately connected. There is probably no art that reveals this more than music. Music can be used as a tool to teach physics and engineering to non-scientists, illustrating such diverse concepts as Fourier analysis and quantum mechanics. This colloquium is aimed in reverse, to explain some interesting aspects of music to physicists. Topics include: What determines the frequency of notes on a musical scale? What is harmony and why would Fourier care? Where did the blues come from? (We' re talking the 'physics of the blues', and not 'the blues of physics' - that's another colloquium). Is there a musical particle? The presentation will be accompanied by live keyboard demonstrations. The presenter will attempt to draw tenuous connections between the subject of his talk and his day job as Director of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

  19. Chemical Applications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical 'Sponges' Could Make Chemo Safer Chemical 'Sponges' Could Make Chemo Safer July 8, 2016 - 4:22pm Addthis A sample of a polymer-based membrane material created at Berkeley Lab. It’s designed to soak up cancer drugs and limit their side effects. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab. A sample of a polymer-based membrane material created at Berkeley Lab. It's designed to soak up cancer drugs and limit their side effects. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab. Glenn Roberts Jr.

  20. Chemical Occurrences

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  1. The birth of the blues : how physics underlies music.

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J. M.

    2009-07-01

    Art and science have intimate connections, although these are often underappreciated. Western music provides compelling examples. The sensation of harmony and related melodic development are rooted in physical principles that can be understood with simple mathematics. The focus of this review is not the better known acoustics of instruments, but the structure of music itself. The physical basis of the evolution of Western music in the last half millennium is discussed, culminating with the development of the 'blues'. The paper refers to a number of works which expand the connections, and introduces material specific to the development of the 'blues'. Several conclusions are made: (1) that music is axiomatic like mathematics and that to appreciate music fully listeners must learn the axioms; (2) that this learning does not require specific conscious study but relies on a linkage between the creative and quantitative brain and (3) that a key element of the musical 'blues' comes from recreating missing notes on the modern equal temperament scale. The latter is an example of 'art built on artifacts'. Finally, brief reference is made to the value of music as a tool for teaching physics, mathematics and engineering to non-scientists.

  2. Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building

    Building Catalog

    Hood River, Oregon The Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building is includes music and science classroom, music practice rooms, teacher offices, a greenhouse, an adjacent recycling and storage building, and outdoor spaces including an amphitheater and garden. The building is integrated with the school's progressive sustainability and permaculture curriculum. Students can track and create experiments using data from the buildings net zero energy system and rainwater harvesting system, and learn about the building's innovative and integrated use of materials and systems. 07/08/2015 - 10:06

  3. Chemical Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2006 May 2006 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 1 of 3) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S.

  4. MUSIC for localization of thunderstorm cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    Lightning represents an event detectable optically, electrically, and acoustically, and several systems are already in place to monitor such activity. Unfortunately, such detection of lightning can occur too late, since operations need to be protected in advance of the first lightning strike. Additionally, the bolt itself can traverse several kilometers before striking the ground, leaving a large region of uncertainty as to the center of the storm and its possible strike regions. NASA Kennedy Space Center has in place an array of electric field mills that monitor the (effectively) DC electric field. Prior to the first lightning strike, the surface electric fields rise as the storm generator within a thundercloud begins charging. Extending methods we developed for an analogous source localization problem in mangnetoencephalography, we present Cramer-Rao lower bounds and MUSIC scans for fitting a point-charge source model to the electric field mill data. Such techniques can allow for the identification and localization of charge centers in cloud structures.

  5. Raising consciousness about the nuclear threat through music

    SciTech Connect

    Ungerleider, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the use of music, in particular topical collaborative group song writing, as a tool for raising consciousness about the threat of nuclear war. Consciousness raising is one way to overcome the phenomenon of denial and to increase discussion and social action in response to the nuclear threat. This dissertation measures the impact of a group song writing workshop on developing critical problem-solving in adult groups; it reviews how music is applied in psychological research and clinical work, has been used historically as a tool in social-change movements in America, and is used in the contemporary field of peace education. The perspectives of several theorists who discuss the potential of music to contribute to social change are presented. It is concluded that consciousness about the nuclear threat - in terms of naming and analyzing - can be raised by working with music's potential for developing affective, expressive, and collaborative capabilities in individuals and groups. Potential applications of the group song writing workshop are in schools, with peace organizations, music groups, and in relation to other social issues.

  6. An Improved MUSIC Model for Gibbsite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Scott C.; Bickmore, Barry R.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2004-06-01

    Here we use gibbsite as a model system with which to test a recently published, bond-valence method for predicting intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups on oxides. At issue is whether the method is adequate when valence parameters for the functional groups are derived from ab initio structure optimization of surfaces terminated by vacuum. If not, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of solvated surfaces (which are much more computationally expensive) will have to be used. To do this, we had to evaluate extant gibbsite potentiometric titration data that where some estimate of edge and basal surface area was available. Applying BET and recently developed atomic force microscopy methods, we found that most of these data sets were flawed, in that their surface area estimates were probably wrong. Similarly, there may have been problems with many of the titration procedures. However, one data set was adequate on both counts, and we applied our method of surface pKa int prediction to fitting a MUSIC model to this data with considerable success—several features of the titration data were predicted well. However, the model fit was certainly not perfect, and we experienced some difficulties optimizing highly charged, vacuum-terminated surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that we probably need to do AIMD simulations of solvated surfaces to adequately predict intrinsic pKa values for surface functional groups.

  7. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  8. Chemical Management System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1998-10-30

    CMS provides an inventory of all chemicals on order or being held in the laboratory, to provide a specific location for all chemical containers, to ensure that health and safety regulatory codes are being upheld, and to provide PNNL staff with hazardous chemical information to better manage their inventories. CMS is comprised of five major modules: 1) chemical purchasing, 2) chemical inventory, 3) chemical names, properties, and hazard groups, 4) reporting, and 5) system administration.

  9. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  10. Chemical Sector Analysis | NISAC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACChemical Sector Analysis content top Chemical Supply Chain Analysis Posted by Admin on Mar 1, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed ...

  11. American Chemical Society Fellow

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Society Fellow August 30, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, August 30, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) scientist Kristin Omberg was named as an American Chemical ...

  12. American Chemical Society Fellows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    selected as American Chemical Society Fellows August 7, 2014 Chamberlin and Porterfield ... group, have been selected as a 2014 Fellows of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ...

  13. Chemical & Engineering News

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARPA-E Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences and Engineering Chemical Sciences ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Chemical & Engineering News Home...

  14. 2. Chemical Kinetics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    * Chemical equilibrium * Energy conservation & adiabatic flame temp., T ad 2. ... Equilibrium (22) * From element conservation for a general chemical reaction we ...

  15. Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes...

  16. Chemical Management Contacts

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  17. Multimedia regulated chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.C.; Huffman, G.L.; Mao, Y.L.

    1999-10-01

    This article examines those chemicals that are listed in either environmental laws or regulations. Its objective is to help readers determine which laws regulate what types of chemicals and which types of chemicals are regulated by what laws. It is multimedia in scope, describing the various chemicals that are regulated in the different media (i.e., air, water, or land).

  18. PINS chemical identification software

    DOEpatents

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  19. Chemical Sciences Capabilities

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling and Simulation in the Chemical Sciences Capabilities Modeling and simulation help us transform chemical data into meaningful information: * Develop remote-sensors that detect nuclear materials * Perform large- or small-scaled process modeling * Simulate new chemicals with tailored properties for diverse applications * Analyze chemical reaction rates for complex modeling needs * Examine chemical-sciences data and modeling for nuclear forensics * Analyze high explosive data and perform

  20. Chemicals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemicals Chemicals The U.S. chemicals industry is maturing and optimizing its business portfolio for more competitive global markets. Over the past decade, the industry has reduced its energy use, shifting its status from the largest to the second-largest energy user among U.S. industries. The chemicals industry has worked in partnership with AMO to develop a range of resources for improving energy efficiency. Some current R&D projects and Energy Management resources will benefit chemicals

  1. EEG and MEG source localization using recursively applied (RAP) MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) algorithm locates multiple asynchronous dipolar sources from electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. A signal subspace is estimated from the data, then the algorithm scans a single dipole model through a three-dimensional head volume and computes projections onto this subspace. To locate the sources, the user must search the head volume for local peaks in the projection metric. Here we describe a novel extension of this approach which we refer to as RAP (Recursively APplied) MUSIC. This new procedure automatically extracts the locations of the sources through a recursive use of subspace projections, which uses the metric of principal correlations as a multidimensional form of correlation analysis between the model subspace and the data subspace. The dipolar orientations, a form of `diverse polarization,` are easily extracted using the associated principal vectors.

  2. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  3. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  4. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  5. Proton adsorption onto alumina: extension of multisite complexation (MUSIC) theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, K.; Blum, F.D.

    1999-09-01

    The adsorption isotherm of protons onto a commercial {gamma}-alumina sample was determined in aqueous nitric acid with sodium nitrate as a background electrolyte. Three discrete regions could be discerned in the log-log plots of the proton isotherm determined at the solution pH 5 to 2. The multisite complexation (MUSIC) model was modified to analyze the simultaneous adsorption of protons onto various kinds of surface species.

  6. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Troy A. Semelsberger Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrogen Storage Summit Jan 27-29, 2015 Denver, CO Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials 2 Objectives 1. Assess chemical hydrogen storage materials that can exceed 700 bar compressed hydrogen tanks 2. Status (state-of-the-art) of chemical hydrogen storage materials 3. Identify key material characteristics 4. Identify obstacles, challenges and risks for the successful deployment of chemical hydrogen materials in a practical on-board hydrogen

  7. 2. Chemical Kinetics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Lecture) Chung K. Law Robert H. Goddard Professor Princeton University Princeton-CEFRC-Combustion Institute Summer School on Combustion June 20-24, 2016 1 Day 1: Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics 1. Chemical Thermodynamics * Chemical equilibrium * Energy conservation & adiabatic flame temp., T ad 2. Chemical Kinetics * Reaction rates and approximations * Theories of reaction rates * Straight and branched chain reactions 3. Oxidation Mechanisms of Fuels * Hydrogen, CO, hydrocarbons 2 1.

  8. Radar Imaging of Spheres in 3D using MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-01-21

    We have shown that multiple spheres can be imaged by linear and planar EM arrays using only one component of polarization. The imaging approach involves calculating the SVD of the scattering response matrix, selecting a subset of singular values that represents noise, and evaluating the MUSIC functional. The noise threshold applied to the spectrum of singular values for optimal performance is typically around 1%. The resulting signal subspace includes more than one singular value per sphere. The presence of reflections from the ground improves height localization, even for a linear array parallel to the ground. However, the interference between direct and reflected energy modulates the field, creating periodic nulls that can obscure targets in typical images. These nulls are largely eliminated by normalizing the MUSIC functional with the broadside beam pattern of the array. The resulting images show excellent localization for 1 and 2 spheres. The performance for the 3 sphere configurations are complicated by shadowing effects and the greater range of the 3rd sphere in case 2. Two of the three spheres are easily located by MUSIC but the third is difficult to distinguish from other local maxima of the complex imaging functional. Improvement is seen when the linear array is replace with a planar array, which increases the effective aperture height. Further analysis of the singular values and their relationship to modes of scattering from the spheres, as well as better ways to exploit polarization, should improve performance. Work along these lines is currently being pursued by the authors.

  9. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a ... TECHNOLOGY VISION 2020: The U.S. Chemical Industry Gasoline Biodesulfurization Fact Sheet ...

  10. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process ... ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying ...

  11. Example-Based Automatic Music-Driven Conventional Dance Motion Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songhua; Fan, Rukun; Geng, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for synthesizing dance motions that follow the emotions and contents of a piece of music. Our method employs a learning-based approach to model the music to motion mapping relationship embodied in example dance motions along with those motions' accompanying background music. A key step in our method is to train a music to motion matching quality rating function through learning the music to motion mapping relationship exhibited in synchronized music and dance motion data, which were captured from professional human dance performance. To generate an optimal sequence of dance motion segments to match with a piece of music, we introduce a constraint-based dynamic programming procedure. This procedure considers both music to motion matching quality and visual smoothness of a resultant dance motion sequence. We also introduce a two-way evaluation strategy, coupled with a GPU-based implementation, through which we can execute the dynamic programming process in parallel, resulting in significant speedup. To evaluate the effectiveness of our method, we quantitatively compare the dance motions synthesized by our method with motion synthesis results by several peer methods using the motions captured from professional human dancers' performance as the gold standard. We also conducted several medium-scale user studies to explore how perceptually our dance motion synthesis method can outperform existing methods in synthesizing dance motions to match with a piece of music. These user studies produced very positive results on our music-driven dance motion synthesis experiments for several Asian dance genres, confirming the advantages of our method.

  12. Chemicals from Biomass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemicals from biomass: A market assessment of bioproducts with near-term potential Mary J. Biddy, PhD Bioenergy 2016 June 13, 2016 2 Significance and Impact * Focus of report is on products that will have near-term market impact. These are bio-derived chemicals that are currently being produced either at demonstration or commercial scales. * Reviews current projects and planned efforts for bio-derived chemicals. * Identifies major drivers for moving biomass-derived products to market and the

  13. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  14. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Herring, J. Stephen; Grandy, Jon D.

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  15. CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List Chemicals on this list are routine use chemicals in the CAMD Cleanroom and are available to users for general use. All others (*) are approved for use in the cleanroom but are not provided by CAMD. You must purchase from your department and store at the facility. If there are any other chemicals that you need to use that are not on this list, contact the Safety Director, Dr. Lorraine Day, day@lsu.edu, 225-578-4616 for approval. Resists Developers *AZ 1505 *AZ 1512

  16. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Wheeler, David R.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  17. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  18. Selecting chemical treatment programs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E. )

    1988-09-01

    Many process equipment performance and reliability problems can be solved economically by the proper selection and application of chemical treatment programs. It is important to choose an experienced chemical vendor and to work closely with the vendor to develop a good chemical treatment program. This requires devoting sufficient manpower to ensure that the treatment program development is thorough and timely. After the treatment program is installed, the system operation and performance should be routinely monitored to ensure that expected benefits are achieved and unexpected problems do not develop.

  19. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Spires, Renee H.

    2010-11-01

    Renee Spires, Project Manager at Savannah River Remediation, opens Session 3 (Accelerated Waste Retrieval and Closure: Key Technologies) at the 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange with a talk on enhanced chemical cleaning.

  20. Chemicals from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

    2004-12-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

  1. Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CDE Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering We support stockpile manufacturing, surveillance, applied and basic energy sciences, threat reduction, public health, the environment, and space exploration. Contact Us Group Leader Peter Stark Deputy Group Leader Tom Yoshida Group Office (505) 667-5740 X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy The Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering (C-CDE) Group combines engineering design with routine analytical services and state-of-the-art

  2. 2. Chemical Kinetics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chung K. Law Robert H. Goddard Professor Princeton University Princeton-CEFRC-Combustion Institute Summer School on Combustion June 20-24, 2016 1 What is Combustion? * Study of chemically reacting flows with highly exothermic, temperature-sensitive reactions A Laminar Bunsen Flame A Turbulent Jet Flame Combustion is A Multi-physics & Multi-scale Science * Combustion is a multi- physics science, embodying two major branches of nonlinear science: - Chemical kinetics - Fluid mechanics *

  3. DISCO: An object-oriented system for music composition and sound design

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.; Tipei, S.; Wright, J. M.

    2000-09-05

    This paper describes an object-oriented approach to music composition and sound design. The approach unifies the processes of music making and instrument building by using similar logic, objects, and procedures. The composition modules use an abstract representation of musical data, which can be easily mapped onto different synthesis languages or a traditionally notated score. An abstract base class is used to derive classes on different time scales. Objects can be related to act across time scales, as well as across an entire piece, and relationships between similar objects can replicate traditional music operations or introduce new ones. The DISCO (Digital Instrument for Sonification and Composition) system is an open-ended work in progress.

  4. JLab, Hampton U. celebrate Einstein's love of music with special event at

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CNU's Ferguson Center for the Arts | Jefferson Lab JLab, Hampton U. celebrate Einstein's love of music with special event at CNU's Ferguson Center for the Arts Dr. Brian Foster and Jack Liebeck Dr. Brian Foster and Jack Liebeck. Photo by Richard Lea-Hair. More publicity photographs available from Jack Liebeck's website JLab, Hampton U. celebrate Einstein's love of music with special event at CNU's Ferguson Center for the Arts April 11, 2005 The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab, in

  5. Biological and Chemical Security

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, P J

    2002-12-19

    The LLNL Chemical & Biological National Security Program (CBNP) provides science, technology and integrated systems for chemical and biological security. Our approach is to develop and field advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical or biological weapons. Recent events show the importance of civilian defense against terrorism. The 1995 nerve gas attack in Tokyo's subway served to catalyze and focus the early LLNL program on civilian counter terrorism. In the same year, LLNL began CBNP using Laboratory-Directed R&D investments and a focus on biodetection. The Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act, passed in 1996, initiated a number of U.S. nonproliferation and counter-terrorism programs including the DOE (now NNSA) Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (also known as CBNP). In 2002, the Department of Homeland Security was formed. The NNSA CBNP and many of the LLNL CBNP activities are being transferred as the new Department becomes operational. LLNL has a long history in national security including nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction. In biology, LLNL had a key role in starting and implementing the Human Genome Project and, more recently, the Microbial Genome Program. LLNL has over 1,000 scientists and engineers with relevant expertise in biology, chemistry, decontamination, instrumentation, microtechnologies, atmospheric modeling, and field experimentation. Over 150 LLNL scientists and engineers work full time on chemical and biological national security projects.

  6. Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................... 1 4 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................................. 5 5 2.1 Chemical Industry Focus

  7. Chemical Supply Chain Analysis | NISAC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Supply Chain Analysis NISAC has developed a range of capabilities for analyzing the consequences of disruptions to the chemical manufacturing industry. Each capability ...

  8. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  9. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  10. Equilibria in Chemical Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1992-01-01

    SOLGASMIX-PV calculates equilibrium relationships in complex chemical systems. Chemical equilibrium calculations involve finding the system composition, within certain constraints, which contains the minimum free energy. The constraints are the preservation of the masses of each element present and either constant pressure or volume. SOLGASMIX-PV can calculate equilibria in systems containing a gaseous phase, condensed phase solutions, and condensed phases of invariant and variable stoichiometry. Either a constant total gas volume or a constant total pressuremore » can be assumed. Unit activities for condensed phases and ideality for solutions are assumed, although nonideal systems can be handled provided activity coefficient relationships are available.« less

  11. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  12. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  13. Category:Chemical Logging | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chemical Logging Jump to: navigation, search Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Chemical Logging page? For detailed information on Chemical Logging, click here. Category:Chemical...

  14. Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories John Pople (Beamline Operations) maintains the SSRL gas inventories and Gas Cage Map. This information is provided on the SPL page as a courtesy. Please

  15. 2. Chemical Kinetics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Lecture) Chung K. Law Robert H. Goddard Professor Princeton University Princeton-CEFRC-Combustion Institute Summer School on Combustion June 20-24, 2016 1 Day 4: Laminar Premixed Flames 1. The standard premixed flame 1. Phenomenological and asymptotic analyses 2. Parametric dependence 3. Chemical structure 2. Limit phenomena 1. The S-curve concept 2. Extinction through volumetric heat loss 3. Aerodynamics of flames 1. Hydrodynamic stretch 2. Flame stretch 3. Flamefront instabilities 2 1. The

  16. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  17. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  18. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  19. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  20. Chemical Processing Qualification Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    6-2010 February 2010 DOE STANDARD CHEMICAL PROCESSING QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1176-2010 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds DOE-STD-1176-2010 iv INTENTIONALLY BLANK DOE-STD-1176-2010 v

  1. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  2. Chemical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  3. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  4. Manifold compositions, music visualization, and scientific sonification in an immersive virtual-reality environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, H. G.

    1998-01-05

    An interdisciplinary project encompassing sound synthesis, music composition, sonification, and visualization of music is facilitated by the high-performance computing capabilities and the virtual-reality environments available at Argonne National Laboratory. The paper describes the main features of the project's centerpiece, DIASS (Digital Instrument for Additive Sound Synthesis); ''A.N.L.-folds'', an equivalence class of compositions produced with DIASS; and application of DIASS in two experiments in the sonification of complex scientific data. Some of the larger issues connected with this project, such as the changing ways in which both scientists and composers perform their tasks, are briefly discussed.

  5. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  6. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  7. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  8. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1981-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  9. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  10. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  11. Corsicana Chemical Company | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Corsicana Chemical Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Corsicana Chemical Company Place: Corsicana, Texas Zip: 75110 Product: Chemical company and biodiesel producer in...

  12. Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC Name: Atlanta Chemical Engineering LLC Place: Marietta, Georgia Country: United...

  13. chemical_methods | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Methods Chemical methods focus mainly on alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) processes that involve the injection of micellar-polymers into the reservoir. Chemical flooding ...

  14. Shanghai TL Chemical Company | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Shanghai TL Chemical Company Place: Shanghai, China Zip: 200240 Product: Focuses on novel chemical structure PEM and PE Resin, PEM FC materials and parts, Key chemical...

  15. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  16. Interpretation of the MEG-MUSIC scan in biomagnetic source localization

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Lewis, P.S.; Leahy, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    MEG-Music is a new approach to MEG source localization. MEG-Music is based on a spatio-temporal source model in which the observed biomagnetic fields are generated by a small number of current dipole sources with fixed positions/orientations and varying strengths. From the spatial covariance matrix of the observed fields, a signal subspace can be identified. The rank of this subspace is equal to the number of elemental sources present. This signal sub-space is used in a projection metric that scans the three dimensional head volume. Given a perfect signal subspace estimate and a perfect forward model, the metric will peak at unity at each dipole location. In practice, the signal subspace estimate is contaminated by noise, which in turn yields MUSIC peaks which are less than unity. Previously we examined the lower bounds on localization error, independent of the choice of localization procedure. In this paper, we analyzed the effects of noise and temporal coherence on the signal subspace estimate and the resulting effects on the MEG-MUSIC peaks.

  17. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  18. ARM - Measurement - Inorganic chemical composition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsInorganic chemical composition ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Inorganic chemical composition The chemical composition of an aerosol, with the exception of those with hydrocarbons, and usually including carbides, oxides of carbon, metallic carbonates, carbon sulfur compounds, and carbon nitrogen compounds. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is

  19. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) in Hermiston, Oregon. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the Umatilla Depot Activity and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site-specific study. This independent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at UMDA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources; seismicity; and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  1. Chemical Looping | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to convert fossil fuels to electricity and provide carbon capture without significant efficiency or cost penalties. Chemical looping combustion is very similar to oxy-fuel...

  2. Chemical Logging | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    concentrations.1 Use in Geothermal Exploration During a chemical logging study at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site, returned drilling fluid samples were collected every...

  3. FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  4. Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, R.O. Jr.

    1990-12-31

    A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Chemical Safety Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemical Safety Program Chemical Safety Program The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety Program provides a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This content is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Chemical Safety Information: Contacts Library Related Chemical Safety Links

  6. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high ...

  7. Method of forming a chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-10-09

    A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

  8. Chemical Microsensors For Detection Of Explosives And Chemical Warfare Agents

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Xiaoguang; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-11-13

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a layer of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bonded to said substrate, said layer of a cyclodextrin derivative adapted for the inclusion of selected compounds, e.g., nitro-containing organic compounds, therewith. Such an article can be a chemical microsensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the nitro-containing organic compound.

  9. Non-planar chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Sokolowski, Sara S.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2006-10-10

    A non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a high-surface area, low mass, three-dimensional, flow-through sorption support structure that can be coated or packed with a sorptive material. The sorptive material can collect and concentrate a chemical analyte from a fluid stream and rapidly release it as a very narrow temporal plug for improved separations in a microanalytical system. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator retains most of the thermal and fabrication benefits of a planar preconcentrator, but has improved ruggedness and uptake, while reducing sorptive coating concerns and extending the range of collectible analytes.

  10. Chemical microreactor and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan

    2011-08-09

    A method for forming a chemical microreactor includes forming at least one capillary microchannel in a substrate having at least one inlet and at least one outlet, integrating at least one heater into the chemical microreactor, interfacing the capillary microchannel with a liquid chemical reservoir at the inlet of the capillary microchannel, and interfacing the capillary microchannel with a porous membrane near the outlet of the capillary microchannel, the porous membrane being positioned beyond the outlet of the capillary microchannel, wherein the porous membrane has at least one catalyst material imbedded therein.

  11. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2007-01-30

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  12. Chemical Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemical Science Chemical Science Plant fatty acids are used in a vast range of products, from polymers to plastics and soaps to industrial feed stocks -- making up an estimated $150 billion market annually. A new discovery of inserting double bonds in the fatty acids could show the way to the designer production of plant fatty acids, and, in turn, to new industrial applications and new products. <a href

  13. MECS 2006 - Chemicals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemicals MECS 2006 - Chemicals Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006) All available footprints and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Chemicals (121.71 KB) More Documents & Publications Chemicals (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum MECS 2006 - Cement

  14. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1996-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  15. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1996-12-31

    Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

  16. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

    1993-07-06

    Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  17. Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Doughty, Daniel H.; Bein, Thomas; Moller, Karin

    1993-01-01

    Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

  18. Chemically enhanced in situ recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, T.; Pitts, M.; Wyatt, K.

    1996-08-01

    Chemically enhanced recovery is a promising alternative to current technologies for management of subsurface releases of organic liquids. Through the inclusion of surfactants, solvents, polymers, and/or alkaline agents to a waterflood, the transport of targeted organic compounds can be increased and rates of recovery enhanced. By far, the vast majority of work done in the field of chemically enhanced recovery has been at a laboratory scale. The following text focuses on chemically enhanced recovery from a field application perspective with emphasis given to chlorinated solvents in a low permeability setting. While chlorinated solvents are emphasized, issues discussed are also relevant to organic liquids less dense than water such as petroleum products. Topics reviewed include: (1) Description of technology; (2) General technology considerations; (3) Low permeability media considerations; (4) Cost and reliability considerations; (5) Commercial availability; and (6) Case histories. Through this paper an appreciation is developed of both the potential and limitations of chemically enhanced recovery. Excluded from the scope of this paper is the in situ destruction of organic compounds through processes such as chemical or biological oxidation, chemically enhanced recovery of inorganic compounds, and ex situ soil treatment processes. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Hanwha Chemical Corp | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chemical Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hanwha Chemical Corp Place: Seoul, Seoul, Korea (Republic) Zip: 100-797 Product: Korea-based manufacturer of synthetic resins and...

  20. Silicon Chemical Corp SCC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Corp SCC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Silicon Chemical Corp (SCC) Place: Vancouver, Washington State Zip: 98687 Product: US manufacturer of polysilicon and silicon chemical...

  1. Heilongjiang Fengrui Chemical Group | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Fengrui Chemical Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Heilongjiang Fengrui Chemical Group Place: Shuangyashan, Heilongjiang Province, China Product: A Chinese bioethanol...

  2. Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. You are accessing a ...

  3. Dainippon Ink Chemicals Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dainippon Ink & Chemicals Inc Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 103-8233 Product: Japanese diversified chemical company that primarily...

  4. Mitsui Chemicals Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mitsui Chemicals Inc Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 105-7117 Sector: Solar Product: Chemicals maker including plastics, industrial...

  5. Keeping Tabs on the World's Dangerous Chemicals

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia chemical engineer Nancy Jackson has worked in laboratories around the world to help ensure that chemicals are used safely and kept secure.

  6. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print The heterogeneous catalysts used in most chemical processes typically consist of nanoscale metal or metal oxide particles ...

  7. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Society Meeting, Boston (August 2002). Production and Deexcitation of Isotopically Diverse Nuclear Systems near the Fermi Energy, S. J. Yennello, American Chemical ...

  8. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst Print Wednesday, 28 January 2009 00:00 The heterogeneous catalysts used in most ...

  9. Thomas selected as American Chemical Society Fellow

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas selected as ACS Fellow Thomas selected as American Chemical Society Fellow Kimberly ... first Los Alamos researcher to be named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ...

  10. Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes Oak Ridge National ... It can also quickly identify a potentially harmful chemical. The invention's sensitivity ...

  11. Mr. Robert Muller, Manager General Chemical Corporation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    S 1997 Mr. Robert Muller, Manager General Chemical Corporation 6300 Philadelphia Pike ... Mr. D. T. Murphy of Allied Chemical Corporation, Delaware Valley Works in Marcus Hook, was ...

  12. Plutonium-238 Production Chemical Processing Evaluations (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Plutonium-238 Production Chemical Processing Evaluations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plutonium-238 Production Chemical Processing Evaluations Authors: ...

  13. Fuels and Chemicals from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Valorization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fuels and Chemicals from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Valorization of Lignin. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fuels and Chemicals from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Valorization ...

  14. Sandia Researchers Develop Promising Chemical Technology for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Researchers Develop Promising Chemical Technology for Energy Storage Sandia Researchers Develop Promising Chemical Technology for Energy Storage March 7, 2012 - 9:50am Addthis ...

  15. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    catalysts for maximum selectivity and efficiency in a wide range of chemical processes. ... The measurements generated chemical contour maps for the species present. Quantitative ...

  16. Dow Chemical Co | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Dow Chemical Co Place: Midland, Michigan Zip: 48674 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Michigan-based global chemical, plastic and agricultural products maker,...

  17. Snapshot of Chemicals Sector | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    According to census data, the number of employees has decreased by 18% since 1991. Chemicals Manufacturing Energy Intensity Chart Chemicals Manufacturing Energy Consumption Chart ...

  18. Chemical sciences, annual report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of eleven research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a DOE National Laboratory. In FY 1993, the Division made considerable progress on developing two end-stations and a beamline to advance combustion dynamics at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). In support of DOE`s national role in combustion research and chemical science, the beamline effort will enable researchers from around the world to make fundamental advances in understanding the structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates and transients, and in understanding the dynamics of elementary chemical reactions. The Division has continued to place a strong emphasis on full compliance with environmental health and safety guidelines and regulations and has made progress in technology transfer to industry. Finally, the Division has begun a new program in advanced battery research and development that should help strengthen industrial competitiveness both at home and abroad.

  19. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Berkner, K.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan (CHSP) is to provide specific guidance to all LBL employees and contractors who use hazardous chemicals. This Plan, when implemented, fulfills the requirements of both the Federal OSHA Laboratory Standard (29 CFR 1910.1450) for laboratory workers, and the Federal OSHA Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) for non-laboratory operations (e.g., shops). It sets forth safety procedures and describes how LBL employees are informed about the potential chemical hazards in their work areas so they can avoid harmful exposures and safeguard their health. Generally, communication of this Plan will occur through training and the Plan will serve as a the framework and reference guide for that training.

  20. The chemical industry, by country

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-03-01

    Beijing will be the site for the third ACHEMASIA, international petrochemical and chemical exhibition and conference, May 15--20, 1995. In preparation for this conference, Hydrocarbon Processing contacted executives of petrochemical/chemical industries and trade associations, seeking views on the state of the industry. The Asia-Pacific region is the center of new construction and expanded capacity and also a mixture of mature, developing and emerging petrochemical industries. Established countries must mold and grow with emerging economies as the newcomers access natural resources and develop their own petrochemical infrastructures. The following nation reports focus on product supply/demand trends, economic forecasts, new construction, etc. Space limitations prohibit publishing commentaries from all countries that have petrochemical/chemical capacity. Reports are published from the following countries: Australia, China, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam.

  1. Uncoated microcantilevers as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    A method and device are provided for chemical sensing using cantilevers that do not use chemically deposited, chemically specific layers. This novel device utilizes the adsorption-induced variation in the surfaces states on a cantilever. The methodology involves exciting charge carriers into or out of the surface states with photons having increasing discrete levels of energy. The excitation energy is provided as discrete levels of photon energy by scanning the wavelength of an exciting source that is illuminating the cantilever surface. When the charge carriers are excited into or out of the surface states, the cantilever bending changes due to changes in surface stress. The amount of cantilever bending with respect to an identical cantilever as a function of excitation energy is used to determine the energy levels associated with adsorbates.

  2. Method for producing chemical energy

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Danen, Wayne C.

    2004-09-21

    Fluoroalkylsilane-coated metal particles having a central metal core, a buffer layer surrounding the core, and a fluoroalkylsilane layer attached to the buffer layer are prepared by combining a chemically reactive fluoroalkylsilane compound with an oxide coated metal particle having a hydroxylated surface. The resulting fluoroalkylsilane layer that coats the particles provides them with excellent resistance to aging. The particles can be blended with oxidant particles to form energetic powder that releases chemical energy when the buffer layer is physically disrupted so that the reductant metal core can react with the oxidant.

  3. Chemical Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Inventory Use the following dropdown menus to filter the results for chemical records. To reset the results clear the entries and click "update". Facility - Any - SSRL LCLS Building - Any - 120 131 999 Room - Any - 109 113 209 257 Storage Area Storage Category Apply Title Facility Building Room Storage Area Storage Category Available to All Qty. Size Units Responsible Person 1,3-cyclohexadiene SSRL 131 209 CI L No 1 25 milliliters (ml) Tsu-Chien Weng 1,4- dioxane SSRL 120 257

  4. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  5. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  6. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  7. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  8. Chemicals Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemicals Industry Profile Chemicals Industry Profile Chemical products are essential to the production of a myriad of manufactured products. More than 96% of all manufactured goods are directly touched by the chemicals industry.1 The industry greatly influences our safe water supply, food, shelter, clothing, health care, computer technology, transportation, and almost every other facet of modern life. Economic The United States is the top chemical producer in the world, accounting for nearly

  9. Apparatus and methods for detecting chemical permeation

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and methods for detecting the permeation of hazardous or toxic chemicals through protective clothing are disclosed. The hazardous or toxic chemicals of interest do not possess the spectral characteristic of luminescence. The apparatus and methods utilize a spectrochemical modification technique to detect the luminescence quenching of an indicator compound which upon permeation of the chemical through the protective clothing, the indicator is exposed to the chemical, thus indicating chemical permeation.

  10. Science on Saturday: Music and 3D Audio | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    February 13, 2016, 9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium, PPPL Science on Saturday: Music and 3D Audio Professor Edgar Choueiri Princeton University Abstract: PDF icon 06 Choueiri.pdf Science_on_Saturday13Feb2016_EChoueiri Contact Information Coordinator(s): Ms. Deedee Ortiz-Arias dortiz@pppl.gov Host(s): Dr. Andrew Zwicker azwicker@pppl.gov PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor Information, Directions, Security at PPPL As a federal facility, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is operating

  11. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  12. Olefin recovery via chemical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Barchas, R.

    1998-06-01

    The recovery of fight olefins in petrochemical plants has generally been accomplished through cryogenic distillation, a process which is very capital and energy intensive. In an effort to simplify the recovery process and reduce its cost, BP Chemicals has developed a chemical absorption technology based on an aqueous silver nitrate solution. Stone & Webster is now marketing, licensing, and engineering the technology. The process is commercially ready for recovering olefins from olefin derivative plant vent gases, such as vents from polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene oxide, and synthetic ethanol units. The process can also be used to debottleneck C{sub 2} or C{sub 3} splinters, or to improve olefin product purity. This paper presents the olefin recovery imp technology, discusses its applications, and presents economics for the recovery of ethylene and propylene.

  13. Chemical Physics | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics FWP/Project Description: Project Leader(s): James Evans, Mark Gordon Principal Investigators: James Evans, Mark Gordon, Klaus Ruedenberg, Theresa Windus Key Scientific Personnel: Da-Jiang Liu, Michael Schmidt. The theoretical Chemical Physics program at Ames Laboratory supports integrated efforts in electronic structure theory and non-equilibrium statistical mechanical & multiscale modeling. The primary focus is on the development and especially application of methods that enable the

  14. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  15. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Charles A.; McAtee, Richard E.

    1981-01-01

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  16. Chemical logging of geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Allen, C.A.; McAtee, R.E.

    The presence of geothermal aquifers can be detected while drilling in geothermal formations by maintaining a chemical log of the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions in the return drilling fluid. A continuous increase in the ratio of the concentrations of calcium to carbonate and bicarbonate ions is indicative of the existence of a warm or hot geothermal aquifer at some increased depth.

  17. Passive in-situ chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Morrell, Jonathan S.; Ripley, Edward B.

    2012-02-14

    A chemical sensor for assessing a chemical of interest. In typical embodiments the chemical sensor includes a first thermocouple and second thermocouple. A reactive component is typically disposed proximal to the second thermal couple, and is selected to react with the chemical of interest and generate a temperature variation that may be detected by a comparison of a temperature sensed by the second thermocouple compared with a concurrent temperature detected by the first thermocouple. Further disclosed is a method for assessing a chemical of interest and a method for identifying a reaction temperature for a chemical of interest in a system.

  18. Chemical tracking at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Costain, D.B.

    1994-04-01

    EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc., has developed a chemical tracking system to support compliance with the Emergency Planning and community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) at the Rocky Flats Plant. This system, referred to as the EPCRA Chemical Control system (ECCS), uses bar code technology to uniquely identify and track the receipt, distribution, and use of chemicals. Chemical inventories are conducted using hand-held electronic scanners to update a site wide chemical database on a VAX 6000 computer. Information from the ECCS supports preparation of the EPCRA Tier II and Form R reports on chemical storage and use.

  19. ITP Chemicals: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Chemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Chemical Industry, May 2000 ITP Chemicals: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Chemical Industry, May 2000 PDF icon ...

  20. Tanaka Chemical Corp | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tanaka Chemical Corp Place: Fukui-shi, Fukui, Japan Zip: 910-3131 Product: Japanese chemical manufactuerer with a focus on materials for...

  1. Searching for the Solar System's Chemical Recipe

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Searching for the Solar System's Chemical Recipe Searching for the Solar System's Chemical Recipe Print Wednesday, 20 February 2013 00:00 The ratio of isotopes in elements like ...

  2. Studying the Solar System's Chemical Recipe

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Studying the Solar System's Chemical Recipe Print To study the origins of different ... of California, San Diego is using ALS Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2 to mimic ...

  3. Studying the Solar System's Chemical Recipe

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Studying the Solar System's Chemical Recipe Studying the Solar System's Chemical Recipe Print Tuesday, 26 March 2013 00:00 To study the origins of different isotope ratios among ...

  4. ICMS. Chemical Tracking, Management, and Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlette, J.; Miles, R.; Carlson, M.; Bargelski, C.

    1997-10-10

    The ICMS provides: management and system users a cost-effective method for identifying, reporting, and tracking chemicals from identifying the chemical when it is received until it enters a waste stream for a facility or area.

  5. Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K.; Call, C.J.; Birmingham, J.G.; McDonald, C.E.; Kurath, D.E.; Friedrich, M.

    1998-09-22

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 26 figs.

  6. Microcomponent chemical process sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; Call, Charles J.; Birmingham, Joseph G.; McDonald, Carolyn Evans; Kurath, Dean E.; Friedrich, Michele

    1998-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one chemical process unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  7. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  9. CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation- June 30, 2011

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chemical Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-31, Rev. 1)

  10. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage » Materials-Based Storage » Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's (FCTO's) chemical hydrogen storage materials research focuses on improving the volumetric and gravimetric capacity, transient performance, and efficient, cost-effective regeneration of the spent storage material. Technical Overview The category of chemical hydrogen storage materials generally refers to covalently bound hydrogen in either solid or

  11. Chemicals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemicals (2010 MECS) Chemicals (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Chemicals (125.4 KB) More Documents & Publications All Manufacturing (2010 MECS) Cement (2010 MECS) Computers, Electronics and Electrical Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy Sankey Diagrams

  12. Chemical heat pump and chemical energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Edward C.; Huxtable, Douglas D.

    1985-08-06

    A chemical heat pump and storage system employs sulfuric acid and water. In one form, the system includes a generator and condenser, an evaporator and absorber, aqueous acid solution storage and water storage. During a charging cycle, heat is provided to the generator from a heat source to concentrate the acid solution while heat is removed from the condenser to condense the water vapor produced in the generator. Water is then stored in the storage tank. Heat is thus stored in the form of chemical energy in the concentrated acid. The heat removed from the water vapor can be supplied to a heat load of proper temperature or can be rejected. During a discharge cycle, water in the evaporator is supplied with heat to generate water vapor, which is transmitted to the absorber where it is condensed and absorbed into the concentrated acid. Both heats of dilution and condensation of water are removed from the thus diluted acid. During the discharge cycle the system functions as a heat pump in which heat is added to the system at a low temperature and removed from the system at a high temperature. The diluted acid is stored in an acid storage tank or is routed directly to the generator for reconcentration. The generator, condenser, evaporator, and absorber all are operated under pressure conditions specified by the desired temperature levels for a given application. The storage tanks, however, can be maintained at or near ambient pressure conditions. In another form, the heat pump system is employed to provide usable heat from waste process heat by upgrading the temperature of the waste heat.

  13. Apparatus and methods for detecting chemical permeation

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1994-12-27

    Apparatus and methods for detecting the permeation of hazardous or toxic chemicals through protective clothing are disclosed. The hazardous or toxic chemicals of interest do not possess the spectral characteristic of luminescence. The apparatus and methods utilize a spectrochemical modification technique to detect the luminescence quenching of an indicator compound which upon permeation of the chemical through the protective clothing, the indicator is exposed to the chemical, thus indicating chemical permeation. The invention also relates to the fabrication of protective clothing materials. 13 figures.

  14. Chemical microreactor and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan

    2005-11-01

    A chemical microreactor suitable for generation of hydrogen fuel from liquid sources such as ammonia, methanol, and butane through steam reforming processes when mixed with an appropriate amount of water contains capillary microchannels with integrated resistive heaters to facilitate the occurrence of catalytic steam reforming reactions. One such microreactor employs a packed catalyst capillary microchannel and at least one porous membrane. Another employs a porous membrane with a large surface area or a porous membrane support structure containing a plurality of porous membranes having a large surface area in the aggregate, i.e., greater than about 1 m.sup.2 /cm.sup.3. The packed catalyst capillary microchannels, porous membranes and porous membrane support structures may be formed by a variety of methods.

  15. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  16. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, Arnold R.

    1987-01-01

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer (11) at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer (11) to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator (10) to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing he evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator.

  17. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-11-24

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  18. Chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process

    DOEpatents

    Vobach, A.R.

    1987-06-23

    There is provided a chemically assisted mechanical refrigeration process including the steps of: mechanically compressing a refrigerant stream which includes vaporized refrigerant; contacting the refrigerant with a solvent in a mixer at a pressure sufficient to promote substantial dissolving of the refrigerant in the solvent in the mixer to form a refrigerant-solvent solution while concurrently placing the solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to transfer energy to the working medium, said refrigerant-solvent solution exhibiting a negative deviation from Raoult's Law; reducing the pressure over the refrigerant-solvent solution in an evaporator to allow the refrigerant to vaporize and substantially separate from the solvent while concurrently placing the evolving refrigerant-solvent solution in heat exchange relation with a working medium to remove energy from the working medium to thereby form a refrigerant stream and a solvent stream; and passing the solvent and refrigerant stream from the evaporator. 5 figs.

  19. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Hannum, David W.; Conrad, Frank James

    1999-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow.

  20. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  1. Acoustic Longitudinal Field NIF Optic Feature Detection Map Using Time-Reversal & MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K

    2006-02-09

    We developed an ultrasonic longitudinal field time-reversal and MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) based detection algorithm for identifying and mapping flaws in fused silica NIF optics. The algorithm requires a fully multistatic data set, that is one with multiple, independently operated, spatially diverse transducers, each transmitter of which, in succession, launches a pulse into the optic and the scattered signal measured and recorded at every receiver. We have successfully localized engineered ''defects'' larger than 1 mm in an optic. We confirmed detection and localization of 3 mm and 5 mm features in experimental data, and a 0.5 mm in simulated data with sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. We present the theory, experimental results, and simulated results.

  2. Lee Chung Yung Chemical Industry Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chung Yung Chemical Industry Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lee Chung Yung Chemical Industry Corporation Place: Taipei, Taiwan Product: Chemical manufacturer...

  3. ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, ...

  4. T Plant, Chemical Separation Building | Department of Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Manhattan Project Signature Facilities T Plant, Chemical Separation Building T Plant, Chemical Separation Building Photos of T-plant's construction and T-Plant's Chemical ...

  5. Electrostatic thin film chemical and biological sensor

    DOEpatents

    Prelas, Mark A.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Tompson, Jr., Robert V.; Viswanath, Dabir; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2010-01-19

    A chemical and biological agent sensor includes an electrostatic thin film supported by a substrate. The film includes an electrostatic charged surface to attract predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A charge collector associated with said electrostatic thin film collects charge associated with surface defects in the electrostatic film induced by the predetermined biological and chemical agents of interest. A preferred sensing system includes a charge based deep level transient spectroscopy system to read out charges from the film and match responses to data sets regarding the agents of interest. A method for sensing biological and chemical agents includes providing a thin sensing film having a predetermined electrostatic charge. The film is exposed to an environment suspected of containing the biological and chemical agents. Quantum surface effects on the film are measured. Biological and/or chemical agents can be detected, identified and quantified based on the measured quantum surface effects.

  6. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases

    SciTech Connect

    Van Keuren, J.C.; Davis, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This topical report contains technical information used to determine the accident consequences of releases of toxic chemical and gases for the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis report (FSAR).It does not provide results for specific accident scenarios but does provide information for use in those calculations including chemicals to be considered, chemical concentrations, chemical limits and a method of summing the fractional contributions of each chemical. Tank farm composites evaluated were liquids and solids for double shell tanks, single shell tanks, all solids,all liquids, headspace gases, and 241-C-106 solids. Emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs) were used as the limits.Where ERPGs were not available for the chemicals of interest, surrogate ERPGs were developed. Revision 2 includes updated sample data, an executive summary, and some editorial revisions.

  7. SOME CHEMICAL SAFETY ASPECTS AT LANL

    SciTech Connect

    J. LAUL

    2001-05-01

    Recently, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have begun activities to improve the quality and consistency of chemical safety programs throughout the DOE Complex. Several working groups have been formed to assemble a framework for systematically identifying and quantifying chemical hazards and managing chemical risks. At LANL, chemical safety program is implemented through Laboratory Implementation Requirements (LIRs), which are part of the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) plan that includes Safe Work Practices, emphasizing five core functions; define work, identify and analyze hazards, develop and implement controls, perform work safely, and ensure performance. Work is authorized in medium, low and minimal risk areas and not in high risk. Some chemical safety aspects are discussed in terms of chemical hazards and identification, screening, facility hazard categorization--Category A (high), Category B (moderate), and Category C (low), and their requirements in format and content in Authorization Safety Basis documents.

  8. Chemical Looping Combustion | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Looping Combustion chemical-looping-combustion.jpg An economical option for using our abundant, domestic coal resources while eliminating CO2 emissions may sound like science fiction, but NETL researchers are working to bring this technology of the future into the present. Chemical looping is the solution. This cost-effective indirect combustion technology has CO2 capture "built in," effectively eradicating greenhouse gas emissions from coal. Although still a few years away

  9. Distinctive properties of tabular solar chemical reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Meirovitch, E. )

    1991-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight that can be stored in the chemical bond by activating an endothermic reaction. This novel concept has been implemented recently with solar power captured in a central receiver equipped with chemical reactors. The related theory, presented in this report, singles out this interactive radiative-chemical system as distinctively stable thermodynamically, resilient to perturbations, internally regulatory and self-corrective. None of the thermochemical devices conceived so far bear all these attributes.

  10. chemical_methods | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Methods Chemical methods focus mainly on alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) processes that involve the injection of micellar-polymers into the reservoir. Chemical flooding reduces the interfacial tension between the in-place crude oil and the injected water, allowing the oil to be produced. Micellar fluids are composed largely of surfactants mixed with water. Goals of polymer floods are to shut off excess water in producing wells, and to improve sweep efficiency to produce more oil.

  11. 2.3 Understanding Chemical Reactions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6/1/2011 2.3 Understanding Chemical Reactions The molecular features that influence the rate of chemical reactions were poorly understood until the mid- 1960s, when Dudley Herschbach and his postdoctoral student Yuan T. Lee began a series of experiments at Harvard University. With funding from the Office of Science and predecessor agencies, they explained in detail how chemical reactions take place, and solved the problem of how to observe the random directions and velocities of molecules in a

  12. Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories Nancy B. Jackson Nancy Jackson Nancy B. Jackson, manager of the International Chemical Threat Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories, will be the American Chemical Society president in 2011 and will serve on the ACS Board of Directors during her presidential succession, which will run from 2010 to 2012. Jackson holds

  13. 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cynthia M. Friend

    2006-03-14

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2005 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces was held at Ventura Beach Marriott, Ventura California from February 13, 2005 through February 18, 2005. The Conference was well-attended with 124 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  14. Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

  15. Division Director, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division is seeking a motivated and highly qualified individual to...

  16. Predicting Pressure-Dependent Combustion Chemical Reactions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Chemical Reactions HomeCapabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Energy, ... in combus-tion and atmospheric chemistry that is expected to benefit auto and ...

  17. Methods and compounds for chemical ligation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Sismour, A. Michael

    2013-07-09

    Compositions and methods for chemical ligation are provided. Methods for nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid assembly and nucleic acid synthesis are also provided.

  18. Chemical Design Inc CDI | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Design Inc CDI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chemical Design Inc (CDI) Place: Lockport, New York Zip: 14094 Product: US-based engineer of separation and purification plants;...

  19. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications in Chemical Catalysis Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users...

  20. Sanyo Chemical Industries | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sanyo Chemical Industries Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 103-0023 Product: String representation "Sanyo is a petr ... uction process." is...

  1. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  2. WEBINAR: MODULAR CHEMICAL PROCESS INTENSIFICATION INSTITUTE FOR...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy will conduct an informational webinar for the Modular Chemical Process Intensification Institute for Clean ...

  3. FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Chemical Processing |...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chemical Processing Gap Analysis Qualification Card (77.17 KB) More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Nuclear Explosive Safety Study FAQS Gap Analysis ...

  4. Studying the Solar System's Chemical Recipe

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Studying the Solar System's Chemical Recipe Print To study the origins of different isotope ratios among the elements that make up today's smorgasbord of planets, moons, comets,...

  5. Characterization of Chemical Properties, Unit Cell Parameters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    They have been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical measurement methods: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), gravimetry, instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), ...

  6. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions with the support, reactants, and products. Probing this chemical soup in real time under realistic reaction conditions is such a tall order that in some cases even...

  7. Fuels and Chemicals from Lignocellulosic Biomass: Valorization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biomass: Valorization of Lignin Mike Kent Deconstruction Division Joint BioEnergy Institute Outline 1. Introduction: -fuels and chemicals from Ngnocellulosic biomass -need ...

  8. Chemically stabilized ionomers containing inorganic fillers

    DOEpatents

    Roelofs, Mark Gerrit

    2013-12-31

    Ionomeric polymers that are chemically stabilized and contain inorganic fillers are prepared, and show reduced degradation. The ionomers care useful in membranes and electrochemical cells.

  9. ORISE: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Training and Analysis Tool Training Tool Improves Information Sharing Between CSEPP and its Response Partners In 2006,...

  10. Dudley Herschbach: Chemical Reactions and Molecular Beams

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    As a co-recipient of the 1986 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 'Dudley Herschbach was cited for ... Dudley R. Herschbach, Harvard Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Teaching ...

  11. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock...

  12. Method and apparatus for chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Kong; Peter C. , Herring; J. Stephen , Grandy; Jon D.

    2007-12-04

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  13. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. ...

  14. Handbook of environmental data on organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Verschueren, K.

    1983-01-01

    This text presents essential data on over 2,000 organic chemicals: synonyms, formulas, properties; effects on plants, animals, people, air, water.

  15. Air Products Chemicals Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Air Products & Chemicals Inc Place: Allentown, Pennsylvania Zip: 18195 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Services Product: A global supplier of merchant hydrogen with a portfolio of...

  16. Integrated Chemical Geothermometry System for Geothermal Exploration

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Develop practical and reliable system to predict geothermal reservoir temperatures from integrated chemical analyses of spring and well fluids.

  17. Inventure Chemical Technology | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Inventure Chemical Technology Address: P.O. Box 530 Place: Gig Harbor, Washington Zip: 98335 Region: Pacific Northwest Area Sector:...

  18. Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Chemical Characterization of Individual ... Collected On Board Research Aircraft in the ISDAC ... inorganic or black carbon cores coated by organic materials. ...

  19. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  20. Excellence in biotechnology for fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, S.

    1999-04-23

    The Biotechnology Center for Fuels and Chemicals (BCFC) leads a national effort, in cooperation with industry, to develop innovative, market-driven biotechnologies for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable resources. The BCFC researchers focus on using bioprocesses to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into valuable products.

  1. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  2. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This report marks the culmination of a 4-month review conducted to identify chemical safety vulnerabilities existing at DOE facilities. This review is an integral part of DOE's efforts to raise its commitment to chemical safety to the same level as that for nuclear safety.

  3. Use and Misuse of Chemical Reactivity Spreadsheets

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F

    2005-09-20

    Misidentifying chemical hazards can have serious deleterious effects. Consequences of not identifying a chemical are obvious and include fires, explosions, injury to workers, etc. Consequences of identifying hazards that are really not present can be equally as bad. Misidentifying hazards can result in increased work with loss of productivity, increased expenses, utilization/consumption of scarce resources, and the potential to modify the work to include chemicals or processes that are actually more hazardous than those originally proposed. For these reasons, accurate hazard identification is critical to any safety program. Hazard identification in the world of chemistry is, at best, a daunting task. The knowing or understanding, of the reactions between any of approximately twelve million known chemicals that may be hazardous, is the reason for this task being so arduous. Other variables, such as adding other reactants/contaminants or changing conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, or concentration), make hazard determination something many would construe as being more than impossibly difficult. Despite these complexities, people who do not have an extensive background in the chemical sciences can be called upon to perform chemical hazard identification. Because hazard identification in the area of chemical safety is so burdensome and because people with a wide variety of training are called upon to perform this work, tools are required to aid in chemical hazard identification. Many tools have been developed. Unfortunately, many of these tools are not seen as the limited resource that they are and are used inappropriately.

  4. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  5. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  6. Exposure Levels for Chemical Threat Compounds; Information to Facilitate Chemical Incident Response

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, Veronique; Watson, Annetta Paule

    2013-01-01

    Exposure Standards, Limits and Guidelines for Chemical Threat Compunds ABSTRACT Exposure criteria for chemical warfare (CW) agents and certain toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) used as CW agents (such as chlorine fill in an improvised explosive device) have been developed for protection of the civilian general public, civilian employees in chemical agent processing facilities and deployed military populations. In addition, compound-specific concentrations have been developed to serve as how clean is clean enough clearance criteria guiding facility recovery following chemical terrorist or other hazardous release events. Such criteria are also useful to verify compound absence, identify containment boundaries and expedite facility recovery following chemical threat release. There is no single right value or concentration appropriate for all chemical hazard control applications. It is acknowledged that locating and comparing the many sources of CW agent and TIC exposure criteria has not been previously well-defined. This paper summarizes many of these estimates and assembles critical documentation regarding their derivation and use.

  7. Chemicals Industry New Process Chemistry Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-08-01

    The Materials Technology I workshop was held in November 1998 to address future research needs for materials technology that will support the chemical industry. Areas covered included disassembly, recovery, reuse and renewable technology; new materials; and materials measurement and characterization. The Materials Technology II workshop was held in September 1999 and covered additives, modeling and prediction and an additional segment on new materials. Materials Technology Institute (MTI) for the Chemical Process Industries, Inc. and Air Products & Chemicals lead the workshops. The Materials Technology Roadmap presents the results from both workshops.

  8. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred (Medina, OH); Lewis, Irwin Charles (Strongsville, OH)

    1998-01-01

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (i) the electrode, (ii) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (iii) a counterelectrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes.

  9. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  10. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1998-05-26

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (1) the electrode, (2) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (3) a counter electrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes. 3 figs.

  11. Production of chemicals and fuels from biomass

    DOEpatents

    Woods, Elizabeth; Qiao, Ming; Myren, Paul; Cortright, Randy D.; Kania, John

    2015-12-15

    Described are methods, reactor systems, and catalysts for converting biomass to fuels and chemicals in a batch and/or continuous process. The process generally involves the conversion of water insoluble components of biomass, such as hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, to volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates, such as alcohols, ketones, cyclic ethers, esters, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, and mixtures thereof. In certain applications, the volatile C.sub.2+O.sub.1-2 oxygenates can be collected and used as a final chemical product, or used in downstream processes to produce liquid fuels, chemicals and other products.

  12. Chemical safety: asking the right questions

    SciTech Connect

    Whyte, Helena M; Quigley, David; Freshwater, David

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that, despite efforts to the contrary, chemical accidents continue to occur at an unacceptable rate and there is no evidence that this rate is decreasing. Based on this observation, one can conclude that previous analyses have not accurately identified and implemented appropriate fixes to eliminate identified root causes for chemical events. Based on this, it is time to reevaluate chemical accident data with a fresh eye and determine (a) what corrective actions have already been identified but have not been implemented, (b) what other root causes may be involved, and (c) what new corrective actions should be taken to eliminate these newly identified root causes.

  13. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  14. CHEMICAL SAFETY: ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F

    2008-08-05

    Recent reports have shown that, despite efforts to the contrary, chemical accidents continue to occur at an unacceptable rate and there is no evidence that this rate is decreasing. Based on this observation, one can conclude that previous analyses have not accurately identified and implemented appropriate fixes to eliminate identified root causes for chemical events. Based on this, it is time to reevaluate chemical accident data with a fresh eye and determine (a) what corrective actions have already been identified but have not been implemented, (b) what other root causes may be involved, and (c) what new corrective actions should be taken to eliminate these newly identified root causes.

  15. More of an art than a science: Using microbial DNA sequences to compose music

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peter E.

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria are everywhere. Microbial ecology is emerging as a critical field for understanding the relationships between these ubiquitous bacterial communities, the environment, and human health. Next generation DNA sequencing technology provides us a powerful tool to indirectly observe the communities by sequencing and analyzing all of the bacterial DNA present in an environment. The results of the DNA sequencing experiments can generate gigabytes to terabytes of information however, making it difficult for the citizen scientist to grasp and the educator to convey this data. Here, we present a method for interpreting massive amounts of microbial ecology data as musical performances,more » easily generated on any computer and using only commonly available or freely available software and the ‘Microbial Bebop’ algorithm. Furthermore, using this approach citizen scientists and biology educators can sonify complex data in a fun and interactive format, making it easier to communicate both the importance and the excitement of exploring the planet earth’s largest ecosystem.« less

  16. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    P.J. Kooyman, H.W. Zandbergen, C. Morin, B.M. Weckhuysen, and F.M.F. de Groot, "Nanoscale chemical imaging of a working catalyst by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy," Nature...

  17. Collaborating for Multi-Scale Chemical Science

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Green

    2006-07-14

    Advanced model reduction methods were developed and integrated into the CMCS multiscale chemical science simulation software. The new technologies were used to simulate HCCI engines and burner flames with exceptional fidelity.

  18. Dow Chemical Company | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dow Chemical Company Place: Midland, MI Zip: 48667 Website: www.dow.com Coordinates: 43.6039709, -84.2370999 Show Map Loading map......

  19. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's chemical hydrogen storage R&D is focused on developing low-cost energy-efficient regeneration systems for these irreversible hydrogen storage systems. Significant technical issues remain...

  20. Sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes

    DOEpatents

    Yi, Dechang; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-07-05

    A sensor for detecting and differentiating chemical analytes includes a microscale body having a first end and a second end and a surface between the ends for adsorbing a chemical analyte. The surface includes at least one conductive heating track for heating the chemical analyte and also a conductive response track, which is electrically isolated from the heating track, for producing a thermal response signal from the chemical analyte. The heating track is electrically connected with a voltage source and the response track is electrically connected with a signal recorder. The microscale body is restrained at the first end and the second end and is substantially isolated from its surroundings therebetween, thus having a bridge configuration.

  1. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  2. Linyi Gelon Chemical | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    China Product: Shangdong based cathode materials (LiMn2O4 and LiFePO4) maker for Lithium secondary batteries. References: Linyi Gelon Chemical1 This article is a stub. You...

  3. Method And Apparatus For Detecting Chemical Binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2005-02-22

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  4. How Do I Work with Chemicals?

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    bottom of the chemical safety page of the ESS (example). If you will be using hazardous materials, this work will usually be restricted to a special bench at the beamline. The...

  5. Chemical vapor infiltration using microwave energy

    DOEpatents

    Devlin, David J.; Currier, Robert P.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Barbero, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    A method for producing reinforced ceramic composite articles by means of chemical vapor infiltration and deposition in which an inverted temperature gradient is utilized. Microwave energy is the source of heat for the process.

  6. Method and apparatus for detecting chemical binding

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2007-07-10

    The method for screening binding between a target binder and potential pharmaceutical chemicals involves sending a solution (preferably an aqueous solution) of the target binder through a conduit to a size exclusion filter, the target binder being too large to pass through the size exclusion filter, and then sending a solution of one or more potential pharmaceutical chemicals (preferably an aqueous solution) through the same conduit to the size exclusion filter after target binder has collected on the filter. The potential pharmaceutical chemicals are small enough to pass through the filter. Afterwards, x-rays are sent from an x-ray source to the size exclusion filter, and if the potential pharmaceutical chemicals form a complex with the target binder, the complex produces an x-ray fluorescence signal having an intensity that indicates that a complex has formed.

  7. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  8. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  9. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  10. Fiber optic chemical sensors on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Grunthaner, F.J.; Lane, A.L.

    1993-12-31

    A fiber optic chemical sensing instrument is described that will measure the reactivity of the martian soil and atmosphere. The self- contained instrument monitors reflectivity changes in reactive thin films caused by chemical reactions with the martian soil or atmosphere. Data from over 200 separate thin-film-coated optical fibers are recorded simultaneously. This fiber optic sensing technology has many advantages for planetary exploration and monitoring applications on manned spacecraft, in addition to many practical terrestrial uses.

  11. Expansion of ARAC for chemical releases

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Blair, M.D.; Foster, C.S.; Taylor, A.G.

    1997-07-01

    In 1996 the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed an effort to expand its national emergency response modeling system for chemical releases. Key components of the new capability include the integration of (1) an extensive chemical property database, (2) source modeling for tanks and evaporating pools, (3) denser-than-air dispersion, (4) public exposure guidelines, and (5) an interactive graphical user interface (GUI). Recent use and the future of the new capability are also discussed.

  12. Chemical Sciences and Engineering | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Chemical Science Plant fatty acids are used in a vast range of products, from polymers to plastics and soaps to industrial feed stocks -- making up an estimated $150 billion market annually. A new discovery of inserting double bonds in the fatty acids could show the way to the designer production of plant fatty acids, and, in turn, to new industrial applications and new products. <a href

  13. Annular gel reactor for chemical pattern formation

    DOEpatents

    Nosticzius, Zoltan; Horsthemke, Werner; McCormick, William D.; Swinney, Harry L.; Tam, Wing Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an annular gel reactor suitable for the production and observation of spatiotemporal patterns created during a chemical reaction. The apparatus comprises a vessel having at least a first and second chamber separated one from the other by an annular polymer gel layer (or other fine porous medium) which is inert to the materials to be reacted but capable of allowing diffusion of the chemicals into it.

  14. Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

  15. Batteryless Chemical Detection - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Batteryless Chemical Detection Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Advanced Materials, 2011, 23, 117-121. (1,804 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Existing nanosensor technologies employ gas, chemical, and biological detection methods that depend on an external power source (typically a battery) to operate. This limits conventional technologies by

  16. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, Karla D.; Kenny, Donald V.; Endres, George W. R.; Sisk, Daniel R.

    1997-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

  17. Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow August 21, 2013 David Hobart, long-time Chemistry Division employee and current affiliate in the National Security Education Center (NSEC), has been elected to Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The ACS honored him for his significant contributions to f-element science. The f-elements are those that have electrons in their f orbitals (lanthanides and the actinides). The ACS noted that Hobart contributed the reduction potential for the

  18. Diffusion approximations to the chemical master equation only have a consistent stochastic thermodynamics at chemical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Jordan M.

    2015-07-28

    The stochastic thermodynamics of a dilute, well-stirred mixture of chemically reacting species is built on the stochastic trajectories of reaction events obtained from the chemical master equation. However, when the molecular populations are large, the discrete chemical master equation can be approximated with a continuous diffusion process, like the chemical Langevin equation or low noise approximation. In this paper, we investigate to what extent these diffusion approximations inherit the stochastic thermodynamics of the chemical master equation. We find that a stochastic-thermodynamic description is only valid at a detailed-balanced, equilibrium steady state. Away from equilibrium, where there is no consistent stochastic thermodynamics, we show that one can still use the diffusive solutions to approximate the underlying thermodynamics of the chemical master equation.

  19. DuPont Chemical Vapor Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    MOORE, T.L.

    2003-10-03

    DuPont Safety Resources was tasked with reviewing the current chemical vapor control practices and providing preventive recommendations on best commercial techniques to control worker exposures. The increased focus of the tank closure project to meet the 2024 Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones has surfaced concerns among some CH2MHill employees and other interested parties. CH2MHill is committed to providing a safe working environment for employees and desires to safely manage the tank farm operations using appropriate control measures. To address worker concerns, CH2MHill has chartered a ''Chemical Vapors Project'' to integrate the activities of multiple CH2MHill project teams, and solicit the expertise of external resources, including an independent Industrial Hygiene expert panel, a communications consultant, and DuPont Safety Resources. Over a three-month time period, DuPont worked with CH2MHill ESH&Q, Industrial Hygiene, Engineering, and the independent expert panel to perform the assessment. The process included overview presentations, formal interviews, informal discussions, documentation review, and literature review. DuPont Safety Resources concluded that it is highly unlikely that workers in the tank farms are exposed to chemicals above established standards. Additionally, the conventional and radiological chemistry is understood, the inherent chemical hazards are known, and the risk associated with chemical vapor exposure is properly managed. The assessment highlighted management's commitment to addressing chemical vapor hazards and controlling the associated risks. Additionally, we found the Industrial Hygiene staff to be technically competent and well motivated. The tank characterization data resides in a comprehensive database containing the tank chemical compositions and relevant airborne concentrations.

  20. ITP Chemicals: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Chemical Industry, May 2000

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Profiles about the ethylene chain, propylene chain, benzene-toulene-xylene chain, agricultural chemicals chain, chlor-alkali industry, and supporting processes

  1. The music of clash: predictions on the concentration-mass relation

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, M.; Rasia, E.; Vega, J.; Yepes, G.; Sembolini, F.; Merten, J.; Ettori, S.; Postman, M.; Coe, D.; Donahue, M.; Umetsu, K.; Czakon, N.; Balestra, I.; Bartelmann, M.; Benítez, N.; Biviano, A.; Bradley, L.; Broadhurst, T.; and others

    2014-12-10

    We present an analysis of the MUSIC-2 N-body/hydrodynamical simulations aimed at estimating the expected concentration-mass relation for the CLASH (Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey with Hubble) cluster sample. We study nearly 1,400 halos simulated at high spatial and mass resolution. We study the shape of both their density and surface-density profiles and fit them with a variety of radial functions, including the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW), the generalized NFW, and the Einasto density profiles. We derive concentrations and masses from these fits. We produce simulated Chandra observations of the halos, and we use them to identify objects resembling the X-ray morphologies and masses of the clusters in the CLASH X-ray-selected sample. We also derive a concentration-mass relation for strong-lensing clusters. We find that the sample of simulated halos that resembles the X-ray morphology of the CLASH clusters is composed mainly of relaxed halos, but it also contains a significant fraction of unrelaxed systems. For such a heterogeneous sample we measure an average two-dimensional concentration that is ?11% higher than is found for the full sample of simulated halos. After accounting for projection and selection effects, the average NFW concentrations of CLASH clusters are expected to be intermediate between those predicted in three dimensions for relaxed and super-relaxed halos. Matching the simulations to the individual CLASH clusters on the basis of the X-ray morphology, we expect that the NFW concentrations recovered from the lensing analysis of the CLASH clusters are in the range [3-6], with an average value of 3.87 and a standard deviation of 0.61.

  2. Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dixon

    2004-04-26

    The conceptual and predictive models documented in this Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model report describe the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository. The modeling approaches and model output data will be used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. These models evaluate the range of potential water compositions within the emplacement drifts, resulting from the interaction of introduced materials and minerals in dust with water seeping into the drifts and with aqueous solutions forming by deliquescence of dust (as influenced by atmospheric conditions), and from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes in the drift. These models also consider the uncertainty and variability in water chemistry inside the drift and the compositions of introduced materials within the drift. This report develops and documents a set of process- and abstraction-level models that constitute the engineered barrier system: physical and chemical environment model. Where possible, these models use information directly from other process model reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for total system performance assessment. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in the technical work plan ''Technical Work Plan for: In-Drift Geochemistry Modeling'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166519]). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system analysis model reports.

  3. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  4. Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and ...

  5. Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology KRICT | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of Chemical Technology KRICT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT) Place: Yooseong-gu, Daejeon, Korea (Republic) Zip: 305-600...

  6. Podolsky Chemical and Metallurgical Plant PCMP | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Podolsky Chemical and Metallurgical Plant PCMP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Podolsky Chemical and Metallurgical Plant (PCMP) Place: Moscow, Russian Federation Zip: 142103...

  7. Zibo Baoyun Chemical Company Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Zibo Baoyun Chemical Company Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zibo Baoyun Chemical Company Ltd Place: Zibo, Shandong Province, China Product: Chinese trichlorosilane producer...

  8. Consortium of Chemical International Ltd CCIL | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of Chemical International Ltd CCIL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Consortium of Chemical International Ltd (CCIL) Place: New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Sector: Biomass Product:...

  9. Hawaii HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical Storage and Tier II Reporting...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical Storage and Tier II Reporting Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii HEPCRA Hazardous Chemical...

  10. Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Chemical Engineering...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Polish Academy of Sciences Institute of Chemical Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Polish Academy of Sciences: Institute of Chemical Engineering Place: Gliwice, Poland...

  11. Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Morphological and Chemical Changes of High Voltage Lithium-Manganese Rich NMC ... resolve changes in the chemical phase, oxidation state and morphology of the material. ...

  12. Nova Chemicals Reliance Industries JV | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Product: Nova Chemicals has signed an agreement with Reliance Industries to construct energy efficient buildings in India. References: Nova Chemicals & Reliance Industries...

  13. Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Zinc Oxide Nanowire Corrosion ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Zinc Oxide Nanowire Corrosion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Zinc Oxide Nanowire Corrosion Nanoscale ...

  14. Overview of Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing for Diesel Exhaust, Both Real Time and Filter Based Measurements Overview of Detailed Chemical Speciation and Particle Sizing for ...

  15. Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of...

    Energy Saver

    Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence This technical report describes the ...

  16. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within DOE's Chemical Hydrogen...

    Energy Saver

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  17. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model And Experiments For Optimization Of ... Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization ...

  18. Los Alamos scientists selected as American Chemical Society Fellows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    American Chemical Society Fellows Los Alamos scientists selected as American Chemical Society Fellows Rebecca Chamberlin and Donivan Porterfield have been selected as a 2014 ...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Allied Chemical and Dye...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Allied Chemical and Dye Corp - DE 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Allied Chemical and Dye Corp. (DE.01 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated ...

  20. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have developed a robust and label-free method to probe the chemical underpinnings of developing bacterial ...

  1. Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM ...

  2. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Wednesday, 25 August 2010 00:00 Scientists have ...

  3. Los Alamos researcher named as American Chemical Society Fellow

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Researcher named American Chemical Society Fellow Los Alamos researcher named as American Chemical Society Fellow Kristin Omberg named for her contributions to national security as ...

  4. Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, ... Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2as Heat Transmission Fluid Chemical Impact of ...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Fairmont Chemical Co - NJ 25 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fairmont Chemical Co. (NJ.25 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ...

  6. Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical analysis of Wild-2 samples returned by Stardust Authors: ...

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Radium Chemical Co Inc ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Radium Chemical Co Inc - NY 60 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: RADIUM CHEMICAL CO., INC (NY.60 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated ...

  8. Chemical Scientist Hendrik Bluhm Receives Bessel Research Award

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Scientist Hendrik Bluhm Receives Bessel Research Award Chemical Scientist Hendrik Bluhm Receives Bessel Research Award Print Friday, 24 May 2013 00:00 Hendrik Bluhm of the ...

  9. Scientist Named an American Chemical Society Fellow - News Releases...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist Named an American Chemical Society Fellow September 1, 2010 Helena Chum Dr. Helena Chum was named a 2010 Fellow by the American Chemical Society. Dr. Helena Chum, ...

  10. Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanojunction Sensors for the Detection of chemical and Biological Species DOE Grant ... gaps for various applications, including chemical and biological sensors, magnetoresistive ...

  11. American Chemical Society International-Domestic Student Summit

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Society International-Domestic Student Summit - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon ... ARPA-E Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences and Engineering Chemical Sciences ...

  12. Chemical Transformation - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Transformation A second energy storage concept being pursued by JCESR is chemical transformation. This concept involves replacement of intercalation of the working ion at ...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dubois Chemical Co - OH...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dubois Chemical Co - OH 39 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dubois Chemical Co. (OH.39 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ...

  14. Analysis and Reduction of Chemical Models under Uncertainty ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis and Reduction of Chemical Models under Uncertainty Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analysis and Reduction of Chemical Models under Uncertainty Abstract not ...

  15. Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-Time Chemical Imaging of Bacterial Biofilm Development Print Scientists have ... The ability to image the chemical reactions in living cells in real time, especially in ...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Texas City Chemicals Co...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Texas City Chemicals Co Inc - TX 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: TEXAS CITY CHEMICALS CO., INC. (TX.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated ...

  17. The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing Firms The Formation of Pioneer Plant Projects in Chemical Processing Firms This report should provide DOE and the ...

  18. Lynden Archer receives chemical engineering award > EMC2 News...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lynden Archer receives chemical engineering award August 6th, 2014 Lynden Archer, the William C. Hooey Director and Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, has...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chemical Company) concerning the procurement of enriched uranium; Feb 24, 1960 MO.0-01-5 - AEC Letter; Price to Greenlee (Spencer Chemical Co.) concerning an inspection of ...

  20. Commercialization of Bio-Based Chemicals: A Successful Public...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Bio-Based Chemicals: A Successful Public-Private Partnership Commercialization of Bio-Based Chemicals: A Successful Public-Private Partnership Opening Plenary Session: Celebrating ...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Chemical Construction Co...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chemical Construction Co Linden Pilot Plant - NJ 12 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Chemical Construction Co., Linden Pilot Plant (NJ.12 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP ...

  2. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex ... Title: Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in ...

  3. RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) A fact sheet detailling a proposal of ...

  4. Enabling Low Temperature Combustion Through Thermo-Chemical Recuperati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Low Temperature Combustion Through Thermo-Chemical Recuperation Enabling Low Temperature Combustion Through Thermo-Chemical Recuperation Poster presentation from the 2007 Diesel ...

  5. New screening process for potentially cancer causing chemicals

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    New screening process for potentially cancer causing chemicals Click to share on Facebook ... A better way to screen chemicals that may cause cancer is under development. This image ...

  6. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of fluids within the Baca...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    by conductive reheating during downward movement. Chemical modeling using the EQ3NR computer code indicates chemical stability with the mineral assemblage quartz, albite, K-mica,...

  7. MSA Apparatus Construction for Chemical Equipment Ltd | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MSA Apparatus Construction for Chemical Equipment Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: MSA Apparatus Construction for Chemical Equipment Ltd Place: United Kingdom Sector: Hydro,...

  8. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - an Energy Frontier Research Center The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT) employs a...

  9. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    scientific roadblocks to U.S. energy security. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations The Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations (IACT)...

  10. Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: Characteristi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: Characteristic determinant and edge universality Prev Next Title: Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical ...

  11. Chemical stabilization of Hanford tank residual waste (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical stabilization of Hanford tank residual waste Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical stabilization of Hanford tank residual waste Authors: Cantrell, Kirk J. ; ...

  12. Direct Determination of the Chemical Bonding of Individual Impurities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Direct Determination of the Chemical Bonding of Individual Impurities in Graphene Prev Next Title: Direct Determination of the Chemical ...

  13. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  15. Compact chemical energy system for seismic applications

    DOEpatents

    Engelke, Raymond P.; Hedges, Robert O.; Kammerman, Alan B.; Albright, James N.

    1998-01-01

    A chemical energy system is formed for producing detonations in a confined environment. An explosive mixture is formed from nitromethane (NM) and diethylenetriamine (DETA). A slapper detonator is arranged adjacent to the explosive mixture to initiate detonation of the mixture. NM and DETA are not classified as explosives when handled separately and can be safely transported and handled by workers in the field. In one aspect of the present invention, the chemicals are mixed at a location where an explosion is to occur. For application in a confined environment, the chemicals are mixed in an inflatable container to minimize storage space until it is desired to initiate an explosion. To enable an inflatable container to be used, at least 2.5 wt % DETA is used in the explosive mixture. A barrier is utilized that is formed of a carbon composite material to provide the appropriate barrel geometry and energy transmission to the explosive mixture from the slapper detonator system.

  16. Separations Needs for the Alternate Chemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2007-05-01

    The bulk of the efforts for the development of a hydrogen production plant supported by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) have been directed towards the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. However, it was judged prudent to re-investigate alternate chemical cycles in light of new developments and technical accomplishments derived from the current S-I work. This work analyzes the available data for the promising alternate chemical cycles to provide an understanding of their inherent chemical separations needs. None of the cycles analyzed have separations that are potential “show stoppers”; although some of the indicated separations will be challenging to perform. The majority of the separations involve processes that are either more achievable or more developed

  17. Engineering microbes for efficient production of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Wei; Dole, Sudhanshu; Grabar, Tammy; Collard, Andrew Christopher; Pero, Janice G; Yocum, R Rogers

    2015-04-28

    This present invention relates to production of chemicals from microorganisms that have been genetically engineered and metabolically evolved. Improvements in chemical production have been established, and particular mutations that lead to those improvements have been identified. Specific examples are given in the identification of mutations that occurred during the metabolic evolution of a bacterial strain genetically engineered to produce succinic acid. This present invention also provides a method for evaluating the industrial applicability of mutations that were selected during the metabolic evolution for increased succinic acid production. This present invention further provides microorganisms engineered to have mutations that are selected during metabolic evolution and contribute to improved production of succinic acid, other organic acids and other chemicals of commercial interest.

  18. Development of specialty chemicals from dimethyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Tartamella, T.L.; Lee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Dimethyl ether (DME) may be efficiently produced from coal-bases syngas in a high pressure, mechanically agitated slurry reactor. DME synthesis occurs in the liquid phase using a dual catalyst. By operating in a dual catalyst mode, DME may be converted from in-situ produced methanol resulting in higher methyl productivities and syngas conversions over methanol conversion alone. The feasibility of utilizing DME as a building block for more valuable specialty chemicals has been examined. A wide variety of petrochemicals may be produced from DME including light olefins, gasoline range hydrocarbons, oxygenates, and glycol precursors. These chemicals represent an important part of petroleum industries inventory of fine chemicals. Carbonylation, hydrocarbonylation, and oxidative dimerization are but a few of the reactions in which DME may undergo conversion. DME provides an additional route for the production of industrially important petrochemicals.

  19. Conformal chemically resistant coatings for microflow devices

    DOEpatents

    Folta, James A.; Zdeblick, Mark

    2003-05-13

    A process for coating the inside surfaces of silicon microflow devices, such as electrophoresis microchannels, with a low-stress, conformal (uniform) silicon nitride film which has the ability to uniformly coat deeply-recessed cavities with, for example, aspect ratios of up to 40:1 or higher. The silicon nitride coating allows extended exposure to caustic solutions. The coating enables a microflow device fabricated in silicon to be resistant to all classes of chemicals: acids, bases, and solvents. The process involves low-pressure (vacuum) chemical vapor deposition. The ultra-low-stress silicon nitride deposition process allows 1-2 .mu.m thick films without cracks, and so enables extended chemical protection of a silicon microflow device against caustics for up to 1 year. Tests have demonstrated the resistance of the films to caustic solutions at both ambient and elevated temperatures to 65.degree. C.

  20. DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

  1. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  3. Chemical sensors technology development planning workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A.

    1993-03-01

    The workshop participants were asked to: (1) Assess the current capabilities of chemical sensor technologies for addressing US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) needs; (2) Estimate potential near term (one to two years) and intermediate term (three to five years) capabilities for addressing those needs; and (3) Generate a ranked list of specific recommendations on what research and development (R&D) should be funded to provide the necessary capabilities. The needs were described in terms of two pervasive EM problems, the in situ determination of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and selected metals in various matrices at DOE sites. The R&D recommendations were to be ranked according to the estimated likelihood that the product technology will be ready for application within the time frame it is needed and the estimated return on investment. The principal conclusions and recommendations of the workshop are as follows: Chemical sensors capable of in situ determinations can significantly reduce analytical costs; Chemical sensors have been developed for certain VOCs in gases and water but none are currently capable of in situ determination of VOCs in soils; The DOE need for in situ determination of metals in soils cannot be addressed with existing chemical sensors and the prospects for their availability in three to five years are uncertain; Adaptation, if necessary, and field application of laboratory analytical instruments and those few chemical sensors that are already in field testing is the best approach for the near term; The chemical sensor technology development plan should include balanced support for near- and intermediate-term efforts.

  4. Revisiting the chemical reactivity indices as the state function derivatives. The role of classical chemical hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, Ali; Balawender, Robert

    2015-02-07

    The chemical reactivity indices as the equilibrium state-function derivatives are revisited. They are obtained in terms of the central moments (fluctuation formulas). To analyze the role of the chemical hardness introduced by Pearson [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 7512 (1983)], the relations between the derivatives up to the third-order and the central moments are obtained. As shown, the chemical hardness and the chemical potential are really the principal indices of the chemical reactivity theory. It is clear from the results presented here that the chemical hardness is not the derivative of the Mulliken chemical potential (this means also not the second derivative of the energy at zero-temperature limit). The conventional quadratic dependence of energy, observed at finite temperature, reduces to linear dependence on the electron number at zero-temperature limit. The chemical hardness plays a double role in the admixture of ionic states to the reference neutral state energy: it determines the amplitude of the admixture and regulates the damping of its thermal factor.

  5. Chemically-functionalized microcantilevers for detection of chemical, biological and explosive material

    DOEpatents

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [Knoxville, TN; Thundat, Thomas G [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Gilbert M [Knoxville, TN; Hawk, John Eric [Olive Branch, MS; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [Knoxville, TN

    2007-04-24

    A chemically functionalized cantilever system has a cantilever coated on one side thereof with a reagent or biological species which binds to an analyte. The system is of particular value when the analyte is a toxic chemical biological warfare agent or an explosive.

  6. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

  7. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K.; Hatton, T. Alan; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  8. Chemical Management (Vol. 2 of 3)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    i TS DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 AUGUST 2006 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 2 of 3) Chemical Safety and Lifecycle Management U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site http://standards.doe.gov DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 iii Foreword During the last several years, the Department

  9. Chemical Management (Volume 3 of 3)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2005 April 2005 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 3 of 3) Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2005 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. It is available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800)

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  11. Detection of electrophilic and nucleophilic chemical agents

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2014-08-12

    A "real time" method for detecting chemical agents generally and particularly electrophilic and nucleophilic species by employing tunable, precursor sensor materials that mimic the physiological interaction of these agents to form highly florescent berberine-type alkaloids that can be easily and rapidly detected. These novel precursor sensor materials can be tuned for reaction with both electrophilic (chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (proteins and other biological molecules) species. By bonding or otherwise attaching these precursor molecules to a surface or substrate they can be used in numerous applications.

  12. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

    1997-07-08

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

  13. Chemical Biological Emergency Management Information System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-06-15

    CB-EMIS is designed to provide information and analysis to transit system operators and emergency responders in the event of a chemical attack on a subway system. The software inforporates detector data, video images, train data, meteorological data, and above- and below-ground plume dispersion models, hight of the liquid level.

  14. Chemical segregation in metallic glass nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Mo; Li, Qi-Kai

    2014-11-21

    Nanowires made of metallic glass have been actively pursued recently due to the superb and unique properties over those of the crystalline materials. The amorphous nanowires are synthesized either at high temperature or via mechanical disruption using focused ion beam. These processes have potential to cause significant changes in structure and chemical concentration, as well as formation of defect or imperfection, but little is known to date about the possibilities and mechanisms. Here, we report chemical segregation to surfaces and its mechanisms in metallic glass nanowires made of binary Cu and Zr elements from molecular dynamics simulation. Strong concentration deviation are found in the nanowires under the conditions similar to these in experiment via focused ion beam processing, hot imprinting, and casting by rapid cooling from liquid state. Our analysis indicates that non-uniform internal stress distribution is a major cause for the chemical segregation, especially at low temperatures. Extension is discussed for this observation to multicomponent metallic glass nanowires as well as the potential applications and side effects of the composition modulation. The finding also points to the possibility of the mechanical-chemical process that may occur in different settings such as fracture, cavitation, and foams where strong internal stress is present in small length scales.

  15. Chemical enhancement of metallized zinc anode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.

    1998-12-31

    Galvanic current delivered to reinforced concrete by a metallized zinc anode was studied relative to the humidity of its environment and periodic direct wetting. Current decreased quickly at low humidity to values unlikely to meet accepted cathodic protection criteria, but could be easily restored by direct wetting of the anode. Thirteen chemicals were screened for their ability to enhance galvanic current. Such chemicals, when applied to the exterior surface of the anode, are easily transported by capillary action to the anode-concrete interface where they serve to maintain the interface conductive and the zinc electrochemically active. The most effective chemicals were potassium and lithium bromide, acetate, chloride and nitrate, which increased galvanic current by a factor of 2--15, depending on relative humidity and chloride contamination of the concrete. This new technique is expected to greatly expand the number of concrete structures which can be protected by simple galvanic cathodic protection, The use of lithium-based chemicals together with metallized zinc anode is also proposed for mitigation of existing problems due to ASR. In this case, lithium which prevents or inhibits expansion due to ASR can be readily injected into the concrete. A new process, electrochemical maintenance of concrete (EMC), is also proposed to benefit reinforced concrete structures suffering from chloride-induced corrosion.

  16. Project Profile: Chemically Reactive Working Fluids

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), is working to identify and test new heat-transfer fluids (HTFs) that store energy chemically for more efficient energy transfer in CSP applications.

  17. Olefin Recovery from Chemical Industry Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    A.R. Da Costa; R. Daniels; A. Jariwala; Z. He; A. Morisato; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans

    2003-11-21

    The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process to separate olefins from paraffins in waste gas streams as an alternative to flaring or distillation. Flaring these streams wastes their chemical feedstock value; distillation is energy and capital cost intensive, particularly for small waste streams.

  18. Detection of Electrophilic and Nucleophilic Chemical Agents

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2008-11-11

    A "real time" method for detecting electrophilic and nucleophilic species generally by employing tunable, precursor sensor materials that mimic the physiological interaction of these agents to form highly florescent berberine-type alkaloids that can be easily and rapidly detected. These novel precursor sensor materials can be tuned for reaction with both electrophilic (chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (proteins and other biological molecules) species.

  19. Collaboratory for Multiscale Chemical Science (CMCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Thomas C

    2012-07-03

    This document provides details of the contributions made by NIST to the Collaboratory for Multiscale Chemical Science (CMCS) project. In particular, efforts related to the provision of data (and software in support of that data) relevant to the combustion pilot project are described.

  20. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  1. Low chemical concentrating steam generating cycle

    DOEpatents

    Mangus, James D. (Greensburg, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A steam cycle for a nuclear power plant having two optional modes of operation. A once-through mode of operation uses direct feed of coolant water to an evaporator avoiding excessive chemical concentration buildup. A recirculation mode of operation uses a recirculation loop to direct a portion of flow from the evaporator back through the evaporator to effectively increase evaporator flow.

  2. Chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Jeong, Seung Y.; Lohan, Dirk; Elizabeth, Anne

    2003-01-01

    A chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic formed by chemically reacting a monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and a sparsely soluble oxide, with a sparsely soluble silicate in an aqueous solution. The monovalent alkali metal phosphate (or ammonium hydrogen phosphate) and sparsely soluble oxide are both in powder form and combined in a stochiometric molar ratio range of (0.5-1.5):1 to form a binder powder. Similarly, the sparsely soluble silicate is also in powder form and mixed with the binder powder to form a mixture. Water is added to the mixture to form a slurry. The water comprises 50% by weight of the powder mixture in said slurry. The slurry is allowed to harden. The resulting chemically bonded phospho-silicate ceramic exhibits high flexural strength, high compression strength, low porosity and permeability to water, has a definable and bio-compatible chemical composition, and is readily and easily colored to almost any desired shade or hue.

  3. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  4. Watch copper deposited in a chemical reaction at the nanoscale...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Watch copper deposited in a chemical reaction at the nanoscale Share Topic Programs Materials science Nanoscience

  5. Biosensor discovery of thyroxine transport disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Gerardo R. Meimaridou, Anastasia; Haasnoot, Willem; Meulenberg, Eline; Albertus, Faywell; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Irth, Hubertus; Murk, Albertinka J.

    2008-10-01

    Ubiquitous chemicals may interfere with the thyroid system that is essential in the development and physiology of vertebrates. We applied a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based screening method for the fast screening of chemicals with thyroxine (T4) transport disrupting activity. Two inhibition assays using the main thyroid hormone transport proteins, T4 binding globulin (TBG) and transthyretin (TTR), in combination with a T4-coated biosensor chip were optimized and automated for screening chemical libraries. The transport protein-based biosensor assays were rapid, high throughput and bioeffect-related. A library of 62 chemicals including the natural hormones, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) and metabolites, halogenated bisphenol A (BPA), halogenated phenols, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and other potential environmentally relevant chemicals was tested with the two assays. We discovered ten new active compounds with moderate to high affinity for TBG with the TBG assay. Strikingly, the most potent binding was observed with hydroxylated metabolites of the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) BDE 47, BDE 49 and BDE 99, that are commonly found in human plasma. The TTR assay confirmed the activity of previously identified hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs and PBDEs, halogenated BPA and genistein. These results show that the hydroxylated metabolites of the ubiquitous PBDEs not only target the T4 transport at the TTR level, but also, and to a great extent, at the TBG level where most of the T4 in humans is circulating. The optimized SPR biosensor-based transport protein assay is a suitable method for high throughput screening of large libraries for potential thyroid hormone disrupting compounds.

  6. Systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2012-03-01

    Throughout history, as new chemical threats arose, strategies for the defense against chemical attacks have also evolved. As a part of an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development project, a systems analysis of past, present, and future chemical terrorism scenarios was performed to understand how the chemical threats and attack strategies change over time. For the analysis, the difficulty in executing chemical attack was evaluated within a framework of three major scenario elements. First, historical examples of chemical terrorism were examined to determine how the use of chemical threats, versus other weapons, contributed to the successful execution of the attack. Using the same framework, the future of chemical terrorism was assessed with respect to the impact of globalization and new technologies. Finally, the efficacy of the current defenses against contemporary chemical terrorism was considered briefly. The results of this analysis justify the need for continued diligence in chemical defense.

  7. Identification of chemical hazards for security risk analysis activities.

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, Calvin Dell

    2005-01-01

    The presentation outline of this paper is: (1) How identification of chemical hazards fits into a security risk analysis approach; (2) Techniques for target identification; and (3) Identification of chemical hazards by different organizations. The summary is: (1) There are a number of different methodologies used within the chemical industry which identify chemical hazards: (a) Some develop a manual listing of potential targets based on published lists of hazardous chemicals or chemicals of concern, 'expert opinion' or known hazards. (b) Others develop a prioritized list based on chemicals found at a facility and consequence analysis (offsite release affecting population, theft of material, product tampering). (2) Identification of chemical hazards should include not only intrinsic properties of the chemicals but also potential reactive chemical hazards and potential use for activities off-site.

  8. Chemical reactor and method for chemically converting a first material into a second material

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.

    2008-04-08

    A chemical reactor and method for converting a first material into a second material is disclosed and wherein the chemical reactor is provided with a feed stream of a first material which is to be converted into a second material; and wherein the first material is combusted in the chemical reactor to produce a combustion flame, and a resulting gas; and an electrical arc is provided which is passed through or superimposed upon the combustion flame and the resulting gas to facilitate the production of the second material.

  9. Bandwidth Study U.S. Chemical Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chemical Manufacturing Bandwidth Study U.S. Chemical Manufacturing Chemicals.jpg Energy bandwidth studies of U.S. manufacturing sectors can serve as foundational references in framing the range (or bandwidth) of potential energy savings opportunities. This bandwidth study examines energy consumption and potential energy savings opportunities in U.S. chemical manufacturing. The study relies on multiple sources to estimate the energy used in the production of 74 individual chemicals, representing

  10. NETL Advances Copper-Hybrid Oxygen Carrier for Chemical Looping |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Advances Copper-Hybrid Oxygen Carrier for Chemical Looping NETL Advances Copper-Hybrid Oxygen Carrier for Chemical Looping November 4, 2016 - 12:18pm Addthis NETL’s Chemical Looping Reactor Pilot-Scale Test Facility NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor Pilot-Scale Test Facility Back in February, we shared that DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) researchers were exploring the potential of using copper in a process known as chemical looping to capture

  11. Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. Image courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc Image courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc APCI PORT ARTHUR ICCS PROJECT In October 2009, DOE selected the Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) team to conduct one of 12 projects in Phase 1 of its Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) program. DOE again selected the project in June 2010 as one of three projects to receive continued (Phase 2) funding. In total,

  12. Chemical Stimulation of Engineered Geothermal Systems (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Technical Report: Chemical Stimulation of Engineered Geothermal Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical Stimulation of Engineered Geothermal Systems The objective of this project is to design, develop and demonstrate methods for the chemical stimulation of candidate EGS reservoirs as well as the chemical treatment of mineral-scaled wellbores. First, a set of candidate chemical compounds capable of dissolving calcite was identified. A series of tests was

  13. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  14. Laser-based Sensors for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2010-05-10

    Stand-off detection of hazardous materials ensures that the responder is located at a safe distance from the suspected source. Remote detection and identification of hazardous materials can be accomplished using a highly sensitive and portable device, at significant distances downwind from the source or the threat. Optical sensing methods, in particular infrared absorption spectroscopy combined with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), are highly suited for the detection of chemical substances since they enable rapid detection and are amenable for autonomous operation in a compact and rugged package. This talk will discuss the sensor systems developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will discuss the progress to reduce the size and power while maintaining sensitivity to enable stand-off detection of multiple chemicals.

  15. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  16. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also

  17. Microfabricated electrochemiluminescence cell for chemical reaction detection

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Hsueh, Yun-Tai; Smith, Rosemary L.

    2003-01-01

    A detector cell for a silicon-based or non-silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The detector cell is an electrochemiluminescence cell constructed of layers of silicon with a cover layer of glass, with spaced electrodes located intermediate various layers forming the cell. The cell includes a cavity formed therein and fluid inlets for directing reaction fluid therein. The reaction chamber and detector cell may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The ECL cell may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  18. The chemical weapons conventional legal issues

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzman, E.A.

    1997-12-31

    Because the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) contains the best developed verification regime in multilaterial arms control history, some have raised concerns for the chemical industry that have legal implications. Chief among these are safeguarding confidential business information and protecting constitutional rights during inspections. This discussion will show how the CWC and proposed national implementing legislation work together to allay these concerns. Both concerns are legitimate. Confidential business information could be lost to a national government or the CWC governing body accidentially or purposely. The CWC regime of routine and challenge inspections are searches under the constitution and could, if abused, potentially conflict with recognized commercial privacy interests. Neither concern justifies opposition to the convention, but both need to be addressed in national implementing legislation. Proposed US legislation goes far in this direction, but can be improved.

  19. A NEW GENERATION CHEMICAL FLOODING SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Mojdeh Delshad

    2005-01-01

    The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. In this final report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 of the project.

  20. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Jr., John W.

    1991-01-01

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken.

  1. Soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, J.W. Jr.

    1991-07-23

    A real time soil chemical sensor and precision agricultural chemical delivery system includes a plurality of ground-engaging tools in association with individual soil sensors which measure soil chemical levels. The system includes the addition of a solvent which rapidly saturates the soil/tool interface to form a conductive solution of chemicals leached from the soil. A multivalent electrode, positioned within a multivalent frame of the ground-engaging tool, applies a voltage or impresses a current between the electrode and the tool frame. A real-time soil chemical sensor and controller senses the electrochemical reaction resulting from the application of the voltage or current to the leachate, measures it by resistivity methods, and compares it against pre-set resistivity levels for substances leached by the solvent. Still greater precision is obtained by calibrating for the secondary current impressed through solvent-less soil. The appropriate concentration is then found and the servo-controlled delivery system applies the appropriate amount of fertilizer or agricultural chemicals substantially in the location from which the soil measurement was taken. 5 figures.

  2. Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hobart named ACS Fellow Hobart named American Chemical Society Fellow The ACS Fellows program began in 2008 to recognize and honor members for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and ACS. August 21, 2013 David Hobart displays Md, the symbol for Mendelevium, the ninth transuranium element of the actinide series, named after Dimitri Mendeleev, who is honored as the "father" of the periodic table. David Hobart displays Md, the symbol for Mendelevium,

  3. BioEngineering Advanced Materials and Chemicals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    BioEngineering Advanced Materials and Chemicals BioEnergy 2016 Conference Adam Bratis PhD, Associate Lab Director, BioEnergy Science and Technology National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) July 14, 2016 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY 2 NREL - National Asset with a Dedicated Mission NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY 2 * Nearly 1,700 employees * Campus is a model of sustainable energy * Founded as Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) - 1977 * Designated national laboratory in 1991

  4. Dynamic thermography of thermite chemical heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.D.; Mohler, J.H.; Dosser, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    Thermites are solid chemical heat sources that react exothermically by the following equation: Metal/sub 1/ + Metal/sub 2/ Oxide ..-->.. Metal/sub 1/ Oxide + Metal/sub 2/ + Heat. This thermite reaction produces a high calorific output that can be used when a concentrated heat source is required. Dynamic evaluation of the thermal profiles generated during thermite reactions requires infrared thermography. The results of this analysis and the technique involved are discussed.

  5. ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Tijrn

    2000-09-30

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  6. ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter J. Tijrn

    2000-03-31

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  7. Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Tijrn

    2003-01-02

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  8. ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  9. ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  10. ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-01-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  11. ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-10-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  12. Renewable chemical feedstock - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Renewable chemical feedstock Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Coexpressing Escherichia coli Cyclopropane Synthase with Sterculia foetida Lysophosphatidic Acid Acyltransferase Enhances Cyclopropane Fatty Acid Accumulation (424 KB) <br type="_moz" /> Synthesis of cyclopropane fatty acids (CPFA) and illustrations of natural sources of CPFAs. Synthesis of cyclopropane fatty

  13. Separation of uranium isotopes by chemical exchange

    DOEpatents

    Ogle, P.R. Jr.

    1974-02-26

    A chemical exchange method is provided for separating /sup 235/U from / sup 238/U comprising contacting a first phase containing UF/sub 6/ with a second phase containing a compound selected from the group consisting of NOUF/sub 6/, NOUF/sub 7/, and NO/sub 2/UF/sub 7/ until the U Fsub 6/ in the first phase becomes enriched in the /sup 235/U isotope. (Official Gazette)

  14. Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1998-08-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  15. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference, will focus on understanding processes in homogeneous (both biological and small molecule) and heterogeneous catalysis, using synchrotron-based methods. The workshop will cover more traditional applications (using XANES and EXAFS), as well as applications of XES, RIXS and

  16. High Efficiency Modular Chemical Processes (HEMCP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    - ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE High Efficiency Modular Chemical Processes (HEMCP) Modular Process Intensification Framework for R&D Targets Advanced Manufacturing Office September 27, 2014 Dickson Ozokwelu, Technology Manager Presentation Outline 1. What is Process Intensification? 2. DOE's !pproach to Process Intensification 3. Opportunity for Cross-Cutting High-Impact Research 4. Goals of the Process Intensification Institute 5. Addressing the 5 EERE Core Questions 2 | Advanced

  17. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  18. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert E.; Hansen, Brian N.

    1990-01-01

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  19. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R. Jarek

    2004-11-23

    The purpose of this report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The abstraction model is used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of these abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports.

  20. Chemical inspectors: On the outside looking in

    SciTech Connect

    Smithson, A.E. )

    1991-10-01

    On July 15, the United States, supported by Britain, Australia, and Japan, proposed a new challenge inspection plan for the chemical weapons convention (CWC), which will prohibit the production, possession, use, and transfer of chemical weapons. The Bush administration claims this proposal has the same anytime, anywhere, with no right of refusal' challenge-inspection features George Bush first recommended in 1984 - as well as the latest in managed access,' aerial inspection, and use of sensing devices. But the proposal would let a challenged country stall for days without allowing inspectors to glimpse a suspected chemical-weapons site, and inspectors might never be able to step inside the gates of facilities where cheating is suspected. Countries considering joining the CWC must realize that the new US approach involves plenty of talk but little action. In fact, the US challenge-inspection plan falls so far short of the means needed to detect and deter prohibited activities that even Saddam Hussein and Muammar Khadafi may queue up to sign on the dotted line.

  1. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  2. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Morse Chemical Co - IL 0...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Morse Chemical Co - IL 0-05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MORSE CHEMICAL CO. (IL.0-05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: ...

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Harshaw Chemical Co - OH...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Harshaw Chemical Co - OH 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Harshaw Chemical Company, OH (OH.04 ) Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Designated Name: Not Designated ...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Blockson Chemical Co - IL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Blockson Chemical Co - IL 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Blockson Chemical Co. (IL.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to US EPA Region V and the State of ...

  6. InEnTec Chemical LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: InEnTec Chemical LLC Place: Florida Zip: 32003 Product: US-based plasma gasification technology developer. References: InEnTec Chemical LLC1...

  7. Hawaii Information Package for Chemical Inventory Form (HCIF...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Information Package for Chemical Inventory Form (HCIF)Tier II Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Hawaii Information Package for Chemical...

  8. Dow Chemical Company-Oyster Creek VIII | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Dow Chemical Company-Oyster Creek VIII Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dow Chemical Company-Oyster Creek VIII Place: Texas Phone Number: 1 989-636-1000; 1 800-331-6451 Website:...

  9. Stephen E. Zitney Named American Institute of Chemical Engineers...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephen E. Zitney Named American Institute of Chemical Engineers Fellow Morgantown, W.Va. ... (NETL) has been named as a Fellow by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). ...

  10. The Northeastern Center for Chemical Energy Storage (NECCES)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The NorthEast Center for Chemical Energy Storage (NECCES) has been moved to Binghamton ... The Northeastern Center for Chemical Energy Storage (NECCES) is an effort being led by ...

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- J T Baker Chemical Co -...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J T Baker Chemical Co - NJ 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: J.T. BAKER CHEMICAL CO. ( NJ.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated ...

  12. Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data Sets for...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Wet Chemical Compositional and Near IR Spectra Data ... Wet chemical compositional data and NIR spectra exist for the following types of biomass ...

  13. DOW CHEMICAL U.S.A. + WESTERN DIVISION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DOW CHEMICAL U.S.A. + WESTERN DIVISION 2855 MITCHELL DRIVE WALNUT CREEK. CtyLlFORNlA 94598 ... cc: R.D. Axe D. L. Graham C. A. Levine AN OPEAATlNO UNIT OF ME DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY

  14. Chemical pressure effects on structural, dielectric and magnetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical pressure effects on structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of solid solutions Mnsub 3-xCosub xTeOsub 6 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical ...

  15. Choices related to chemical cleaning of fossil plant equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, K.

    1995-01-01

    Choices faced by utility personnel responsible for cleanliness of steamside and waterside surfaces of fossil plant equipment are identified and discussed. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) guidelines for chemical cleaning are introduced. A chemical cleaning case history is presented.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - KS...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chemical Company) concerning the procurement of enriched uranium; Feb 24, 1960 KS.0-01-5 - AEC Letter; Price to Greenlee (Spencer Chemical Co. concerning an inspection of the ...

  17. Argonne researchers make new study of special type of chemical...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    make new study of special type of chemical bond By Jared Sagoff * September 29, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Covalent bonds, one of the most common classes of chemical interactions, occur...

  18. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic Feedstocks

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable chemical company Genomatica made significant progress toward increasing the range of feedstocks that can be used to commercially produce high-quality bio-based chemicals, in a project...

  19. Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  20. Thermal, chemical, and mechanical cookoff modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    A Thermally Reactive, Elastic-plastic eXplosive code, TREX, has been developed to analyze coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical effects associated with cookoff simulation of confined or unconfined energetic materials. In confined systems, pressure buildup precedes thermal runaway, and unconfined energetic material expands to relieve high stress. The model was developed based on nucleation, decomposition chemistry, and elastic/plastic mechanical behavior of a material with a distribution of internal defects represented as clusters of spherical inclusions. A local force balance, with mass continuity constraints, forms the basis of the model requiring input of temperature and reacted gas fraction. This constitutive material model has been incorporated into a quasistatic mechanics code SANTOS as a material module which predicts stress history associated with a given strain history. The thermal-chemical solver XCHEM has been coupled to SANTOS to provide temperature and reacted gas fraction. Predicted spatial history variables include temperature, chemical species, solid/gas pressure, solid/gas density, local yield stress, and gas volume fraction. One-Dimensional Time to explosion (ODTX) experiments for TATB and PBX 9404 (HMX and NC) are simulated using global multistep kinetic mechanisms and the reactive elastic-plastic constitutive model. Pressure explosions, rather than thermal runaway, result in modeling slow cookoff experiments of confined conventional energetic materials such as TATB. For PBX 9404, pressure explosions also occur at fast cookoff conditions because of low temperature reactions of nitrocellulose resulting in substantial pressurization. A demonstrative calculation is also presented for reactive heat flow in a hollow, propellant-filled, stainless steel cylinder, representing a rocket motor. This example simulation show

  1. Decontamination of metals using chemical etching

    DOEpatents

    Lerch, Ronald E.; Partridge, Jerry A.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to chemical etching process for reclaiming contaminated equipment wherein a reduction-oxidation system is included in a solution of nitric acid to contact the metal to be decontaminated and effect reduction of the reduction-oxidation system, and includes disposing a pair of electrodes in the reduced solution to permit passage of an electrical current between said electrodes and effect oxidation of the reduction-oxidation system to thereby regenerate the solution and provide decontaminated equipment that is essentially radioactive contamination-free.

  2. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    ScienceCinema

    LANL

    2016-07-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  3. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  4. Chemical Management, Volume 2 of 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2002 July 2002 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 2 of 3) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S.

  5. Use of chemical mechanical polishing in micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Nasby, Robert D.; Hetherington, Dale L.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; McWhorter, Paul J.; Apblett, Christopher A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for removing topography effects during fabrication of micromachines. A sacrificial oxide layer is deposited over a level containing functional elements with etched valleys between the elements such that the sacrificial layer has sufficient thickness to fill the valleys and extend in thickness upwards to the extent that the lowest point on the upper surface of the oxide layer is at least as high as the top surface of the functional elements in the covered level. The sacrificial oxide layer is then polished down and planarized by chemical-mechanical polishing. Another layer of functional elements is then formed upon this new planarized surface.

  6. Use of chemical mechanical polishing in micromachining

    DOEpatents

    Nasby, R.D.; Hetherington, D.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; McWhorter, P.J.; Apblett, C.A.

    1998-09-08

    A process for removing topography effects during fabrication of micromachines. A sacrificial oxide layer is deposited over a level containing functional elements with etched valleys between the elements such that the sacrificial layer has sufficient thickness to fill the valleys and extend in thickness upwards to the extent that the lowest point on the upper surface of the oxide layer is at least as high as the top surface of the functional elements in the covered level. The sacrificial oxide layer is then polished down and planarized by chemical-mechanical polishing. Another layer of functional elements is then formed upon this new planarized surface. 4 figs.

  7. ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    LANL

    2008-05-12

    A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane

  8. Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-02

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE�s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  9. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  10. Theoretical studies of chemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, G.C.

    1993-12-01

    This collaborative program with the Theoretical Chemistry Group at Argonne involves theoretical studies of gas phase chemical reactions and related energy transfer and photodissociation processes. Many of the reactions studied are of direct relevance to combustion; others are selected they provide important examples of special dynamical processes, or are of relevance to experimental measurements. Both classical trajectory and quantum reactive scattering methods are used for these studies, and the types of information determined range from thermal rate constants to state to state differential cross sections.

  11. Direct Chemical Oxidation. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The DOE complex has a need to demonstrate technologies that are alternatives to incineration for the destruction of organic solvents, chlorinated hydrocarbons, plastics, and organic solids. The current industry practice for the targeted waste streams is treatment by incineration. There has been increased public concern on the use of incinerators because of the potential release of products of incomplete combustion, dioxins, furans, and emission of radionuclides. Direct Chemical Oxidation is a technology for the destruction of organic solids and liquids that uses peroxydisulfate as the oxidant to destroy organics and treats residue immobilized using phosphate ceramic solidification.

  12. Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

  13. Portable chemical detection system with intergrated preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Baumann, Mark J.; Brusseau, Charles A.; Hannum, David W.; Linker, Kevin L.

    2005-12-27

    A portable system for the detection of chemical particles such as explosive residue utilizes a metal fiber substrate that may either be swiped over a subject or placed in a holder in a collection module which can shoot a jet of gas at the subject to dislodge residue, and then draw the air containing the residue into the substrate. The holder is then placed in a detection module, which resistively heats the substrate to evolve the particles, and provides a gas flow to move the particles to a miniature detector in the module.

  14. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  15. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Marshall Name Christopher L. Marshall Institution Argonne National Laboratory Department Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Areas of Focus Characterization & Catalytic...

  16. Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms for complex hydrocarbon fuels and computationally efficiecnt, accurate methodologies for modeling advanced combustion strategies.

  17. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Feedstocks | Department of Energy Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic Feedstocks BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic Feedstocks October 13, 2015 - 1:43pm Addthis Renewable chemical company Genomatica made significant progress toward increasing the range of feedstocks that can be used to commercially produce high-quality bio-based chemicals, in a project funded by the Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO).

  18. Chemical Energy Carriers (CEC) for the Utilization of Geothermal Energy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Energy Carriers (CEC) for the Utilization of Geothermal Energy Chemical Energy Carriers (CEC) for the Utilization of Geothermal Energy DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: Develop chemical energy carrier (CEC) systems to recover thermal energy from enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in the form of chemical energy, in addition to sensible and latent energy. specialized_jody_chemical_carriers.pdf (489.93 KB) More Documents & Publications

  19. ITP Chemicals: Hybripd Separations/Distillation Technology. Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hybripd SeparationsDistillation Technology. Research Opportunities for Energy and Emissions Reduction ITP Chemicals: Hybripd SeparationsDistillation Technology. Research ...

  20. Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

  1. Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs | Department of Energy Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs This project will develop a chemical model, based on existing models and databases, that is capable of simulating chemical reactions between supercritical (SC) CO2 and Enhanced Geothermal

  2. ITP Chemicals: Hybrid Separations/Distillation Technology. Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hybrid SeparationsDistillation Technology. Research Opportunities for Energy and Emissions Reduction ITP Chemicals: Hybrid SeparationsDistillation Technology. Research ...

  3. ITP Chemicals: Vision 2020 Technology Roadmap for Combinatroial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Vision 2020 Technology Roadmap for Combinatroial Methods; September 2001 ITP Chemicals: Vision 2020 Technology Roadmap for Combinatroial Methods; September 2001 ...

  4. NIF: Impacts of chemical accidents and comparison of chemical/radiological accident approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Lazaro, M.A.; Policastro, A.J.; Rhodes, M.

    1996-01-12

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The goals of the NIF are to (1) achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time by using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology based on an advanced-design neodymium glass solid-state laser, and (2) conduct high-energy-density experiments in support of national security and civilian applications. The primary focus of this paper is worker-public health and safety issues associated with postulated chemical accidents during the operation of NIF. The key findings from the accident analysis will be presented. Although NIF chemical accidents will be emphasized, the important differences between chemical and radiological accident analysis approaches and the metrics for reporting results will be highlighted. These differences are common EIS facility and transportation accident assessments.

  5. Chemical dynamics in the gas phase: Time-dependent quantum mechanics of chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.

    1993-12-01

    A major goal of this research is to obtain an understanding of the molecular reaction dynamics of three and four atom chemical reactions using numerically accurate quantum dynamics. This work involves: (i) the development and/or improvement of accurate quantum mechanical methods for the calculation and analysis of the properties of chemical reactions (e.g., rate constants and product distributions), and (ii) the determination of accurate dynamical results for selected chemical systems, which allow one to compare directly with experiment, determine the reliability of the underlying potential energy surfaces, and test the validity of approximate theories. This research emphasizes the use of recently developed time-dependent quantum mechanical methods, i.e. wave packet methods.

  6. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer

    The central feature of the Combustion Chemistry project at LLNL is the development, validation, and application of detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms for the combustion of hydrocarbon and other types of chemical fuels. For the past 30 years, LLNL's Chemical Sciences Division has built hydrocarbon mechanisms for fuels from hydrogen and methane through much larger fuels including heptanes and octanes. Other classes of fuels for which models have been developed include flame suppressants such as halons and organophosphates, and air pollutants such as soot and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur. Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  7. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  8. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production | Department of Energy Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical Model and Experiments for Optimization of Enhanced Geothermal System Development and Production Project objective: Develop a novel Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) modeling tool.

  9. Nuclear energy field fascinates David Parkinson, chemical engineer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear energy field fascinates David Parkinson, chemical engineer Nuclear energy field fascinates David Parkinson, chemical engineer Chemical engineer undergraduate designs and tests a separator used in processing plutonium. August 3, 2012 David Parkinson David Parkinson, an undergraduate student, currently designs and tests a separator used in processing plutonium. Parkinson collaborates with his mentor on the entire design process, including researching different separator designs, creating

  10. Chemicals from biomass: an assessment of the potential for production of chemical feedstocks from renewable resources

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, T.L.; Culberson, O.L.

    1983-06-01

    This assessment of the potential for production of commodity chemicals from renewable biomass resources is based on (1) a Delphi study with 50 recognized authorities to identify key technical issues relevant to production of chemicals from biomass, and (2) a systems model based on linear programming for a commodity chemicals industry using renewable resources and coal as well as gas and petroleum-derived resources. Results from both parts of the assessment indicate that, in the absence of gas and petroleum, coal undoubtedly would be a major source of chemicals first, followed by biomass. The most attractive biomass resources are wood, agricultural residues, and sugar and starch crops. A reasonable approximation to the current product slate for the petrochemical industry could be manufactured using only renewable resources for feedstocks. Approximately 2.5 quads (10/sup 15/ Btu (1.055 x 10/sup 18/ joules)) per year of oil and gas would be released. Further use of biomass fuels in the industry could release up to an additional 1.5 quads. however, such an industry would be unprofitable under current economic conditions with existing or near-commercial technology. As fossil resources become more expensive and biotechnology becomes more efficient, the economics will be more favorable. Use of the chemicals industry model to evaluate process technologies is demonstrated. Processes are identified which have potential for significant added value to the system if process improvements can be made to improve the economics. Guidelines and recommendations for research and development programs to improve the attractiveness of chemicals from biomass are discussed.

  11. Chemical Management Volume 3 of 3 - Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 July 2008 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 3 of 3) Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 iii Foreword Numerous

  12. Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen

    2003-01-01

    A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  13. Unit Price Scaling Trends for Chemical Products

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wei; Sathre, Roger; William R. Morrow, III; Shehabi, Arman

    2015-08-01

    To facilitate early-stage life-cycle techno-economic modeling of emerging technologies, here we identify scaling relations between unit price and sales quantity for a variety of chemical products of three categories - metal salts, organic compounds, and solvents. We collect price quotations for lab-scale and bulk purchases of chemicals from both U.S. and Chinese suppliers. We apply a log-log linear regression model to estimate the price discount effect. Using the median discount factor of each category, one can infer bulk prices of products for which only lab-scale prices are available. We conduct out-of-sample tests showing that most of the price proxies deviate from their actual reference prices by a factor less than ten. We also apply the bootstrap method to determine if a sample median discount factor should be accepted for price approximation. We find that appropriate discount factors for metal salts and for solvents are both -0.56, while that for organic compounds is -0.67 and is less representative due to greater extent of product heterogeneity within this category.

  14. POISON SPIDER FIELD CHEMICAL FLOOD PROJECT, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Arnell; Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi

    2004-11-01

    A reservoir engineering and geologic study concluded that approximate 7,852,000 bbls of target oil exits in Poison Spider. Field pore volume, OOIP, and initial oil saturation are defined. Potential injection water has a total dissolved solids content of 1,275 mg/L with no measurable divalent cations. If the Lakota water consistently has no measurable cations, the injection water does not require softening to dissolve alkali. Produced water total dissolved solids were 2,835 mg/L and less than 20 mg/L hardness as the sum of divalent cations. Produced water requires softening to dissolve chemicals. Softened produced water was used to dissolve chemicals in these evaluations. Crude oil API gravity varies across the field from 19.7 to 22.2 degrees with a dead oil viscosity of 95 to 280 cp at 75 F. Interfacial tension reductions of up to 21,025 fold (0.001 dyne/cm) were developed with fifteen alkaline-surfactant combinations at some alkali concentration. An additional three alkaline-surfactant combinations reduced the interfacial tension greater than 5,000 fold. NaOH generally produced the lowest interfacial tension values. Interfacial tension values of less than 0.021 dyne/cm were maintained when the solutions were diluted with produced water to about 60%. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} when mixed with surfactants did not reduce interfacial tension values to levels at which incremental oil can be expected. NaOH without surfactant interfacial tension reduction is at a level where some additional oil might be recovered. Most of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions producing ultra low interfacial tension gave type II- phase behavior. Only two solutions produced type III phase behavior. Produced water dilution resulted in maintenance of phase type for a number of solutions at produced water dilutions exceeding 80% dilution. The average loss of phase type occurred at 80% dilution. Linear corefloods were performed to determine relative permeability end points, chemical

  15. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  16. USE OF CHEMICAL INVENTORY ACCURACY MEASUREMENTS AS LEADING INDICATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntamukkula, M.

    2011-02-10

    Chemical safety and lifecycle management (CSLM) is a process that involves managing chemicals and chemical information from the moment someone begins to order a chemical and lasts through final disposition(1). Central to CSLM is tracking data associated with chemicals which, for the purposes of this paper, is termed the chemical inventory. Examples of data that could be tracked include chemical identity, location, quantity, date procured, container type, and physical state. The reason why so much data is tracked is that the chemical inventory supports many functions. These functions include emergency management, which depends upon the data to more effectively plan for, and respond to, chemical accidents; environmental management that uses inventory information to aid in the generation of various federally-mandated and other regulatory reports; and chemical management that uses the information to increase the efficiency and safety with which chemicals are stored and utilized. All of the benefits of having an inventory are predicated upon having an inventory that is reasonably accurate. Because of the importance of ensuring one's chemical inventory is accurate, many have become concerned about measuring inventory accuracy. But beyond providing a measure of confidence in information gleaned from the inventory, does the inventory accuracy measurement provide any additional function? The answer is 'Yes'. It provides valuable information that can be used as a leading indicator to gauge the health of a chemical management system. In this paper, we will discuss: what properties make leading indicators effective, how chemical inventories can be used as a leading indicator, how chemical inventory accuracy can be measured, what levels of accuracies should realistically be expected in a healthy system, and what a subpar inventory accuracy measurement portends.

  17. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-10-29

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  18. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  19. Paint for detection of radiological or chemical agents

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Brunk, James L.; Day, Sumner Daniel

    2010-08-24

    A paint that warns of radiological or chemical substances comprising a paint operatively connected to the surface, an indicator material carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances, and a thermo-activation material carried by the paint. In one embodiment, a method of warning of radiological or chemical substances comprising the steps of painting a surface with an indicator material, and monitoring the surface for indications of the radiological or chemical substances. In another embodiment, a paint is operatively connected to a vehicle and an indicator material is carried by the paint that provides an indication of the radiological or chemical substances.

  20. Biotechnology for producing fuels and chemicals from biomass. Volume II. Fermentation chemicals from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Villet, R.

    1981-02-01

    The technological and economic feasibility of producing some selected chemicals by fermentation is discussed: acetone, butanol, acetic acid, citric acid, 2,3-butanediol, and propionic acid. The demand for acetone and butanol has grown considerably. They have not been produced fermentatively for three decades, but instead by the oxo and aldol processes. Improved cost of fermentative production will hinge on improving yields and using cellulosic feedstocks. The market for acetic acid is likely to grow 5% to 7%/yr. A potential process for production is the fermentation of hydrolyzed cellulosic material to ethanol followed by chemical conversion to acetic acid. For about 50 years fermentation has been the chief process for citric acid production. The feedstock cost is 15% to 20% of the overall cost of production. The anticipated 5%/yr growth in demand for citric acid could be enhanced by using it to displace phosphates in detergent manufacture. A number of useful chemicals can be derived from 2,3-butanediol, which has not been produced commercially on a large scale. R and D are needed to establish a viable commercial process. The commercial fermentative production of propionic acid has not yet been developed. Recovery and purification of the product require considerable improvement. Other chemicals such as lactic acid, isopropanol, maleic anhydride, fumarate, and glycerol merit evaluation for commercial fermentative production in the near future.

  1. ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEM: PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    R. Jarek

    2005-08-29

    The purpose of this model report is to describe the evolution of the physical and chemical environmental conditions within the waste emplacement drifts of the repository, including the drip shield and waste package surfaces. The resulting seepage evaporation and gas abstraction models are used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to assess the performance of the engineered barrier system and the waste form. This report develops and documents a set of abstraction-level models that describe the engineered barrier system physical and chemical environment. Where possible, these models use information directly from other reports as input, which promotes integration among process models used for TSPA-LA. Specific tasks and activities of modeling the physical and chemical environment are included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782], Section 1.2.2). As described in the technical work plan, the development of this report is coordinated with the development of other engineered barrier system reports. To be consistent with other project documents that address features, events, and processes (FEPs), Table 6.14.1 of the current report includes updates to FEP numbers and FEP subjects for two FEPs identified in the technical work plan (TWP) governing this report (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]). FEP 2.1.09.06.0A (Reduction-oxidation potential in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.06.0B (Reduction-oxidation potential in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). FEP 2.1.09.07.0A (Reaction kinetics in EBS), as listed in Table 2 of the TWP (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173782]), has been updated in the current report to FEP 2.1.09.07.0B (Reaction kinetics in Drifts; see Table 6.14-1). These deviations from the TWP are justified because they improve integration with FEPs documents. The updates

  2. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Machesky, Michael L.; Predota, M.; Wesolowski, David J

    2008-11-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 {angstrom} of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 {+-} 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH{sub znpc} values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH{sub znpc} value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 {+-} 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic

  3. A New Understanding of Chemical Agent Release

    SciTech Connect

    Nakafuji, G; Greenman, R; Theofanous, T

    2002-07-24

    The evolution of thickened chemical agent released at supersonic velocities, due to a missile defense intercept or a properly functioning warhead, has been misunderstood. Current and historical experimental and modeling efforts have attributed agent breakup to a variety of droplet breakup mechanisms. According to this model, drops of agent fragment into subsequent generations of smaller drops until a stable drop size is reached. Recent experimental data conducted in a supersonic wind tunnel show that agent breakup is not driven by any droplet breakup mechanism. The breakup of agent is instead governed by viscoelastic behavior and aerodynamic history effects. This viscoelastic breakup mechanism results in the formation of threads and sheets of liquid, instead of drops. The evolution and final state of agent released has broad implications not only for aerobreakup models, but also for all atmospheric dispersion models.

  4. Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Frink, L.J.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1998-11-20

    Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.

  5. Fundamentals of fluidized bed chemical processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical processes based on the use of fluidized solids, although widely used on an industrial scale for some four decades, are currently increasing in importance as industry looks for improved methods for handling and reacting solid materials. This book provides background necessary for an understanding of the technique of gas-solid fluidization. Contents: Some Fundamental Aspects of Fluidization-General Features of Gas-Solid Fluidization; Minimum Fluidization Velocity; Inter-particle forces; Liquid-Solid Fluidization; Bubbles; Slugging; Entrainment and Elutriation; Particle Movement; Bed Viscosity; Fluidization Under Pressure. Fluidized-Bed Reactor Models-ome Individual Models; Model Comparisons; Multiple Region Models. Catalytic Cracking-Process Developments Riser Cracking; Catalysis; Process Chemistry; Kinetics; Process Models. Combustion and Gasification-Plant Developments; Oil and Gas Combustion; Desulphurization; No/sub x/ Emissions; Coal Gassification. Miscellaneous Processes-Phthalic Anhydride (1,3-isobezofurandione); Acrylonitrile (prop-3-enenitrile); Vinyl Chloride (chloroethene); Titanium Dioxide; Uranium Processing; Sulphide Roasting; Indexes.

  6. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  7. Production of Chemical Derivatives from Renewables

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, Brian; Nghiem, John; Donnelly, Mark; Tsai, Shih-Perng; Frye, John; Landucci, Ron; Griffin, Michael

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp., (LMER), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Battelle Memorial Institute, operator of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), (collectively referred to as the 'Contractor'), and Applied Carbochemicals, Inc. (Participant) was to scale-up from bench results an economically promising and competitive process for the production of chemical derivatives from biologically produced succinic acid. The products that were under consideration for production from the succinic acid platform included 1,4-butanediol, {gamma}y-butyrolactone, 2-pyrrolidinone and N-methyl pyrrolidinone. Preliminary economic analyses indicated that this platform was competitive with the most recent petrochemical routes. The Contractors and participant are hereinafter jointly referred to as the 'Parties.' Research to date in succinic acid fermentation, separation and genetic engineering resulted in a potentially economical process based on the use of an Escherichia coli strain AFP111 with suitable characteristics for the production of succinic acid from glucose. Economic analysis has shown that higher value commodity chemicals can be economically produced from succinic acid based on preliminary laboratory findings and predicted catalytic parameters. At the time, the current need was to provide the necessary laboratory follow-up information to properly optimize, design and operate a pilot scale process. The purpose of the pilot work was to validate the integrated process, assure 'robustness' of the process, define operating conditions, and provide samples for potential customer evaluation. The data from the pilot scale process was used in design and development of a full scale production facility. A new strain, AFP111 (patented), discovered at ANL was tested and developed for process use at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL

  8. Chemical reclamation of scrap rubber. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, G.C.; Chan, S.M.; Culberson, O.L.; Perona, J.J.; Larsen, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual, commercial-scale plant design was formulated for processing 22,500 t/yr of scrap rubber tires to hydrocarbon fuel gases, oils, petrochemicals (principally ethylene and aromatic liquids), and carbon black. The process is based upon molten salt (zinc chloride) pyrolysis of the rubber, and pyrolysis data obtained in a bench-scale flow apparatus. An economic assessment of the plant was made in terms of late 1979 dollars, for ranges in scrap tire costs and prices for the principal products: carbon black and the fuel gases and oil. Profitability at these 1979 costs and prices is somewhat modest by chemical processing industry standards for new processes, but any increases in energy and carbon black prices would cause favorable changes in this assessment.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  10. High temperature chemically resistant polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    High temperature chemically resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites consist of about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder. The binder is polymerized in situ from a liquid vinyl-type monomer or mixture of vinyl containing monomers such as triallylcyanurate, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylamide, methacrylamide, methyl-methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene. About 5 to 40% by weight of a reactive inorganic filler selected from the group consisting of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate and mixtures containing less than 2% free lime, and about 48 to 83% by weight of silica sand/ and a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other orgaic peroxides and combinations to initiate polymerization of the monomer in the presence of the inorganic filers are used.

  11. Method for forming a chemical microreactor

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed is a chemical microreactor that provides a means to generate hydrogen fuel from liquid sources such as ammonia, methanol, and butane through steam reforming processes when mixed with an appropriate amount of water. The microreactor contains capillary microchannels with integrated resistive heaters to facilitate the occurrence of catalytic steam reforming reactions. Two distinct embodiment styles are discussed. One embodiment style employs a packed catalyst capillary microchannel and at least one porous membrane. Another embodiment style employs a porous membrane with a large surface area or a porous membrane support structure containing a plurality of porous membranes having a large surface area in the aggregate, i.e., greater than about 1 m.sup.2/cm.sup.3. Various methods to form packed catalyst capillary microchannels, porous membranes and porous membrane support structures are also disclosed.

  12. Fluorescence based chemical sensors for corrosion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Agarwala, V.S.

    1997-12-01

    Several fluorescent materials have been identified as possible corrosion sensing coatings. These are either redox or metal ion complex materials. The redox materials are nonfluorescent in the reduced state and become fluorescent upon oxidation. Incorporated into paint coatings, they provide an early warning of corrosive conditions at the metal or alloy surface. The metal ion complex materials only fluoresce when the organic compound complexes with metal ions such as those generated in corrosion reactions. Fluorescent materials have been incorporated into paint coatings and on metal surfaces for the detection of corrosion. Oxine reacts with aluminum oxide on corroded aluminum to give a fluorescence that can be photographed in UV light. Several other materials were found to have good fluorescence but cannot be reversibly oxidized or reduced at the present time. More work will be done with these compounds as well as with Schiff bases to develop new fluorescent chemical sensing materials for smart coating on alloy surfaces.

  13. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  14. Reliability of chemical analyses of water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beardon, R.

    1989-11-01

    Ground-water quality investigations require reliable chemical analyses of water samples. Unfortunately, laboratory analytical results are often unreliable. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s solution to this problem was to establish a two phase quality assurance program for the analysis of water samples. In the first phase, eight laboratories analyzed three solutions of known composition. The analytical accuracy of each laboratory was ranked and three laboratories were awarded contracts. The second phase consists of on-going monitoring of the reliability of the selected laboratories. The following conclusions are based on two years experience with the UMTRA Project`s Quality Assurance Program. The reliability of laboratory analyses should not be taken for granted. Analytical reliability may be independent of the prices charged by laboratories. Quality assurance programs benefit both the customer and the laboratory.

  15. Chemical, mechanical treatment options reduce hydroprocessor fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Groce, B.C.

    1996-01-29

    The processing of opportunity crudes and the need to meet stricter environmental regulations in the production of distillates and finished fuels have increased the benefit of the hydroprocessing unit to the refiner. With this potential for increased margins and more environmentally friendly fuel products comes increased risk of fouling in hydroprocessing units. Increased fouling can reduce unit reliability and increase maintenance and operating costs. The refiner has several options available to help minimize the fouling and maximize the unit`s profitability and flexibility. One of the two commonly selected options is to allocate capital for a mechanical solution to address a specific cause of fouling. The other option is the use of a chemical treatment program. This paper reviews the efficiency and implementation procedures for these two processes.

  16. Recovery from chemical, biological, and radiological incidents :

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, David Oliver; Yang, Lynn I.; Hammer, Ann E.

    2012-06-01

    To restore regional lifeline services and economic activity as quickly as possible after a chemical, biological or radiological incident, emergency planners and managers will need to prioritize critical infrastructure across many sectors for restoration. In parallel, state and local governments will need to identify and implement measures to promote reoccupation and economy recovery in the region. This document provides guidance on predisaster planning for two of the National Disaster Recovery Framework Recovery Support Functions: Infrastructure Systems and Economic Recovery. It identifies key considerations for infrastructure restoration, outlines a process for prioritizing critical infrastructure for restoration, and identifies critical considerations for promoting regional economic recovery following a widearea disaster. Its goal is to equip members of the emergency preparedness community to systematically prioritize critical infrastructure for restoration, and to develop effective economic recovery plans in preparation for a widearea CBR disaster.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  18. Chemical Technology Division. Annual technical report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Laidler, J.J.; Myles, K.M.; Green, D.W.; McPheeters, C.C.

    1996-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1995 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (3) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (4) processes for separating and recovering selected elements from waste streams, concentrating low-level radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; (5) electrometallurgical treatment of different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (6) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems.

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  20. THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PRAESEPE (M44)

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Roper, Brian W.; Lum, Michael G. E-mail: brianwroper@gmail.com

    2013-09-20

    Star clusters have long been used to illuminate both stellar evolution and Galactic evolution. They also hold clues to the chemical and nucleosynthetic processes throughout the history of the Galaxy. We have taken high signal-to-noise (S/N), high-resolution spectra of 11 solar-type stars in the Praesepe open cluster to determine the chemical abundances of 16 elements: Li, C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y, and Ba. We have determined Fe from Fe I and Fe II lines and find [Fe/H] = +0.12 ±0.04. We find that Li decreases with temperature due to increasing Li depletion in cooler stars; it matches the Li-temperature pattern found in the Hyades. The [C/Fe] and [O/Fe] abundances are below solar and lower than the field star samples due to the younger age of Praesepe (0.7 Gyr) than the field stars. The alpha-elements, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, have solar ratios with respect to Fe, and are also lower than the field star samples. The Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, track Fe and have solar values. The neutron capture element [Y/Fe] is found to be solar, but [Ba/Fe] is enhanced relative to solar and to the field stars. Three Praesepe giants were studied by Carrera and Pancino; they are apparently enhanced in Na, Mg, and Ba relative to the Praesepe dwarfs. The Na enhancement may indicate proton-capture nucleosynthesis in the Ne ? Na cycling with dredge-up into the atmospheres of the red giants.

  1. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  2. CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Bekki, Kenji [ICRAR, M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Tsujimoto, Takuji [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-12-20

    We adopt a new chemical evolution model for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and thereby investigate its past star formation and chemical enrichment histories. The delay time distribution of Type Ia supernovae recently revealed by Type Ia supernova surveys is incorporated self-consistently into the new model. The principle results are summarized as follows. The present gas mass fraction and stellar metallicity as well as the higher [Ba/Fe] in metal-poor stars at [Fe/H] < -1.5 can be more self-consistently explained by models with steeper initial mass functions. The observed higher [Mg/Fe] ({>=}0.3) at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.6 and higher [Ba/Fe] (>0.5) at [Fe/H] {approx} -0.3 could be due to significantly enhanced star formation about 2 Gyr ago. The observed overall [Ca/Fe]-[Fe/H] relation and remarkably low [Ca/Fe] (< - 0.2) at [Fe/H] > -0.6 are consistent with models with short-delay supernova Ia and with the more efficient loss of Ca possibly caused by an explosion mechanism of Type II supernovae. Although the metallicity distribution functions do not show double peaks in the models with a starburst about 2 Gyr ago, they show characteristic double peaks in the models with double starbursts {approx}200 Myr and {approx}2 Gyr ago. The observed apparent dip of [Fe/H] around {approx}1.5 Gyr ago in the age-metallicity relation can be reproduced by models in which a large amount ({approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) of metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) gas can be accreted onto the LMC.

  3. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF COLLAPSING FILAMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, William J.; Scannapieco, Evan

    2013-05-10

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z Almost-Equal-To 0.1 Z{sub Sun} filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form a dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10{sup -3} Z{sub Sun} filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is mostly due to the lower initial temperatures, which lead to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbursting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occurs. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  4. The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The active site of hen egg-white lysozyme: flexibility and chemical bonding Chemical bonding ...

  5. Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

  6. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Aker, Pam M.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-01-20

    Research done by the IR sensors team at PNNL is focused on developing advanced spectroscopic methods for detecting signatures of nuclear, chemical, biological and explosives weapons or weapons production. The sensors we develop fall into two categories: remote sensors that can be operated at distances ranging from 150 m to 10 km, and point sensors that are used for in-situ inspection and detection. FY03 has seen an explosion in FM DIAL progress with the net result being solid confirmation that FM DIAL is a technique capable of remote chemical monitoring in a wide variety of venues. For example, FM DIAL was used to detect a small plume of hydrogen sulfide, a candidate CW agent, released in the desert environment of the Hanford 200 Area site. These experiments were conducted over a range of physical conditions including outside temperatures ranging from 70 F to 105 F and turbulence conditions ranging from quiescent to chaotic. We are now rapidly developing the information needed to design prototype FM DIAL systems that are optimized for specific applications that include scenarios such as fixed position stand-off detection and mobile UAV mounted remote monitoring. Just as an example, in FY04 we will use FM DIAL to detect both in-facility and outdoor release of enriched UF6. The rapid progress in FM DIAL research made in FY03 is attributed to several advances. First, final construction of a custom-designed trailer allowed the instrument to be housed in a mobile temperature-controlled environment. This allowed the experiment to be transported to several locations so that data could be collected under a range of physical conditions. This has led to a better understanding of a variety of experimental noise sources. With this knowledge, we have been able to implement several changes in the way the FM DIAL data is collected and processed, with the net result being a drastic improvement in our confidence of analyte concentration measurement and an improvement i n the

  7. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2014-03-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO{sub 2} capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (5.1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (5.2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification; (5.3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratoryscale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability; and (5.4) the identification of kinetic data for copper-based oxygen carriers as well as the development and analysis of supported copper oxygen carrier material. Subtask 5.1 focused on the development of kinetic expressions for the Chemical Looping with Oxygen Uncoupling (CLOU) process and validating them with reported literature data. The kinetic expressions were incorporated into a process model for determination of reactor size and oxygen carrier circulation for the CLOU process using ASPEN PLUS. An ASPEN PLUS process model was also developed using literature data for the CLC process employing an iron-based oxygen carrier, and the results of the process model have been utilized to perform a relative economic comparison. In Subtask 5.2, the investigators studied the trade-off between modeling approaches and available simulations tools. They quantified uncertainty in the high-performance computing (HPC) simulation tools for CLC bed applications. Furthermore

  8. Mercury stabilization in chemically bonded phosphate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A. S.; Singh, D.; Jeong, S. Y.

    2000-04-04

    Mercury stabilization and solidification is a significant challenge for conventional stabilization technologies. This is because of the stringent regulatory limits on leaching of its stabilized products. In a conventional cement stabilization process, Hg is converted at high pH to its hydroxide, which is not a very insoluble compound; hence the preferred route for Hg sulfidation to convert it into insoluble cinnabar (HgS). Unfortunately, efficient formation of this compound is pH-dependent. At a high pH, one obtains a more soluble Hg sulfate, in a very low pH range, insufficient immobilization occurs because of the escape of hydrogen sulfide, while efficient formation of HgS occurs only in a moderately acidic region. Thus, the pH range of 4 to 8 is where stabilization with Chemically Bonded Phosphate Ceramics (CBPC) is carried out. This paper discusses the authors experience on bench-scale stabilization of various US Department of Energy (DOE) waste streams containing Hg in the CBPC process. This process was developed to treat DOE's mixed waste streams. It is a room-temperature-setting process based on an acid-base reaction between magnesium oxide and monopotassium phosphate solution that forms a dense ceramic within hours. For Hg stabilization, addition of a small amount (< 1 wt.%) of Na{sub 2}S or K{sub 2}S is sufficient in the binder composition. Here the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results on CBPC waste forms of surrogate waste streams representing secondary Hg containing wastes such as combustion residues and Delphi DETOX{trademark} residues are presented. The results show that although the current limit on leaching of Hg is 0.2 mg/L, the results from the CBPC waste forms are at least one order lower than this stringent limit. Encouraged by these results on surrogate wastes, they treated actual low-level Hg-containing mixed waste from their facility at Idaho. TCLP results on this waste are presented here. The efficient stabilization in

  9. Chemical Routes to Colloidal Chalcogenide Nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Schaak, Raymond

    2015-02-19

    This project sought to develop new low-temperature synthetic pathways to intermetallic and chalcogenide nanostructures and powders, with an emphasis on systems that are relevant to advancing the synthesis, processing, and discovery of superconducting materials. The primary synthetic routes involved solution chemistry methods, and several fundamental synthetic challenges that underpinned the formation of these materials were identified and investigated. Methods for incorporating early transition metals and post transition metals into nanoscale and bulk crystals using low-temperature solution chemistry methods were developed and studied, leading to colloidal nanocrystals of elemental indium, manganese, and germanium, as well as nanocrystalline and bulk intermetallic compounds containing germanium, gallium, tin, indium, zinc, bismuth, and lithium. New chemical tools were developed to help target desired phases in complex binary intermetallic and metal chalcogenide systems that contain multiple stable phases, including direct synthesis methods and chemical routes that permit post-synthetic modification. Several phases that are metastable in bulk systems were targeted, synthesized, and characterized as nanocrystalline solids and bulk powders, including the L12-type intermetallic compounds Au3Fe, Au3Ni, and Au3Co, as well as wurtzite-type MnSe. Methods for accessing crystalline metal borides and carbides using direct solution chemistry methods were also developed, with an emphasis on Ni3B and Ni3C, which revealed useful correlations of composition and magnetic properties. Methods for scale-up and nanoparticle purification were explored, providing access to centimeter-scale pressed pellets of polyol-synthesized nanopowders and a bacteriophage-mediated method for separating impure nanoparticle mixtures into their components. Several advances were made in the synthesis of iron selenide and related superconducting materials, including the production of colloidal Fe

  10. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found inmore » the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.« less

  11. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding as a synthetic tool to induce chemical

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    selectivity in acid catalyzed porphyrin synthesis Intramolecular hydrogen bonding as a synthetic tool to induce chemical selectivity in acid catalyzed porphyrin synthesis Authors: Megiatto, J. D., Patterson, D., Sherman, B. D., Moore, T. A., Gust, D., and Moore, A. L. Title: Intramolecular hydrogen bonding as a synthetic tool to induce chemical selectivity in acid catalyzed porphyrin synthesis Source: Chemical Communications Year: 2012 Volume: 48 Pages: 4558-4560 ABSTRACT: A straightforward

  12. BioEngineering Advanced Materials and Chemicals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    BioEngineering Advanced Materials and Chemicals BioEngineering Advanced Materials and Chemicals Breakout Session 3C: Innovative Approaches and Materials for Clean Energy BioEngineering Advanced Materials and Chemicals Adam Bratis, Biofuels Program Manager, National Renewable Energy Laboratory bratis_bioenergy_2016.pdf (1.31 MB) More Documents & Publications CX-100173 Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable, Low-Cost Carbon Fiber for Lightweight Vehicles: Summary Report Demonstration

  13. Chemical Free Water Analysis with Nanoelectrode Arrays - Energy Innovation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search Chemical Free Water Analysis with Nanoelectrode Arrays Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (759 KB) <em>Nanoelectrode Array</em> Nanoelectrode Array Technology Marketing Summary Electrochemical analysis is a highly sensitive, chemically selective method for identifying and quantifying many different chemicals in water. Previous

  14. Miniaturized Chemical Detectors for Point-of-Care Diagnosis - Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Miniaturized Chemical Detectors for Point-of-Care Diagnosis Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (763 KB) <br type="_moz" /> Technology Marketing Summary Building on decades of portable chemical analysis research, Sandia's latest chemical detector, based on our miniaturized pulse-discharged ionization detector (mini-PDID), makes it possible to diagnose illnesses by identifying

  15. Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Stratigraphy | Department of Energy Stratigraphy Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy The purpose of this research is to develop a method to identify fracture systems in wells using fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chips. reservoir_dilley_chemical_signatures.pdf (1.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Chemical Signatures of and Precursors to Fractures

  16. Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water | Department of Energy Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver,

  17. Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    from LM Monitoring Wells | Department of Energy Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells AS&T Ancillary Work Plan (AWP) Final Well Redevelopment Evaluation Report Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells (3.25 MB) More Documents & Publications Analysis and Geochemical Modeling

  18. Radiation and Chemical Risk Management | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation & Chemical Risk Mgmt. Argonne assists technical problems as diverse as chemically and radiologically contaminated soil, military munitions disposal areas, and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride. Argonne's work in radiation and chemical risk management includes the development of information and tools to support decision making based on health, safety, environmental, economic, and socio-cultural risks. As an example, Argonne-developed set of RESRAD codes are the

  19. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within DOE's Chemical Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage Center of Excellence | Department of Energy Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within DOE's Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within DOE's Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Technical report describing DOE's Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence investigation into various hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE's hydrogen storage targets. The report presents a review of the material status as

  20. New tool helps reduce use of hazardous chemicals

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tool Helps Reduce Use Of Hazardous Chemicals Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit New tool helps reduce use of hazardous chemicals The "Green Chemical Alternatives Purchasing Wizard," will begin to help employees choose the most benign substances possible for their work. January 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community

  1. New model predicts once-mysterious chemical reactions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    New model predicts once-mysterious chemical reactions New model predicts once-mysterious chemical reactions Results will also be used to understand basic questions about nature such as the cooling mechanisms of the early universe and the formation of planets and stars. June 28, 2016 Mark Zammit, of Los Alamos' Physics and Chemistry of Materials group, is part of a team that developed a theoretical model to forecast the fundamental chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen. Photo credit

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory - Sr90 - Chemical Holes | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy - Chemical Holes Brookhaven National Laboratory - Sr90 - Chemical Holes January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Brookhaven National Laboratory Responsible DOE Office: Office of Science Plume Name: Sr90 - Chemical Holes Remediation Contractor: Brookhaven Science Associates PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2014 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: No Fuel Present? No Metals Present? No

  3. Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries | Department of Energy Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical manufacturing, and the petroleum refining industries. The report also estimates the energy savings potential available from

  4. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  5. Spin-selective recombination kinetics of a model chemical magnetoreceptor

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Spin-selective recombination kinetics of a model chemical magnetoreceptor Authors: Maeda, K., Wedge, C. J., Storey, J. G., Henbest, K. B., Liddell, P. A., Kodis, G., Gust, D., Hore, P. J., and Timmel, C. R. Title: Spin-selective recombination kinetics of a model chemical magnetoreceptor Source: Chemical Communications Year: 2011 Volume: 47 Pages: 6563-6565 ABSTRACT: We determine the spin-selective kinetics of a carotenoid-porphyrin-fullerene triad that has previously been used to establish the

  6. BioRenewable Chemicals and Solvents - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search BioRenewable Chemicals and Solvents National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryAs a spin-off of NREL's long history of renewable energy research, alternatives to chemicals and solvents have been developed from renewable feedstocks. Traditionally, household and industrial chemicals and solvents are made from the limited

  7. Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.; Webster, D. S.; Barney, D. L.; Cafasso, F. A.; Steindler, M. J.

    1980-06-01

    In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

  8. Chemical Looping Combustion Reactions and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarofim, Adel; Lighty, JoAnn; Smith, Philip; Whitty, Kevin; Eyring, Edward; Sahir, Asad; Alvarez, Milo; Hradisky, Michael; Clayton, Chris; Konya, Gabor; Baracki, Richard; Kelly, Kerry

    2011-07-01

    Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) is one promising fuel-combustion technology, which can facilitate economic CO2 capture in coal-fired power plants. It employs the oxidation/reduction characteristics of a metal, or oxygen carrier, and its oxide, the oxidizing gas (typically air) and the fuel source may be kept separate. This work focused on two classes of oxygen carrier, one that merely undergoes a change in oxidation state, such as Fe3O4/Fe2O3 and one that is converted from its higher to its lower oxidation state by the release of oxygen on heating, i.e., CuO/Cu2O. This topical report discusses the results of four complementary efforts: (1) the development of process and economic models to optimize important design considerations, such as oxygen carrier circulation rate, temperature, residence time; (2) the development of high-performance simulation capabilities for fluidized beds and the collection, parameter identification, and preliminary verification/uncertainty quantification (3) the exploration of operating characteristics in the laboratory-scale bubbling bed reactor, with a focus on the oxygen carrier performance, including reactivity, oxygen carrying capacity, attrition resistance, resistance to deactivation, cost and availability (4) the identification of mechanisms and rates for the copper, cuprous oxide, and cupric oxide system using thermogravimetric analysis.

  9. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant Process Efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Griebenow, B.

    1996-03-01

    In response to decreasing funding levels available to support activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and a desire to be cost competitive, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company have increased their emphasis on cost-saving measures. The ICPP Effectiveness Improvement Initiative involves many activities to improve cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This report documents the methodology and results of one of those cost cutting measures, the Process Efficiency Improvement Activity. The Process Efficiency Improvement Activity performed a systematic review of major work processes at the ICPP to increase productivity and to identify nonvalue-added requirements. A two-phase approach was selected for the activity to allow for near-term implementation of relatively easy process modifications in the first phase while obtaining long-term continuous improvement in the second phase and beyond. Phase I of the initiative included a concentrated review of processes that had a high potential for cost savings with the intent of realizing savings in Fiscal Year 1996 (FY-96.) Phase II consists of implementing long-term strategies too complex for Phase I implementation and evaluation of processes not targeted for Phase I review. The Phase II effort is targeted for realizing cost savings in FY-97 and beyond.

  10. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS AND CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF ARCTURUS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, I. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Allende Prieto, C., E-mail: ivan@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: callende@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-12-20

    We derive a self-consistent set of atmospheric parameters and abundances of 17 elements for the red giant star Arcturus: T{sub eff} = 4286 {+-} 30 K, log g = 1.66 {+-} 0.05, and [Fe/H] = -0.52 {+-} 0.04. The effective temperature was determined using model atmosphere fits to the observed spectral energy distribution from the blue to the mid-infrared (0.44 to 10 {mu}m). The surface gravity was calculated using the trigonometric parallax of the star and stellar evolution models. A differential abundance analysis relative to the solar spectrum allowed us to derive iron abundances from equivalent width measurements of 37 Fe I and 9 Fe II lines, unblended in the spectra of both Arcturus and the Sun; the [Fe/H] value adopted is derived from Fe I lines. We also determine the mass, radius, and age of Arcturus: M = 1.08 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun }, R = 25.4 {+-} 0.2 R{sub Sun }, and {tau} = 7.1{sup +1.5}{sub -1.2} Gyr. Finally, abundances of the following elements are measured from an equivalent width analysis of atomic features: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn. We find the chemical composition of Arcturus typical of that of a local thick-disk star, consistent with its kinematics.

  11. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1994-04-01

    Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

  12. Quantum dynamics of fast chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Light, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The aims of this research are to explore, develop, and apply theoretical methods for the evaluation of the dynamics of gas phase collision processes, primarily chemical reactions. The primary theoretical tools developed for this work have been quantum scattering theory, both in time dependent and time independent forms. Over the past several years, the authors have developed and applied methods for the direct quantum evaluation of thermal rate constants, applying these to the evaluation of the hydrogen isotopic exchange reactions, applied wave packet propagation techniques to the dissociation of Rydberg H{sub 3}, incorporated optical potentials into the evaluation of thermal rate constants, evaluated the use of optical potentials for state-to-state reaction probability evaluations, and, most recently, have developed quantum approaches for electronically non-adiabatic reactions which may be applied to simplify calculations of reactive, but electronically adiabatic systems. Evaluation of the thermal rate constants and the dissociation of H{sub 3} were reported last year, and have now been published.

  13. Chemical and Physical Signatures for Microbial Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff, John B.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-01-03

    Chemical and physical signatures for microbial forensics John Cliff and Helen Kreuzer-Martin, eds. Humana Press Chapter 1. Introduction: Review of history and statement of need. Randy Murch, Virginia Tech Chapter 2. The Microbe: Structure, morphology, and physiology of the microbe as they relate to potential signatures of growth conditions. Joany Jackman, Johns Hopkins University Chapter 3. Science for Forensics: Special considerations for the forensic arena - quality control, sample integrity, etc. Mark Wilson (retired FBI): Western Carolina University Chapter 4. Physical signatures: Light and electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gravimetry etc. Joseph Michael, Sandia National Laboratory Chapter 5. Lipids: FAME, PLFA, steroids, LPS, etc. James Robertson, Federal Bureau of Investigation Chapter 6. Carbohydrates: Cell wall components, cytoplasm components, methods Alvin Fox, University of South Carolina School of Medicine David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 7. Peptides: Peptides, proteins, lipoproteins David Wunschel, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 8. Elemental content: CNOHPS (treated in passing), metals, prospective cell types John Cliff, International Atomic Energy Agency Chapter 9. Isotopic signatures: Stable isotopes C,N,H,O,S, 14C dating, potential for heavy elements. Helen Kreuzer-Martin, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michaele Kashgarian, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chapter 10. Extracellular signatures: Cellular debris, heme, agar, headspace, spent media, etc Karen Wahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Chapter 11. Data Reduction and Integrated Microbial Forensics: Statistical concepts, parametric and multivariate statistics, integrating signatures Kristin Jarman, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  14. Data base of chemical explosions in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, V.N.; Malahova, M.N.; Martysevich, P.N.; Mihaylova, N.N.; Nurmagambetov, A.; Kopnichev, Yu.F. D.; Edomin, V.I.

    1996-12-01

    Within the bounds of this report, the following works were done: (1) Information about explosion quarries, located in Southern, Eastern and Northern Kasakstan was summarized. (2) The general information about seismicity of areas of location of explosion quarries was adduced. (3) The system of observation and seismic apparatus, recording the local earthquakes and quarry explosions at the territory of Kazakstan were described. (4) Data base of quarry explosions, that were carried out in Southern, Eastern and Northern Kazakstan during 1995 and first half of 1996 year was adduced. (5) Upon the data of registration of explosions in Southern Kazakstan the correlative dependences between power class of explosions and summary weight of charge were constructed. (6) Seismic records of quarry explosions were adduced. It is necessary to note, that the collection of data about quarry explosions in Kazakstan in present time is very difficult task. Organizations, that makes these explosions, are always suffering reorganizations and sometimes it is actually impossible to receive all the necessary information. Some quarries are situated in remote, almost inaccessible regions, and within the bounds of supplier financing not the every quarry was in success to visit. So the present data base upon the chemical explosions for 1995 is not full and in further it`s expansion is possible.

  15. Chemically Induced Surface Evolutions with Level Sets

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2006-11-17

    ChISELS is used for the theoretical modeling of detailed surface chemistry and consomitant surface evolutions occurring during microsystem fabrication processes conducted at low pressures. Examples include physical vapor deposition (PVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and plasma etching. Evolving interfaces are represented using the level-set method and the evolution equations time integrated using a Semi-Lagrangian approach. A Ballistic transport model is employed to solve for the fluxes incident on each of the surface elements.more » Surface chemistry leading to etching or deposition is computed by either coupling to Surface Chemkin (a commercially available code) or by providing user defined subroutines. The computational meshes used are quad-trees (2-D) and oct-trees (3-D), constructed such that grid refinement is localized to regions near the surface interfaces. As the interface evolves, the mesh is dynamically reconstructed as needed for the grid to remain fine only around the interface. For parallel computation, a domain decomposition scheme with dynamic load balancing is used to distribute the computational work across processors.« less

  16. Multidimensional thermal-chemical cookoff modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Gross, R.J.; Gartling, D.K.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1994-08-01

    Multidimensional thermal/chemical modeling is an essential step in the development of a predictive capability for cookoff of energetic materials in systems subjected to abnormal thermal environments. COYOTE II is a state-of-the-art two- and three-dimensional finite element code for the solution of heat conduction problems including surface-to-surface thermal radiation heat transfer and decomposition chemistry. Multistep finite rate chemistry is incorporated into COYOTE II using an operator-splitting methodology; rate equations are solved element-by-element with a modified matrix-free stiff solver, CHEMEQ. COYOTE II is purposely designed with a user-oriented input structure compatible with the database, the pre-processing mesh generation, and the post-processing tools for data visualization shared with other engineering analysis codes available at Sandia National Laboratories. As demonstrated in a companion paper, decomposition during cookoff in a confined or semi-confined system leads to significant mechanical behavior. Although mechanical effect are not presently considered in COYOTE II, the formalism for including mechanics in multidimensions is under development.

  17. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  18. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  19. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  20. Calibration-free optical chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for taking absorbance-based chemical measurements are described. In a specific embodiment, an indicator-based pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) sensor displays sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and measurement stability. These qualities are achieved by: 1) renewing the sensing solution, 2) allowing the sensing solution to reach equilibrium with the analyte, and 3) calculating the response from a ratio of the indicator solution absorbances which are determined relative to a blank solution. Careful solution preparation, wavelength calibration, and stray light rejection also contribute to this calibration-free system. Three pCO2 sensors were calibrated and each had response curves which were essentially identical within the uncertainty of the calibration. Long-term laboratory and field studies showed the response had no drift over extended periods (months). The theoretical response, determined from thermodynamic characterization of the indicator solution, also predicted the observed calibration-free performance.