National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rong richbu rg

  1. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow The boundary entropy log(g) of a critical ...

  2. Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boundary Entropy Can Increase Under Bulk RG Flow You are accessing a document from ...

  3. RG&E (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficiency equipment who pay a natural gas Systems Benefits Charge (SBC). Both prescriptive rebates and custom...

  4. RG&E (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficient equipment that have an electricity Systems Benefits Charge (SBC) included in their energy bills. Both...

  5. Ginsenoside Rg3 regulates S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome via suppression of iNOS

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sung-Jin; Park, Jun-Young; Choi, Song; Lee, Jin-Bong; Jung, Haiyoung; Kim, Tae-Don; Yoon, Suk Ran; Choi, Inpyo; Shim, Sungbo; Park, Young-Jun

    2015-08-07

    Ginsenoside Rg3, a specific biological effector, is well-known as a major bioactive ingredient of Panax ginseng. However, its role in the inflammasome activation process remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 are capable of suppressing both lethal endotoxic shock and the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production through the regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the reducing effect of 20(S)-Rg3 and 20(R)-Rg3 on nitric oxide led to an increase in the survival time of mice after lethal endotoxin-induced shock, and excess levels of NO inhibited IL-1β production via the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In addition, ginsenosides 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3 had suppressive effects on the LPS- or UV-irradiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in macrophage and HaCaT cells and thereby prevented apoptosis of spleen cells in mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ginsenoside 20(R)-Rg3 and 20(S)-Rg3, a naturally occurring compound, might act as a dual therapeutic regulator for the treatment of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related diseases. - Highlights: • Ginsenosides Rg3 inhibits NO production through the regulation of iNOS expression. • Ginsenosides Rg3 inhibits the S-nitrosylation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. • Ginsenosides Rg3 suppress on the LPS- or UV-irradiation-induced ROS levels in cells.

  6. Microsoft Word - RBL_Jan_2009_RG13-1-398.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    13-1-398 Well: Gas production well, Federal RG 13-1-398, API # 05-103-10605. Operator: Williams Production RMT, Incorporated Sampler: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, CO. Date of Sampling Event: 7 January 2009 Samples of natural gas and produced water were collected from production well Federal RG 13-1-398. Location data for the surface collection point and the sample location are given in Table 1. A description of each sample collected is listed in Table

  7. Microsoft Word - RBL_Jan_2009_RG24-13-398.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    24-13-398 Well: Gas production well, Federal RG 24-13-398, API # 05-103-10702. Operator: Williams Production RMT, Incorporated Sampler: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, CO. Date of Sampling Event: 7 January 2009 Samples of natural gas and produced water were collected from production well Federal RG 24-13-398. Location data for the surface collection point and the sample location are given in Table 1. A description of each sample collected is listed in

  8. Telescope Guiding with a HyViSI H2RG Used in Guide Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, Lance M.; Figerb, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kahn, Steven M.; Gilmore, D.Kirk

    2010-06-04

    We report on long exposure results obtained with a Teledyne HyViSI H2RG detector operating in guide mode. The sensor simultaneously obtained nearly seeing-limited data while also guiding the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope. Results from unguided and guided operation are presented and used to place lower limits on flux/fluence values for accurate centroid measurements. We also report on significant noise reduction obtained in recent laboratory measurements that should further improve guiding capability with higher magnitude stars.

  9. RG flow of the Polyakov-loop potential - first status report

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, J.; Gies, H.; Pirner, H.-J.

    2005-06-14

    We study SU(2) Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature in the framework of the functional renormalization group. We concentrate on the effective potential for the Polyakov loop which serves as an order parameter for confinement. In this first status report, we focus on the behaviour of the effective Polyakov-loop potential at high temperatures. In addition to the standard perturbative result, our findings provide information about the 'RG improved' backreactions of Polyakov-loop fluctuations on the potential. We demonstrate that these fluctuations establish the convexity of the effective potential.

  10. Recognition of the Activated States of G[alpha]13 by the rgRGS Domain of PDZRhoGEF

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Singer, William D.; Danesh, Shahab M.; Sternweis, Paul C.; Sprang, Stephen R.

    2009-12-01

    G12 class heterotrimeric G proteins stimulate RhoA activation by RGS-RhoGEFs. However, p115RhoGEF is a GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) toward G{alpha}13, whereas PDZRhoGEF is not. We have characterized the interaction between the PDZRhoGEF rgRGS domain (PRG-rgRGS) and the alpha subunit of G13 and have determined crystal structures of their complexes in both the inactive state bound to GDP and the active states bound to GDP {center_dot} AlF (transition state) and GTP{gamma}S (Michaelis complex). PRG-rgRGS interacts extensively with the helical domain and the effector-binding sites on G{alpha}13 through contacts that are largely conserved in all three nucleotide-bound states, although PRG-rgRGS has highest affinity to the Michaelis complex. An acidic motif in the N terminus of PRG-rgRGS occupies the GAP binding site of G{alpha}13 and is flexible in the GDP {center_dot} AlF complex but well ordered in the GTPS complex. Replacement of key residues in this motif with their counterparts in p115RhoGEF confers GAP activity.

  11. COL Application Content Guide for HTGRs: Revision to RG 1.206, Part 1 - Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2012-08-01

    A combined license (COL) application is required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for all proposed nuclear plants. The information requirements for a COL application are set forth in 10 CFR 52.79, “Contents of Applications; Technical Information in Final Safety Analysis Report.” An applicant for a modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) must develop and submit for NRC review and approval a COL application which conforms to these requirements. The technical information necessary to allow NRC staff to evaluate a COL application and resolve all safety issues related to a proposed nuclear plant is detailed and comprehensive. To this, Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.206, “Combined License Applications for Nuclear Power Plants” (LWR Edition), was developed to assist light water reactor (LWR) applicants in incorporating and effectively formatting required information for COL application review (Ref. 1). However, the guidance prescribed in RG 1.206 presumes a LWR design proposal consistent with the systems and functions associated with large LWR power plants currently operating under NRC license.

  12. PPAR agonists reduce steatosis in oleic acid-overloaded HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rogue, Alexandra; Anthérieu, Sébastien; Vluggens, Aurore; Umbdenstock, Thierry; Claude, Nancy; Moureyre-Spire, Catherine de la; Weaver, Richard J.; Guillouzo, André

    2014-04-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently the most common form of chronic liver disease there is no pharmacological agent approved for its treatment. Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are closely associated with hepatic lipid metabolism, they seem to play important roles in NAFLD. However, the effects of PPAR agonists on steatosis that is a common pathology associated with NAFLD, remain largely controversial. In this study, the effects of various PPAR agonists, i.e. fenofibrate, bezafibrate, troglitazone, rosiglitazone, muraglitazar and tesaglitazar on oleic acid-induced steatotic HepaRG cells were investigated after a single 24-hour or 2-week repeat treatment. Lipid vesicles stained by Oil-Red O and triglycerides accumulation caused by oleic acid overload, were decreased, by up to 50%, while fatty acid oxidation was induced after 2-week co-treatment with PPAR agonists. The greatest effects on reduction of steatosis were obtained with the dual PPARα/γ agonist muraglitazar. Such improvement of steatosis was associated with up-regulation of genes related to fatty acid oxidation activity and down-regulation of many genes involved in lipogenesis. Moreover, modulation of expression of some nuclear receptor genes, such as FXR, LXRα and CAR, which are potent actors in the control of lipogenesis, was observed and might explain repression of de novo lipogenesis. Conclusion: Altogether, our in vitro data on steatotic HepaRG cells treated with PPAR agonists correlated well with clinical investigations, bringing a proof of concept that drug-induced reversal of steatosis in human can be evaluated in in vitro before conducting long-term and costly in vivo studies in animals and patients. - Highlights: • There is no pharmacological agent approved for the treatment of NAFLD. • This study demonstrates that PPAR agonists can reduce fatty acid-induced steatosis. • Some nuclear receptors appear to be potent actors in the control

  13. Investigation of structural heterogeneity at the SPE site using combined P–wave travel times and Rg phase velocities

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Rowe, Charlotte A.; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present analyses of the 2D seismic structure beneath Source Physics Experiments (SPE) geophone lines that extended radially at 100 m spacing from 100 to 2000 m from the source borehole. With seismic sources at only one end of the geophone lines, standard refraction profiling methods cannot resolve seismic velocity structures unambiguously. In previous work, we demonstrated overall agreement between body-wave refraction modeling and Rg dispersion curves for the least complex of the five lines. A more detailed inspection supports a 2D reinterpretation of the structure. We obtained Rg phase velocity measurements in both the time and frequency domains,more » then used iterative adjustment of the initial 1D body-wave model to predict Rg dispersion curves to fit the observed values. Our method applied to the most topographically severe of the geophone lines is supplemented with a 2D ray-tracing approach, whose application to P-wave arrivals supports the Rg analysis. In addition, midline sources will allow us to refine our characterization in future work.« less

  14. https://bluedart.phe.com/owa/?ae=Item&t=IPM.Note&id=RgAAAAA%2f3

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Phyllis Radack Manager, Regulatory Services 702-295-6582 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 ...idRgAAAAA%2f3mOqqZ%2bfSq... 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 (fax) From: Morris, Patrick ...

  15. Ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} induces angiogenesis by the inverse regulation of MET tyrosine kinase receptor expression through miR-23a

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Chan, Lai-Sheung; Poon, Po-Ying; Yue, Patrick Ying-Kit; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2015-09-15

    Therapeutic angiogenesis has been implicated in ischemic diseases and wound healing. Ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} (Rg{sub 1}), one of the most abundant active components of ginseng, has been demonstrated as an angiogenesis-stimulating compound in different models. There is increasing evidence implicating microRNAs (miRNAs), a group of non-coding RNAs, as important regulators of angiogenesis, but the role of microRNAs in Rg{sub 1}-induced angiogenesis has not been fully explored. In this report, we found that stimulating endothelial cells with Rg{sub 1} could reduce miR-23a expression. In silico experiments predicted hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), a well-established mediator of angiogenesis, as the target of miR-23a. Transfection of the miR-23a precursor or inhibitor oligonucleotides validated the inverse relationship of miR-23a and MET expression. Luciferase reporter assays further confirmed the interaction between miR-23a and the MET mRNA 3′-UTR. Intriguingly, ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} was found to increase MET protein expression in a time-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1}-induced angiogenic activities were indeed mediated through the down-regulation of miR-23a and subsequent up-regulation of MET protein expression, as confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function angiogenic experiments. In summary, our results demonstrated that ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} could induce angiogenesis by the inverse regulation of MET tyrosine kinase receptor expression through miR-23a. This study has broadened our understanding of the non-genomic effects of ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1,} and provided molecular evidence that warrant further development of natural compound as novel angiogenesis-promoting therapy. - Highlights: • Therapeutic angiogenesis has been implicated in ischemic diseases and wound healing. • Ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} (Rg{sub 1}) has been demonstrated as an angiogenesis-stimulating compound. • We found that Rg{sub 1} induces angiogenesis by

  16. Investigation of structural heterogeneity at the SPE site using combined P–wave travel times and Rg phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Charlotte A.; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present analyses of the 2D seismic structure beneath Source Physics Experiments (SPE) geophone lines that extended radially at 100 m spacing from 100 to 2000 m from the source borehole. With seismic sources at only one end of the geophone lines, standard refraction profiling methods cannot resolve seismic velocity structures unambiguously. In previous work, we demonstrated overall agreement between body-wave refraction modeling and Rg dispersion curves for the least complex of the five lines. A more detailed inspection supports a 2D reinterpretation of the structure. We obtained Rg phase velocity measurements in both the time and frequency domains, then used iterative adjustment of the initial 1D body-wave model to predict Rg dispersion curves to fit the observed values. Our method applied to the most topographically severe of the geophone lines is supplemented with a 2D ray-tracing approach, whose application to P-wave arrivals supports the Rg analysis. In addition, midline sources will allow us to refine our characterization in future work.

  17. Rod consolidation of RG and E's (Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation) spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.

    1987-05-01

    The rod consolidation demonstration involved pulling the fuel rods from five fuel assemblies from Unit 1 of RG and E's R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant. Slow and careful rod pulling efforts were used for the first and second fuel assemblies. Rod pulling then proceeded smoothly and rapidly after some minor modifications were made to the UST and D consolidation equipment. The compaction ratios attained ranged from 1.85 to 2.00 (rods with collapsed cladding were replaced by dummy rods in one fuel assembly to demonstrate the 2:1 compaction ratio capability). This demonstration involved 895 PWR fuel rods, among which there were some known defective rods (over 50 had collapsed cladding); no rods were broken or dropped during the demonstration. However, one of the rods with collapsed cladding unexplainably broke during handling operations (i.e., reconfiguration in the failed fuel canister), subsequent to the rod consolidation demonstration. The broken rod created no facility problems; the pieces were encapsulated for subsequent storage. Another broken rod was found during postdemonstration cutting operations on the nonfuel-bearing structural components from the five assemblies; evidence indicates it was broken prior to any rod consolidation operations. During the demonstration, burnish-type lines or scratches were visible on the rods that were pulled; however, experience indicates that such lines are generally produced when rods are pulled (or pushed) through the spacer grids. Rods with collapsed cladding would not enter the funnel (the transition device between the fuel assembly and the canister that aids in obtaining high compaction ratios). Reforming of the flattened areas of the cladding on those rods was attempted to make the rod cross sections more nearly circular; some of the reformed rods passed through the funnel and into the canister.

  18. D= DOE/RG-0067

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... and Stream Env i ronment . Oregon State Un ivers i ty . pp . ... ffect of human act i v i ty on b i rds a t a coas tal bay . ... Ber l in , NH 03570 The Coos County Democrat 7 9 Ma in ...

  19. Jian-Rong (Jeff) Li | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdoc in Chemistry, Miami University and Texas A&M University EFRC research: Metal-organic ... Hong-Cai Highly porous metal-organic framework sustained with 12-connected nanoscopic ...

  20. J rg Calefice | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    it. Jrg Calefice is a company located in Germany . References " Jrg Calefice" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleJrgCalefice&oldid782975...

  1. RG&E (Gas)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    An online rebate reservation system is used to ensure program funds are not overextended. All new rebate requests must first be reserved in the rebate reservation system to be valid. The program...

  2. Rotational and angular distributions of NO products from NO-Rg(Rg = He, Ne, Ar) complex photodissociation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Heather L. Holmes-Ross; Hall, Gregory E.; Valenti, Rebecca J.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2016-01-29

    In this study, we present the results of an investigation into the rotational and angular distributions of the NO A~ state fragment following photodissociation of the NO-He, NO-Ne and NO-Ar van der Waals complexed excited via the A~ ← X~ transition. For each complex the dissociation is probed for several values of Ea, the available energy above the dissociation threshold.

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Wang, Xiaoxiong (7) Miller, T. (6) Liu, Yang (2) Chang, Tay-Rong (1) Hasan, M. Zahid (1) ... thin films Bian, Guang ; Xu, Caizhi ; Chang, Tay-Rong ; Wang, Xiaoxiong ; Velury, ...

  4. Microsoft Word - PA Submission--12-2011 ASCeNews--RG.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 December 2011 "The Meisner Minute" editorial does not appear in this issue. It will resume in the March issue of this newsletter.-Editor's note ______________________________________________________ First-Ever 3D Kinetic Simulations of a Novel Laser-Driven Ion Acceleration Mechanism Enabled by Petascale Computing A recent article in Physical Review Letters 1 is the result of extensive analysis of "Science at Scale" calculations during the stabilization and open science

  5. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    315 Miles 2001 BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin ...

  6. SITE ;&;*E: ELK R~dEx RG&cme ALTERNATE NAIIE:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Mlnnesota, confirmed that the former Elk River Nuclear reactor slte Is currently bejng used for a coal-flred power plant. -3- Bjbllography 1. Environmental Statement (WASH-1516)d, ...

  7. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  8. Microsoft Word - PA Submission--12-2011 ASCeNews--RG.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Appro, LANL, LLNL, and beyond. 8 University of Minnesota's turbulent fluid dynamics 3D visualization results showcased at SC11 using eight Knights Corner co-processors of Arthur. ...

  9. ARM-96-004 UAV Spring Flight Series Mission Summary RG Ellingson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    flights to obtain data on the interaction of solar energy with clear and cloudy skies to test and develop new mathematical models of this interaction for use in climate studies. ...

  10. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Miles 2001 Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian ...

  11. ARM-96-003 UAV Fall 1996 Flight Series Mission Summary RG Ellingson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    in the relative accuracy of the Valero shortwave radiometers. Thus, despite the problems encountered on the flight, good data were gathered regarding the accuracy of the...

  12. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... ASH BU RN C REEK HUNT ING CREEK RED BIRD C OALBED GREEN GROVE RPD-WAYNE-3 LOC UST HILL BU ... Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to ...

  13. Highly porous metal-organic framework sustained with 12-connected...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Highly porous metal-organic framework sustained with 12-connected nanoscopic octahedra Previous Next List Weigang Lu , Daqiang Yuan , Trevor A. Makal , Zhangwen Wei , Jian-Rong Li ...

  14. Isostructural Metal-Organic Frameworks Assembled from Functionalized...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembled from Functionalized Diisophthalate Ligands through a Ligand-Truncation Strategy Previous Next List Yangyang Liu, Jian-Rong Li, Wolfgang M. Verdegaal, Tian-Fu Liu,...

  15. https://bluedart.phe.com/owa/?ae=Item&t=IPM.Note&id=RgAAAAA%2f3

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Services 702-295-6582 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 (fax) From: Michael Skougard ... Services 702-295-6582 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 (fax) From: Morris, Patrick ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Chiang, T.-C. (12) Lin, Hsin (12) Neupane, Madhab (12) Miller, T. (11) Chang, Tay-Rong (10) Jeng, Horng-Tay (10) Zheng, Hao (10) Chang, Guoqing (8) Liu, Chang (8) Sanchez, Daniel ...

  17. Methane storage in advanced porous materials | Center for Gas...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Methane storage in advanced porous materials Previous Next List Trevor A. Makal, Jian-Rong Li, Weigang Lu and Hong-Cai Zhou, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 7761-7779 DOI: 10.1039...

  18. A porous metal-organic framework with helical chain building...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    porous metal-organic framework with helical chain building units exhibiting facile transition from micro- to meso-porosity Previous Next List Jinhee Park , Jian-Rong Li , E. ...

  19. A versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture and cooperative catalysis Previous Next List Jinhee Park, Jian-Rong Li, Ying-Pin Chen, Jiamei Yu, Andrey A. Yakovenko, ...

  20. Daqiang Yuan | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lu, Weigang; Yuan, Daqiang; Makal, Trevor A; Wei, Zhangwen; Li, Jian-Rong; and Zhou, Hong-Cai Highly porous metal-organic framework sustained with 12-connected nanoscopic ...

  1. Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Yuguang Ma, M. Colin McCarthy, Julian Sculley, Jiamei Yu,...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... high gradient SRF R&D for ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab Geng, Rongli We report the progress on high gradient R&D of ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab (JLab) since the Beijing workshop. ...

  3. Bridging-ligand-substitution strategy for the preparation of...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bridging-ligand-substitution strategy for the preparation of metal-organic polyhedra Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li & Hong-Cai Zhou, Nature Chemistry 2, 893-898 (2010) DOI:...

  4. Confinement of Metal-Organic Polyhedra in Silica Nanopores |...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Confinement of Metal-Organic Polyhedra in Silica Nanopores Previous Next List Lin-Bing Sun, Jian-Rong Li, Weigang Lu, Zhi-Yuan Gu, Zhiping Luo, and Hong-Cai Zhou, J. Am. Chem....

  5. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Separations | Center for GasSeparationsR...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Metal-Organic Frameworks for Separations Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li , Julian Sculley , and Hong-Cai Zhou, Chem. Rev., 2012, 112 (2), pp 869-932 DOI: 10.1021cr200190s Journal...

  6. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter Results Filter by Author Alidoust, Nasser (1) Bansil, Arun (1) Belopolski, Ilya (1) Bian, Guang (1) Chang, Guoqing (1) Chang, Tay-Rong (1) Guo, Cheng (1) Hasan, M. Zahid (1) ...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter Results Filter by Author Chang, Tay-Rong (12) Jeng, Horng-Tay (12) Lin, Hsin (12) ... Xu, Su-Yang (9) Neupane, Madhab (8) Zheng, Hao (7) Chang, Guoqing (6) Sanchez, Daniel S. ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ryu, Shinsei (4) Alidoust, Nasser (3) Bansil, Arun (3) Belopolski, Ilya (3) Bian, Guang (3) Chang, Guoqing (3) Chang, Tay-Rong (3) Hasan, M. Zahid (3) Huang, Shin-Ming (3) ...

  9. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (12) Chang, Tay-Rong (11) Jeng, Horng-Tay (11) Xu, Su-Yang (11) Alidoust, Nasser (10) Belopolski, Ilya (10) Bian, Guang (10) Neupane, Madhab (10) Bansil, A. (9) Chang, Guoqing ...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter Results Filter by Author Alidoust, Nasser (2) Bansil, Arun (2) Belopolski, Ilya (2) Bian, Guang (2) Chang, Guoqing (2) Chang, Tay-Rong (2) Guo, Cheng (2) Hasan, M. Zahid (2) ...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for: All records 14 results for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Chang, ... Filter Results Filter by Author Chang, Tay-Rong (13) Jeng, Horng-Tay (12) Lin, Hsin (12) ...

  12. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bansil, Arun (1) Belopolski, Ilya (1) Bian, Guang (1) Brombosz, Scott M. (1) Chang, Guoqing (1) Chang, Tay-Rong (1) Guo, Cheng (1) Hasan, M. Zahid (1) Hsu, Chuang-Han (1) Huang, ...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neupane, Madhab (2) Shin, Shik (2) Xu, Su-Yang (2) Bansil, Arun (1) Cava, Robert J. (1) Chang, Guoqing (1) Chang, Tay-Rong (1) Durakiewicz, Tomasz (1) Fregoso, Benjamin M. (1) ...

  14. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neupane, Madhab (11) Bansil, Arun (10) Lin, Hsin (10) Miller, T. (10) Chang, Tay-Rong (9) Jeng, Horng-Tay (9) Zheng, Hao (8) Chang, Guoqing (7) Liu, Chang (7) Sanchez, Daniel S. ...

  15. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bansil, Arun (3) Lin, Hsin (3) Alidoust, Nasser (2) Belopolski, Ilya (2) Bian, Guang (2) Chang, Guoqing (2) Chang, Tay-Rong (2) Hasan, M. Zahid (2) Hsu, Chuang-Han (2) Huang, ...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Alidoust, Nasser (10) Belopolski, Ilya (10) Bian, Guang (10) Chang, Tay-Rong (10) Jeng, Horng-Tay (10) Xu, Su-Yang (9) Neupane, Madhab (8) Chang, Guoqing (7) Sanchez, Daniel S. (7) ...

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    Hasan, M. Zahid (11) Bansil, Arun (10) Lin, Hsin (10) Neupane, Madhab (10) Chang, Tay-Rong (8) Jeng, Horng-Tay (8) Chang, Guoqing (7) Sanchez, Daniel S. (7) Zheng, Hao (7) Huang, ...

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    Alidoust, Nasser (5) Belopolski, Ilya (5) Bian, Guang (5) Chang, Guoqing (5) Hasan, M. Zahid (5) Huang, Shin-Ming (5) Xu, Su-Yang (5) Zheng, Hao (5) Chang, Tay-Rong (4) Jeng, ...

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  4. JLab Scientist Develops Portrait of a Gremlin | Jefferson Lab

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    Scientist Develops Portrait of a Gremlin JLab Scientist Develops Portrait of a Gremlin Rongli Geng Rongli Geng zeros in on a defect inside this accelerator cavity with a long-distance microscope. When an expensive accelerator component designed for the International Linear Collider failed to perform as expected, Jefferson Lab scientists set out to find the root of the problem. What they discovered and the tool they used to make their discovery could have widespread applications in accelerator

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    ... Guo, Peijun (1) Hao, Yulin (1) Hu, Yan (1) Kai, Ji-Jung (1) Lee, Chi-Hung (1) Leonardi, ... Tsai, Shuo-Cheng ; Huang, E-Wen ; Kai, Ji-Jung ; Chen, Fu-Rong ; NTHU-Taiwan) March 2013 ...

  6. Small business and Lab honored for mentoring partnership

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    Small business and Lab honored for mentoring partnership RG Construction Services wins DOE ... of the Year awards to LANS and RG Construction Services on May 24, 2016 DOE's Office ...

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    Rong, Xi" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX

  8. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are also several erroneous and misleading statements made by these authors which require a response by the IntCal working group. Furthermore, we would like to comment on the sample selection criteria, pretreatment methods, and statistical methods utilized by Fairbanks et al. in derivation of their own radiocarbon calibration.

  9. Whitfield Solar Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Kingdom Zip: RG6 6AU Sector: Renewable Energy, Solar Product: Developing solar photovoltaic concentrators aimed at generating clean renewable energy for the world market....

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    ... ; Schmitt, Felix ; Lu, Donghui ; Moore, R.G. ; Zhang, C. ; Meevasana, W. ; ... Brian ; He, Yu ; Tanaka, Kiyohisa ; Moore, Robert G. ; Lu, Donghui ; Yoshida, ...

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    ... Inna M. ; Yi, Ming ; Chen, Yulin ; Moore, Rob G. ; Shen, Zhi-Xun October 2014 Phase ... ; Schmitt, Felix ; Lu, Donghui ; Moore, R.G. ; Zhang, C. ; Meevasana, W. ; ...

  12. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    NYSEG (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficient equipment that have an...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    NYSEG (Gas)- Commercial and Industrial Efficiency Program NYSEG and RG&E offer rebates to non-residential customers installing energy efficiency equipment that pay a natural gas...

  14. An Evaluation of the Nonlinearity Correction Applied to Atmospheric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    used in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's AERIs. Authors: Turner, DD ; Revercomb, HE ; Knuteson, RO ; Dedecker, RG ; Feltz, WF Publication Date: ...

  15. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...

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    1: New Light Management Mechanisms RG Leader: Eli Yablonovitch Affiliated PIs: Harry Atwater, Paul Braun, Mark Brongersma, Jennifer Dionne, Shanhui Fan, Andrei Faraon, John Rogers,...

  16. Monte Carlo and renormalization group local effective potentials in scalar field theories at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, J.D.; Shepard, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    We derive an approximate renormalization group (RG) flow equation for the local effective potential of single-component {phi}{sup 4} field theory at finite temperature. Previous zero-temperature RG equations are recovered in the low- and high-temperature limits, in the latter case, via the phenomenon of dimensional reduction. We numerically solve our RG equations to obtain local effective potentials at finite temperature. These are found to be in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results, especially when lattice artifacts are accounted for in the RG treatment. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Most Viewed Documents - Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    energy Canonico, D.A.; Stelzman, W.J.; Berggren, R.G.; et al. (1975) Thermal and electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of unirradiated and irradiated graphites ...

  18. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction While it may seem to be a simple quantity, cloud amount is somewhat elusive. ...

  19. 1

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    Short-Term Variability of Extinction by Broadband Steller Photometry I.C. Musat and R.G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Abstract ...

  20. Microsoft Word - taylor.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Tropical Western Pacific P. Taylor and R.G. Ellingson Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction The effective cloud fraction, N e , has been suggested ...

  1. GHESolar | Open Energy Information

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    GHESolar Jump to: navigation, search Name: GHESolar Place: United Kingdom Zip: RG14 2TF Sector: Solar Product: Wholesaler of solar panels based in Berkshire, UK. References:...

  2. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...

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    2: Solar Spectrum Control and Conversion RG Leader: John Rogers Affiliated PIs: Paul ... in solar energy conversion efficiency is via exploitation of the full solar spectrum. ...

  3. Microsoft Word - 2016 Annual Meeting Agenda v5.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    California Institute of Technology August 25-26, 2016 Wednesday, August 24, 2016 6:30 pm PI Dinner Seco Restaurant: 140 S Lake Ave, Pasadena Thursday, August 25, 2016 7:30-8:15 Breakfast Winnett Lounge 8:15-9:00 Welcome & LMI-EFRC Overview Winnett Lounge Ralph Nuzzo 9:00-9:25 RG3: Thermal Photon Harvesting Winnett Lounge Shanhui Fan 9:25-9:50 RG2: Solar Spectrum Control and Conversion Winnett Lounge Ralph Nuzzo 9:50-10:00 Coffee Break Winnett Lounge 10:00-11:30 RG2/RG3 Breakout Sessions 109

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Leuenberger, Dominik (3) Lu, Donghui (3) Mo, Sung-Kwan (3) Moore, Robert G. (3) Sasagawa, ... ; Schmitt, Felix ; Lu, Donghui ; Moore, R.G. ; Zhang, C. ; Meevasana, W. ; ...

  5. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes:...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    M. J. Demkowicz, J. Wang, and R.G. Hoagland, Interfaces between dissimilar crystalline solids, in Dislocation in Solids, Volume 14, ed. J. P. Hirth (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2008)....

  6. Duality cascade of softly broken supersymmetric theories (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We study the duality cascade of softly broken supersymmetric theories. We investigate the renormalization group (RG) flow of SUSY breaking terms as well as supersymmetric ...

  7. Passiv Systems | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: England, United Kingdom Zip: RG14 2PZ Product: UK based developer of a home energy management system, covering heating, hot water and electrical appliances....

  8. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...

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    Harvesting RG Leader: Shanhui Fan Affiliated PIs: Harry Atwater, Paul Braun, Jennifer Lewis, Austin Minnich, John Rogers, and Eli Yablonovitch Refractive index design via porous...

  9. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4: Programmable Assembly of Photonic and Electronic Architectures RG Leader: Jennifer Lewis Affiliated PIs: Harry Atwater, Paul Braun, Nate Lewis, Ralph Nuzzo, John Rogers, Eli...

  10. MiniBooNE at All Experimenter's Meeting

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    100807 MiniBooNE Status Report R.G. Van de Water 100107 MiniBooNE Status Report R.G. Van de Water 080607 MiniBooNE Status Report Steve Brice 073007 MiniBooNE Status...

  11. Water electrolysis on La1−xSrxCoO3−δ perovskite electrocatalysts

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    8 Apr 2015 | Accepted 16 Feb 2016 | Published 23 Mar 2016 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11053 OPEN Water electrolysis on La1 _ xSrxCoO3 _ d perovskite electrocatalysts J. Tyler Mefford1, Xi Rong2, Artem M. Abakumov3,4, William G. Hardin5, Sheng Dai6, Alexie M. Kolpak2, Keith P. Johnston5,7 & Keith J. Stevenson1,3,5,8 Perovskite oxides are attractive candidates as catalysts for the electrolysis of water in alkaline energy storage and conversion systems. However, the rational design of active catalysts

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    ... Hussain, Zaheed (1) Ishida, S. (1) Ishikado, M. (1) Lee, Wei-Sheng (1) Lu, Donghui (1) Meevasana, W. (1) Moore, R.G. (1) Sasagawa, T. (1) Schmitt, Felix (1) Shen, Zhi-Xun (1) ...

  13. ARM TR-008

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    Measurement Program September 2004 D.D. Turner, H.E. Revercomb, R.O. Knuteson, R.G. ... and Environmental Research D. D. Turner et al., September 2004, ARM TR-013 ...

  14. SAND97-8490 UC-404 Unlimited Release

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Reading Berks RG7 4PR United Kingdom Cambridge University Attn: Prof. M. F. Ashby Engineering Department Trumpington St. Cambridge CB2 1PZ United Kingdom ERG Inc. Attn: Mr. ...

  15. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review: Preprint

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    ... 4 kW amorphous-silicon PV system in Michigan. Solar Cells 1990; 28: 163-176. 37. Pratt RG. Three year performance and reliability of a 4 kW amorphous-silicon PV system in Michigan. ...

  16. An Evaluation of the Nonlinearity Correction Applied to Atmospheric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Turner, DD ; Revercomb, HE ; Knuteson, RO ; Dedecker, RG ; Feltz, WF Publication Date: 2004-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1020730 Report Number(s): DOESC-ARMTR-013 PNNL-14922; ...

  17. DOE/SC-ARM-0606

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Tobin,.DC,.H.Revercomb,.RO.Knuteson,.FA.Best,.WL.Smith,.NN.Ciganovich,.RG.Dedecker,.S.Dutc... .Minnis,.P,.L.Nguyen,.W.Smith,.R.Palikonda,.J.Ayers,.D.Doelling,.M.Norde...

  18. A D O E En

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    power to enhance clean energy production A D O E En e rg y Inn ov ati o n H ub Nuclear Energy Cover photo: 3D visualizations allow a physical walk-through of the top 20% of...

  19. Voller Energy Group Plc | Open Energy Information

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    Basingstoke, United Kingdom Zip: RG24 8PZ Product: UK-based manufacturer of portable fuel cell systems for use as power packs, battery re-chargers and mobile generators....

  20. From Z to Planets. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    D. ; Lemke, Raymond William ; Root, Seth ; Seagle, Christopher T ; Shulenburger, Luke ; Jacobseen, S.B ; Kraus, R.G. ; Petaev, I. ; Sasselov, D.D. ; Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, S. ; ...

  1. Feburary , 2005

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Mimi R. Garstang, RG Director and State Geologist Director's Office - Administration Program 573368-2101 573368-2111 (Fax) mimi.garstang@dnr.mo.gov MG:led c: Ms. Cecelia Tapia, ...

  2. Microsoft Word - chapter FeNiCrMo_ver4.doc

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    ... OH, 1990, pp. 140-194. 2. MR Louthan, RG Derrick, JA Donovan, and GR Caskey, "Hydrogen Transport in Iron and Steel", in Effect of Hydrogen on Behavior of Materials, AW Thompson ...

  3. Microsoft Word - TechRef_FeNiCo_Oct05.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... J Vac Sci Technol 12 (1975) 405-409. 6. MR Louthan and RG Derrick. Hydrogen Transport in Austenitic Stainless Steel. Corros Sci 15 (1975) 565-577. Specialty Steels Specialty ...

  4. Microsoft Word - TP22135.doc

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    ... Park Ridge NJ: Noyes Publications (1985) p. 822-862. 4. MR Louthan and RG Derrick. Hydrogen Transport in Austenitic Stainless Steel. Corrosion Science 15 (1975) 565-577. 5. GR ...

  5. Microsoft Word - TPHP9420.doc

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    ... Metall Trans 8A (1977) 265-272. 7. MR Louthan, RG Derrick, JA Donovan and GR Caskey. Hydrogen Transport in Iron and Steel. in: AW Thompson and IM Bernstein, editor. Effect of ...

  6. Hybrid Rotaxanes: Interlocked Structures for Quantum Computing...

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    modifications of the chemistry. Research conducted by C.-F. Lee, D.A. Leigh, and D. Schultz, (University of Edinburgh, UK); R.G. Pritchard, G.A. Timco, and R.E.P. Winpenny...

  7. Section 65

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    American Meteorological Society, Boston, 241-242. Ellingson, R.G., S.H. Shen, and J. Warner, 1994b: Calibra- tion of radiation codes used in climate models: Comparison of...

  8. On the origin of radiation growth of hcp crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Golubov, Stanislav I; Barashev, Aleksandr; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to study theoretically the radiation growth (RG) of hcp-type materials with a particular focus on the effect of one-dimensionally (1-D) migrating clusters of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), which are steadily produced in displacement cascades under neutron or heavy-ion irradiation. A reaction-diffusion model is developed for the description of RG in single hcp-type metallic crystals. The model reproduces all RG stages observed in neutron-irradiated annealed samples of pure Zr and Zr alloys, such as high strain rate at low, strain saturation at intermediate and breakaway growth at relatively high irradiation doses. In addition, it accounts for the striking observations of negative strains in prismatic directions and coexistence of vacancy- and SIA-type prismatic loops. The role of cold work in RG behavior and alignment of the vacancy-type loops along basal planes are revealed and the maximum strain rate is estimated.

  9. Phase Competition in Trisected Superconducting Dome (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Vishik, I.M. ; Hashimoto, M ; He, Rui-Hua ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Schmitt, Felix ; Lu, Donghui ; Moore, R.G. ; Zhang, C. ; Meevasana, W. ; Sasagawa, T. ; Uchida, S. ; Fujita, ...

  10. IT Power Limited | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    IT Power Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: IT Power Limited Place: Basingstoke, England, United Kingdom Zip: RG24 8AG Sector: Renewable Energy Product: IT Power is a...

  11. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O`Neill, M.A.; Pellerin, P.J.M.; Warrenfeltz, D.; Vidal, S.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1999-03-02

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations. 15 figs.

  12. Plant rhamnogalacturonan II complexation of heavy metal cations

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Malcolm A.; Pellerin, Patrice J. M.; Warrenfeltz, Dennis; Vidal, Stephane; Darvill, Alan G.; Albersheim, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) and relates to its ability to complex specific multivalent heavy metal cations. In the presence of boric acid, RG-II monomers form dimers that are cross-linked by a borate ester. The yield of such borate ester cross-linked dimers of RG-II is enhanced in the presence of specific heavy metal cations. The present invention further relates to the utility of RG-II in assays for the detection of specific heavy metal contamination; as a reagent useful in the removal of specific heavy metal cations contaminating foods and liquids, for example, fish, wines, etc.; as a pharmaceutical composition useful as an antidote in specific heavy metal cation poisoning; as a treatment for the detoxification of specific heavy metal cations from blood and/or tissues; and in a method of remediation of waters and soils contaminated with specific heavy metal cations.

  13. Meeting Minutes

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has endorsed NQA-1-2008 with 2009 addenda (RG 1.28, R4). ... be implemented to achieve compliance with NQA-1. Yanek asked the board to consider ...

  14. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

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    S. Stave, G. Tatishvili, L. Wood INL: T. Hill California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo: R.G. Baker, J.L. Klay Colorado School of Mines: U. Greife, J. Bundgaard,...

  15. Cherokee Nation - Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CHEROKEE Acres: 2,633.348 CHEROKEE Acres: 1,641.687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOURCES: US Census Bureau (Tiger Files) DOQQ's, USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee ...

  16. Lawrence Co. Scioto Co. Greenup Co. Jack

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... TEAYS VALLEY DOT Y BRANCH ISLAN D CREEK RITC HIE GREEN GROVE WILL IAM SBU RG BEECH Y C ... Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to ...

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

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    Introducing WEBMADS Dedecker, R.G., Quinn, G.M., Garcia, R.K., and Revercomb, H.E., ... WEB-MADS is a Web based prototype version of MADS that allows remote access to the same ...

  18. Small business and Lab honored for mentoring partnership

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    Small business and Lab honored for mentoring partnership Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Small business and Lab honored for mentoring partnership RG Construction Services wins DOE award. July 6, 2016 DOE's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization presented Mentor and Protégé of the Year awards to LANS and RG Construction Services on May 24, 2016 DOE's

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - AVP_poster_KAN [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud charge measurements using aerial platforms K. A. Nicoll and R.G. Harrison Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6BB UK k.a.nicoll@reading.ac.uk The electrical conductivity of air results from molecular cluster ions, which are produced by cosmic rays and natural background radioactivity. Attachment of cluster ions to droplets and particles causes charging, and depletes ion concentrations. Near the upper and lower boundaries of layer clouds, unipolar charge regions

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rio_Monitoring

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rio_Monitoring Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site Natural Gas Well Monitoring Results Project Rio Blanco Monitoring Results Fourth Quarter 2010 Separated Water at a Natural Gas Plant, Parachute, Colorado (4th Quarter 2010) Natural Gas Wells near the Project Rio Blanco Horizon (3rd Quarter 2010) Federal RG 13-1-398 (January 2009) Federal RG 24-13-398 (January 2009) Last Updated: 11/17/2011

  1. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) - Jennifer Lewis RG4 Leader Jennifer Lewis Jennifer Lewis, Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering Harvard University Jennifer A. Lewis joined the faculty of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University in 2013. Prior to her appointment at Harvard, she served as the Director of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory and the Hans Thurnauer Professor of

  2. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll...

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    ... L F r r m n r r r m n n m n g m n m n rG r r gF r rG g mn Gg m n n gG F m n d d d d 1 2 ( ) ( ) 1 d d d ( ) d 2 2 ( ) , 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 (10) ...

  3. MOX and MOX with 237Np/241Am Inert Fission Gas Generation Comparison in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. Robel; W. J. Carmack; D. J. Utterbeck

    2006-06-01

    The treatment of spent fuel produced in nuclear power generation is one of the most important issues to both the nuclear community and the general public. One of the viable options to long-term geological disposal of spent fuel is to extract plutonium, minor actinides (MA), and potentially long-lived fission products from the spent fuel and transmute them into short-lived or stable radionuclides in currently operating light-water reactors (LWR), thus reducing the radiological toxicity of the nuclear waste stream. One of the challenges is to demonstrate that the burnup-dependent characteristic differences between Reactor-Grade Mixed Oxide (RG-MOX) fuel and RG-MOX fuel with MA Np-237 and Am 241 are minimal, particularly, the inert gas generation rate, such that the commercial MOX fuel experience base is applicable. Under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), developmental fuel specimens in experimental assembly LWR-2 are being tested in the northwest (NW) I-24 irradiation position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment uses MOX fuel test hardware, and contains capsules with MOX fuel consisting of mixed oxide manufactured fuel using reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) and mixed oxide manufactured fuel using RG-Pu with added Np/Am. This study will compare the fuel neutronics depletion characteristics of Case-1 RG-MOX and Case-2 RG-MOX with Np/Am.

  4. The structure of the invariant charge in massive theories with one coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, E.

    1995-06-01

    Invariance under finite renormalization group (RG) transformations is used to structure the invariant charge in models with one coupling in the 4 lowest orders of perturbation theory. In every order there starts a RG-invariant, which is uniquely continued to higher orders. Whereas in massless models the RG-invariants are power series in logarithms, there is no such requirement in a massive model. Only when one applies the Callan-Symanzik (CS) equation of the respective theories is the high-energy behavior of the RG-invariants restricted. In models where the CS-equation has the same form as the RG-equation, the massless limit is reached smoothly, i.e., the {beta}-functions are constants in the asymptotic limit and the RG-functions starting the new invariant tend to logarithms. On the other hand, in the spontaneously broken models with fermions the CS-equation contains a {beta}-function of a physical mass. As a consequence the {beta}-functions depend on the normalization point also in the asymptotic region and a mass independent limit does not exist anymore. {copyright} 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. Effects of confinement on short-period surface waves: Observations from a new dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, H.; Bonner, J.; Leidig, M.

    2006-04-15

    The Source Phenomenology Experiment (SPE) was conducted during the summer of 2003 in Arizona. Single-fired chemical shots were detonated and recorded at two locations, including a coal mine in the Black Mesa district of northern Arizona. This article reports on research into the effects of confinement on the generation of short-period, fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves (Rg), using a subset of the SPE data. Results show important differences between the Rg amplitudes of confined and unconfined explosions which must be understood to develop discriminants for mining explosions, which are an important aspect of nuclear test monitoring. Rg energy and frequency content depend on explosive weight and confinement, and unconfined explosions generate up to eight times less energy than equivalent confined explosions. For this reason, unconfined mining explosions cannot be simulated using a Mueller and Murphy (1971) source without including an empirical chemical decoupling factor. Rg chemical decoupling factors for unconfined shots vary from 0.5 to 8.2 at frequencies between 0.5 and 11 Hz. The effects of the bench free face are evident in radiation patterns. Explosions on the topographic bench show increased spectral energies for Rg (by a factor of 1.5) at azimuths behind the bench. This suggests that a discriminant based on the relative azimuthal spectral energies of Rg may be a possibility.

  6. Richard Gerber! NERSC! User Services Group Lead

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    t ry s ome a nd s ee w hat works f or y ou - Totalview a nd D DT d ebuggers - PAPI, T au, v arious r esearch t ools, & v endor---specific performance t ools * Common c ode p roblems * How t ools w ork i n g eneral * Be s uspicious o f o utliers a mong p arallel t asks * Where t o g et m ore i nforma:on 3 Debugging 4 What is a Bug? * A b ug i s w hen y our c ode - crashes - hangs ( doesn't fi nish) - gets i nconsistent a nswers - produces w rong a nswers - behaves i n a ny w ay y ou d idn't

  7. Richard Gerber! NERSC! User Services Group Lead

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Totalview a nd D DT d ebuggers - PAPI, T au, & v endor---specific p erformance t ools * Common c ode p roblems * How t ools w ork i n g eneral * Use t he t ools t hat w orks f or y ou a nd a re a ppropriate f or your p roblem * Be s uspicious o f o utliers a mong p arallel t asks * Where t o g et m ore i nforma:on 3 Debugging 4 What is a Bug? * A b ug i s w hen y our c ode - crashes - hangs ( doesn't fi nish) - gets i nconsistent a nswers - produces w rong a nswers - behaves i n a ny w ay y

  8. Dynamics near QCD critical point by dynamic renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Yuki

    2011-05-01

    We work out the basic analysis on dynamics near the QCD critical point (CP) by the dynamic renormalization group (RG). In addition to the RG analysis by coarse-graining, we construct the nonlinear Langevin equation as a basic equation for the critical dynamics. Our construction is based on the generalized Langevin theory and the relativistic hydrodynamics. Applying the dynamic RG to the constructed equation, we derive the RG equation for the transport coefficients and analyze their critical behaviors. We find that the resulting RG equation turns out to be the same as that for the liquid-gas CP except for an insignificant constant. Therefore, the bulk viscosity and the thermal conductivity strongly diverge at the QCD CP. We also show that the thermal and viscous diffusion modes exhibit critical slowing down with the dynamic critical exponents z{sub thermal}{approx}3 and z{sub viscous}{approx}2, respectively. In contrast, the sound propagating mode shows critical speeding up with the negative exponent z{sub sound}{approx}-0.8.

  9. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Strategy for Revising the RIA Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, Paul M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued interim criteria and guidance for the reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) within the latest revision to NUREG-0800, 'Standard Review Plan' (SRP), Section 4.2, 'Fuel System Design', Appendix B (Revision 03, March 2007). The purpose of this paper is as follows: 1. present a change in regulatory staff position regarding the requirements of 10 CFR 50, Appendix A, General Design Criteria 28 (GDC28) and changes in regulatory guidance provided in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.77, RG 1.195, RG 1.183, and previous versions of NUREG-0800 SRP; 2. describe the implementation strategy and schedule for both new reactors and the existing fleet; and 3. encourage licensees and nuclear fuel vendors to (1) develop improved core physics analytical methods to allow a more deliberate transition to the new fuel cladding failure criteria and (2) develop the technical basis to address the new core coolability criteria. (authors)

  10. A DUF-246 family glycosyltransferase-like gene affects male fertility and the biosynthesis of pectic arabinogalactans

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Stonebloom, Solomon; Ebert, Berit; Xiong, Guangyan; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Birdseye, Devon; Lao, Jeemeng; Pauly, Markus; Hahn, Michael G.; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2016-04-18

    We report pectins are a group of structurally complex plant cell wall polysaccharides whose biosynthesis and function remain poorly understood. The pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) has two types of arabinogalactan side chains, type-I and type-II arabinogalactans. To date few enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pectin have been described. Here we report the identification of a highly conserved putative glycosyltransferase encoding gene, Pectic ArabinoGalactan synthesis-Related (PAGR), affecting the biosynthesis of RG-I arabinogalactans and critical for pollen tube growth. T-DNA insertions in PAGR were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and were found to segregate at a 1:1 ratio of heterozygotes to wildmore » type. We were unable to isolate homozygous pagr mutants as pagr mutant alleles were not transmitted via pollen. In vitro pollen germination assays revealed reduced rates of pollen tube formation in pollen from pagr heterozygotes. To characterize a loss-of-function phenotype for PAGR, the Nicotiana benthamiana orthologs, NbPAGR-A and B, were transiently silenced using Virus Induced Gene Silencing. NbPAGR-silenced plants exhibited reduced internode and petiole expansion. Cell wall materials from NbPAGR-silenced plants had reduced galactose content compared to the control. Immunological and linkage analyses support that RG-I has reduced type-I arabinogalactan content and reduced branching of the RG-I backbone in NbPAGR-silenced plants. Arabidopsis lines overexpressing PAGR exhibit pleiotropic developmental phenotypes and the loss of apical dominance as well as an increase in RG-I type-II arabinogalactan content. Together, results support a function for PAGR in the biosynthesis of RG-I arabinogalactans and illustrate the essential roles of these polysaccharides in vegetative and reproductive plant growth.« less

  11. 37 - Comment from URENCO USA.pdf

    Energy Saver

    610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507 cliff.whyte@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-2098  Fax (304) 285-4403  www.netl.doe.gov A l b a ny, O R * M o rg a n tow n , W V * Pi t t s b u rg h , PA February 24, 2015 Dear Reader: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a supplement analysis (SA) to the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP) Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This document was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of

  12. Power spectral density functions compatible with NRC Regulatory Guide 1. 60 response spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozuka, M.; Mochio, T.; Samaras, E.F.

    1988-06-01

    Among other possibilities, the Kanai-Tajimi power spectral density enhanced at the higher frequency range is found to be useful for generating ground acceleration time histories that satisfy NRC RG 1.60 requirements. The values of the parameters involved in the spectral density function are recommended for this purpose. Also, a suggestion is made as to how the power spectral density requirements can be placed in combination with those of the current NRC RG 1.60 to ensure both the response and power spectrum requirements.

  13. 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507 cliff.whyte@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-2098  Fax (304) 285-4403  www.netl.doe.gov A l b a ny, O R * M o rg a n tow n , W V * Pi t t s b u rg h , PA February 24, 2015 Dear Reader: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a supplement analysis (SA) to the Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP) Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This document was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of

  14. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Production Flux of Sea-Spray Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Leeuw G, EL Andreas, MD Anguelova, ER Lewis, C O'Dowd, M Schulz, and SE Schwartz. 2011. "Production flux of sea-spray aerosol." Reviews of Geophysics, 49, RG2001, doi:10.1029/2010RG000349. Lewis ER and SE Schwartz. 2004. Sea Salt Aerosol Production: Mechanisms, Methods,

  15. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Tobin, D.C., F.A. Best, P.D. Brown, S.A. Clough, R.G. Dedecker, R.G. Ellingson, R.K. Garcia, H.B. Howell, R.O. Knuteson, E.J. Mlawer, H.E. Revercomb, J.F. Short, P.F.W. van Delst, and V.P. Walden, 1999. "Downwelling spectral radiance observations at the SHEBA ice station:

  16. Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphism Affects the Response to Preoperative 5-Fluorouracil Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Hoguen; Choi, Sung Ho; Lee, Mi-Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: This study aims to correlate thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms with the tumor response to preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU-based preoperative CRT were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thymidylate synthase expression and TS gene polymorphisms were evaluated in tumor obtained before preoperative CRT and were correlated with the pathologic response, as assessed by histopathologic staging (pTNM) and tumor regression grade. Results: Patients exhibited 2R/3R and 3R/3R tandem repeat polymorphisms in the TS gene. With regard to TS expression in these genotypes, 2R/3RC and 3RC/3RC were defined as the low-expression group and 2R/3RG, 3RC/3RG, and 3RG/3RG as the high-expression group. There was no significant correlation between TS expression and tumor response. There was no significant difference in the tumor response between patients homozygous for 3R/3R and patients heterozygous for 2R/3R. However, 13 of 14 patients in the low-expression group with a G>C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (2R/3RC [n = 5] or 3RC/3RC [n = 9]) exhibited a significantly greater tumor downstaging rate, as compared with only 12 of 30 patients in the high-expression group without the SNP (2R/3RG [n = 10], 3RC/3RG [n = 9], or 3RG/3RG [n = 11]) (p = 0.001). The nodal downstaging rate was also significantly greater in this low-expression group, as compared with the high-expression group (12 of 14 vs. 14 of 30, p = 0.014). However, there was no significant difference in the tumor regression grade between these groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that SNPs within the TS enhancer region affect the tumor response to preoperative 5-FU-based CRT in rectal cancer.

  17. Microsoft Word - 12.18.13 NEPA UK FT DSEA draft DearReaderLtr.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    William.Gwilliam@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-4401  Fax (304) 285-4403  www.netl.doe.gov A l b a ny, O R * M o rg a n tow n , W V * Pi t t s b u rg h , PA December 18 , 2013 Dear Reader: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) invites comments on the enclosed draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (draft SEA) for the University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch

  18. Tornado Climatology of the Contiguous United States (NURG/CR...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 >76 Tc765 Tf0 Ts0.000 Tc(0) TjETBT3 Tr0.000 0.000 0.000 rg376.800 540.960 Td0.000 Tw100.756 TzF Tc765 Tf0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1...

  19. Lawrence Co. Scioto Co. Greenup Co. Jack

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    LYNAM CR EEK MCGRAW-CBM TEAYS VALLEY DOT Y BRANCH ISLAN D CREEK RITC HIE GREEN GROVE WILL IAM SBU RG BEECH Y C REEK YELLOW CR EEK GROUN DHOG CREEK ST FK-BLST N CK SLAB F OR K-CBM ...

  20. L E G A L N O T I C E

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... e s e t o t a l d o ses, being l i t t l e more th a n h a lf th e intended ones, induced le th a ls a t frequencies having la rg e r r e la tiv e e rro rs th an d e s ira b le . ...

  1. Microsoft Word - 45164 Final.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... U.S. Department of Energy Report DOENV11718-582. p. 3-4. U.S. Environmental Protection ... Swadley, R.J. Laczniak, R.G. Warren, K.S. Green and C.M. Engle, 1997. Digital geologic map ...

  2. Oxidative Dissolution Potential of Biogenic and Abiogenic TcO2 in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Kennedy, David W.; Liu, Chongxuan; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

    2009-04-15

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Exhibiting an intermediate redox potential, Tc is highly mobile in its anionic, oxidized state [Tc(VII)O4-]; and less mobile as a poorly soluble oxyhydroxide precipitate [Tc(IV)O2•nH2O] in its reduced state. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state (FRC, RG). Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Biogenic Tc(IV)O2•nH2O was oxidized in anoxic, but unreduced RG and FRC sediments through redox interaction with Mn(III/IV) oxides. Bioreduction by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 dissolved Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated biogenic Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. Biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO2-like phase in both sediments. Redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular speciation to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro x-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-contained particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 µm-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were attributed to mass-transfer-limited migration of O2 into

  3. Test results and commercialization plans for long life Stirling generators

    SciTech Connect

    Erbeznik, R.M.; White, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Many optimistic predictions regarding commercialization of Stirling engines have been announced over the years, but to date no real successes have emerged. STC is excited to announce the availability of beta prototypes for its RemoteGen{trademark} family of free-piston Stirling generators. STC is working with suppliers, manufacturers, and beta customers to commercialize the RemoteGen family of generators. STC is proving that these machines overcome previously inhibiting barriers by providing long life, high reliability, cost effective mass production, and market relevance. Stirling power generators are generally acknowledged to offer much higher conversion efficiencies than direct energy conversion systems. Life and reliability, on the other hand, are generally considered superior for direct conversion systems, as established by the exceptional endurance records (though with degradation) for thermoelectric (TE) and photovoltaic (PV) systems. STC`s unique approaches combine dynamic system efficiency with static system reliability. The RemoteGen family presently includes a 10-watt RG-10, a 350-watt RG-350, and with 1-kW and 3-kW sizes planned for the future. They all use the same basic configuration with flexure bearings, clearance seals, and moving iron linear alternators. The third generation RG-10 has entered limited production with a radioisotope-fueled version, and a niche market for a propane-fueled version has been identified. Market analysis has led STC to focus on early commercial production of the RG-350. The linear alternator power module portion of the RG-350 is also used in its sister BeCool{trademark} family of coolers as the linear motor. By using a common power module, both programs will benefit by each other`s commercialization efforts. The technology behind the RemoteGen generators, test results, and plans for commercialization are described in this paper.

  4. On the increase of the non-uniform scaling of the magnetic field variations before the M{sub w}9.0 earthquake in Japan in 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Skordas, E. S.

    2014-06-01

    By applying Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) to the time series of the geomagnetic data recorded at three measuring stations in Japan, Rong et al. in 2012 recently reported that anomalous magnetic field variations were identified well before the occurrence of the disastrous Tohoku M{sub w}9.0 earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011 in Japan exhibiting increased non-uniform scaling behavior. Here, we provide an explanation for the appearance of this increase of non-uniform scaling on the following grounds: These magnetic field variations are the ones that accompany the electric field variations termed Seismic Electric Signals (SES) activity which have been repeatedly reported that precede major earthquakes. DFA as well as multifractal DFA reveal that the latter electric field variations exhibit scaling behavior as shown by analyzing SES activities observed before major earthquakes in Greece. Hence, when these variations are superimposed on a background of pseudosinusoidal trend, their long range correlation propertiesquantified by DFAare affected resulting in an increase of the non-uniform scaling behavior. The same is expected to hold for the former magnetic field variations. This explanation is strengthened by recent findings showing that the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity exhibited an unprecedented minimum almost two months before the Tohoku earthquake occurrence which is characteristic for an almost simultaneous emission of Seismic Electric Signals activity.

  5. Oxidative dissolution potential of biogenic and abiogenic TcO{sub 2} in subsurface sediments.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J. K.; Zachara, J. M.; Plymale, A. E.; Heald, S. M.; McKinley, J. P.; Kennedy, D. W.; Liu, C.; Nachimuthu, P.

    2009-04-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is an important fission product contaminant associated with sites of nuclear fuels reprocessing and geologic nuclear waste disposal. Tc is highly mobile in its most oxidized state [Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup -}] and less mobile in the reduced form [Tc(IV)O{sub 2} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O]. Here we investigate the potential for oxidation of Tc(IV) that was heterogeneously reduced by reaction with biogenic Fe(II) in two sediments differing in mineralogy and aggregation state; unconsolidated Pliocene-age fluvial sediment from the upper Ringold (RG) Formation at the Hanford Site and a clay-rich saprolite from the Field Research Center (FRC) background site on the Oak Ridge Site. Both sediments contained Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV) as redox active phases, but FRC also contained mass-dominant Fe-phyllosilicates of different types. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 reduced Mn(III/IV) oxides and generated Fe(II) that was reactive with Tc(VII) in heat-killed, bioreduced sediment. After bioreduction and heat-killing, biogenic Fe(II) in the FRC exceeded that in RG by a factor of two. More rapid reduction rates were observed in the RG that had lower biogenic Fe(II), and less particle aggregation. EXAFS measurements indicated that the primary reduction product was a TcO{sub 2}-like phase in both sediments. The biogenic redox product Tc(IV) oxidized rapidly and completely in RG when contacted with air. Oxidation, in contrast, was slow and incomplete in the FRC, in spite of similar molecular scale speciation of Tc compared to RG. X-ray microprobe, electron microprobe, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to the whole sediment and isolated Tc-containing particles. These analyses revealed that non-oxidizable Tc(IV) in the FRC existed as complexes with octahedral Fe(III) within intra-grain domains of 50-100 {micro}m-sized, Fe-containing micas presumptively identified as celadonite. The markedly slower oxidation rates in FRC as compared to RG were

  6. Regulatory guidance for lightning protection in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, R. A.; Wilgen, J. B.; Ewing, P. D.; Korsah, K.; Antonescu, C. E.

    2006-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects. (authors)

  7. Regulatory Guidance for Lightning Protection in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, Roger A; Wilgen, John B; Ewing, Paul D; Korsah, Kofi; Antonescu, Christina E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to address design and implementation practices for lightning protection systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Lightning protection is becoming increasingly important with the advent of digital and low-voltage analog systems in NPPs. These systems have the potential to be more vulnerable than older analog systems to the resulting power surges and electromagnetic interference (EMI) when lightning strikes facilities or power lines. This paper discusses the technical basis for guidance to licensees and applicants covered in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.204, Guidelines for Lightning Protection of Nuclear Power Plants, issued August 2005. RG 1.204 describes guidance for practices that are acceptable to the NRC staff for protecting nuclear power structures and systems from direct lightning strikes and the resulting secondary effects.

  8. Internal combustion engine fuel feed

    SciTech Connect

    Cochard, P.; Guicherd, C.

    1980-02-19

    In a method and apparatus for controlling the fuel feed to a stratified-charge internal combustion engine, from idle up to the position corresponding with the maximum flow of air, the overall richness (Rg) of the combustible mixture is reduced by acting simultaneously upon the flow of fuel feeding the main chamber and upon the flow of fuel injected into the auxiliary chamber. For higher loads the maximum flow of air is kept constant and rg is increased by continuing to act upon both fuel flows. By keeping the richness of the mixture in the auxiliary chamber substantially constant, it is possible to obtain the best compromise between the performance of the engine and the emission of pollutant gases.

  9. Characterizing the mechanism of thiazolidinedione-induced hepatotoxicity: An in vitro model in mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dan; Wu, Chun-qi; Li, Ze-jun; Liu, Yue; Fan, Xing; Wang, Quan-jun; Ding, Ri-gao

    2015-04-15

    Objective: To characterize the mechanism of action of thiazolidinedione (TZD)-induced liver mitochondrial toxicity caused by troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone in HepaRG cells. Methods: Human hepatoma cells (HepaRG) were treated with troglitazone, rosiglitazone, or pioglitazone (12.5, 25, and 50 μM) for 48 h. The Seahorse Biosciences XF24 Flux Analyzer was used to measure mitochondrial oxygen consumption. The effect of TZDs on reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were detected by flow cytometry. The mitochondrial ultrastructure of HepaRG cells was observed under a transmission electrical microscope (TEM). mtDNA content was evaluated by real-time PCR, and ATP content and mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex I, II, III, IV activity were measured via chemiluminescence. Results were considered statistically significant at p < 0.05. Results: Among the three drugs, troglitazone exhibited the highest potency, followed by rosiglitazone, and then pioglitazone. The TZDs caused varying degrees of mitochondrial respiratory function disorders including decreases in oxygen consumption, MRC activity, and ATP level, and an elevation in ROS level. TZD treatment resulted in mtDNA content decline, reduction in MMP, and alterations of mitochondrial structure. Conclusion: All investigated TZDs show a certain degree of mitochondrial toxicity, with troglitazone exhibiting the highest potency. The underlying mechanism of TZD-induced hepatotoxicity may be associated with alterations in mitochondrial respiratory function disorders, oxidative stress, and changes in membrane permeability. These parameters may be used early in drug development to further optimize risk:benefit profiles. - Highlights: • We compared three TZD mitochondrial toxicity characteristics in HepaRG cells. • TZD induced respiratory disorders and mitochondrial structural damage. • Mitochondrial toxicity evaluation presents guidance value for hepatotoxicity.

  10. Evaluation of two polyurethane resins for injection shimming of the MFTF magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Steger, V.Y.; Ring, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    This work was conducted to support selection of a filler for the injection shimming of the MFTF Magnet (Reference 1). Two candidate polyurethanes (Pplycast RG256-57-3 and Polycast 1009-78 manufactured by CPR Upjohn Co.) were evaluated with respect to their physical and mechanical properties. Physical properties examined include thermal contraction, viscosity, and cure shrinkage. Mechanical properties include thermal shock resistance, compression modulus, and compression strength at LH/sub 2/ temperature.

  11. Phase Competition in Trisected Superconducting Dome (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Journal Article: Phase Competition in Trisected Superconducting Dome Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Phase Competition in Trisected Superconducting Dome Authors: Vishik, I.M. ; Hashimoto, M ; He, Rui-Hua ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Schmitt, Felix ; Lu, Donghui ; Moore, R.G. ; Zhang, C. ; Meevasana, W. ; Sasagawa, T. ; Uchida, S. ; Fujita, Kazuhiro ; Ishida, S. ; Ishikado, M. ; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki ; Eisaki, Hiroshi ; Hussain, Zaheed ; Devereaux, Thomas P. ; Shen, Zhi-Xun

  12. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) Refractive Index Design via Porous Etched Si as part of RG-3 research efforts (Chris Gladden, LBNL) The Scientific Vision of the "Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion Energy Frontier Research Center" (LMI-EFRC) is to tailor the morphology, complex dielectric structure, and electronic properties of matter so as to sculpt the flow of sunlight and heat, enabling light conversion to electrical and chemical energy with unprecedented efficiency. The

  13. 2012 Microgrid Workshop Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2 DOE Microgrid Workshop July 30-31, 2012 Chicago, Illinois 2012 DOE Microgrid Workshop Report Page i Acknowledgment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would like to acknowledge the support provided by the organizations represented on the workshop planning committee in developing the workshop process and sessions. The preparation of this workshop report was coordinated by Energy & Environmental Resources Group, LLC (E2RG). The report content is based on the workshop session discussions,

  14. 2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-OFFSHORE DEMOS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Offshore Demos March 24, 2014 Wind Energy Technologies PR-5000-62152 2 Contents GOWind Demonstration Project-Ian Hatton, Baryonyx Corporation Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm: Birthplace of Offshore Wind in the Americas-Stanley M. White, Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm, LLC Project Icebreaker-Lorry Wagner, Lake Erie Energy Development Corporation WindFloat Pacific OSW Demo Project-Alla Weinstein, Principle Power, Inc. Hywind Maine-Trine Ingebjørg Ulla, Statoil New England Aqua Ventus

  15. Rio Arriba Leadership Summit addresses challenges, opportunities

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    » Rio Arriba Leadership Summit addresses challenges, opportunities Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Rio Arriba Leadership Summit addresses challenges, opportunities Community leaders gather in Española for a round-table discussion. July 6, 2016 DOE's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization presented Mentor and Protégé of the Year awards to LANS and RG

  16. 2015 Carbon Storage Project Review Meeting | netl.doe.gov

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Meeting Summary Presentations Tuesday, August 18, 2015 OPENING PLENARY SESSION - KEYNOTE PRESENTATION Transforming Technology Through Integration and Collaboration Grace M. Bochenek, Ph.D., Director, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory DOE's Clean Coal RD&D Program Mark Ackiewicz, Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy Overview of the Norwegian RD&D CCS Program (CLIMIT) Hans Jörg Fell, Gassnova IEAGHG

  17. Kenneth Wilson and Renormalization

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Kenneth Wilson and Renormalization Resources with Additional Information Kenneth Wilson Courtesy A&M-Commerce 'Kenneth G. Wilson ... was part of the generation of scientists who revolutionized physics in the 1970s and confirmed the quantum theories of physicists from the early 20th century ... . Wilson won the 1982 Nobel Prize in physics for his development of the Renormalization Group (RG) into a central tool in physics. ... He received a doctorate from the California Institute of

  18. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) - Shanhui Fan RG3 Leader Shanhui Fan Shanhui Fan, Professor of Electrical Engineering Stanford University Shanhui Fan is a Professor of Electrical Engineering, and the Director of the Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, at the Stanford University. He received his Ph. D in 1997 in theoretical condensed matter physics from MIT. His research interests are in nanophotonics. He has published over 350 refereed journal articles and has given over 270 invited talks, and was granted 53 US

  19. TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite with reduced graphene oxide through facile blending and its photocatalytic behavior for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Fuyun; Liu, Yingliang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shengping; Xu, Shengang Cao, Shaokui

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: TRG-COOH nanocomposite as a photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution is prepared. The reduction of graphene oxide reconstructs a part of conjugated structure. The band gap is red-shifted due to the reconstruction of conjugated structure. RG-COOH covered and anchored by P25 blocks the aggregation and the stacking. The photocatalytic efficiency of TRG-COOH was increased under 500 W Xenon lamp. - Abstract: TRG-COOH nanocomposite is prepared as a photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution by blending TiO{sub 2} with reduced graphene oxide (RG-COOH). TRG-COOH is characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and photoluminescent spectra. XPS result shows the reduction of monolayer graphene oxide (GO). The band gap is red-shifted from 3.25 eV for P25, which consists of 20% rutile and 80% anatase, to 2.95 eV for TGO and then to 2.80 eV for TRG-COOH due to the introduction of GO and the reconstruction of conjugated structure. TEM image illustrates that RG-COOH in TRG-COOH is covered and anchored by P25, which blocks the aggregation of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and the stacking of monolayer graphene. This allows RG-COOH to take a good role of electron-sink and electron-transporting bridge. The photocatalytic efficiency of TRG-COOH is respectively increased under Xenon lamp about 8.9 and 2.7 times compared to P25 and TGO.

  20. Analysis of the irradiation data for A302B and A533B correlation monitor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    The results of Charpy V-notch impact tests for A302B and A533B-1 Correlation Monitor Materials (CMM) listed in the surveillance power reactor data base (PR-EDB) and material test reactor data base (TR-EDB) are analyzed. The shift of the transition temperature at 30 ft-lb (T{sub 30}) is considered as the primary measure of radiation embrittlement in this report. The hyperbolic tangent fitting model and uncertainty of the fitting parameters for Charpy impact tests are presented in this report. For the surveillance CMM data, the transition temperature shifts at 30 ft-lb ({Delta}T{sub 30}) generally follow the predictions provided by Revision 2 of Regulatory Guide 1.99 (R.G. 1.99). Difference in capsule temperatures is a likely explanation for large deviations from R.G. 1.99 predictions. Deviations from the R.G. 1.99 predictions are correlated to similar deviations for the accompanying materials in the same capsules, but large random fluctuations prevent precise quantitative determination. Significant scatter is noted in the surveillance data, some of which may be attributed to variations from one specimen set to another, or inherent in Charpy V-notch testing. The major contributions to the uncertainty of the R.G. 1.99 prediction model, and the overall data scatter are from mechanical test results, chemical analysis, irradiation environments, fluence evaluation, and inhomogeneous material properties. Thus in order to improve the prediction model, control of the above-mentioned error sources needs to be improved. In general the embrittlement behavior of both the A302B and A533B-1 plate materials is similar. There is evidence for a fluence-rate effect in the CMM data irradiated in test reactors; thus its implication on power reactor surveillance programs deserves special attention.

  1. Office of Electricity Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Smart Grid R&D Program DOE Microgrid Workshop Report August 30-31, 2011 San Diego, California ii Acknowledgment The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would like to acknowledge the support provided by the organizations represented on the workshop planning committee in developing the workshop process and sessions. The preparation of this workshop report was coordinated by Energy & Environmental Resources Group, LLC (E2RG). The report content is

  2. Community Connections: July 2016

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2016 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Small business and Lab honored for mentoring partnership RG Construction Services wins DOE award First endowed position created at Santa Fe Community College Early Childhood Center for Excellence director's position now funded $390K raised for youth scholarships Lab employees give to LAESF Lab engineer moonlights as

  3. LCLS - Activities of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Members of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) Bill Colson Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Chairman Jerry Hastings National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Pat O'Shea University of Maryland (UMD) Jörg Rossbach Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron (DESY) Ron Ruth Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Ross Schlueter Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory (LBNL) Meetings of the LCLS Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) 5) December 10-11, 2001: Fifth meeting of the LCLS Technical Advisory

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparisons of Measurements of Cloud Lower Boundaries by the MPL, BLC, MMCR, BBSS and AERI Han, D., and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The cloud lower boundary is an important factor in radiative transfer under various cloud conditions. Several ground-based instruments at the ARM CART Central Facility, including the micro pulse lidar (MPL), the Belfort laser ceilometer (BLC), and the MilliMeter Cloud profiling Radar

  5. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Use of the MMCR to Estimate Finite-Size Cloud Effects on Longwave Radiation Cheng, Z., and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting In a pioneering study, Han and Ellingson used the then-available Southern Great Plains (SGP) data to test models of broken cumulus clouds on the downwelling longwave flux at the surface. A major uncertainty of that study was the cloud thickness, because the thickness was inferred from radiosonde data.

  6. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence for Aerosol Effects on AERI Clear-Sky Radiance at the SGP Ma, Y., and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) 10-micron window residuals have been examined relative to the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) 0.87-micron optical depth for clear-sky periods during

  7. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Aircraft Observed with Calculated Downwelling Solar Fluxes During ARESE Shi, B., and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The focus of this study is to estimate the confidence intervals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) solar radiation measurements on board the Egrett and Twin-Otter aircraft. The observational uncertainty is estimated by comparing measurements of

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Seasonal Variability in Cloud Cover, Cloud Base Height, and Cloud Liquid Water Content at the North Slope of Alaska and the Adjacent Arctic Ocean Takara, E.E. and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting It is well known that complete radiative transfer calculations for broken cloud fields are extremely complex and time consuming. Furthermore, the solution for a particular broken cloud field is not particularly useful for

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of MM5 Forecast Shortwave Radiation with ARM SGP Data Armstrong, M.A. and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The performance of the Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5), in particular the shortwave downwelling (SW) flux calculations, is examined in this paper. Selected quantities output from the MM5 were compared with ARM SGP data gathered during the SCM

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Use of the ARM WSI to Estimate the Atmospheric Optical Depth at Night Musat, I.C. and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The shortwave extinction by atmospheric constituents can be studied during the night, with the light of stars as a radiation source, using the ARM Whole Sky Imager (WSI). The digital images obtained with the WSI are processed to infer the star radiance at the TOA and the broadband atmospheric

  11. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial Testing of Longwave Parameterizations for Broken Water Cloud Fields - Accounting for Transmission Takara, E.E. and Ellingson, R.G., Department of Meteorology, Florida State University Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Given the spatial scale of current general circulation models, parameterizations are necessary to account for three-dimensional effects. In the longwave, the effective cloud fraction is commonly used for broken water cloud fields. There

  12. Mobility of singly-charged lanthanide cations in rare gases: Theoretical assessment of the state specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Buchachenko, Alexei A.; Viehland, Larry A.

    2014-03-21

    High quality, ab initio calculations are reported for the potential energy curves governing the interactions of four singly-charged lanthanide ions (Yb{sup +}, Eu{sup +}, Lu{sup +}, and Gd{sup +}) with the rare gases (RG = HeXe). Scalar-relativistic coupled cluster calculations are used for the first three S-state ions, but for Gd{sup +}({sup 10}D) it is necessary to take the interaction anisotropy into account with the help of the multi-reference technique. The potential energy curves are used to determine the ion mobility and other transport properties describing the motion of the ions through the dilute RG, both as functions of the temperature, T, in the low-field limit, and at fixed T as functions of the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, E/N. The calculated mobilities are in good agreement with the very limited experimental data that have become available recently. The calculations show a pronounced dependence of the transport properties on the electronic configuration of the ion, as well as a significant effect of the spin-orbit coupling on the transport properties of the Gd{sup +} ion, and predict that state-specific mobilities could be detectable in Gd{sup +}RG experiments.

  13. Disruption of a red giant star by a supermassive black hole and the case of PS1-10jh

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanovi?, Tamara; Cheng, Roseanne M.; Amaro-Seoane, Pau E-mail: rcheng@gatech.edu

    2014-06-20

    The development of a new generation of theoretical models for tidal disruptions is timely, as increasingly diverse events are being captured in surveys of the transient sky. Recently, Gezari et al. reported a discovery of a new class of tidal disruption events: the disruption of a helium-rich stellar core, thought to be a remnant of a red giant (RG) star. Motivated by this discovery and in anticipation of others, we consider tidal interaction of an RG star with a supermassive black hole (SMBH) which leads to the stripping of the stellar envelope and subsequent inspiral of the compact core toward the black hole. Once the stellar envelope is removed the inspiral of the core is driven by tidal heating as well as the emission of gravitational radiation until the core either falls into the SMBH or is tidally disrupted. In the case of the tidal disruption candidate PS1-10jh, we find that there is a set of orbital solutions at high eccentricities in which the tidally stripped hydrogen envelope is accreted by the SMBH before the helium core is disrupted. This places the RG core in a portion of parameter space where strong tidal heating can lift the degeneracy of the compact remnant and disrupt it before it reaches the tidal radius. We consider how this sequence of events explains the puzzling absence of the hydrogen emission lines from the spectrum of PS1-10jh and gives rise to its other observational features.

  14. Spectral softening in the X-RAY afterglow of GRB 130925A as predicted by the dust scattering model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yi-Nan; Shao, Lang, E-mail: lshao@hebtu.edu.cn [Department of Space Science and Astronomy, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually occur in a dense star-forming region with a massive circumburst medium. The small-angle scattering of intense prompt X-ray emission off the surrounding dust grains will have observable consequences and sometimes can dominate the X-ray afterglow. In most of the previous studies, only the Rayleigh-Gans (RG) approximation is employed for describing the scattering process, which works accurately for the typical size of grains (with radius of a ? 0.1 ?m) in the diffuse interstellar medium. When the size of the grains may significantly increase, as in a more dense region where GRBs would occur, the RG approximation may not be valid enough for modeling detailed observational data. In order to study the temporal and spectral properties of the scattered X-ray emission more accurately with potentially larger dust grains, we provide a practical approach using the series expansions of anomalous diffraction (AD) approximation based on the complicated Mie theory. We apply our calculations to understand the puzzling X-ray afterglow of recently observed GRB 130925A that showed a significant spectral softening. We find that the X-ray scattering scenarios with either AD or RG approximation adopted could well reproduce both the temporal and spectral profile simultaneously. Given the plateau present in the early X-ray light curve, a typical distribution of smaller grains as in the interstellar medium would be suggested for GRB 130925A.

  15. A CAD system for nodule detection in low-dose lung CTs based on region growing and a new active contour model

    SciTech Connect

    Bellotti, R.; De Carlo, F.; Gargano, G.; Tangaro, S.; Cascio, D.; Catanzariti, E.; Cerello, P.; Cheran, S. C.; Delogu, P.; De Mitri, I.; Fulcheri, C.; Grosso, D.; Retico, A.; Squarcia, S.; Tommasi, E.; Golosio, Bruno

    2007-12-15

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the selection of lung nodules in computer tomography (CT) images is presented. The system is based on region growing (RG) algorithms and a new active contour model (ACM), implementing a local convex hull, able to draw the correct contour of the lung parenchyma and to include the pleural nodules. The CAD consists of three steps: (1) the lung parenchymal volume is segmented by means of a RG algorithm; the pleural nodules are included through the new ACM technique; (2) a RG algorithm is iteratively applied to the previously segmented volume in order to detect the candidate nodules; (3) a double-threshold cut and a neural network are applied to reduce the false positives (FPs). After having set the parameters on a clinical CT, the system works on whole scans, without the need for any manual selection. The CT database was recorded at the Pisa center of the ITALUNG-CT trial, the first Italian randomized controlled trial for the screening of the lung cancer. The detection rate of the system is 88.5% with 6.6 FPs/CT on 15 CT scans (about 4700 sectional images) with 26 nodules: 15 internal and 11 pleural. A reduction to 2.47 FPs/CT is achieved at 80% efficiency.

  16. Comparison Evaluation of the PFP FSAR and NRC Regulatory Guide 3.39 with DOE-STD-3009-94

    SciTech Connect

    OSCARSON, E.E.

    2000-07-28

    One of the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) current Authorization Basis (AB) documents is the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR (HNF-SD-CP-SAR-02 1) was prepared to the format and content guidance specified in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 3.39, Standard Format and Content of License Applications for Plutonium Processing and Fuel Fabrication Plants (RG 3.39). In April 1992, the US Department of Energy (DOE) issued DOE Order 5480.23 which established the FSAR requirements for DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. In 1994, DOE issued DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, which is a format and content guide addressing the preparation of FSARs in accordance with DOE Order 5480.23. During the initial preparation and issuance of the PFP FSAR the format and content guidance contained in NRC Regulatory Guide 3.39 was utilized, since it was the most applicable guidance at the time for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for plutonium processing plants. With the adoption of DOE Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94, DOE required the preparation of SARs to meet the format and content of those DOE documents. The PFP was granted an exemption to continue with RG 3.39 format for future FSAR revisions. PFP modifications and additions have required PFP FSAR modifications that have typically been prepared to the same NRC Regulatory Guide 3.39 format and content, to provide consistency with the PFP FSAR. This document provides a table comparison between the 3009 and RG 3.39 formats to validate the extent of PFP FSAR compliance with the intent of DOE Order 5480.23 and DOE-STD-3009-94. This evaluation was initially performed on Revisions 1 and 1A of the PFP FSAR. With the preparation of a Revision 2 draft to the FSAR, sections with significant changes were reevaluated for compliance and the tables were updated, as appropriate. The tables resulting from this

  17. Structureinhibition relationship of ginsenosides towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs)

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Cao, Yun-Feng; Hu, Cui-Min; Hong, Mo; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Ge, Guang-Bo; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yang, Ling; Sun, Hong-Zhi

    2013-03-01

    The wide utilization of ginseng provides the high risk of herbdrug interaction (HDI) with many clinical drugs. The inhibition of ginsenosides towards drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as an important reason for herbdrug interaction (HDI). Compared with the deep studies on the ginsenosides' inhibition towards cytochrome P450 (CYP), the inhibition of ginsenosides towards the important phase II enzymes UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) remains to be unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the inhibition behavior of ginsenosides towards important UGT isoforms located in the liver and intestine using in vitro methods. The recombinant UGT isoform-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction was employed as in vitro probe reaction. The results showed that structure-dependent inhibition existed for the inhibition of ginsenosides towards UGT isoforms. To clarify the possibility of in vivo herbdrug interaction induced by this kind of inhibition, the ginsenoside Rg{sub 3} was selected as an example, and the inhibition kinetic type and parameters (K{sub i}) were determined. Rg{sub 3} competitively inhibited UGT1A7, 2B7 and 2B15-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation reaction, and exerted noncompetitive inhibition towards UGT1A8-catalyzed 4-MU glucuronidation. The inhibition parameters (K{sub i} values) were calculated to be 22.6, 7.9, 1.9, and 2.0 ?M for UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15. Using human maximum plasma concentration of Rg{sub 3} (400 ng/ml (0.5 ?M)) after intramuscular injection of 60 mg Rg{sub 3}, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) was extrapolated to increase by 2.2%, 6.3%, 26.3%, and 25% for the co-administered drugs completely undergoing the metabolism catalyzed by UGT1A7, 1A8, 2B7 and 2B15, respectively. All these results indicated that the ginsenosides' inhibition towards UGT isoforms might be an important reason for ginsengdrug interaction. - Highlights: ? Structure-dependent inhibition of ginsenoside

  18. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S.

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  19. Task 4 - EMI/RFI Issues Potentially Impacting Electromagnetic Compatibility of I&C Systems (NRCHQ6014D0015)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Ewing, Paul D.

    2015-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) regulations in Part 50, “Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,” of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50) state that structures, systems, and components important to safety in a nuclear power plant are to be designed to accommodate the effects of environmental conditions (i.e., remain functional under all postulated service conditions) and that design control measures such as testing are to be used to check the adequacy of design. Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.180 was developed to provide guidance to licensees and applicants on methods acceptable to the NRC staff for complying with the NRC’s regulations on design, installation, and testing practices for addressing the effects of electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference (EMI/RFI) and power surges on safety-related instrumentation and control (I&C) systems. The first revision of RG 1.180 was issued in January 2000 and a second revision was issued in October 2003*. The second revision differed from the first revision in endorsing Military Standard (MIL-STD)-461E and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard (Std) 61000 series of EMI/RFI test methods, extending the guidance to cover signal line testing, incorporating frequency ranges where portable communications devices are experiencing increasing use, and relaxing the operating envelopes (test levels) when experience and confirmatory research warranted. It also offered exemptions from specific test criteria based on technical considerations such as plant conditions and the intended location of the safety-related I&C equipment. Since the last revision, new requirements have been identified, associated RGs have been created and updated, and additional industry guidance has been developed. Additionally, the operational environment has changed with the increase in wireless communication technology for both personal (smartphone) and industrial

  20. Basis for and practical methods of controlling painting activities at the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.R.

    1997-08-01

    Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) follows the guidance presented in Regulatory Guide (R.G.) 1.52, {open_quotes}Design, Testing, and Maintenance Criteria for Atmospheric Cleanup System Air Filtration and Adsorption System Units of Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants{close_quotes} in protecting its charcoal filter trains from the effects of painting and other chemical releases. SQN, as well as other nuclear facilities around the country, have the problem of how to address the issue of protection of Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) filter systems from degradation due to communication with airborne hydrocarbons (i.e., primarily paints and solvents). R.G. 1.52 (and a similar statement from R.G. 1.140) states in part,{open_quotes}Testing should be performed ... following painting, fire, or chemical release in any ventilation zone communicating with the system...,{close_quotes} and requires that a test be performed upon any kind of painting or chemical release. This is considered overly restrictive if the activity is minor and in a location remote from the charcoal filters. Charcoal filters used in air cleaning systems are required to filter out radioactive iodine from an airstream before its release from the plant to the environment. Charcoal filters will age with time because of their ability to adsorb many different types of material. This aging affects the charcoal by lowering its iodine retention efficiency, and therefore the charcoal needs to be protected from the effects of chemicals such as paint fumes. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Structural homologies of component C5 of human complement with components C3 and C4 by neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.J.; Smith, K.F.; Nealis, A.S.; Lachmann, P.J.; Harrison, R.A. )

    1990-02-06

    The complement component C5 is one of a family of structurally related plasma proteins that includes components C3 and C4. Activation of C5 is the initial step in the formation of the membrane attack complex of complement. Analysis of the solution structure of C5 and comparisons with similar analyses of the structures of C3 and C4 are reported here. Neutron solution scattering gave an Mr for C5 of 201,000, which demonstrates that C5 is monomeric in solution. The radius of gyration RG of C5 at infinite contrast is 4.87 nm and corresponds to an elongated structure. The longest length of C5 was determined to be at least 15-16 nm from three calculations on the basis of the RG, the scattering intensity at zero angle I(0), and the indirect transformation of the scattering curve into real space. Comparison of the RG and contrast variation data and indirect transformations of the scattering curves for C3, C4, and C5 show that these have very similar structures. Comparisons of the C5 scattering curve with Debye small-sphere models previously employed for C4 and C3 show that good curve fits could be obtained. Unlike previous studies that have suggested significant differences, these experiments indicate that, while C5 differs from C3 and C4 in its activation and inactivation pathways, significant structural homology exists between the native proteins, as might be predicted from their high (and similar) sequence homology.

  2. Keeping the home fires burning

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1993-07-01

    Some utilities and thermal researchers are devising thermoelectric and thermophotovoltaic technologies to convert furnace heat to electricity and keep home heating systems functioning during extended power failures. Storms that damage power lines often leave homes without heat, since the electricity supplied to furnace blowers is cut along with all other electricity. One case in points is the March 1991 ice storm that left nearly 200,000 Rochester Gas and Electric Corp. customers without electrical power, some for up to two weeks. This led the Rochester, N.Y., utility, RG and E, to search for an independent power source that could provide homes with heat during prolonged outages. RG and E funded development of a continuous gas furnace by the GE Research and Development Center in Schenectady, N.Y., that would keep its customers' homes heated and provide some electricity during power outages. Since natural gas lines are rarely interrupted during a power outage, the furnace is still a potential source of heat, but only if there is some way to supply electricity that is independent of the grid, said Bruce Snow, manager and chief engineer of the technical services division at RG and E. The electricity would power the furnace blower, which blows hot air through air ducts, or run the motor that pumps water through a piping system to keep the house warm. Such a thermoelectrical system involves heating the two junctions of thermocouples, which are made of dissimilar wires, at two different temperatures in order to create electricity. A newer technology, thermophoto-voltaics, also converts heat to electricity. In this process described here, the heat causes an emitter to radiate a wavelength of light, which is converted into electricity by a photovoltaic unit.

  3. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Holt, Adam P.; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M.; White, B. Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J. P.; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E.; et al

    2016-06-23

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as lowmore » as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density.« less

  4. Constitutional Isomers of Dendrimer-like Star Polymers: Design, Synthesis and Conformational and Structural Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A.

    2001-03-22

    The design, synthesis and solution properties of six constitutional isomers of dendrimer-like star polymers is described. Each of the polymers have comparable molecular weights ({approx} 80,000 g/mol), narrow polydispersities (< 1.19) and an identical number of branching junctures (45) and surface hydroxyl functionalities (48). The only difference in the six isomers is the placement of the branching junctures. The polymers are constructed from high molecular weight poly(e-caprolactone) with branching junctures derived from 2,2'-bis(hydroxylmethyl) propionic acid (bis-MPA) emanating from a central core. The use of various generations of dendritic initiators and dendrons coupled with the ring opening polymerization of e-caprolactones allowed a modular approach to the dendrimer-like star polymer isomers. The most pronounced effects on the physical properties/morphology and hydrodynamic volume was for those polymers in which the branching was distributed throughout the sample in a dendrimer-like fashion. The versatility of this approach has provided the possibility of understanding the relationship between architecture and physical properties. Dynamic light scattering and small angle X-ray scattering techniques were used to determine the hydrodynamic radius Rh and radius of gyration Rg respectively. The relationship between Rg and molecular weight was indicative of a compact star-like structure, and did not show advanced bias towards either the dense core or dense shell models. The radial density distribution of the isomers was therefore modeled according to a many arm star polymer, and good agreement was found with experimental measures of Rh/Rg.

  5. Windpower

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Chilocco Wind Park Cherokee Nation (other nations as well) Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC And PNE Wind Cherokee Chilocco Wind North Central Oklahoma Location KA W PA W N EE TO NK AW A PO NC A OT OE -M IS S OU RI CH E RO KE E Acr es: 2,633 .348 CH E RO KE E Acr es: 1,641 .687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOU RC ES: US Census Bureau (T iger Files ) D OQQ's , USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty D epartment C herokee N ation GeoD ata C enter Date: 12/19/01

  6. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

  7. Impact of new K Area geotechnical parameters on K Reactor restart response spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.A.; Chen, R.C.; Mulliken, J.S.

    1991-08-01

    This report provides a description of a study performed to evaluate the impact of recently obtained soils parameters on the 105-K Reactor using Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis. This study includes: the frequency check of the reactor building based on the fixed base analysis; the modification of the computer model to reflect actual building properties and building frequencies; The live load impact on seismic analysis; The comparison of soil spectrum at elev. {minus}50 ft with 60% of RG1.60 curve; comparison of spectral results to the previous FREDA and SASSI results; and implications to the stack building analysis.

  8. Impact of new K Area geotechnical parameters on K Reactor restart response spectra. Seismic Structural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, J.A.; Chen, R.C.; Mulliken, J.S.

    1991-08-01

    This report provides a description of a study performed to evaluate the impact of recently obtained soils parameters on the 105-K Reactor using Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis. This study includes: the frequency check of the reactor building based on the fixed base analysis; the modification of the computer model to reflect actual building properties and building frequencies; The live load impact on seismic analysis; The comparison of soil spectrum at elev. {minus}50 ft with 60% of RG1.60 curve; comparison of spectral results to the previous FREDA and SASSI results; and implications to the stack building analysis.

  9. Gainache. Lori M From: Conrad, Jill A

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Gainache. Lori M From: Conrad, Jill A Setit:Friday, February 15, 2013 LOS PM TO: Alex Nazara-i Lale)(nazarali@ctuir~org), Alyssa Buck (Abuc k1gcrpLjd.Org), HNRTC Smith, Anthory; 'Rambi Rodriquez (ba mbirod riquez@ctu i .rg.)Y; 'Barbara Harper (barbaraharer@ctuir.com)'; HNRTC - Landeen, Dan, Dana Mil ler (drn1er@yrenr.com). Darla lackson (darlaijnezperce-org); Dave Rowland (b)(6) davidb@nezperce.org; Doreen Dogsleep {ddoogs een@ynerwm ~corn); HNRTC - Bohnee, Gabriel; 'George Klin~ger (gedrgek

  10. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kablick III, G. P., University of Maryland Ellingson, R. G., Florida State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kablick III GP, RG Ellingson, EE Takara, and J Gu. 2011. "Longwave 3D benchmarks for inhomogeneous clouds and comparisons with approximate methods." Journal of Climate, 24, doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3752.1. The

  11. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington,

  12. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R.

  13. Wilsonian renormalization group in the Randall-Sundrum 1 scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Adam

    2005-01-15

    We find renormalization group transformations for the compactified Randall-Sundrum scenario by integrating out an infinitesimal slice of ultraviolet degrees of freedom near the Planck brane. Under these transformations the coefficients of operators on the Planck brane experience RG evolution. The extra-dimensional radius also scales, flowing to zero in the IR. We find an attractive fixed point in the context of a bulk scalar field theory. Calculations are simplified in the low energy effective theory as we demonstrate with the computation of a loop diagram.

  14. The Wilsonian Renormalization Group in Randall-Sundrum 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, A

    2004-09-17

    We find renormalization group transformations for the compactified Randall-Sundrum scenario by integrating out an infinitesimal slice of ultraviolet degrees of freedom near the Planck brane. Under these transformations the coefficients of operators on the Planck brane experience RG evolution. The extra-dimensional radius also scales, flowing to zero in the IR. We find an attractive fixed point in the context of a bulk scalar field theory. Calculations are simplified in the low energy effective theory as we demonstrate with the computation of a loop diagram.

  15. 2014-2015 Section III: Nuclear Theory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron stars in the framework of Landau's theory H. Zheng, J. Sahagun, and A. Bonasera Asymptotic normalization coefficients and spectroscopic factors from deuteron stripping reactions D.Y. Pang and A.M. Mukhamedzhanov Big bang nucleosynthesis revisted via Trojan Horse method measurements R.G. Pizzone, R. Spartá, C.A. Bertulani, C. Spitaleri, M. La Cognata, J. Lalmansingh, L. Lamia, A. Mukhamedzhanov, and A. Tumino Constraining the 6.05 MeV 0+ and 6.13 MeV 3- cascade transitions in the

  16. 2015-2016 Section III: Nuclear Theory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Systematic analysis of hadron spectra in p+p collisions using Tsallis distribution H. Zheng, Lilin Zhu, and A. Bonasera Asymptotic normalization coefficients and radiative widths A.M. Mukhamedzhanov and D.Y. Pang Improvement of the high-accuracy 17O(p,α)14N reaction-rate measurement via the Trojan Horse method for application to 17O nucleosynthesis M.L. Sergi, C. Spitaleri, M. La Cognata, L. Lamia, R.G. Pizzone, G.G. Rapisarda, X.D. Tang, B. Bucher, M. Couder, P. Davies, R. deBoer, X. Fang, L.

  17. Flight Path 90L - About TPC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    L - Publications . M. Heffner, D.M. Asner, R.G. Baker, J. Baker, et al."A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross Section Measurements", Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 759, 50 (2014). S. Mosby, F. Tovesson, A. Couture, D. Duke, V. Kleinrath, R. Meharchand, K. Meierbachtol, J. M. O'Donnell, B. Perdue, D. Richman, D. Shields, "A fission fragment detector for correlated fission output studies", Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 757, 75 (2014). F. Tovesson, A. B.

  18. 2015 News Releases | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Mentor and Protege of the Year Awards 2015 Mentor and Protege of the Year Awards July 7, 2016 - 11:35am Addthis U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) recently presented the DOE Mentor of the Year award to Los Alamos National Security, LLC, and the DOE Protégé of the Year award to RG Construction Services. Additional Reading Materials Read the full article on the Los Alamos National Laboratory website. Addthis Related Articles The U.S.

  19. 2015 Mentor and Protege of the Year Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    5 Mentor and Protege of the Year Awards 2015 Mentor and Protege of the Year Awards July 7, 2016 - 11:35am Addthis U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) recently presented the DOE Mentor of the Year award to Los Alamos National Security, LLC, and the DOE Protégé of the Year award to RG Construction Services. Additional Reading Materials Read the full article on the Los Alamos National Laboratory website. Addthis Related Articles The U.S.

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI Observations in the Arctic: Monthly-Average Radiance Spectra and Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Walden, V.P., Revercomb, H.E., Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Ciganovich, N., Dedecker, R.G., Dirkx, T., Garcia, R.K., Herbsleb, R., Howell, H.B., McRae, D., Short, J., and Tobin, D., Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/Space Science and Engineering Center/University of Wisconsin Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Atmospheric Emitted Radiance

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Probability of Clear Line-of-Sight Determined from the VTLC and WSI Ma, Y. and Ellingson, R.G., University of Maryland Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting An important term in the calculation of radiative transfer through a broken cloud layer is the probability of a clear line-of-sight (PCLOS) through a cloud layer as a function of view angle. The ARM Video Time-Lapsed Camera (VTLC) and the Whole Sky Imager (WSI) obtain data from which the PCLOS may be

  2. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparisons Between 3-D Model Computations and Spectral and Broadband Observations of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During ARESE II O'Hirok, W. (a), Gautier, C. (a), Ellingson, R.G. (b), Valero, F.P.J. (c), Pilewskie, P. (d), Michalsky, J.J. (e), Asano, S. (f), Stephens, G.L. (g), and Tooman, T.P. (h), University of California, Santa Barbara (a), University of Maryland, College Park (b), Scripps Oceanographic Institute (c), NASA Ames Research Center (d), State University of New York, Albany

  3. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Shortwave and Longwave Flux and Cooling Rate Profiles for the ARM Central Facility Clough, S.A. (a), Delamere, J.S. (a), Mlawer, E.J. (a), Cederwall, R.T. (b), Revercomb, H. (c), Tobin, D. (c), Turner, D.D. (c), Knuteson, R.O. (c), Michalsky, J.J. (d), Kiedron, P.W. (d), Ellingson, R.G. (e), Krueger, S.K. (f), Mace, G.G. (f), Shippert, T. (g), and Zhang, M.H.(h), Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (a), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (b), University of Wisconsin-Madison (c),

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Second ARM Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance Comparison Fall 2003 Michalsky, J.J.(a), Dolce, R.(b), Dutton, E.G.(c), Long, C.N.(d), Jeffries, W.Q.(e), McArthur, L.J.B.(f), Philipona, R.(g), Reda, I.(h), and Stoffel, T.L.(h), State University of New York at Albany (a), Kipp & Zonen, Inc. (b), Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, NOAA (c), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (d), Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc. (e), Meteorological Service of Canada (f), World Radiation Center

  5. CONTINUATION S EFIIERENCE NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTINUATION S EFIIERENCE NO OF DOCUMENT BEING CONTINUED AEO CONINUTIO SHETDE-AC27-08RV148OO/095 rG NAME OF OFFEROR OR CONTRACTOR WASH-INGTON RIVER PROTECTION SOLUTIONS LLC- ITEM NO SUPPLIES/SERVICES QUANTITY UNIT UNIT PRICE AMOUNT (A) (B) (C) (D) )/F New Total Amount for this Award: $7,094,451,000.00 Obligated Amount for this Modification: $30, 952, 500.00 New Total Obligated Amount for this Award: $1, 353,766,560.39 Incremental Funded Amount changed: from $1,293,125,180.69 to $1,323,766,560.39

  6. MAGNETIC SHIELDING OF EXOMOONS BEYOND THE CIRCUMPLANETARY HABITABLE EDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, René; Zuluaga, Jorge I. E-mail: jzuluaga@fisica.udea.edu.co

    2013-10-20

    With most planets and planetary candidates detected in the stellar habitable zone (HZ) being super-Earths and gas giants rather than Earth-like planets, we naturally wonder if their moons could be habitable. The first detection of such an exomoon has now become feasible, and due to observational biases it will be at least twice as massive as Mars. However, formation models predict that moons can hardly be as massive as Earth. Hence, a giant planet's magnetosphere could be the only possibility for such a moon to be shielded from cosmic and stellar high-energy radiation. Yet, the planetary radiation belt could also have detrimental effects on exomoon habitability. Here we synthesize models for the evolution of the magnetic environment of giant planets with thresholds from the runaway greenhouse (RG) effect to assess the habitability of exomoons. For modest eccentricities, we find that satellites around Neptune-sized planets in the center of the HZ around K dwarf stars will either be in an RG state and not be habitable, or they will be in wide orbits where they will not be affected by the planetary magnetosphere. Saturn-like planets have stronger fields, and Jupiter-like planets could coat close-in habitable moons soon after formation. Moons at distances between about 5 and 20 planetary radii from a giant planet can be habitable from an illumination and tidal heating point of view, but still the planetary magnetosphere would critically influence their habitability.

  7. Use and Application of the ARCON96 Dispersion Model at the Y-12 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.A.; Lee, D.W.; Miller, R.L.

    2001-06-04

    The Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in Building Wakes computer code (ARCON96) was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to calculate normalized concentrations in plumes from nuclear power plants at control room air intakes in the vicinity of hypothetical accidental releases. ARCON96 implements a straight-line Gaussian dispersion model with dispersion coefficients that are modified to account for low-wind-speed meander and building wake effects. These two modifications to the dispersion coefficients were benchmarked and justified in the ARCON96 code documentation. The code calculates {chi}/Q values (normalized concentrations) consistent with the methodology defined in NRC Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.145, position 3. Based on recent U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) acceptance of NRC RG 1.145, position 3 methodology for performing accident dispersion analyses, BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. evaluated the potential use and application for performing dispersion analyses at the Y-12 Complex. Using site specific meteorology inputs, a generic analysis (assuming ground-level releases) was performed to develop site-wide normalized concentrations for various distances to be used in consequence screening analyses. Additionally, the results were compared to other dispersion analysis models for confirmation of the results.

  8. CP violation in heavy MSSM Higgs scenarios

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Lee, J. S.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C. E. M.

    2016-02-18

    We introduce and explore new heavy Higgs scenarios in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit CP violation, which have important phenomenological implications that may be testable at the LHC. For soft supersymmetry-breaking scales MS above a few TeV and a charged Higgs boson mass MH+ above a few hundred GeV, new physics effects including those from explicit CP violation decouple from the light Higgs boson sector. However, such effects can significantly alter the phenomenology of the heavy Higgs bosons while still being consistent with constraints from low-energy observables, for instance electric dipole moments. To consider scenarios with amore » charged Higgs boson much heavier than the Standard Model (SM) particles but much lighter than the supersymmetric particles, we revisit previous calculations of the MSSM Higgs sector. We compute the Higgs boson masses in the presence of CP violating phases, implementing improved matching and renormalization-group (RG) effects, as well as two-loop RG effects from the effective two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) scale MH± to the scale MS. Here, we illustrate the possibility of non-decoupling CP-violating effects in the heavy Higgs sector using new benchmark scenarios named.« less

  9. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ☉} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ∼1.6M {sub ☉} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  10. Neutron Polarization Analysis for Biphasic Solvent Extraction Systems

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Motokawa, Ryuhei; Endo, Hitoshi; Nagao, Michihiro; Heller, William T.

    2016-06-16

    Here we performed neutron polarization analysis (NPA) of extracted organic phases containing complexes, comprised of Zr(NO3)4 and tri-n-butyl phosphate, which enabled decomposition of the intensity distribution of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) into the coherent and incoherent scattering components. The coherent scattering intensity, containing structural information, and the incoherent scattering compete over a wide range of magnitude of scattering vector, q, specifically when q is larger than q* ≈ 1/Rg, where Rg is the radius of gyration of scatterer. Therefore, it is important to determine the incoherent scattering intensity exactly to perform an accurate structural analysis from SANS data when Rgmore » is small, such as the aforementioned extracted coordination species. Although NPA is the best method for evaluating the incoherent scattering component for accurately determining the coherent scattering in SANS, this method is not used frequently in SANS data analysis because it is technically challenging. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that experimental determination of the incoherent scattering using NPA is suitable for sample systems containing a small scatterer with a weak coherent scattering intensity, such as extracted complexes in biphasic solvent extraction systems.« less

  11. A Physically Based Correlation of Irradiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shifts for RPV Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Eason, Ernest D.; Odette, George Robert; Nanstad, Randy K; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2007-11-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high-energy neutrons from the core, which causes changes in material toughness properties that increase with radiation exposure and are affected by many variables. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials is currently evaluated using Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG1.99/2), which presents methods for estimating the shift in Charpy transition temperature at 30 ft-lb (TTS) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). The purpose of the work reported here is to improve on the TTS correlation model in RG1.99/2 using the broader database now available and current understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The USE database and models have not been updated since the publication of NUREG/CR-6551 and, therefore, are not discussed in this report. The revised embrittlement shift model is calibrated and validated on a substantially larger, better-balanced database compared to prior models, including over five times the amount of data used to develop RG1.99/2. It also contains about 27% more data than the most recent update to the surveillance shift database, in 2000. The key areas expanded in the current database relative to the database available in 2000 are low-flux, low-copper, and long-time, high-fluence exposures, all areas that were previously relatively sparse. All old and new surveillance data were reviewed for completeness, duplicates, and discrepancies in cooperation with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Subcommittee E10.02 on Radiation Effects in Structural Materials. In the present modeling effort, a 10% random sample of data was reserved from the fitting process, and most aspects of the model were validated with that sample as well as other data not used in calibration. The model is a hybrid, incorporating both physically motivated features and empirical calibration to the U.S. power reactor surveillance

  12. Centroid Position as a Function of Total Counts in a Windowed CMOS Image of a Point Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, R E; Olivier, S; Riot, V; Hanold, B J; Figer, D F

    2010-05-27

    We obtained 960,200 22-by-22-pixel windowed images of a pinhole spot using the Teledyne H2RG CMOS detector with un-cooled SIDECAR readout. We performed an analysis to determine the precision we might expect in the position error signals to a telescope's guider system. We find that, under non-optimized operating conditions, the error in the computed centroid is strongly dependent on the total counts in the point image only below a certain threshold, approximately 50,000 photo-electrons. The LSST guider camera specification currently requires a 0.04 arcsecond error at 10 Hertz. Given the performance measured here, this specification can be delivered with a single star at 14th to 18th magnitude, depending on the passband.

  13. En route to Background Independence: Broken split-symmetry, and how to restore it with bi-metric average actions

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D. Reuter, M.

    2014-11-15

    The most momentous requirement a quantum theory of gravity must satisfy is Background Independence, necessitating in particular an ab initio derivation of the arena all non-gravitational physics takes place in, namely spacetime. Using the background field technique, this requirement translates into the condition of an unbroken split-symmetry connecting the (quantized) metric fluctuations to the (classical) background metric. If the regularization scheme used violates split-symmetry during the quantization process it is mandatory to restore it in the end at the level of observable physics. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of split-symmetry breaking and restoration within the Effective Average Action (EAA) approach to Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) with a special emphasis on the Asymptotic Safety conjecture. In particular we demonstrate for the first time in a non-trivial setting that the two key requirements of Background Independence and Asymptotic Safety can be satisfied simultaneously. Carefully disentangling fluctuation and background fields, we employ a ‘bi-metric’ ansatz for the EAA and project the flow generated by its functional renormalization group equation on a truncated theory space spanned by two separate Einstein–Hilbert actions for the dynamical and the background metric, respectively. A new powerful method is used to derive the corresponding renormalization group (RG) equations for the Newton- and cosmological constant, both in the dynamical and the background sector. We classify and analyze their solutions in detail, determine their fixed point structure, and identify an attractor mechanism which turns out instrumental in the split-symmetry restoration. We show that there exists a subset of RG trajectories which are both asymptotically safe and split-symmetry restoring: In the ultraviolet they emanate from a non-Gaussian fixed point, and in the infrared they loose all symmetry violating contributions inflicted on them by the

  14. Cu

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cu rre n t Ge n e ratio n Lo w En e rg y Cro s s Se c tio n Me as u re m e n ts : Sc iBar an d Min iBo o NE MiniBooNE Beam ➢ 8 GeV protons on Be target ➢ <E ν > = 0.7 GeV ➢ Change horn polarity for ν, ν modes Detector ➢ 12 m diameter, 800 ton mineral oil (CH 2 ) tank ➢ 1280 inner PMTs, 240 veto PMTs ➢ Events produce prompt Cherenkov light and delayed, isotropic scintillation light ➢ A " subevent" is cluster of tank activity in time ν µ µ - e - e + π + µ + K2

  15. EMI/RFI and Power Surge Withstand Guidance for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, PD

    2001-09-07

    This paper discusses the regulatory guidance implemented by U.S. NRC for minimizing malfunctions and upsets in safety-related instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants caused by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), and power surges. The engineering design, installation, and testing practices deemed acceptable to U.S. NRC are described in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.180, ''Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic and Radio-Frequency in Safety-Related Instrumentation and Control Systems'' (January 2000) and in a Safety Evaluation Report (SER) endorsing EPRI TR-102323, ''Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing in Power Plants,'' (April 1996). These engineering practices provide a well-established, systematic approach for ensuring electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and surge withstand capability (SWC).

  16. Geometric metastability, quivers and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Aganagic, Mina; Aganagic, Mina; Beem, Christopher; Freivogel, Ben

    2007-09-06

    We use large N duality to study brane/anti-brane configurations on a class of Calabi-Yau manifolds. With only branes present, the Calabi-Yau manifolds in question give rise to N=2 ADE quiver theories deformed by superpotential terms. We show that the large N duality conjecture of hep-th/0610249 reproduces correctly the known qualitative features of the brane/anti-brane physics. In the supersymmetric case, the gauge theories have Seiberg dualities which are represented as flops in the geometry. Moreover, the holographic dual geometry encodes the whole RG flow of the gauge theory. In the non-supersymmetric case, the large N duality predicts that the brane/anti-brane theories also enjoy such dualities, and allows one to pick out the good description at a given energy scale.

  17. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2001-09-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499, Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR). This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996). CAU 499 is located on the TTR and consists of the following single Corrective Action Site (CAS) (Figure 1): CAS RG-25-001-RD24 - Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been cased by numerous small historical over fillings, spills and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of 36 years. The tank was located on the north side of Building 24-50 on the TTR approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of the Avenue 24.

  18. Cherokee Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cherokee Wind Presenter: Carol Wyatt Cherokee Nation Businesses, Inc. DOE Tribal Energy Program October 26, 2010 KA W PA W N EE TO NK AW A PO NC A OT OE -M IS S OU RI CH E RO KE E Acr es: 2,633 .348 CH E RO KE E Acr es: 1,641 .687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOU RC ES: US Census Bureau (T iger Files ) D OQQ's , USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty D epartment C herokee N ation GeoD ata C enter Date: 12/19/01 e:\project\land\c hilocc o N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco

  19. Evaluating Light Source Color Rendition using the IES TM-30-15 Method

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, Kevin W.; Royer, Michael P.; David, Aurelien

    2015-11-30

    A system for evaluating the color rendition of light sources was recently published as IES TM-30-15 IES Method for Evaluating Light Source Color Rendition. The system includes a fidelity index (Rf) to quantify similarity to a reference illuminant, a relative-gamut index (Rg) to quantify saturation relative to a reference illuminant, and a color vector icon that visually presents information about color rendition. The calculation employs CAM02-UCS and uses a newly-developed set of reflectance functions, comprising 99 color evaluation samples (CES). The CES were down-selected from 105,000 real object samples and are uniformly distributed in color space (fairly representing different colors) and wavelength space (avoiding artificial increase of color rendition values by selective optimization).

  20. Source spectra of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions from the frequency-domain moment-tensor inversion

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this study, I used seismic waveforms recorded within 2 km from the epicenter of the first four Source Physics Experiments (SPE) explosions to invert for the moment-tensor spectra of these explosions. I employed a one-dimensional (1D) Earth model for Green's function calculations. The model was developed from P- and Rg-wave travel times and amplitudes. I selected data for the inversion based on the criterion that they had consistent travel times and amplitude behavior as those predicted by the 1D model. Due to limited azimuthal coverage of the sources and the mostly vertical-component-only nature of the dataset, only long-period, volumetricmore » components of the moment-tensor spectra were well constrained.« less

  1. Low Temperature Combustion with Thermo-Chemical Recuperation to Maximize In-Use Engine Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nigel N. Clark; Francisco Posada; Clinton Bedick; John Pratapas; Aleksandr Kozlov; Martin Linck; Dmitri Boulanov

    2009-03-30

    experimental results suggest that the LTC-TCR combination may offer a high efficiency solution to engine operation. A single zone model using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism was implemented in CHEMKIN and to study the effects of base fuel and steam-fuel reforming products on the ignition timing and heat release characteristics. The study was performed considering the reformed fuel species composition for total n-heptane conversion (ideal case) and also at the composition corresponding to a specific set of operational reforming temperatures (real case). The computational model confirmed that the reformed products have a strong influence on the low temperature heat release (LTHR) region, affecting the onset of the high temperature heat release (HTHR). The ignition timing was proportionally delayed with respect to the baseline fuel case when higher concentrations of reformed gas were used. For stoichiometric concentration of RG, it was found that by increasing the proportion of reformed fuel to total fuel (RG), from 0% to 30%, the amount of energy released during the LTHR regime, or HR{sub L}, was reduced by 48% and the ignition timing was delayed 10.4 CA degrees with respect to the baseline fuel case. For RG composition corresponding to certain operational reforming temperatures, it was found that the most significant effects on the HCCI combustion, regarding HR{sub L} reduction and CA50 delay, was obtained by RG produced at a reforming temperature range of 675 K-725 K.

  2. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Burjan, S. V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Coc, A.; Hammache, F.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction is of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RG), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars and classical novae. We report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the resonance strength of the narrow resonance at E{sub c.m.}{sup R} = 65 keV (E{sub X} =5.673 MeV). The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O+p radiative capture channel.

  3. Single transmission line data acquisition system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    A single transmission line interrogated multiple channel data acquisition system is provided in which a plurality of remote station/sensors monitor specific process variables and transmit measurement values over the single transmission line to a master station when addressed by the master station. Power for all remote stations (up to 980) is provided by driving the line with constant voltage supplied from the master station and automatically maintained independent of the number of remote stations directly connected to the line. The transmission line can be an RG-62 coaxial cable with lengths up to about 10,000 feet with branches up to 500 feet. The remote stations can be attached randomly along the line. The remote stations can be scanned at rates up to 980 channels/second.

  4. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bechel Nevada

    2004-05-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

  5. Synergy between Membranes and Microbial Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    S Sy yn ne er rg gy y b be et tw we ee en n M Me em mb br ra an ne es s a an nd d M Mi ic cr ro ob bi ia al l F Fu ue el l C Ce el ll ls s Zhen (Jason) He, Ph.D. Associate Professor � Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering � Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University � DOE Workshop on Hydrogen, Hydrocarbons, and Bioproduct Precursors from Wastewaters March 18-19, Washington DC * Hi h- lit effluent for direct dischar e or W Wh hy y l li in nk ki in ng g " "f fi

  6. ON THE RADIAL EXTENT OF THE DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY IC10

    SciTech Connect

    Sanna, N.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R.; Stetson, P. B.; Ferraro, I.; Caputo, F.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Bresolin, R.; Cignoni, M.; Matsunaga, N.; Pietrinferni, A.; Romaniello, M.; Storm, J.; Walker, A. R.

    2010-10-20

    We present new deep and accurate space (Advanced Camera for Surveys-Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope) and ground-based (Suprime-Cam at Subaru Telescope, Mega-Cam at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) photometric and astrometric data for the Local Group dwarf irregular IC10. We confirm the significant decrease of the young stellar population when moving from the center toward the outermost regions. We find that the tidal radius of IC10 is significantly larger than previous estimates of r{sub t} {approx_lt} 10'. By using the I, V-I color-magnitude diagram based on the Suprime-Cam data, we detect sizable samples of red giant (RG) stars up to radial distances of 18'-23' from the galactic center. The ratio between observed star counts (Mega-Cam data) across the tip of the RG branch and star counts predicted by Galactic models indicates a star count excess at least at a 3{sigma} level up to 34'-42' from the center. This finding supports the hypothesis that the huge H I cloud covering more than 1{sup 0} across the galaxy is associated with IC10. We also provide new estimates of the total luminosity (L{sub V} {approx} 9 x 10{sup 7} L {sub sun}, M{sub V} {approx} -15.1 mag) that agree with similar estimates available in the literature. If we restrict our study to the regions where rotational velocity measurements are available (r {approx} 13'), we find a mass-to-light ratio ({approx}10 M {sub sun}/L {sub sun}) that is at least one order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. The new estimate should be cautiously treated, since it is based on a minimal fraction of the body of the galaxy.

  7. The dynamical crossover in attractive colloidal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Mallamace, Domenico; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2013-12-07

    We study the dynamical arrest in an adhesive hard-sphere colloidal system. We examine a micellar suspension of the Pluronic-L64 surfactant in the temperature (T) and volume fraction (ϕ) phase diagram. According to mode-coupling theory (MCT), this system is characterized by a cusp-like singularity and two glassy phases: an attractive glass (AG) phase and a repulsive glass (RG) phase. The T − ϕ phase diagram of this system as confirmed by a previous series of scattering data also exhibits a Percolation Threshold (PT) line, a reentrant behavior (AG-liquid-RG), and a glass-to-glass transition. The AG phase can be generated out of the liquid phase by using T and ϕ as control parameters. We utilize viscosity and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. NMR data confirm all the characteristic properties of the colloidal system phase diagram and give evidence of the onset of a fractal-like percolating structure at a precise threshold. The MCT scaling laws used to study the shear viscosity as a function of ϕ and T show in both cases a fragile-to-strong liquid glass-forming dynamic crossover (FSC) located near the percolation threshold where the clustering process is fully developed. These results suggest a larger thermodynamic generality for this phenomenon, which is usually studied only as a function of the temperature. We also find that the critical values of the control parameters, coincident with the PT line, define the locus of the FSC. In the region between the FSC and the glass transition lines the system dynamics are dominated by clustering effects. We thus demonstrate that it is possible, using the conceptual framework provided by extended mode-coupling theory, to describe the way a system approaches dynamic arrest, taking into account both cage and hopping effects.

  8. EinsteinCartan gravity, Asymptotic Safety, and the running Immirzi parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, J.-E.; Reuter, M.

    2013-07-15

    In this paper we analyze the functional renormalization group flow of quantum gravity on the EinsteinCartan theory space. The latter consists of all action functionals depending on the spin connection and the vielbein field (co-frame) which are invariant under both spacetime diffeomorphisms and local frame rotations. In the first part of the paper we develop a general methodology and corresponding calculational tools which can be used to analyze the flow equation for the pertinent effective average action for any truncation of this theory space. In the second part we apply it to a specific three-dimensional truncated theory space which is parametrized by Newtons constant, the cosmological constant, and the Immirzi parameter. A comprehensive analysis of their scale dependences is performed, and the possibility of defining an asymptotically safe theory on this hitherto unexplored theory space is investigated. In principle Asymptotic Safety of metric gravity (at least at the level of the effective average action) is neither necessary nor sufficient for Asymptotic Safety on the EinsteinCartan theory space which might accommodate different universality classes of microscopic quantum gravity theories. Nevertheless, we do find evidence for the existence of at least one non-Gaussian renormalization group fixed point which seems suitable for the Asymptotic Safety construction in a setting where the spin connection and the vielbein are the fundamental field variables. -- Highlights: A functional RG equation for a first order formulation of gravity is constructed. The theory space constituted by tetrad and spin connection variables is explored. The RG equation is solved in a 3 dimensional truncation of theory space. The flow of Newtons constant, the cosmological constant and the Immirzi parameter is analyzed. Evidence for the nonperturbative renormalizability of the theory is found.

  9. Corrrective action decision document for the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (Corrective Action Unit No. 426). Revision No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 426) has been prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project. This CADD has been developed to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996, stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Cactus Spring Waste Trenches Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. RG-08-001-RG-CS is included in CAU No. 426 (also referred to as the {open_quotes}trenches{close_quotes}); it has been identified as one of three potential locations for buried, radioactively contaminated materials from the Double Tracks Test. The trenches are located on the east flank of the Cactus Range in the eastern portion of the Cactus Spring Ranch at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nye County, Nevada, on the northern portion of Nellis Air Force Range. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The trenches were dug for the purpose of receiving waste generated during Operation Roller Coaster, primarily the Double Tracks Test. This test, conducted in 1963, involved the use of live animals to assess the biological hazards associated with non-nuclear detonation of plutonium-bearing devices (i.e., inhalation uptake of plutonium aerosol). The CAS consists of four trenches that received solid waste and had an overall impacted area of approximately 36 meters (m) (120 feet [ft]) long x 24 m (80 ft) wide x 3 to 4.5 m (10 to 15 ft) deep. The average depressions at the trenches are approximately 0.3 m (1 ft) below land surface.

  10. Grant No DE-FG02-03ER83720 Report for US Department of Engery

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Winston; Wagner, Robert

    2004-04-22

    Effective and reliable nuclear monitoring requires discrimination between small magnitude explosions and earthquakes based on the use of limited regional data. Lg is generally the largest seismic phase from both explosion and earthquake sources recorded at regional distances. For small events, Lg may sometimes be the only well-recorded seismic phase so that discriminants based only on the use of Lg are especially desirable. Recent research has provided significantly better understanding of Lg by demonstrating that the explosion-generated Rg makes significant contribution to the low-frequency S or Lg from explosions. Near-source scattering of explosion-generated Rg appears to be a viable mechanism for generating low-frequency(< 2 Hz) Lg waves from explosions. Detailed knowledge of the complex scattering process is, however, still incomplete and is in fact the subject of several ongoing studies. Our analysis of regional data from nuclear explosions from both Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Kazakh Test Site (KTS) and nearby earthquakes in Phase I has suggested that there are several reliable source discrimination methods only based on the use of Lg at regional distances. These discriminants should be. especially useful for small magnitude seismic events for which Lg may be the only well-recorded seismic phase. Our results suggest four possible regional discriminants: (a) frequency-amplitude-time analysis of spectrograms, (b) Lg(low frequency)/Lg(high frequency), (c) Lg spectral slopes, and (d) skewness of Lg spectra. Remarkable similarity of discrimination results from both NTS and KTS nuclear explosions and nearby earthquakes, with entirely different geological settings, indicates that our results should be applicable to other regions of the world.

  11. Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Brian J; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-10-01

    In currently operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), there are two main types of nuclear fuel, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and mixed-oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX) fuel. The LEU fuel is made of pure uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2} or UOX) and has been the fuel of choice in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) for a number of years. Naturally occurring uranium contains a mixture of different uranium isotopes, primarily, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. {sup 235}U is a fissile isotope, and will readily undergo a fission reaction upon interaction with a thermal neutron. {sup 235}U has an isotopic concentration of 0.71% in naturally occurring uranium. For most reactors to maintain a fission chain reaction, the natural isotopic concentration of {sup 235}U must be increased (enriched) to a level greater than 0.71%. Modern nuclear reactor fuel assemblies contain a number of fuel pins potentially having different {sup 235}U enrichments varying from {approx}2.0% to {approx}5% enriched in {sup 235}U. Currently in the United States (US), all commercial nuclear power plants use UO{sub 2} fuel. In the rest of the world, UO{sub 2} fuel is still commonly used, but MOX fuel is also used in a number of reactors. MOX fuel contains a mixture of both UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Because the plutonium provides the fissile content of the fuel, the uranium used in MOX is either natural or depleted uranium. PuO{sub 2} is added to effectively replace the fissile content of {sup 235}U so that the level of fissile content is sufficiently high to maintain the chain reaction in an LWR. Both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium contains a number of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes, with the fraction of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes being dependent on the source of the plutonium. While only RG plutonium is currently used in MOX, there is the possibility that WG plutonium from dismantled weapons will be used to make MOX for use in US reactors. Reactor-grade plutonium

  12. Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Şahin, Sümer

    2014-09-30

    Renewability and sustainability aspects of nuclear energy have been presented on the basis of two different technologies: (1) Conventional nuclear technology; CANDU reactors. (2) Emerging nuclear technology; fusion/fission (hybrid) reactors. Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, {sup 233}U fuels and heavy water moderator have given a good combination with respect to neutron economy so that mixed fuel made of (ThO{sub 2}/RG‐PuO{sub 2}) or (ThC/RG-PuC) has lead to very high burn up grades. Five different mixed fuel have been selected for CANDU reactors composed of 4 % RG‐PuO{sub 2} + 96 % ThO{sub 2}; 6 % RG‐PuO{sub 2} + 94 % ThO{sub 2}; 10 % RG‐PuO{sub 2} + 90 % ThO{sub 2}; 20 % RG‐PuO{sub 2} + 80 % ThO{sub 2}; 30 % RG‐PuO{sub 2} + 70 % ThO{sub 2}, uniformly taken in each fuel rod in a fuel channel. Corresponding operation lifetimes have been found as ∼ 0.65, 1.1, 1.9, 3.5, and 4.8 years and with burn ups of ∼ 30 000, 60 000, 100 000, 200 000 and 290 000 MW.d/ton, respectively. Increase of RG‐PuO{sub 2} fraction in radial direction for the purpose of power flattening in the CANDU fuel bundle has driven the burn up grade to 580 000 MW.d/ton level. A laser fusion driver power of 500 MW{sub th} has been investigated to burn the minor actinides (MA) out of the nuclear waste of LWRs. MA have been homogenously dispersed as carbide fuel in form of TRISO particles with volume fractions of 0, 2, 3, 4 and 5 % in the Flibe coolant zone in the blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. Tritium breeding for a continuous operation of the fusion reactor is calculated as TBR = 1.134, 1.286, 1.387, 1.52 and 1.67, respectively. Fission reactions in the MA fuel under high energetic fusion neutrons have lead to the multiplication of the fusion energy by a factor of M = 3.3, 4.6, 6.15 and 8.1 with 2, 3, 4 and 5 % TRISO volume fraction at start up, respectively. Alternatively with thorium, the same fusion driver would produce ∼160 kg {sup 233}U per year in addition to fission

  13. Packaging Review Guide for Reviewing Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabatino, A; Biswas, D; DeMicco, M; Fisher, L E; Hafner, R; Haslam, J; Mok, G; Patel, C; Russell, E

    2007-04-12

    This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE Order 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his or her review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. This PRG is generally organized at the section level in a format similar to that recommended in Regulatory Guide 7.9 (RG 7.9). One notable exception is the addition of Section 9 (Quality Assurance), which is not included as a separate chapter in RG 7.9. Within each section, this PRG addresses the technical and regulatory bases for the review, the manner in which the review is accomplished, and findings that are generally applicable for a package that meets the approval standards. This Packaging Review Guide (PRG) provides guidance for DOE review and approval of packagings to transport fissile and Type B quantities of radioactive material. It fulfills, in part, the requirements of DOE O 460.1B for the Headquarters Certifying Official to establish standards and to provide guidance for the preparation of Safety Analysis Reports for Packagings (SARPs). This PRG is intended for use by the Headquarters Certifying Official and his review staff, DOE Secretarial offices, operations/field offices, and applicants for DOE packaging approval. The primary objectives of this PRG are to: (1) Summarize the regulatory requirements for package approval; (2) Describe the technical review procedures by which DOE determines that these requirements have been satisfied; (3) Establish and maintain the quality and uniformity of reviews; (4) Define the base from which to evaluate proposed changes in scope

  14. Linkages of DOE'S Energy Storage R & D to Batteries and Ultracapacitors for Hybrid, Plug-In Hybrid, and Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of DOE's Energy S torage R & D to B atteries and U l tracap acitors for H yb rid ,P l u g- In H yb rid ,and El ectric V eh icl es P re p are d fo r P re p are d fo P P r re p are d fo r re p are d fo r O ffice o f E n e rgy E fficie n cy an d R e n e w ab le E n e rgy O ffice o f E n e rgy E fficie n cy an d R e n e w ab le E n e rg O O y ffice o f E n e rgy E fficie n cy an d R e n e w ab le E n e rgy ffice o f E n e rgy E fficie n cy an d R e n e w ab le E n e rgy O ffice o O ffice o O

  15. Influence of the bound polymer layer on nanoparticle diffusion in polymer melts

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Griffin, Philip J.; Bocharova, Vera; Middleton, L. Robert; Composto, Russell J.; Clarke, Nigel; Schweizer, Kenneth S.; Winey, Karen I.

    2016-09-23

    We measure the center-of-mass diffusion of silica nanoparticles (NPs) in entangled poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) melts using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. While these NPs are well within the size regime where enhanced, nonhydrodynamic NP transport is theoretically predicted and has been observed experimentally (2RNP/dtube ≈ 3, where 2RNP is the NP diameter and dtube is the tube diameter), we find that the diffusion of these NPs in P2VP is in fact well-described by the hydrodynamic Stokes–Einstein relation. The effective NP diameter 2Reff is significantly larger than 2RNP and strongly dependent on P2VP molecular weight, consistent with the presence of a bound polymer layermore » on the NP surface with thickness heff ≈ 1.1Rg. Our results show that the bound polymer layer significantly augments the NP hydrodynamic size in polymer melts with attractive polymer–NP interactions and effectively transitions the mechanism of NP diffusion from the nonhydrodynamic to hydrodynamic regime, particularly at high molecular weights where NP transport is expected to be notably enhanced. Lastly, these results provide the first experimental demonstration that hydrodynamic NP transport in polymer melts requires particles of size ≳5dtube, consistent with recent theoretical predictions.« less

  16. Bulk amorphous Pd{endash}Ni{endash}Fe{endash}P alloys: Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T.D.; He, Y.; Schwarz, R.B. [Materials Science and Technology Division, MS K765, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Bulk amorphous alloys of Pd{sub x}Ni{sub y}Fe{sub 80{minus}x{minus}y}P{sub 20} (25{le}x{le}60, 20{le}y{le}55, x+y{ge}60) were prepared by a flux-melting and water-quenching method. Seven-mm diameter glassy rods of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40{minus}x}Fe{sub x}P{sub 20} (0{le}x{le}20) were studied in greater detail. For these alloys, the difference between the crystallization and glass transition temperatures ranges from 102 K for x=0 to 53 K for x=20. In this composition range, the reduced glass transition temperature, T{sub rg}, ranges from 0.66 to 0.57. The change in density upon crystallization ranges from 0.24{plus_minus}0.04{percent} for x=0 to 1.33{plus_minus}0.24{percent} for x=10. The partial molar volume of Fe in amorphous Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40{minus}x}Fe{sub x}P{sub 20} alloys is significantly larger than the molar volume of (metastable) fcc Fe. This, as well as a comparison with the molar volumes of crystalline compounds, suggests chemically selective Fe{endash}Pd bonding in these glasses. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  17. ROMP-based polymer composites and biorenewable rubbers

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Wonje

    2009-01-01

    This research is divided into two related topics. In the first topic, the synthesis and characterization of novel composite materials reinforced with MWCNTs by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) is reported for two ROMP based monomers: dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and 5-ethylidene-2-norbornene (ENB). Homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs in the polymer matrices is achieved by grafting norbornene moieties onto the nanotube surface. For the DCPD-based system, the investigation of mechanical properties of the composites shows a remarkable increase of tensile toughness with just 0.4 wt % of functionalized MWCNTs (f-MWCNTs). To our knowledge, this represents the highest toughness enhancement efficiency in thermosetting composites ever reported. DMA results show that there is a general increase of thermal stability (rg) with the addition of f-MWCNTs, which means that covalently bonded f-MWCNTs can reduce the local chain mobility of the matrix by interfacial interactions. The ENB system also shows significant enhancement of the toughness using just 0.8 wt % f-MWCNTs. These results indicate that the ROMP approach for polyENB is also very effective. The second topic is an investigation of the biorenewable rubbers synthesized by the tandem ROMP and cationic polymerization. The resin consists of a norbornenyl-modified linseed oil and a norbornene diester. Characterization of the bio-based rubbers includes dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, and thermogravimetric analysis. The experimental results show that there is a decrease in glass transition temperature and slight increase of elongation with increased diester loading.

  18. ON THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS IN NGC 2808

    SciTech Connect

    Iannicola, G.; Bono, G.; Caputo, F.; Castellani, M.; Corsi, C. E.; Di Cecco, A.; Ferraro, I.; Pulone, L.; Sanna, N.; Monelli, M.; Stetson, P. B.; Buonanno, R.; Calamida, A.; Zoccali, M.; Romaniello, M.; Dall'Ora, M.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Nonino, M.; Pietrinferni, A.

    2009-05-10

    We present accurate new ultraviolet and optical BVI photometry for the Galactic globular cluster NGC 2808 based on both ground-based and archival Hubble Space telescope imagery. From this we have selected a sample of {approx}2000 Horizontal Branch (HB) stars; given the extensive wavelength range considered and the combination of both high angular resolution and wide-field photometric coverage, our sample should be minimally biased. We divide the HB stars into three radial bins and find that the relative fractions of cool, hot, and extreme HB stars do not change radically when moving from the center to the outskirts of the cluster: the difference is typically smaller than {approx}2{sigma}. These results argue against the presence of strong radial differentiation among any stellar subpopulations having distinctly different helium abundances. The ratio between HB and red giant (RG) stars brighter than the ZAHB steadily increases when moving from the innermost to the outermost cluster regions. The difference is larger than {approx}4{sigma} and indicates a deficiency of bright RGs in the outskirts of the cluster.

  19. Development of the IES method for evaluating the color rendition of light sources

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    David, Aurelien; Fini, Paul T.; Houser, Kevin W.; Ohno, Yoshi; Royer, Michael P.; USA, Richland Washington; Smet, Kevin A. G.; Wei, Minchen; Whitehead, Lorne

    2015-06-08

    We have developed a two-measure system for evaluating light sources’ color rendition that builds upon conceptual progress of numerous researchers over the last two decades. The system quantifies the color fidelity and color gamut (change in object chroma) of a light source in comparison to a reference illuminant. The calculations are based on a newly developed set of reflectance data from real samples uniformly distributed in color space (thereby fairly representing all colors) and in wavelength space (thereby precluding artificial optimization of the color rendition scores by spectral engineering). The color fidelity score Rf is an improved version of themore » CIE color rendering index. The color gamut score Rg is an improved version of the Gamut Area Index. In combination, they provide two complementary assessments to guide the optimization of future light sources. This method summarizes the findings of the Color Metric Task Group of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES). It is adopted in the upcoming IES TM-30-2015, and is proposed for consideration with the International Commission on Illumination (CIE).« less

  20. Modeling Characteristics of an Operational Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA)

    SciTech Connect

    Anoba, Richard C.; Khalil, Yehia; Fluehr, J.J. III; Kellogg, Richard; Hackerott, Alan

    2002-07-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs) are increasingly being used as a tool for supporting the acceptability of design, procurement, construction, operation, and maintenance activities at nuclear power plants. Since the issuance of Generic Letter 88-20 and subsequent Individual Plant Examinations (IPEs)/Individual Plant Examinations for External Events (IPEEEs), the NRC has issued several Regulatory Guides such as RG 1.182 to describe the use of PSA in risk informed regulation activities. The PSA models developed for the IPEs were typically based on a 'snapshot' of the the risk profile at the nuclear power plant. The IPE models contain implicit assumptions and simplifications that limit the ability to realistically assess current issues. For example, IPE modeling assumptions related to plant configuration limit the ability to perform online equipment out-of-service assessments. The lack of model symmetry results in skewed risk results. IPE model simplifications related to initiating events have resulted in non-conservative estimates of risk impacts when equipment is removed from service. The IPE models also do not explicitly address all external events that are potentially risk significant as equipment is removed from service. (authors)

  1. Reactions of small molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, C.

    1993-12-01

    This DOE program remains focused on small molecular systems relevant to combustion. Though a number of experimental approaches and machines are available for this research, the authors` activities are centered around the high-n Rydberg time-of-flight (HRTOF) apparatus in this laboratory. One student and one postdoc carry out experiments with this machine and also engage in small intra-group collaborations involving shared equipment. This past year was more productive than the previous two, due to the uninterrupted operation of the HRTOF apparatus. Results were obtained with CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}SH, Rg-HX complexes, HCOOH, and their deuterated analogs where appropriate. One paper is in print, three have been accepted for publication, and one is under review. Many preliminary results that augur well for the future were obtained with other systems such as HNO{sub 3}, HBr-HI complexes, toluene, etc. Highlights from the past year are presented below that display some of the features of this program.

  2. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  3. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  4. Task 2 - Limits for High-Frequency Conducted Susceptibility Testing - CS114 (NRC-HQ-60-14-D-0015)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Ewing, Paul D.; Moses, Rebecca J.

    2015-09-01

    A principal focus of Task 2 under this project was for ORNL to evaluate the basis for susceptibility testing against high-frequency conducted interference and to establish recommendations to resolve concerns about the severity of test limits for the conducted susceptibility (CS) test, CS114, from MIL-STD-461. The primary concern about the test limit has been characterized by the EPRI EMI Working Group in the following terms: Demonstrating compliance with the CS114 test limits recommended in TR-102323 has proven to be problematic, even for components that have been tested to commercial standards and demonstrated proper operation in industrial applications [6]. Specifically, EPRI notes that the CS114 limits approved in regulatory documents are significantly higher than those invoked by the US military and similar commercial standards in the frequency range below 200 kHz. For this task, ORNL evaluated the original approach to establishing the test limit, EPRI technical findings from a review of the limit, and the regulatory basis through which the currently approved limits were accepted. Based on this analysis, strategies have been developed regarding changes to the CS114 limit that can resolve the technical concerns raised by the industry. Guided by the principles that reasonable assurance of safety must not be compromised but excessive conservatism should be reduced, recommendations on a suitable basis for a revised limit have been developed and can be incorporated into the planned Revision 2 of RG 1.180.

  5. Utilization of reactor pressure vessel surveillance data in support of aging management

    SciTech Connect

    Mager, T.R.

    1993-12-01

    The majority of pressurized water reactors (PWR) operating in the US have a design basis life of 30 to 40 years. These design basis life estimations were not based on technical studies of material degradation in general but rather on fatigue usage factors for the most part. Recognizing this fact, the subject of operating an existing nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) for longer periods than originally intended has become an important issue worldwide. Radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline region (the area surrounding the height of the reactor core) is the main concern in extending the operation of the NSSS. Radiation damage, if any, to the reactor pressure vessel material is monitored by a material radiation surveillance program. If the data from the reactor vessel materials surveillance program indicate that the reactor pressure vessel will not meet the rules of the Code of Federal Register (CFR) and various regulatory guides (RG), there are a number of options a utility may take to ensure reactor pressure vessel design life attainment or extension. This paper describes the results from 12 surveillance capsule programs, which encompass four reactor vessel materials and five reactor vessel manufacturers.

  6. Protein Folding Dynamics Detected By Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Small-Angle Scattering Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Satoshi [RIKEN Harima Institute, SPring-8 Center, Laboratory for Biometal Science, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University Suita Osaka 565-0871/CREST, JST (Japan)

    2007-03-30

    The polypeptide collapse is an essential dynamics in protein folding. To understand the mechanism of the collapse, in situ observation of folding by various probes is necessary. The changes in secondary and tertiary structures in the folding process of globular proteins, whose chain lengths are less than 300 polypeptides, were observed by circular dichrosim and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopies, respectively. On the other hand, those in protein compactness could be only detected by using time-resolved synchrotron x-ray small-angle scattering technique. The observed dynamics for several proteins with different topologies suggested a common folding mechanism termed 'collapse and search' dynamics, in which the polypeptide collapse precedes the formation of the native contact formation. In 'collapse and search' dynamics, the most outstanding feature lied in the compactness of the initial intermediates. The collapsed intermediates demonstrated the scaling relationship between radius of gyration (Rg) and chain length with a scaling exponent of 0.35 {+-} 0.11, which is close to the value (1/3) predicted by mechano-statistical theory for the collapsed globules of polymers in poor solvent. Thus, it was suggested that the initial collapse is caused by the coil-globule transition of polymers. Since the collapse is essential to the folding of larger proteins, further investigations on the collapse likely lead to an important insight into the protein folding phenomena.

  7. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2013-04-01

    Asymmetric, thermal and non-thermal dark matter and its detection. The first of these workshops (RG Flows) was held from September 17-21 with local organizers Henriette Elvang and Jim Liu, and external organizer Matt Headrick (Brandeis). There were a total of 40 participants, 27 of which were external. The conference website is http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2012/rgflows/, with slides available at http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/ 2012/rgflows/sciprog.html. The second workshop (Light DM), was held April 15th-17th. It was especially timely as it coincided with the announcment of events seen by the CDMS collaboration consistent with a possible hint of a Light Dark Matter signal. The conference website is available at: http://www.umich. edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/dm2013/ with slides available on-line at http://www.umich.edu/~mctp/SciPrgPgs/events/2013/dm2013/program. html.

  8. Geothermal Energy for New Mexico: Assessment of Potential and Exploratory Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Person, Lara Owens, James Witcher

    2010-02-17

    This report summarizes the drilling operations and subsequent interpretation of thermal and geochemical data from the New Mexico Tech NMT-2GT (OSE RG- 05276 POD) test well. This slim hole was drilled along an elongate heat-flow anomaly at the base of the Socorro Mountains to better assess the geothermal resource potential (Socorro Peak geothermal system) on the western side of the New Mexico Tech campus in Socorro, New Mexico. The reservoir depth, hydraulic properties, temperature and chemistry were unknown prior to drilling. The purpose of the NMT-2GT (OSE RG-05276 POD) well was to explore the feasibility of providing geothermal fluids for a proposed district space heating system on the New Mexico Tech campus. With DOE cost over runs funds we completed NMT-2GT to a depth of 1102 feet at the Woods Tunnel drill site. Temperatures were nearly constant (41 oC ) between a depth of 400–1102 feet. Above this isothermal zone, a strong temperature gradient was observed (210 oC /km) beneath the water table consistent with vertical convective heat transfer. The existence of a groundwater upflow zone was further supported by measured vertical hydraulic head measurements which varied between about 258 feet at the water table to 155 feet at a depth of 1102 feet yielding a vertical hydraulic a gradient of about 0.1. If the upflow zone is 1 km deep, then a vertical flow rate is about 0.6 m/yr could have produced the observed curvature in the thermal profile. This would suggest that the deep bedrock permeability is about 20 mD. This is much lower than the permeability measured in a specific capacity

  9. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.L.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shan, N.; Yap, N.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Seames, W.; Ames, M.R.; Sarofim, A.F.; Swenson, S.; Lighty, J.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.; Palmer, C.; Mroczkowski, S.; Helble, J.; Mamani-Paco, R.; Sterling, R.; Dunham, G.; Miller, S.

    2000-08-17

    The final program review meeting of Phase II was held on June 22 in Salt Lake City. The goals of the meeting were to present work in progress and to identify the remaining critical experiments or analyses, particularly those involving collaboration among various groups. The information presented at the meeting is summarized in this report. Remaining fixed bed, bench-scale experiments at EERC were discussed. There are more ash samples which can be run. Of particular interest are high carbon ash samples to be generated by the University of Arizona this summer and some ash-derived sorbents that EERC has evaluated on a different program. The use of separation techniques (electrostatic or magnetic) was also discussed as a way to understand the active components in the ash with respect to mercury. XAFS analysis of leached and unleached ash samples from the University of Arizona was given a high priority. In order to better understand the fixed bed test results, CCSEM and Moessbauer analyses of those ash samples need to be completed. Utah plans to analyze the ash from the single particle combustion experiments for those major elements not measured by INAA. USGS must still complete mercury analyses on the whole coals and leaching residues. Priorities for further work at the SHRIMP-RG facility include arsenic on ash surfaces and mercury in sulfide minerals. Moessbauer analyses of coal samples from the University of Utah were completed; samples from the top and bottom layers of containers of five different coals showed little oxidation of pyrite in the top relative to the bottom except for Wyodak.

  10. BAAD: a Biomass And Allometry Database for woody plants

    SciTech Connect

    Falster, Daniel; Duursma, Remko; Ishihara, Masae; Barneche, Diego; Fitzjohn, Richard; Varhammar, Angelica; Aiba, Masahiro; Ando, M.; Anten, Niels; Aspinwall, Michael J.; Baltzer, Jennifer; Baraloto, Christopher; Battaglia, Michael; Battles, John; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; van Breugel, Michiel; Camac, James; Claveau, Yves; Coll Mir, Llus; Dannoura, Dannoura; Delagrange, Sylvain; Domec, Jean-Cristophe; Fatemi, Farrah; Feng, Wang; Gargaglione, Veronica; Goto, Yoshiaki; Hagihara, Akio; Hall, Jefferson S.; Hamilton, Steve; Harja, Degi; Hiura, Tsutom; Holdaway, Robert; Hutley, L. B.; Ichie, Tomoaki; Jokela, Eric; Kantola, Anu; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Kenzo, Tanaka; King, David A.; Kloeppel, Brian; Kohyama, Takashi; Komiyama, Akira; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Lusk, Christopher; Maguire, Doug; le Maire, Guerric; Makela, Annikki; Markesteijn, Lars; Marshall, John; McCulloh, Kate; Miyata, Itsuo; Mokany, Karen; Mori, Shigeta; Myster, Randall; Nagano, Masahiro; Naidu, Shawna; Nouvellon, Yann; O'Grady, Anthony; O'Hara, Kevin; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Osada, Noriyuki; Osunkoya, Olusegun O.; Luis Peri, Pablo; Petritan, Mary; Poorter, Lourens; Portsmuth, Angelika; Potvin, Catherine; Ransijn, Johannes; Reid, Douglas; Ribeiro, Sabina C.; Roberts, Scott; Rodriguez, Rolando; Saldana-Acosta, Angela; Santa-Regina, Ignacio; Sasa, Kaichiro; Gailia Selaya, Nadezhda; Sillett, Stephen; Sterck, Frank; Takagi, Kentaro; Tange, Takeshi; Tanouchi, Hiroyuki; Tissue, David; Umehara, Tohru; Utsugi, Hajime; Vadeboncoeur, Matthew; Valladares, Fernando; Vanninen, Petteri; Wang, Jian; Wenk, Elizabeth; Williams, Dick; Ximenes, Fabiano de Aquino; Yamaba, Atsushi; Yamada, Toshihiro; Yamakura, Takuo; Yanai, Ruth; York, Robert

    2015-05-07

    Quantifying the amount of mass or energy invested in plant tissues is of fundamental interest across a range of disciplines, including ecology, forestry, ecosystem science, and climate change science (Niklas, 1994; Chave et al. 2005; Falster et al. 2011). The allocation of net primary production into different plant components is an important process affecting the lifetime of carbon in ecosystems, and resource use and productivity by plants (Cannell & Dewar, 1994; Litton et al. 2007; Poorter et al. 2012). While many studies in have destructively harvested woody plants in the name of science, most of these data have only been made available in the form of summary tables or figures included in publications. Until now, the raw data has resided piecemeal on the hard drives of individual scientists spread around the world. Several studies have gathered together the fitted (allometric) equations for separate datasets (Ter-Mikaelian & Korzukhin, 1997; Jenkins et al. 2003; Zianis et al. 2005; Henry et al. 2013), but none have previously attempted to organize and share the raw individual plant data underpinning these equations on a large scale. Gathered together, such data would represent an important resource for the community, meeting a widely recognised need for rich, open data resources to solve ecological problems (Costello et al. 2013; Fady et al. 2014; Harfoot & Roberts, 2014; Costello et al. 2013). We (D.S. Falster and R.A. Duursma, with the help of D.R. Barneche, R.G. FitzJohn and A. Vårhammar) set out to create such a resource, by asking authors directly whether they would be willing to make their raw data files freely available. The response was overwhelming: nearly everyone we contacted was interested to contribute their raw data. Moreover, we were invited to incorporate another compilation led by M. Ishihara and focussing on Japanese literature. As a result, we present BAAD: a Biomass And Allometry Database for woody plants, comprising data collected in 174

  11. Natural SUSY and the Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Peisi

    2014-01-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) solves the hierarchy problem by introducing a super partner to each Standard Model(SM) particle. SUSY must be broken in nature, which means the fine-tuning is reintroduced to some level. Natural SUSY models enjoy low fine-tuning by featuring a small super potential parameter ? ~ 125 GeV, while the third generation squarks have mass less than 1.5 TeV. First and second generation sfermions can be at the multi-TeV level which yields a decoupling solution to the SUSY flavor and CP problem. However, models of Natural SUSY have difficulties in predicting a m{sub h} at 125 GeV, because the third generation is too light to give large radiative correction to the Higgs mass. The models of Radiative Natural SUSY (RNS) address this problem by allowing for high scale soft SUSY breaking Higgs mass m{sub Hu} > m{sub 0}, which leads to automatic cancellation by the Renormalization Group (RG) running effect. Coupled with the large mixing in the stop sector, RNS allows low fine-tuning at 3-10 % level and a 125 GeV SM-like Higgs. RNS can be reached at the LHC, and a linear collider. If the strong CP problem is solved by the Peccei-Quinn mechanism, then RNS accommodates mixed axion-Higgsino cold dark matter, where the Higgsino-like WIMPs, which in this case make up only a fraction of the relic abundance, can be detectable at future WIMP detectors.

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, June 2001)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-06-12

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located near Area 3 on the TTR approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, CAU 409 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site; CAS TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1); CAS TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2). This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's (NNSA/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 409. The CADD/CR have been combined into one report based on sample data collected during the field investigation performed in November 2000. Analysis of the data generated from these investigation activities indicates preliminary action levels were not exceeded for total volatile organic compounds, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, TCLP semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (except arsenic), TCLP RCRA metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, isotopic uranium, and gamma-emitting radionuclides (except thorium-234) for any of the soil samples collected. Concentrations of arsenic were detected above the preliminary action level in all samples; however, the concentrations are considered representative of ambient conditions at the site. Thorium-234 was tentatively identified in one sample; however, the concentration is considered no greater than background. The NNSA/NV's final determination is that CAU 409 shows no evidence of soil

  13. Knowledge is power: How information alone can cause commercial customers to install energy-efficient measures

    SciTech Connect

    Garafalo, A.; Mulholland, C.

    1994-12-31

    As part of their overall efforts to encourage Commercial and Industrial customers to become more energy efficient, many utilities offer Energy Audit Programs. This type of program has two main purposes. First, it offers the utility`s commercial and industrial (C/I) customers the opportunity to identify ways in which they can increase the overall energy efficiency of their facilities through the installation of more energy-efficient lighting, space conditioning, thermal efficiency, and other measures. Secondly, audit programs offer a utility public relations value because such programs usually have a positive reception among customers. The first purpose, however, that of educating customers about the energy efficiency of their facilities, is the key to potential energy savings. Many audit programs are designed to feed directly into a utility`s rebate program, and thus offer good marketing opportunities for demand side management. Many utilities and regulatory bodies consider C/I audit programs to be non-resource or information-only programs. There are quantifiable benefits to these programs beyond the marketing leads they provide for the rebate programs. Since 1987, Applied Energy Group, Inc. (AEG) has been involved in the measurement of savings attributable to energy audit programs. Through years of development and refinement, AEG has developed a process which is able to identify savings attributable solely to a utility`s energy audit program, effectively netting out the results achieved through the efforts of a rebate program. This process also factors out free ridership and ensures that there is no double counting of savings between audit and rebate programs. The findings presented here focus on the work that AEG has done for two of its utility clients: Rochester Gas & Electric (RG&E) and Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) during the course of evaluating their 1990 and 1991 C/I programs.

  14. Peer Review of NRC Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Koonce; James Knudsen; Robert Buell

    2011-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Models underwent a Peer Review using ASME PRA standard (Addendum C) as endorsed by NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.200. The review was performed by a mix of industry probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) experts and NRC PRA experts. Representative SPAR models, one PWR and one BWR, were reviewed against Capability Category I of the ASME PRA standard. Capability Category I was selected as the basis for review due to the specific uses/applications of the SPAR models. The BWR SPAR model was reviewed against 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements; however, based on the Capability Category I level of review and the absence of internal flooding and containment performance (LERF) logic only 216 requirements were determined to be applicable. Based on the review, the BWR SPAR model met 139 of the 216 supporting requirements. The review also generated 200 findings or suggestions. Of these 200 findings and suggestions 142 were findings and 58 were suggestions. The PWR SPAR model was also evaluated against the same 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements. Of these requirements only 215 were deemed appropriate for the review (for the same reason as noted for the BWR). The PWR review determined that 125 of the 215 supporting requirements met Capability Category I or greater. The review identified 101 findings or suggestions (76 findings and 25 suggestions). These findings or suggestions were developed to identify areas where SPAR models could be enhanced. A process to prioritize and incorporate the findings/suggestions supporting requirements into the SPAR models is being developed. The prioritization process focuses on those findings that will enhance the accuracy, completeness and usability of the SPAR models.

  15. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  16. Lower head creep rupture failure analysis associated with alternative accident sequences of the Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sang Lung, Chan

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this lower head creep rupture analysis is to assess the current version of MELCOR 1.8.5-RG against SCDAP/RELAP5 MOD 3.3kz. The purpose of this assessment is to investigate the current MELCOR in-vessel core damage progression phenomena including the model for the formation of a molten pool. The model for stratified molten pool natural heat transfer will be included in the next MELCOR release. Presently, MELCOR excludes the gap heat-transfer model for the cooling associated with the narrow gap between the debris and the lower head vessel wall. All these phenomenological models are already treated in SCDAP/RELAP5 using the COUPLE code to model the heat transfer of the relocated debris with the lower head based on a two-dimensional finite-element-method. The assessment should determine if current MELCOR capabilities adequately cover core degradation phenomena appropriate for the consolidated MELCOR code. Inclusion of these features should bring MELCOR much closer to a state of parity with SCDAP/RELAP5 and is a currently underway element in the MELCOR code consolidation effort. This assessment deals with the following analysis of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) alternative accident sequences. The TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-1 includes the continuation of the base case of the TMI-2 accident with the Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) tripped, and the High Pressure Injection System (HPIS) throttled after approximately 6000 s accident time, while in the TMI-2 alternative accident sequence-2, the reactor coolant pumps is tripped after 6000 s and the HPIS is activated after 12,012 s. The lower head temperature distributions calculated with SCDAP/RELAP5 are visualized and animated with open source visualization freeware 'OpenDX'. (author)

  17. Sizes, graphitic structures and fractal geometry of light-duty diesel engine particulates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. O.; Zhu, J.; Ciatti, S.; Choi, M. Y.; Energy Systems; Drexel Univ.

    2003-01-01

    The particulate matter of a light-duty diesel engine was characterized in its morphology, sizes, internal microstructures, and fractal geometry. A thermophoretic sampling system was employed to collect particulates directly from the exhaust manifold of a 1.7-liter turbocharged common-rail direct-injection diesel engine. The particulate samples collected at various engine-operating conditions were then analyzed by using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) and an image processing/data acquisition system. Results showed that mean primary particle diameters (dp), and radii of gyration (Rg), ranged from 19.4 nm to 32.5 nm and 77.4 nm to 134.1 nm, respectively, through the entire engine-operating conditions of 675 rpm (idling) to 4000 rpm and 0% to 100% loads. It was also revealed that the other important parameters sensitive to the particulate formation, such as exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) rate, equivalence ratio, and temperature, affected particle sizes significantly. Bigger primary particles were measured at higher EGR rates, higher equivalence ratios (fuel-rich), and lower exhaust temperatures. Fractal dimensions (D{sup f}) were measured at a range of 1.5 - 1.7, which are smaller than those measured for heavy-duty direct-injection diesel engine particulates in our previous study. This finding implies that the light-duty diesel engine used in this study produces more stretched chain-like shape particles, while the heavy-duty diesel engine emits more spherical particles. The microstructures of diesel particulates were observed at high TEM magnifications and further analyzed by a Raman spectroscope. Raman spectra revealed an atomic structure of the particulates produced at high engine loads, which is similar to that of typical graphite.

  18. A novel parameter to describe the glass-forming ability of alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, E. S.; Ryu, C. W.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, D. H.

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, we propose a new parameter for glass-forming ability (GFA) based on the combination of thermodynamic (stability of stable and metastable liquids by ΔT{sub m} = T{sub m}{sup mix} − T{sub l} and ΔT{sub x} = T{sub x} − T{sub g}, respectively) and kinetic (resistance to crystallization by T{sub x}) aspects for glass formation. The parameter is defined as ε = (ΔT{sub m} + ΔT{sub x} + T{sub x})/T{sub m}{sup mix} without directly adding T{sub g} while considering the whole temperature range for glass formation up to T{sub m}{sup mix}, which reflects the relative position of crystallization curve in continuous cooling transformation diagram. The relationship between the ε parameter and critical cooling rate (R{sub c}) or maximum section thickness for glass formation (Z{sub max}) clearly confirms that the ε parameter exhibits a better correlation with GFA than other commonly used GFA parameters, such as ΔT{sub x} (=T{sub x} − T{sub g}), K (=[T{sub x} − T{sub g}]/[T{sub l} − T{sub x}]), ΔT*(=(T{sub m}{sup mix} − T{sub l})/T{sub m}{sup mix}), T{sub rg} (=T{sub g}/T{sub l}), and γ (=[T{sub x}]/[T{sub l} + T{sub g}]). The relationship between the ε parameter and R{sub c} or Z{sub max} is also formulated and evaluated in the study. The results suggest that the ε parameter can effectively predict R{sub c} and Z{sub max} for various glass-forming alloys, which would permit more widespread uses of these paradigm-shifting materials in a variety of industries.

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, February 2001)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2001-02-23

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended Corrective Action Alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 490 is located on the Nellis Air Force Range and the Tonopah Test Range and is approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (located southwest of Area 3); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area (located west of Main Lake); 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard (located north of the northwest corner of Area 3); and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area (located south of the Area 9 Compound on the TTR). A Corrective Action Investigation was performed in July and August 2000, and analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine contaminants of concern (COCs). There were no COCs identified in soil at the Gun Propellant Burn Area or the Station 44 Burn Area; therefore, there is no need for corrective actions at these two sites. Five soil samples at the Fire Training Area and seven at the Sandia Service Yard exceeded PALs for total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel. Upon the identification of COCs specific to CAU 490, Corrective Action Objectives were developed based on a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the TTR, with the following three CAAs under consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure In Place - No Further Action With Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the

  1. Status of an advanced radioisotope space power system using free-piston Stirling technology

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.A,; Qiu, S.; Erbeznik, R.M.; Olan, R.W.; Welty, S.C.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a free-piston Stirling engine technology project to demonstrate a high efficiency power system capable of being further developed for deep space missions using a radioisotope (RI) heat source. The key objective is to develop a power system with an efficiency exceeding 20% that can function with a high degree of reliability for 10 years or longer on deep space missions. Primary issues being addressed for Stirling space power systems are weight and the vibration associated with reciprocating pistons. Similar weight and vibration issues have been successfully addressed with Stirling cryocoolers, which are the accepted standard for cryogenic cooling in space. Integrated long-life Stirling engine-generator (or convertor) operation has been demonstrated by the terrestrial Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) and other Stirling Technology Company (STC) programs. Extensive RSG endurance testing includes more than 40,000 maintenance-free, degradation-free hours for the complete convertor, in addition to several critical component and subsystem endurance tests. The Stirling space power convertor project is being conducted by STC under DOE Contract, and NASA SBIR Phase II contracts. The DOE contract objective is to demonstrate a two-convertor module that represents half of a nominal 150-W(e) power system. Each convertor is referred to as a Technology Demonstration Convertor (TDC). The ultimate Stirling power system would be fueled by three general purpose heat source (GPHS) modules, and is projected to produce substantially more electric power than the 150-watt target. The system is capable of full power output with one failed convertor. One NASA contract, nearing completion, uses existing 350-W(e) RG-350 convertors to evaluate interactivity of two back-to-back balanced convertors with various degrees of electrical and mechanical interaction. This effort has recently provided the first successful synchronization of two convertors by means of parallel

  2. ON INFRARED EXCESSES ASSOCIATED WITH Li-RICH K GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Rebull, Luisa M.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Gibbs, John C.; Cashen, Sarah; Datta, Ashwin; Hodgson, Emily; Lince, Megan; Deeb, J. Elin; Larsen, Estefania; Altepeter, Shailyn; Bucksbee, Ethan; Clarke, Matthew; Black, David V.

    2015-10-15

    Infrared (IR) excesses around K-type red giants (RGs) have previously been discovered using Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) data, and past studies have suggested a link between RGs with overabundant Li and IR excesses, implying the ejection of circumstellar shells or disks. We revisit the question of IR excesses around RGs using higher spatial resolution IR data, primarily from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. Our goal was to elucidate the link between three unusual RG properties: fast rotation, enriched Li, and IR excess. Our sample of RGs includes those with previous IR detections, a sample with well-defined rotation and Li abundance measurements with no previous IR measurements, and a large sample of RGs asserted to be Li-rich in the literature; we have 316 targets thought to be K giants, about 40% of which we take to be Li-rich. In 24 cases with previous detections of IR excess at low spatial resolution, we believe that source confusion is playing a role, in that either (a) the source that is bright in the optical is not responsible for the IR flux, or (b) there is more than one source responsible for the IR flux as measured in IRAS. We looked for IR excesses in the remaining sources, identifying 28 that have significant IR excesses by ∼20 μm (with possible excesses for 2 additional sources). There appears to be an intriguing correlation in that the largest IR excesses are all in Li-rich K giants, though very few Li-rich K giants have IR excesses (large or small). These largest IR excesses also tend to be found in the fastest rotators. There is no correlation of IR excess with the carbon isotopic ratio, {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C. IR excesses by 20 μm, though relatively rare, are at least twice as common among our sample of Li-rich K giants. If dust shell production is a common by-product of Li enrichment mechanisms, these observations suggest that the IR excess stage is very short-lived, which is supported by theoretical calculations. Conversely, the

  3. Application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft DG-1108 to evolutionary and advanced reactor designs

    SciTech Connect

    Chang 'Apollo', Chen

    2006-07-01

    For the seismic design of evolutionary and advanced nuclear reactor power plants, there are definite financial advantages in the application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108. NUREG/CR-6661, 'Benchmark Program for the Evaluation of Methods to Analyze Non-Classically Damped Coupled Systems', was by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the USNRC, and Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is the proposed revision to the current Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.92, Revision 1, 'Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is available at http://members.cox.net/apolloconsulting, which also provides a link to the USNRC ADAMS site to search for NUREG/CR-6661 in text file or image file. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 removes unnecessary conservatism in the modal combinations for closely spaced modes in seismic response spectrum analysis. Its application will be very helpful in coupled seismic analysis for structures and heavy equipment to reduce seismic responses and in piping system seismic design. In the NUREG/CR-6661 benchmark program, which investigated coupled seismic analysis of structures and equipment or piping systems with different damping values, three of the four participants applied the complex mode solution method to handle different damping values for structures, equipment, and piping systems. The fourth participant applied the classical normal mode method with equivalent weighted damping values to handle differences in structural, equipment, and piping system damping values. Coupled analysis will reduce the equipment responses when equipment, or piping system and structure are in or close to resonance. However, this reduction in responses occurs only if the realistic DG-1108 modal response combination method is applied, because closely spaced modes will be produced when structure and equipment or piping systems are in or close to resonance. Otherwise, the conservatism in

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2000-10-05

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at

  5. Toxic substances from coal combustion -- A comprehensive assessment

    SciTech Connect

    C.L. Senior; T. Panagiotou; F.E. Huggins; G.P. Huffman; N. Yap; J.O.L. Wendt; W. Seames; M.R. Ames; A.F Sarofim; J. Lighty; A. Kolker; R. Finkelman; C.A. Palmer; S.J. Mroczkowsky; J.J. Helble; R. Mamani-Paco

    1999-11-01

    for use of the Stanford/USGS SHRIMP RG Ion Microprobe during August 1999. The SHRIMP-RG data confirm that Cr is present at concentrations of about 20 to 120 ppm, just below the electron microprobe detection limits (100 to 200 ppm), as suspected from Phase 1 microprobe work and previous studies of clay mineral separates. The University of Utah has started trial runs on the drop tube furnace to ensure that the gas analysis system is working properly and that the flow pattern within the furnace is laminar and direct. A third set of ASTM samples will be prepared at the University of Utah for the Phase 1 and Phase 2 coals. This time the INAA counting time will be optimized for the elements in which the authors are interested, guided by the results from the first two samples. The iodated charcoal which was used by MIT for vapor phase Hg collection was tested to see whether it collected other vapor phase metals. A second set of tests were performed at PSI using the entrained flow reactor (EFR). The University of Arizona's pilot-scale downflow laboratory combustion furnace was used to test the partitioning of toxic metals in the baseline experiments for the Phase 2 North Dakota lignite and the Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal at baghouse inlet sampling conditions. In addition, baseline data were collected on combustion of the Phase 1 Kentucky Elkhorn/Hazard bituminous coal. Emphasis at the University of Kentucky was placed on (1) collection of new Hg XAFS data for various sorbents, and (2) on collection of XAFS and other data for arsenic, sulfur, chromium and selenium in two baseline ash samples from the University of Arizona combustion unit. A preliminary interpretation of the mercury data is given in this report. Revision was made to the matrix for the initial experiments on mercury-ash interactions to be conducted at EERC. The overall goal of this effort is to collect data which will allow one to model the interactions of mercury and fly ash (specifically, adsorption of Hg

  6. AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    SciTech Connect

    William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

    2005-06-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Program and the Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL) seek to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to minimize the overall Pu and minor actinides present in the light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel cycles. It is proposed to reuse the Pu from LWR spent fuel both for the energy it contains and to decrease the hazard and proliferation impact resulting from storage of the Pu and minor actinides. The use of fuel compositions with a combination of U and Pu oxide (MOX) has been proposed as a way to recycle Pu and/or minor actinides in LWRs. It has also been proposed to replace the fertile U{sup 238} matrix of MOX with a fertile-free matrix (IMF) to reduce the production of Pu{sup 239} in the fuel system. It is important to demonstrate the performance of these fuels with the appropriate mixture of isotopes and determine what impact there might be from trace elements or contaminants. Previous work has already been done to look at weapons-grade (WG) Pu in the MOX configuration [1][2] and the reactor-grade (RG) Pu in a MOX configuration including small (4000 ppm additions of Neptunium). This program will add to the existing database by developing a wide variety of MOX fuel compositions along with new fuel compositions called inert-matrix fuel (IMF). The goal of this program is to determine the general fabrication and irradiation behavior of the proposed IMF fuel compositions. Successful performance of these compositions will lead to further selection and development of IMF for use in LWRs. This experiment will also test various inert matrix material compositions with and without quantities of the minor actinides Americium and Neptunium to determine feasibility of incorporation into the fuel matrices for destruction. There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in the investigation of IMF (inert matrix fuels) for scenarios involving stabilization or burn down of plutonium in the fleet of existing commercial power reactors. IMF offer the