National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rms von mises

  1. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; CALCULATION METHODS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FOURIER ANALYSIS",,"An efficient method is presented for calculation of RMS von Mises...

  2. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS TRANSFER FUNCTIONS CALCULATION METHODS FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOURIER ANALYSIS An efficient method is presented for calculation of RMS von Mises stresses...

  3. vibration environment Segalman, D.J.; Fulcher, C.W.G.; Reese...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS; TRANSFER FUNCTIONS; CALCULATION METHODS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; FOURIER ANALYSIS An efficient method is presented for calculation of RMS von Mises stresses...

  4. Probability distribution of von Mises stress in the presence of pre-load.

    SciTech Connect

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Field, Richard V.; Reese, Garth M.

    2013-04-01

    Random vibration under preload is important in multiple endeavors, including those involving launch and re-entry. There are some methods in the literature to begin to address this problem, but there is nothing that accommodates the existence of preloads and the necessity of making probabilistic statements about the stress levels likely to be encountered. An approach to achieve to this goal is presented along with several simple illustrations.

  5. Mise-A-La-Masse At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Kauahikaua...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    likely consist of dike complexes. References James Kauahikaua, Mark Mattice, Dallas Jackson (1980) Mise-A-La-Masse Mapping of the HGP-A Geothermal Reservoir, Hawaii Additional...

  6. DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-A-La-Masse) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-A-La-Masse): No definition has been...

  7. Stephanie von Numers | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Stephanie von Numers - Communications and Web Coordinator, Education & Workforce Development Stephanie von Numers joined the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency ...

  8. Mise-a-la-masse mapping of the HGP-A geothermal reservoir, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Kauahikaua, J.; Mattice, M.; Jackson, D.

    1980-09-01

    The HGP-A well casing was used as an electrode in a mise-a-la-masse experiment to define the boundaries of the geothermal reservoir. Electric potentials were measured to distances of 2 km from the drill hole. Although cased or lined the full 1967 m, only the top 670 m of the HGP-A casing are electrically continuous; the electrode did not extend into the high-temperature part of the reservoir. Nevertheless, the data did define a compartment of dike-impounded freshwater of higher resistivity than the surrounding saltwater-saturated rock. This dike-impounded water is warm and apparently overlies the actual reservoir; however, the lateral boundaries impounding this water probably confine geothermal fluids at depth.

  9. Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, inventor of groundbreaking...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    the new Wendelstein 7-X stellarator in Germany, the Large Helical Device in Japan, the ... He was killed in 1944 in World War II. Von Goeler grew up during wartime Germany and after ...

  10. Klimov receives Alexander von Humboldt award

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Klimov Receives Alexander Von Humboldt Award Klimov receives Alexander von Humboldt award The German government grants the award in recognition of a researcher whose discoveries, theories or insights have had a significant impact on his or her own discipline and who is expected to continue producing cutting-edge achievements in the future. May 16, 2013 Victor Klimov Victor Klimov Klimov is an expert in nanocrystal quantum dots and optical amplification in nanocrystals. Victor Klimov of Physical

  11. Measuring the RMS length of short electron pulses with an rf cavity and a beam position monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, S.J.

    1997-08-01

    The Sub-picosecond Accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a 1,300 MHz, 8 MeV photoinjector. Its beam can be bunched to sub-picosecond lengths using a magnetic chicane. To observe this, the author uses an rf cavity operating in a TM{sub 110} mode to generate a transverse magnetic dipole field that streaks each bunch as it passes. Inserting a screen downstream, he determines the pulse length by measuring the increase in the beam spot width. To achieve sufficient resolution two things must happen: first, the unstreaked beam must be well focused at the screen, and, second, the drift after the cavity must be long enough. At high charge and short pulse lengths, these goals become mutually exclusive. To eliminate this problem, the author proposes using a beam position monitor instead of a screen. The second moment of the beam position monitor signals determines the difference between the x and y rms widths of the beam. With a properly orientated cavity, the resulting change in this quantity also gives the pulse length. However, the BPM does not require a well focused beam at its position, eliminating that constraint on resolution.

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_FRANK_VON_HIPPEL_NMMSS_2014_screensaver.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Keynote Speaker Professor Frank N. von Hippel Princeton University

  13. Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, inventor of groundbreaking

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    diagnostics used to analyze fusion experiments worldwide, dies at 84 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, inventor of groundbreaking diagnostics used to analyze fusion experiments worldwide, dies at 84 By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe December 14, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, an award-winning physicist at the

  14. Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, inventor of groundbreaking

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    diagnostics used to analyze fusion experiments worldwide, dies at 84 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, inventor of groundbreaking diagnostics used to analyze fusion experiments worldwide, dies at 84 By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe December 14, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, an award-winning physicist at the

  15. Union zur F rderung von Oel und Proteinpflanzen Ufop | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    zur F rderung von Oel und Proteinpflanzen Ufop Jump to: navigation, search Name: Union zur Frderung von Oel- und Proteinpflanzen (Ufop) Place: Germany Product: Germany-based...

  16. Microsoft Word - Lamellae tungsten tile design thermal and electromagn...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stress Profile: von Mises; Screw Assy View 1 Temp Profile (281 C) (275 C) (207 C) (440 C) (440 C) (456 C) (484 C) 31 Fig. 3.2.7 - Thermal Stress Profile: von Mises, Screw...

  17. TBH-0034- In the Matter of Casey von Bargen

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Initial Agency Decision involves a whistleblower complaint filed by Mr. Casey von Bargen (also referred to as the complainant or the individual) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor...

  18. Von Ardenne Anlagentechnik GmbH | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    1324 Sector: Solar Product: German equipment manufacturer of wafer-based and thin-film solar cells. References: Von Ardenne Anlagentechnik GmbH1 This article is a stub. You...

  19. Interpolatability distinguishes LOCC from separable von Neumann measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Andrew M.; Leung, Debbie; Man?inska, Laura; Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 ; Ozols, Maris; Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1; IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598

    2013-11-15

    Local operations with classical communication (LOCC) and separable operations are two classes of quantum operations that play key roles in the study of quantum entanglement. Separable operations are strictly more powerful than LOCC, but no simple explanation of this phenomenon is known. We show that, in the case of von Neumann measurements, the ability to interpolate measurements is an operational principle that sets apart LOCC and separable operations.

  20. TBZ-0034 - In the Matter of Casey Von Bargen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    34 - In the Matter of Casey Von Bargen TBZ-0034 - In the Matter of Casey Von Bargen This Decision concerns a Motion To Dismiss that was filed by Sandia National Laboratories (hereinafter referred to as "SNL" or "the Respondent"). In this Motion, SNL seeks the dismissal of a complaint that was filed by Casey Von Bargen (hereinafter referred to as "Mr. Von Bargen" or "the Complainant") under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection

  1. The von Neumann model of measurement in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, Pier A.

    2014-01-08

    We describe how to obtain information on a quantum-mechanical system by coupling it to a probe and detecting some property of the latter, using a model introduced by von Neumann, which describes the interaction of the system proper with the probe in a dynamical way. We first discuss single measurements, where the system proper is coupled to one probe with arbitrary coupling strength. The goal is to obtain information on the system detecting the probe position. We find the reduced density operator of the system, and show how Lüders rule emerges as the limiting case of strong coupling. The von Neumann model is then generalized to two probes that interact successively with the system proper. Now we find information on the system by detecting the position-position and momentum-position correlations of the two probes. The so-called 'Wigner's formula' emerges in the strong-coupling limit, while 'Kirkwood's quasi-probability distribution' is found as the weak-coupling limit of the above formalism. We show that successive measurements can be used to develop a state-reconstruction scheme. Finally, we find a generalized transform of the state and the observables based on the notion of successive measurements.

  2. Stochastic resonance in a generalized Von Foerster population growth model

    SciTech Connect

    Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    The stochastic dynamics of a population growth model, similar to the Von Foerster model for human population, is studied. The influence of fluctuating environment on the carrying capacity is modeled as a multiplicative dichotomous noise. It is established that an interplay between nonlinearity and environmental fluctuations can cause single unidirectional discontinuous transitions of the mean population size versus the noise amplitude, i.e., an increase of noise amplitude can induce a jump from a state with a moderate number of individuals to that with a very large number, while by decreasing the noise amplitude an opposite transition cannot be effected. An analytical expression of the mean escape time for such transitions is found. Particularly, it is shown that the mean transition time exhibits a strong minimum at intermediate values of noise correlation time, i.e., the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. Applications of the results in ecology are also discussed.

  3. C.F.von Weizsäcker-Political consequences of science

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    le DG C.Rubbia remercie le Prof.C.F.von Weizsäcker pour ses trois conférences très intéréssantes

  4. John von Neumann, 1956 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    John von Neumann, 1956 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1950's John von Neumann, 1956 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Citation For his scientific contribution to the theory

  5. C.F.von Weizsäcker-High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    C.F.von Weizsäcker (1912-2007),physicien,philosophe et "chercheur de paix", prit la décision de faire des études de physique sous l'influence de W.Heisenberg qu'il rencontra en 1927.

  6. Numerical simulation of laminar plasma dynamos in a cylindrical von Karman flow

    SciTech Connect

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Schnack, D. D.; Forest, C. B. [University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ebrahimi, F. [University of New Hampshire, 8 College Road, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The results of a numerical study of the magnetic dynamo effect in cylindrical von Karman plasma flow are presented with parameters relevant to the Madison Plasma Couette Experiment. This experiment is designed to investigate a broad class of phenomena in flowing plasmas. In a plasma, the magnetic Prandtl number Pm can be of order unity (i.e., the fluid Reynolds number Re is comparable to the magnetic Reynolds number Rm). This is in contrast to liquid metal experiments, where Pm is small (so, Re>>Rm) and the flows are always turbulent. We explore dynamo action through simulations using the extended magnetohydrodynamic NIMROD code for an isothermal and compressible plasma model. We also study two-fluid effects in simulations by including the Hall term in Ohm's law. We find that the counter-rotating von Karman flow results in sustained dynamo action and the self-generation of magnetic field when the magnetic Reynolds number exceeds a critical value. For the plasma parameters of the experiment, this field saturates at an amplitude corresponding to a new stable equilibrium (a laminar dynamo). We show that compressibility in the plasma results in an increase of the critical magnetic Reynolds number, while inclusion of the Hall term in Ohm's law changes the amplitude of the saturated dynamo field but not the critical value for the onset of dynamo action.

  7. Benchmarking of measurement and simulation of transverse rms...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    beam dynamics simulation codes, i.e. DYNAMION, PARMILA, and PARTRAN against systematic measurements of beam emittances for different machine settings. Experimental set-ups, data ...

  8. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, Y.; B?achucki, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Neff, M.; Romano, V.

    2014-04-15

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers.

  9. Solar Radiation Monitoring Station (SoRMS): Humboldt State University, Arcata, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    A partnership with HSU and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  10. RMIS ViewPrint c:\rmis\rmisdocs\mailatt.rms Spool 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

  11. RMIS ViewPrint c:\rmis\rmisdocs\mailatt.rms Spool 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

  12. RMIS ViewPrint c:\rmis\rmisdocs\mailatt.rms Spool 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

  13. RMIS ViewPrint c:\rmis\rmisdocs\mailatt.rms Spool 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    , Modification No. 160 Section G Page G-2 G.1 Billing Instructions a. Public Voucher The Contractor shall submit to the Government a monthly Public Voucher (SF-1034). Vouchers are to be submitted as follows: ORIGINAL TO: Department of Energy Oak Ridge Financial Service Center P.O. Box 4307 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 EXPRESS COURIER ADDRESS: Department of Energy Oak Ridge Financial Service Center - RL 200 Administration Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Copies are to be submitted as follows: COPY TO: Department

  14. RMIS ViewPrint c:\rmis\rmisdocs\mailatt.rms Spool 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ; Modification M008 Section H Page H-1 Section H Special Contract Requirements Table of Contents Section Page H.1 Security Requirements H-3 H.2 Definitions H-4 H.3 Key Personnel Requirements H-5 H.4 Qualification of Medical Personnel H-6 H.5 Use of DOE Property H-7 H.6 Transition Costs H-7 H.7 Recovery of Allowable Relocation Expenses H-7 H.8 Recovery of Allowable Indirect Costs H-8 H.9 Health and Safety H-8 H.10 Required Insurance H-9 H.11 Recognition of Collective Bargaining Unit(s) H-9 H.12

  15. RMIS ViewPrint c:\rmis\rmisdocs\mailatt.rms Spool 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

  16. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    updates occur. Search Related Instruments Related Measurement 3-axis Acceleration (Translation) (6) CDL MiniPOSNAV INS AIRMAR 200WX Weather Station AIRMAR 150WX Weather Station...

  17. Solar Radiation Monitoring Station (SoRMS): Humboldt State University, Arcata, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    2007-05-02

    A partnership with HSU and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  18. Mise-A-La-Masse Mapping of the HGP-A Geothermal Reservoir, Hawaii...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    confine geothermal fluids at depth. Authors James Kauahikaua, Mark Mattice and Dallas Jackson Conference GRC Annual Meeting; unknown; 19800901 Published Geothermal Resources...

  19. DC Resistivity Survey (Mise-A-La-Masse) At Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Area. References S. H. Ward, W. T. Parry, W. P. Nash, W. R. Sill, K. L. Cook, R. B. Smith, D. S. Chapman, F. H. Brown, J. A. Whelan, J. R. Bowman (1978) A Summary of the...

  20. Modeling of stress distributions on the microstructural level in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Petrovic, B.G.; Ruud, C.O.; Mcllree, A.R.

    1995-04-01

    Stress distribution in a random polycrystalline material (Alloy 600) was studied using a topologically correct microstructural model. Distributions of von Mises and hydrostatic stresses at the grain vertices, which could be important in intergranular stress corrosion cracking, were analyzed as functions of microstructure, grain orientations and loading conditions. Grain size, shape, and orientation had a more pronounced effect on stress distribution than loading conditions. At grain vertices the stress concentration factor was higher for hydrostatic stress (1.7) than for von Mises stress (1.5). The stress/strain distribution in the volume (grain interiors) is a normal distribution and does not depend on the location of the studied material volume i.e., surface vs/bulk. The analysis of stress distribution in the volume showed the von Mises stress concentration of 1.75 and stress concentration of 2.2 for the hydrostatic pressure. The observed stress concentration is high enough to cause localized plastic microdeformation, even when the polycrystalline aggregate is in the macroscopic elastic regime. Modeling of stresses and strains in polycrystalline materials can identify the microstructures (grain size distributions, texture) intrinsically susceptible to stress/strain concentrations and justify the correctness of applied stress state during the stress corrosion cracking tests. Also, it supplies the information necessary to formulate the local failure criteria and interpret of nondestructive stress measurements.

  1. Klimov receives Alexander von Humboldt award

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    May 16, 2013 Victor Klimov Victor Klimov Klimov is an expert in nanocrystal quantum dots and optical amplification in nanocrystals. Victor Klimov of Physical Chemistry and Applied ...

  2. Schweickhard "Schwick" von Goeler, inventor of groundbreaking...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    diagnostics used to analyze fusion experiments worldwide, dies at 84 By ... of numerous X-ray diagnostics used in fusion experiments worldwide, died of leukemia ...

  3. Multiaxial plasticity and fatigue life prediction in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Coiled tubing is being used increasingly in the oil well drilling and servicing industry. Continuous steel tubing of structural dimensions (up to 89 mm or 3.5 in. in diameter) is wound onto a large-diameter reel for repeated deployment into and out of a well bore. The bending strain range associated with each wrap-unwrap cycle can exceed 3% with lives well below 100 cycles. During constant internal pressure fatigue testing, tubing has been observed to grow in diameter by as much as 30%. This paper describes an analytical model to predict the fatigue behavior of coiled tubing subjected to variable pressure service conditions. The approach utilizes standard low-cycle fatigue data but requires additional experimental results from constant pressure fatigue testing. The algorithm is based on estimates of biaxial ratcheting from an incremental plasticity model using a hybrid associated flow rule, a modified kinematic hardening rule with multiple von Mises yield surfaces, and a specialized limit surface concept. An empirical damage parameter was formulated based on constant pressure fatigue data using mean and fluctuating von Mises equivalent strain components occurring throughout the life of a section of tubing. This parameters is used with the Palmgren-Miner definition of cumulative damage to track damage that is accumulating nonlinearly under constant or variable pressure histories. Modifications to standard incremental plasticity components and implementation assumptions used to apply the model are presented and discussed. The predictive capability of the model is demonstrated relative to data generated under constant and variable pressure histories.

  4. Assessment of an improved multiaxial strength theory based on creep-rupture data for Inconel 600

    SciTech Connect

    Huddleston, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    A new multiaxial strength theory incorporating three independent stress parameters was developed and reported by the author in 1984. It was formally incorporated into ASME Code Case N47-29 in 1990. The new theory provided significantly more accurate stress-rupture life predictions than obtained using the classical theories of von Mises, Tresca, and Rankins (maximum principal stress), for Types 304 and 316 stainless steel tested at 593 and 600{degrees}C respectively under different biaxial stress states. Additional results for Inconel 600 specimens tested at 816{degrees}C under tension-tension and tension-compression stress states are presented in this paper and show a factor of approximately 2.4 reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed lives as compared to the classical theories of von Mises and Tresca and a factor of about 5 as compared to the Rankins theory. A key feature of the theory, which incorporates the maximum deviatoric stress, the first invariant of the stress tensor, and the second invariant of the deviatoric stress tensor, is its ability to distinguish between life under tensile versus compressive stress states.

  5. Thermoplastic deformation of silicon surfaces induced by ultrashort pulsed lasers in submelting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsibidis, G. D.; Stratakis, E.; Aifantis, K. E.

    2012-03-01

    A hybrid theoretical model is presented to describe thermoplastic deformation effects on silicon surfaces induced by single and multiple ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation in submelting conditions. An approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation is adopted to describe the laser irradiation process. The evolution of the induced deformation field is described initially by adopting the differential equations of dynamic thermoelasticity while the onset of plastic yielding is described by the von Mises stress. Details of the resulting picometre sized crater, produced by irradiation with a single pulse, are discussed as a function of the imposed conditions and thresholds for the onset of plasticity are computed. Irradiation with multiple pulses leads to ripple formation of nanometre size that originates from the interference of the incident and a surface scattered wave. It is suggested that ultrafast laser induced surface modification in semiconductors is feasible in submelting conditions, and it may act as a precursor of the incubation effects observed at multiple pulse irradiation of materials surfaces.

  6. A non-linear elastic constitutive framework for replicating plastic deformation in solids.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Scott Alan; Schunk, Peter Randall

    2014-02-01

    Ductile metals and other materials typically deform plastically under large applied loads; a behavior most often modeled using plastic deformation constitutive models. However, it is possible to capture some of the key behaviors of plastic deformation using only the framework for nonlinear elastic mechanics. In this paper, we develop a phenomenological, hysteretic, nonlinear elastic constitutive model that captures many of the features expected of a plastic deformation model. This model is based on calculating a secant modulus directly from a material's stress-strain curve. Scalar stress and strain values are obtained in three dimensions by using the von Mises invariants. Hysteresis is incorporated by tracking an additional history variable and assuming an elastic unloading response. This model is demonstrated in both single- and multi-element simulations under varying strain conditions.

  7. Dynamic response of Cu4Zr54 metallic glass to high strain rate shock loading: plasticity, spall and atomic-level structures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shengnian; Arman, Bedri; Germann, Timothy C; Cagin, Tahir

    2009-01-01

    We investigate dynamic response of Cu{sub 46}Zr{sub 54} metallic glass under adiabatic planar shock wave loading (one-dimensional strain) wjth molecular dynamics simulations, including Hugoniot (shock) states, shock-induced plasticity and spallation. The Hugoniot states are obtained up to 60 CPa along with the von Mises shear flow strengths, and the dynamic spall strength, at different strain rates and temperatures. The spall strengths likely represent the limiting values achievable in experiments such as laser ablation. For the steady shock states, a clear elastic-plastic transition is identified (e.g., in the shock velocity-particle velocity curve), and the shear strength shows strain-softening. However, the elastic-plastic transition across the shock front displays transient stress overshoot (hardening) above the Hugoniot elastic limit followed by a relatively sluggish relaxation to the steady shock state, and the plastic shock front steepens with increasing shock strength. The local von Mises shear strain analysis is used to characterize local deformation, and the Voronoi tessellation analysis, the corresponding short-range structures at various stages of shock, release, tension and spallation. The plasticity in this glass is manifested as localized shear transformation zones and of local structure rather than thermal origin, and void nucleation occurs preferentially at the highly shear-deformed regions. The Voronoi and shear strain analyses show that the atoms with different local structures are of different shear resistances that lead to shear localization (e.g., the atoms indexed with (0,0,12,0) are most shear-resistant, and those with (0,2,8,1) are highly prone to shear flow). The dynamic changes in local structures are consistent with the observed deformation dynamics.

  8. Plastic cap evolution law derived from induced transverse isotropy in dilatational triaxial compression.

    SciTech Connect

    Macon, David James; Brannon, Rebecca Moss; Strack, Otto Eric

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical testing of porous materials generates physical data that contain contributions from more than one underlying physical phenomenon. All that is measurable is the (3z(Bensemble(3y (Bhardening modulus. This thesis is concerned with the phenomenon of dilatation in triaxial compression of porous media, which has been modeled very accurately in the literature for monotonic loading using models that predict dilatation under triaxial compression (TXC) by presuming that dilatation causes the cap to move outwards. These existing models, however, predict a counter-intuitive (and never validated) increase in hydrostatic compression strength. This work explores an alternative approach for modeling TXC dilatation based on allowing induced elastic anisotropy (which makes the material both less stiff and less strong in the lateral direction) with no increase in hydrostatic strength. Induced elastic anisotropy is introduced through the use of a distortion operator. This operator is a fourth-order tensor consisting of a combination of the undeformed stiffness and deformed compliance and has the same eigenprojectors as the elastic compliance. In the undeformed state, the distortion operator is equal to the fourth-order identity. Through the use of the distortion operator, an evolved stress tensor is introduced. When the evolved stress tensor is substituted into an isotropic yield function, a new anisotropic yield function results. In the case of the von Mises isotropic yield function (which contains only deviatoric components), it is shown that the distortion operator introduces a dilatational contribution without requiring an increase in hydrostatic strength. In the thesis, an introduction and literature review of the cap function is given. A transversely isotropic compliance is presented, based on a linear combination of natural bases constructed about a transverse-symmetry axis. Using a probabilistic distribution of cracks constructed for the case of transverse isotropy

  9. Von Hippel, at PPPL, calls for international control of nuclear enrichment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Volvo SuperTruck Visits the Energy Department Volvo SuperTruck Visits the Energy Department Addthis Description Below is the text version for the "Volvo SuperTruck Visits the Energy Department" video. Mike Mueller, EERE Digital Team Look what rolled up to Energy Department headquarters-it's the Volvo SuperTruck. This is the latest class 8 truck to achieve more than 50% freight efficiency compared to a 2009 baseline model in our SuperTruck I program. Daimler trucks North America, along

  10. Statistical and Spectral Analysis of Wind Characteristics Relevant to Wind Energy Assessment Using Tower Measurements in Complex Terrain

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Belu, Radian; Koracin, Darko

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind speed and direction in complex terrain that are relevant to wind energy assessment and development, as well as to wind energy system operation, management, and grid integration. Wind data from five tall meteorological towers located in Western Nevada, USA, operated from August 2003 to March 2008, used in the analysis. The multiannual average wind speeds did not show significant increased trend with increasing elevation, while the turbulence intensity slowly decreased with an increase were the average wind speed. The wind speed and direction weremore » modeled using the Weibull and the von Mises distribution functions. The correlations show a strong coherence between the wind speed and direction with slowly decreasing amplitude of the multiday periodicity with increasing lag periods. The spectral analysis shows significant annual periodicity with similar characteristics at all locations. The relatively high correlations between the towers and small range of the computed turbulence intensity indicate that wind variability is dominated by the regional synoptic processes. Knowledge and information about daily, seasonal, and annual wind periodicities are very important for wind energy resource assessment, wind power plant operation, management, and grid integration.« less

  11. Kayenta v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2009-06-09

    The Kayenta material model (previously named the Sandia GeoModel, see The Sandia GeoModel Theory and User's Guide, by A.F. Fossum and R.M. Brannon, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 2004, SAND2004-3226) is a unified general-purpose constitutive model that can predict material response over a wide range of material properties and strain rates. The model strikes a balance between first-principles micro-mechanics and phenomenological, homogenized, and semi-empirical modeling strategies. Being a unified theory, the model can simultaneously modelmore » multiple failure mechanisms, or it can duplicate simpler idealized yield models such as classic Von Mises plasticity and Mohr-Coulomb failure. Since publication of the GeoModel Theory and User's Guide the model has been extended to support material softening and failure, as well as thermodynamic effects. These extensions have generalized the application space of the model, and it is now capable of accurately modeling metals and metal-like materials in addition to rocks and rock-like materials.« less

  12. Computational simulation of dynamic impact problems

    SciTech Connect

    Muenz, T.W.; Rix, K.S.; Willam, K.J.

    1996-12-31

    Recent advances of computing methods make it possible to examine dynamic failure and complicated contact-impact load scenarios in time and space. The response simulation for these extreme load conditions needs to capture dynamic contact between the impactor and the deformable target and progressive failure in the target. Independently from the impact scenario, two basic approaches may be used to describe the failure process in an appropriate manner, namely the Discrete Failure Approach and the Smeared Failure Approach. In the contribution the dynamic impact of a pendulum test and the failure scenario in notched cylindrical specimens (Charpy-type IZOD test) are examined using the explicit dynamic finite element code DYNA3D. The study focuses on the question, whether the smeared crack approach is able to capture the dynamic failure process using von Mises plasticity with a plastic strain-based failure limiter. The computational results indicate that upon consistent mesh refinement the overall energy dissipation approaches the value observed in laboratory experiments.

  13. Probabilities from entanglement, Born's rule p{sub k}= vertical bar {psi}{sub k} vertical bar{sup 2} from envariance

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2005-05-15

    I show how probabilities arise in quantum physics by exploring the implications of environment-assisted invariance or envariance, a recently discovered symmetry exhibited by entangled quantum systems. Envariance of perfectly entangled 'Bell-like' states can be used to rigorously justify complete ignorance of the observer about the outcome of any measurement on either of the members of the entangled pair. For more general states, envariance leads to Born's rule p{sub k}{proportional_to} vertical bar {psi}{sub k} vertical bar{sup 2} for the outcomes associated with Schmidt states. The probabilities derived in this manner are an objective reflection of the underlying state of the system--they represent experimentally verifiable symmetries, and not just a subjective 'state of knowledge' of the observer. This envariance-based approach is compared with and found to be superior to prequantum definitions of probability including the standard definition based on the 'principle of indifference' due to Laplace and the relative frequency approach advocated by von Mises. Implications of envariance for the interpretation of quantum theory go beyond the derivation of Born's rule: Envariance is enough to establish the dynamical independence of preferred branches of the evolving state vector of the composite system and, thus, to arrive at the environment-induced superselection (einselection) of pointer states, which was usually derived by an appeal to decoherence. The envariant origin of Born's rule for probabilities sheds light on the relation between ignorance (and, hence, information) and the nature of quantum states.

  14. Defining coiled tubing limits -- A new approach

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, K.R.; Sathuvalli, U.B.; Stone, L.R.; Wolhart, S.

    1996-12-31

    The burst, collapse and axial load operating limits for Coiled Tubing (CT) are currently established using the Von Mises incipient yield criterion. This criterion has historically been used to calculate the limits for oil country tubular goods (OCTG). The limits according to this criterion are based on the point at which the pipe material reaches a load state in which it begins to yield. Because of the bending that occurs when the CT is spooled on and off the reel, and when it is bent over the guide arch, the CT is already far beyond the yield point before it enters a well. Thus, this criterion does not really apply to CT. This paper describes a research project currently in progress. The purpose of this project is to define a new set of CT limits based on criteria other than incipient yield. This new approach to setting CT operating limits takes into account the internal residual stresses in the CT which are a consequence of repeated bending cycles and the accompanying change in material properties.

  15. Collapse pressure of coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-09-01

    The collapse pressure is a measure of an external force required to collapse a tube in the absence of internal pressure. It is defined as the minimum pressure required to yield the tube in the absence of internal pressure. Coiled tubing is sometimes used in high-pressure wells. If the external pressure becomes too high, the coiled tubing will collapse. This could not only lead to serious well-control problems, but may result in extensive fishing operations. A reliable safety criterion of collapse pressure for the coiled tubing is needed by the coiled tubing operators. Theoretical models of collapse pressure are well developed for perfectly round coiled tubing but not for oval coiled tubing. Coiled tubing is initially manufactured with nearly perfect roundness, sometimes having a small ovality (typically {le} 0.5%). Perfectly round CT becomes oval owing to the plastic mechanical deformation of the coiled tubing as it spooled on and off the reel and over the gooseneck. As the cycling continues, the ovality usually increases. This ovality significantly decreases the collapse failure pressure as compared to perfectly round tubing. In this paper, an analytical model of collapse pressure for oval tubing under axial tension or compression is developed based on elastic instability theory and the von Mises criterion. The theoretical model shows satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  16. Thermoplastic Response in Anisotr Rock

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1998-10-14

    UTAH-2 is a two-dimensional, thermomechanical finite element program designed to analyze elastic, elastic-plastic, and elastic brittle response in anisotropic geologic media. Both constant strain triangles and quadrilateral elements composed of four constant strain trangles are used. The yield function for either elastic-plastic or elastic-brittle response is an extended von Mises criteria for the yield function considers the effects of confining pressure. UTAH-2 is able to consider temperature dependence of material properties. The elastic and plasticmore » moduli as well as the thermal expansion coefficients can vary with temperature based on a polynomial fit of experimental data. UTAH-2 is intended for use in analyzing stress and displacement fields associated with repository excavation, canister emplacement, salt over short time periods and in other geological media for any time scale; for evaluating room stability and generating boundary conditions (stress fields) used in canister sleeve studies; for analyzing bedded sedimentary regions; and for sensitivity and stability studies where temperature dependence of material properties may be a factor.« less

  17. An attempt to calibrate and validate a simple ductile failure model against axial-torsion experiments on Al 6061-T651

    SciTech Connect

    Reedlunn, Benjamin; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-01-01

    This report details a work in progress. We have attempted to calibrate and validate a Von Mises plasticity model with the Johnson-Cook failure criterion ( Johnson & Cook , 1985 ) against a set of experiments on various specimens of Al 6061-T651. As will be shown, the effort was not successful, despite considerable attention to detail. When the model was com- pared against axial-torsion experiments on tubes, it over predicted failure by 3 x in tension, and never predicted failure in torsion, even when the tube was twisted by 4 x further than the experiment. While this result is unfortunate, it is not surprising. Ductile failure is not well understood. In future work, we will explore whether more sophisticated material mod- els of plasticity and failure will improve the predictions. Selecting the appropriate advanced material model and interpreting the results of said model are not trivial exercises, so it is worthwhile to fully investigate the behavior of a simple plasticity model before moving on to an anisotropic yield surface or a similarly complicated model.

  18. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-10-20

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event and the mathematical framework is used therein. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing the source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Moreover, using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.

  19. Improved Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization for regional infrasound

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Blom, Philip S.; Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-10-20

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) methodology is examined and simplified providing a generalized method of estimating the source location and time for an infrasonic event and the mathematical framework is used therein. The likelihood function describing an infrasonic detection used in BISL has been redefined to include the von Mises distribution developed in directional statistics and propagation-based, physically derived celerity-range and azimuth deviation models. Frameworks for constructing propagation-based celerity-range and azimuth deviation statistics are presented to demonstrate how stochastic propagation modelling methods can be used to improve the precision and accuracy of the posterior probability density function describing themore » source localization. Infrasonic signals recorded at a number of arrays in the western United States produced by rocket motor detonations at the Utah Test and Training Range are used to demonstrate the application of the new mathematical framework and to quantify the improvement obtained by using the stochastic propagation modelling methods. Moreover, using propagation-based priors, the spatial and temporal confidence bounds of the source decreased by more than 40 per cent in all cases and by as much as 80 per cent in one case. Further, the accuracy of the estimates remained high, keeping the ground truth within the 99 per cent confidence bounds for all cases.« less

  20. Design of an Aluminum Proton Beam Window for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Jim G; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum proton beam window design is being considered at the Spallation Neutron Source primarily to increase the lifetime of the window, with secondary advantages of higher beam transport efficiency and lower activation. The window separates the core vessel, the location of the mercury target, from the vacuum of the accelerator, while withstanding the pass through of a proton beam of up to 2 MW with 1.0 GeV proton energy. The current aluminum alloy being investigated for the window material is 6061-T651 due to its combination of high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good resistance to aqueous corrosion, as well as demonstrated dependability in previous high-radiation environments. The window design will feature a thin plate with closely spaced cross drilled cooling holes. An analytical approach was used to optimize the dimensions of the window before finite element analysis was used to simulate temperature profiles and stress fields resulting from thermal and static pressure loading. The resulting maximum temperature of 60 C and Von Mises stress of 71 MPa are very low compared to allowables for Al 6061-T651. A significant challenge in designing an aluminum proton beam window for SNS is integrating the window with the current 316L SS shield blocks. Explosion bonding was chosen as a joining technique because of the large bonding area required. A test program has commenced to prove explosion bonding can produce a robust vacuum joint. Pending successful explosion bond testing, the aluminum proton beam window design will be proven acceptable for service in the Spallation Neutron Source.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF PLASTICITY MODEL USING NON ASSOCIATED FLOW RULE FOR HCP MATERIALS INCLUDING ZIRCONIUM FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael V. Glazoff; Jeong-Whan Yoon

    2013-08-01

    In this report (prepared in collaboration with Prof. Jeong Whan Yoon, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia) a research effort was made to develop a non associated flow rule for zirconium. Since Zr is a hexagonally close packed (hcp) material, it is impossible to describe its plastic response under arbitrary loading conditions with any associated flow rule (e.g. von Mises). As a result of strong tension compression asymmetry of the yield stress and anisotropy, zirconium displays plastic behavior that requires a more sophisticated approach. Consequently, a new general asymmetric yield function has been developed which accommodates mathematically the four directional anisotropies along 0 degrees, 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and biaxial, under tension and compression. Stress anisotropy has been completely decoupled from the r value by using non associated flow plasticity, where yield function and plastic potential have been treated separately to take care of stress and r value directionalities, respectively. This theoretical development has been verified using Zr alloys at room temperature as an example as these materials have very strong SD (Strength Differential) effect. The proposed yield function reasonably well models the evolution of yield surfaces for a zirconium clock rolled plate during in plane and through thickness compression. It has been found that this function can predict both tension and compression asymmetry mathematically without any numerical tolerance and shows the significant improvement compared to any reported functions. Finally, in the end of the report, a program of further research is outlined aimed at constructing tensorial relationships for the temperature and fluence dependent creep surfaces for Zr, Zircaloy 2, and Zircaloy 4.

  2. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  3. A Recoil Mass Spectrometer for the HHIRF facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.D. ); Cormier, T.M. ); Hamilton, J.H. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1989-01-01

    A Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) is to be built that will carry out a broad research program in heavy-ion science. The RMS will make possible the study of otherwise inaccessible exotic nuclei. Careful attention has been given to match the RMS to all the beams available from the HHIRF accelerators, including those beams with the highest energy, as well as massive particles for use in inverse reactions. The RMS is to be a momentum achromat followed by a split electric-dipole mass spectrometer of the type operating at NSRL at the University of Rochester. The RMS is essential for many of the proposed experiments on short-lived and/or low cross-section products. The spectrometer design is discussed, with examples and comparisons with other spectrometers given. Detector arrays to be used with the RMS are also discussed. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New York Busso von Alvensleben meet to ... General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New York Busso von Alvensleben meet to ...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Students & Postdocs: Fellowships:

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    John von Neumann Fellowship John von Neumann Fellowship The John von Neumann Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Computational Science offers an exceptional opportunity to conduct innovative research in computational mathematics and scientific computing on advanced computing architectures. As members of either the Center for Computing Research at Sandia/New Mexico or the Computer Sciences and Information Systems Center at Sandia/California, von Neumann Fellows apply their research findings

  6. Existing Data Format for Two-Parameter Beta-Gamma Histograms...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The current aerosol RMS type data format is not applicable for radioxenon in that the current format contains implicit assumptions specific ...

  7. Optical Metrology Lab Receives New Funding for Upgrades

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Profiler (DLTP) is a new surface slope measuring instrument demonstrating state-of-the-art 80 nano radians (rms) performance in measurements with a 1280 spherical optic. The...

  8. MHK ISDB/Instruments/MTi-G-700 GPS/INS | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    updates occur. Search Related Instruments Related Measurement 3-axis Acceleration (Translation) (6) AirMar 42183 Heading Sensor Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS AIRMAR 150WX...

  9. Sandia Energy - DOE-Sponsored Reference Model Project Results...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    partnered effort to develop marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team...

  10. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Zachery W.; Zevenbergen, Gary A.

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  11. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect

    John Collins; John M. Beck

    2011-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Risk Management System (RMS) is a database used to maintain the project risk register. The RMS also maps risk reduction activities to specific identified risks. Further functionality of the RMS includes mapping reactor suppliers Design Data Needs (DDNs) to risk reduction tasks and mapping Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRTs) to associated risks. This document outlines the basic instructions on how to use the RMS. This document constitutes Revision 1 of the NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk. It incorporates the latest enhancements to the RMS. The enhancements include six new custom views of risk data - Impact/Consequence, Tasks by Project Phase, Tasks by Status, Tasks by Project Phase/Status, Tasks by Impact/WBS, and Tasks by Phase/Impact/WBS.

  12. Stephen Parke Fermilab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephanie von Numers About Us Stephanie von Numers - Communications and Web Coordinator, Education & Workforce Development Stephanie von Numers joined the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in November 2013. She supports the Education & Workforce Development team's printed and online resource development, social media activity, website maintenance and analytics, and outreach events to promote nation-wide energy literacy and career planning in the

  13. LCLS CDR Appendix A - Parameter Tables

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    A Parameter Tables A.1 FEL-Physics A.1.1 Performance A.1.1.1 Electron Beam Parameter Name Low Energy High Energy All Energies Unit Electron energy 4.54 14.35 GeV Electron Lorentz factor 8880 28082 Normalized slice emittance 1.2 1.2 µm rad Charge at undulator entrance 1 1 nC Peak current 3400 3400 A Longitudinal pulse form Flat-Top Transverse pulse form Gaussian RMS bunch length 23 23 µm RMS bunch duration 77 77 fs FWHM bunch length 69 69 µm FWHM bunch duration 230 230 fs Slice rms gamma

  14. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... SC and LQC at Penn State acknowledge the financial support of NSF under DMR-0213623, DMR-0507146. NB acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt foundation. The theory ...

  15. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of energetic materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Azad, Abul Kalam 1 ; Whitley, Von Howard 1 ; Brown, Kathryn Elizabeth 1 ; Ahmed, Towfiq 1 ; Sorensen, Christian Josaf 1 ; Moore, David Steven 1 + Show Author ...

  16. Scott Campbell

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bailey, Scott Campbell, Michael Corn, Deborah A. Frincke, Ardoth Hassler, Craig Jackson, James A. Marsteller, Rodney J. Petersen, Mark Servilla, Von Welch, "Report of the...

  17. COLLOQUIUM: "The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge": The History...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Founded in 1930, it exists to encourage and support curiosity-driven research in the sciences and humanities. Diverse scholars including Albert Einstein, Erwin Panofsky, John von ...

  18. ASCR Program Documents | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC)

    ... architectures that go beyond Moore's Law and mimic neuro-biological architectures. ... and Computation Systems beyond von NeumannTuring Architecture and Moore's Law Limits. ...

  19. NERC IVGTF Task 1-3 Section 3-1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    98 Unlimited Release Printed February 2012 Reactive Power Interconnection Requirements for PV and Wind Plants - Recommendations to NERC Abraham Ellis, Robert Nelson, Edi Von ...

  20. DUAL Gamma-Ray Mission (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    von Ballmoos, P. ; Toulouse, CESR ; Takahashi, T. ; JAXA, Sagamihara ; Gehrels, N. ; NASA, Goddard ; Tueller, J. ; NASA, Goddard ; Baring, M. ; Rice U. ; Beacom, J. ; Ohio...

  1. Stainless steel 316L and Inconel 625 material compatibility with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Abstract not provided. Authors: Iverson, Brian DeVon ; Qiu, Songgang ; Galbraith, Ross ; Fang, Ming ; Ring, Bradley ; Baca, Suzanne Publication Date: 2011-03-01 OSTI Identifier: ...

  2. Two-color quark matter: U(1){sub A} restoration, superfluidity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Brauner, Tomas 1 ; Fukushima, Kenji 2 ; Hidaka, Yoshimasa 3 + Show Author Affiliations Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Strasse ...

  3. 2014 WIND POWER PROGRAM PEER REVIEW-RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Singapore. Argonne Nat. Lab; Invited lecturer at von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. 12 | Wind and Water Power Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Project Plan & ...

  4. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    station in the NSTX-U control room. Seated from left, John Lacenere, Larry Dudek. Standing from left, Anthony Indelicato, Tracy Estes, Stefan Gerhardt, Tim Stevenson, Al von...

  5. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of energetic materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Temperature dependent terahertz properties of energetic materials Authors: Azad, Abul Kalam 1 ; Whitley, Von Howard 1 ; Brown, Kathryn Elizabeth 1 ; Ahmed, Towfiq 1 ...

  6. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford, California; 20130101 Published...

  7. Chemoselective Sensor Development for WR Applications. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Washburn, Cody M. ; Hochrein, James Michael ; Bernstein, Robert ; White II, Gregory Von ; Dirk, Shawn M. ; Smith, Jonell Nicole ; Finnegan, Patrick Sean ; Strong, Jennifer ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Von Abendroth, Gregory" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Patent Number: Patent Application Number: Contract Number: Subject: LabTechnology Center: Sponsoring Office: Issue Date: to ...

  9. Thin Film CIGS and CdTe Photovoltaic Technologies: Commercialization...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic Technologies: Commercialization, Critical Issues, and Applications Preprint H.S. Ullal and B. von Roedern To be presented at the 22nd European Photovoltaic Solar ...

  10. January 30, 2016: Science on Saturday: Dealing with Iran's Nuclear...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    30, 2016 - 09:30 January 30, 2016: Science on Saturday: Dealing with Iran's Nuclear Program Speaker: Professor Frank von Hippel Princeton...

  11. PowerPoint Presentation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    PVLIB, ... * Many variations: 67 parameters, 2 diodes, ... * Evaluations by Boyd, et al (2011) indicate model predicts within 6% RMS for c-Si, mc-Si, less accurate for thin-film ...

  12. SAND2012-1395

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... there are several major developments that portend a dramatic drop in installed PV costs. ... Also, IEEE Std. 1547 specifies that DG should trip off line if the RMS voltage at the ...

  13. Find Reports

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Classified reports - contact the SI-RMS Technical Report Collection for an appointment: ... Office 94 Cities of Gold Road Santa Fe, NM 87506 Where can I find Classified Reports? ...

  14. MHK ISDB/Instruments/CDL MiniRLG2 | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    AirMar 42183 Heading Sensor CDL MiniSense 2-IPS ... further results 3-axis Velocity (Translation) (6) INS CDL MiniPOSNAV Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS CDL MiniPOS3 CDL TOGSNav...

  15. MHK ISDB/Instruments/AirMar 42183 Heading Sensor | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    2-IPS CDL MiniSense 2 CDL MiniPOSNAV ... further results 3-axis Acceleration (Translation) (6) Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS CDL MiniPOSNAV3 AIRMAR 200WX Weather Station...

  16. MHK ISDB/Instruments/CDL MiniPOSNAV3 | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    3 CDL MiniRLG2 AirMar 42183 Heading Sensor ... further results 3-axis Velocity (Translation) (6) Dynamic Motion Sensors 0.05 RMS INS CDL TOGSNav CDL MiniPOSNAV CDL MiniRLG2...

  17. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions | Argonne Leadership...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of 92.16 MeV and the point rms radius is 2.35 fm vs 2.33 from experiment. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Reactions PI Name: James Vary PI Email: jvary@iastate.edu Institution: Iowa ...

  18. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... sent through the chain, again possibly exceeding the damage threshold. To avoid the problems described above, the laser source was specified to operate with less than 0.2% rms ...

  19. Synchronizing femtosecond laser with x-ray synchrotron operating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Test Facility beamline more of Pohang Light Source where timing-jitter less than 4 ps (r.m.s.) is measured using a new shot-to-shot method. less Authors: Jo, Wonhyuk 1...

  20. Rhabdomyosarcoma Arising in a Previously Irradiated Field: An Analysis of 43 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Nguyen D.; Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2013-03-01

    Patients with soft tissue sarcomas that arise from previously irradiated fields have traditionally been reported to have a poor prognosis. In this report, we examined the characteristics and outcomes of patients who developed a rhabdomyosarcoma in a previously irradiated field (RMS-RIF); we hypothesize that these patients should have a better outcome compared to other postradiation soft tissue sarcomas as these tumors are chemosensitive and radiosensitive. A PubMed search of the literature from 1961-2010 yielded 33 studies with data for patients with RMS-RIF. The study included 43 patients with a median age of 6.5 years at the time of radiation therapy (RT) for the initial tumor. The median RT dose was 48 Gy. The median latency period, the time from RT to development of RMS-RIF, was 8 years. The 3-year overall survival for RMS-RIF was 42%. The 3-year overall survival was 66% for patients receiving chemotherapy and local treatment (surgery and/or RT) compared to 29% for those who had systemic treatment only or local treatment only (P=.049). Other factors associated with increased 3-year overall survival included retinoblastoma initial diagnosis (P<.001), age ?18 years at diagnosis of RMS-RIF (P=.003), favorable site (P=.008), and stage 1 disease (P=.002). Age at time of RMS-RIF, retinoblastoma initial tumor, favorable site, stage 1 disease, and use of both systemic and local treatment were found to be favorable prognostic factors for 3-year overall survival.

  1. Quantum leaps in philosophy of mind: Reply to Bourget'scritique

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2004-07-26

    David Bourget has raised some conceptual and technical objections to my development of von Neumann's treatment of the Copenhagen idea that the purely physical process described by the Schroedinger equation must be supplemented by a psychophysical process called the choice of the experiment by Bohr and Process 1 by von Neumann. I answer here each of Bourget's objections.

  2. Book review of Dragonfly Genera of the New World. An Illustrated and Annotated Key to the Anisoptera. Garrison, R.W., N. Von Ellenrieder and J.A. Louton, Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, MD. xi+368 pp. Hardback, ISBN 0-8018-8446-2

    SciTech Connect

    Cannings, R.A.

    2007-03-15

    This superb book is the most important reference on the Order Odonata to appear since the 1999 publication of Philip Corbet's monumental work on the behavior and ecology of Odonata. In the context of specimen identification and faunistics, it is the most significant contribution in decades, for it opens a new door to the most diverse and least known dragonfly fauna on Earth, that of the Neotropical Region. The book treats the genera of all the New World dragonflies, but while the Nearctic Anisoptera (at least north of the Mexican border) is extensively summarized in many taxonomic and identification manuals (e.g., Needham et al. 2000), the Neotropical fauna remains rather poorly known. Much of it still is undescribed and taxonomic syntheses are few and far between. This is partly because of its huge diversity, the remoteness of much of the region, and the relative scarcity of specimens in collections. As T. W. Donnelly (2006) noted in a recent review of this book, the New World tropics have always been a challenge to biologists in many disciplines because the region was first colonized by the Spanish and Portuguese who largely lacked the tradition of natural history studies characteristic of the British, French, Dutch and Germans in Africa, India or Southeast Asia. In South America there simply was no F. C. Fraser to write an equivalent to his three volumes on the Odonata in The Fauna of British India. Borror (1945) was an early and wonderful resource for deciphering the genera of the large family Libellulidae in the Americas. Calvert's hard-to-find contributions on the Odonata (1902-1908) in the Biologia Centrali-Americana helped students of the Central American fauna; the updated equivalent by Foerster (2001) for Mesoamerican genera is also important. But as far as syntheses and overviews, that's about all there was - until now.

  3. Electrical current suppression in Pd-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires caused by reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Oh, Soon-Young; Yu, Han Young; Yun, Yong Ju; Kim, Yark Yeon; Hong, Won G.; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Jeong Yong; Kim, Hae Jin

    2010-04-19

    Pd nanoparticle-doped vanadium pentoxide nanowires (Pd-VONs) were synthesized. Electrical current suppression was observed when the Pd-VON was exposed to hydrogen gas, which cannot be explained by the work function changes mentioned in previous report such as Pd-doped carbon nanotubes and SnO{sub 2} nanowires. Using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we found that the reduction in PdO due to hydrogen exposure plays an important role in the current suppression of the Pd-VON.

  4. SIMULATED FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES TOWARD HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDES

    SciTech Connect

    Akahori, Takuya; Kim, Jongsoo; Ryu, Dongsu; Gaensler, B. M. E-mail: akahori@physics.usyd.edu.au E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr

    2013-04-20

    We study the Faraday rotation measure (RM) due to the Galactic magnetic field (GMF) toward high Galactic latitudes. The RM arises from the global, regular component as well as from the turbulent, random component of the GMF. We model the former based on observations and the latter using the data of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations. For a large number of different GMF models, we produce mock RM maps around the Galactic poles and calculate various statistical quantities with the RM maps. We find that the observed medians of RMs toward the north and south Galactic poles, {approx}0.0 {+-} 0.5 rad m{sup -2} and {approx} + 6.3 {+-} 0.5 rad m{sup -2}, are difficult to explain with any of our many alternate GMF models. The standard deviation of observed RMs, {approx}9 rad m{sup -2}, is clearly larger than that of simulated RMs. The second-order structure function of observed RMs is substantially larger than that of simulated RMs, especially at small angular scales. We discuss other possible contributions to RM toward high Galactic latitudes. Besides observational errors and the intrinsic RM of background radio sources against which RM is observed, we suggest that the RM due to the intergalactic magnetic field may account for a substantial fraction of the observed RM. Finally, we note that reproducing the observed medians may require additional components or/and structures of the GMF that are not present in our models.

  5. Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma Survival Improved With Treatment on Multimodality Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit Kurshan; Wexler, Leonard H.; Singer, Samuel; Alektiar, Kaled M.; Keohan, Mary Louise; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric sarcoma rarely occurring in adults. For unknown reasons, adults with RMS have worse outcomes than do children. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from all patients who presented to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1990 and 2011 with RMS diagnosed at age 16 or older. One hundred forty-eight patients met the study criteria. Ten were excluded for lack of adequate data. Results: The median age was 28 years. The histologic diagnoses were as follows: embryonal 54%, alveolar 33%, pleomorphic 12%, and not otherwise specified 2%. The tumor site was unfavorable in 67% of patients. Thirty-three patients (24%) were at low risk, 61 (44%) at intermediate risk, and 44 (32%) at high risk. Forty-six percent were treated on or according to a prospective RMS protocol. The 5-year rate of overall survival (OS) was 45% for patients with nonmetastatic disease. The failure rates at 5 years for patients with nonmetastatic disease were 34% for local failure and 42% for distant failure. Among patients with nonmetastatic disease (n=94), significant factors associated with OS were histologic diagnosis, site, risk group, age, and protocol treatment. On multivariate analysis, risk group and protocol treatment were significant after adjustment for age. The 5-year OS was 54% for protocol patients versus 36% for nonprotocol patients. Conclusions: Survival in adult patients with nonmetastatic disease was significantly improved for those treated on RMS protocols, most of which are now open to adults.

  6. DPSS Laser Beam Quality Optimization Through Pump Current Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, Rob; Callen, Alice; Sukuta, Sydney; /San Jose City Coll.

    2012-03-30

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate how a DPSS laser beam's quality parameters can be simultaneously optimized through pump current tuning. Two DPSS lasers of the same make and model were used where the laser diode pump current was first varied to ascertain the lowest RMS noise region. The lowest noise was found to be 0.13% in this region and the best M{sup 2} value of 1.0 and highest laser output power were simultaneously attained at the same current point. The laser manufacturer reported a M{sup 2} value of 1.3 and RMS noise value of .14% for these lasers. This study therefore demonstrates that pump current tuning a DPSS laser can simultaneously optimize RMS Noise, Power and M{sup 2} values. Future studies will strive to broaden the scope of the beam quality parameters impacted by current tuning.

  7. Reducing Risk for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Beck II; Harold J. Heydt; Emmanuel O. Opare; Kyle B. Oswald

    2010-07-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, managed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is directed by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, to research, develop, design, construct, and operate a prototype forth generation nuclear reactor to meet the needs of the 21st Century. As with all large projects developing and deploying new technologies, the NGNP has numerous risks that need to be identified, tracked, mitigated, and reduced in order for successful project completion. A Risk Management Plan (RMP) was created to outline the process the INL is using to manage the risks and reduction strategies for the NGNP Project. Integral to the RMP is the development and use of a Risk Management System (RMS). The RMS is a tool that supports management and monitoring of the project risks. The RMS does not only contain a risk register, but other functionality that allows decision makers, engineering staff, and technology researchers to review and monitor the risks as the project matures.

  8. BEAM HALO IN PROTON LINAC BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    T. WANGLER; K. CRANDALL

    2000-08-01

    In this paper we review the present picture of km halo in proton linacs. Space-charge forces acting in mismatched beams have been identified as a major cause of beam-halo. We present a definition of halo based on a ratio of moments of the distribution of the beam coordinates. We find from our initial studies that for halo detined in this way, a beam can have rms emittance growth without halo growth, but halo growth is always accompanied by rms emittance growth. We describe the beam-halo experiment that is in preparation at Los Alamos, which will address questions about the beam profiles, maximum particle amplitudes, and rms emittance growth associated with the halo.

  9. NGNP Risk Management Database: A Model for Managing Risk

    SciTech Connect

    John Collins

    2009-09-01

    To facilitate the implementation of the Risk Management Plan, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project has developed and employed an analytical software tool called the NGNP Risk Management System (RMS). A relational database developed in Microsoft Access, the RMS provides conventional database utility including data maintenance, archiving, configuration control, and query ability. Additionally, the tools design provides a number of unique capabilities specifically designed to facilitate the development and execution of activities outlined in the Risk Management Plan. Specifically, the RMS provides the capability to establish the risk baseline, document and analyze the risk reduction plan, track the current risk reduction status, organize risks by reference configuration system, subsystem, and component (SSC) and Area, and increase the level of NGNP decision making.

  10. Papers Published - April 1, 2001 - March 31, 2002

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... L. Tang, W. B. Tippens, R. E. Tribble, X. L. Tu, L. A. Van Ausdeln, W. H. von Witch, D. Whitehouse, C. Wilkinson, B. Wright, S. C. Wright, Y. Zhang, and K. O. H. Ziock Phys. Rev. ...

  11. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inventors: Spormann, Alfred M. 1 ; Muller, Jochen A. 2 ; Rosner, Bettina M. 3 ; Von Abendroth, Gregory 4 ; Meshulam-Simon, Galit 5 ; McCarty, Perry L 1 + Show Author ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... curves Wullschleger, Stan D ; Gu, Lianhong ; Pallardy, Stephen G. ; Tu, Kevin ; Law, Beverly E. The Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry (FvCB) model of photosynthesis is a ...

  13. Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership II Expert...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Cost recovery structure? Single or dual-fuel? Because ComEd ... single stage two zoned heat pump system. * TVA three ... Jack LavertyColumbia Gas, Valerie von SchrammCPS ...

  14. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Environmenta...

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    H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Heinemann, Detlev (Detlev Heinemann) - Institut fr Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universitt Oldenburg Hines, Paul (Paul Hines) - School of ...

  15. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Veron, K von Salzen, GK Walker, Z Wang, AB Wolf, S Xie, KM Xu, F Yang, and G Zhang. 2009. ... DD Turner, DE Veron, GK Walker, Z Wang, AB Wolf, KM Xu, F Yang, and G Zhang. 2009. ...

  16. Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inventors: Spormann, Alfred M 1 ; Muller, Jochen A 2 ; Rosner, Bettina M 3 ; Von Abendroth, Gregory 4 ; Meshulam-Simon, Galit 5 ; McCarty, Perry L 1 + Show Author ...

  17. AE-NUFACT-SBN-0914.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... University of Bern: A. Ereditato, D. Goeldi, I. Kreslo, M. Luethi, C. Rudolf von Rohr, T. Strauss, M. Weber INFN: F. Cavanna, O. Palamara (currently at Yale) Virginia Tech: M. ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    ... Two cylindrical curved crystals are used as collection optics and diffractive elements in the von Hamos geometry. The dispersed x rays are focused onto the slit of an ultrafast ...

  19. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ou SS, KN Liou, XJ Wang, A Dybdahl, M Mussetto, LD Carey, J Niu, JA Kankiewicz, S Kidder, and TH Von der Haar. 2009. "Retrievals of mixed-phase...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - EERE org chart public 3-28-2016

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    EE-61P Steven Capanna , Director International EE-61I Robert Sandoli, Director ... VonVital Director (Acting) Office of Financial Management(OFM) EE-63 (Vacant) Director Budget ...

  1. Microsoft Word - 0096.TBH.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... David L. Moses, Case No. TBH-0066 (2008) (citing Casey Von ... Dennis Patterson, Case No. TBH-0047 (2008) (quoting Kalil v. ... Tr. at 376 (Hyder); see also Ex. AA. Repeated ...

  2. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

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    Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." Frank von Hippel discusses the Iran nuclear deal at the Jan. 30 Ronald E. Hatcher Science on Saturday ...

  3. my title

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    ... Matter 25 (2013) 396002. xviii A. Magnus G. Carvalho, F. Garcia, V. S. R. de Sousa, P. J. von Ranke, D. L. Rocco, G. D. Loula, E. J. de Carvalho, A. A. Coelho, L.M. da Silva, F. ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Wang, Qi (2) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit ... Soft-virtual corrections to Higgs production at N 3 LO Li, Ye ; von Manteuffel, Andreas ; ...

  5. RSC_CP_C4CP04232H 1..28

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Lett., 1998, 81(19), 4156-4159. 25 O. Scherzer, Sparische und chromatische Korrektur von Electronen-Linsen, Optik, 1947, 2, 114-132. 26 H. Rose, History of aberration correction, ...

  6. PPPL_OrgChart_12.2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Infrastructure Head: L. Dudek* Dep for Ops: A. vonHalle* Dep for INF: E. Perry* Business Ops & CFO Head: K.A. Fischer NSTX - U Project: M. Ono Program: J.E. Menard Dep:...

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    Datasets0 Filter Results Filter by Subject theory-hep,hepth (4) theory-hep,hepth, math (1) Filter by Author Dixon, Lance J. (6) von Hippel, Matt (6) Bern, Zvi (2) Douglas,...

  8. SAC - Linac Coherent Light Source

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    von der Linde - University of Essen, Germany Justin Wark,-Oxford University, USA C. Lewis Cocke-Kansas State University, USA Robert Schoenlein-LBNL, USA Philip Anfinrud-NIH,...

  9. NREL: Technology Deployment - Disaster Preparedness and Planning

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado National Guardsmen respond to floods in Boulder County. Photo credit: Sgt. Joseph VonNida, U.S. DOD. Colorado In September 2013 parts of Colorado recorded historical ...

  10. Spark ignited turbulent flame kernel growth. Annual report, January--December, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Santavicca, D.A.

    1994-06-01

    Cyclic combustion variations in spark-ignition engines limit the use of dilute charge strategies for achieving low NO{sub x} emissions and improved fuel economy. Results from an experimental study of the effect of incomplete fuel-air mixing (ifam) on spark-ignited flame kernel growth in turbulent propane-air mixtures are presented. The experiments were conducted in a turbulent flow system that allows for independent variation of flow parameters, ignition system parameters, and the degree of fuel-air mixing. Measurements were made at 1 atm and 300 K conditions. Five cases were studied; a premixed and four incompletely mixed cases with 6%, 13%, 24% and 33% RMS (root-mean-square) fluctuations in the fuel/air equivalence ratio. High speed laser shadowgraphy at 4,000 frames-per-second was used to record flame kernel growth following spark ignition, from which the equivalent flame kernel radius as a function of time was determined. The effect of ifam was evaluated in terms of the flame kernel growth rate, cyclic variations in the flame kernel growth, and the rate of misfire. The results show that fluctuations in local mixture strength due to ifam cause the flame kernel surface to become wrinkled and distorted; and that the amount of wrinkling increases as the degree of ifam. Ifam was also found to result in a significant increase in cyclic variations in the flame kernel growth. The average flame kernel growth rates for the premixed and the incompletely mixed cases were found to be within the experimental uncertainty except for the 33%-RMS-fluctuation case where the growth rate is significantly lower. The premixed and 6%-RMS-fluctuation cases had a 0% misfire rate. The misfire rates were 1% and 2% for the 13%-RMS-fluctuation and 24%-RMS-fluctuation cases, respectively; however, it drastically increased to 23% in the 33%-RMS-fluctuation case.

  11. SU-E-J-171: Surface Imaging Based Intrafraction Motion Assessments for Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wiant, D; Vanderstraeten, C; Maurer, J; Pursley, J; Terrell, J; Sintay, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify and characterize intrafraction motion for whole brain radiotherapy treatments in open face masks using 3D surface imaging. Methods: Fifteen whole brain patients were monitored with 3D surface imaging over a total of 202 monitoring sessions. Mean translations and rotations were calculated over each minute, each session, and over all sessions combined. The percentage of each session that the root mean square (RMS) of the linear translations were outside of 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm were determined for each patient. Correlations between mean translations per minute and time and between standard deviation per minute and time were evaluated using Pearson's r value. Results: The mean RMS translation averaged over all patients was 1.45 mm +/− 1.52 mm. The patients spent an average of 18%, 10%, 6%, and 3% of the monitoring time outside of 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, and 5 mm RMS tolerances, respectively. The RMS values averaged over all patients were 1.31 mm +/− 0.98 mm, 1.52 +/- 1.04, and 1.30 mm +/− 0.71 mm over the 1th, 5th, and 10th minutes of monitoring, respectively. Neither, the RMS values (p = 0.15) or the standard deviations of the RMS values (p = 0.16) showed significant correlations with time. Conclusion: The patients were positioned within 2 mm of isocenter, which was the initial set-up tolerance, for the majority of their treatments. The average position changed by < 0.3 mm over 10 minutes of monitoring. Short term movements, reflected by the standard deviations, where on the order of 1 mm. This immobilization system provides adequate immobilization over a course of treatment for whole brain radiotherapy. This system may also be suitable for head and neck or stereotactic radiosurgery treatments as well.

  12. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifeng, E-mail: walfe@nuaa.edu.cn; Hu, Haiyan [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 210016 Nanjing (China)

    2014-06-21

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  13. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Von Abendroth, Gregory" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Patent Number: Patent Application Number: Contract Number: Subject: Lab/Technology Center: Sponsoring Office: Issue Date: to Sort: Relevance (highest to lowest) Publication Date (newest first) Publication Date (oldest first) Close Clear All Find Switch to Detail View for this search DOepatents Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records 2 results for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Von Abendroth, Gregory" ×

  14. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Klimov receives Alexander von Humboldt award May 16, 2013 Victor Klimov of Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy (C-PCS) received the Alexander von Humboldt award from the foundation of the same name. The German government grants the award in recognition of a researcher whose discoveries, theories or insights have had a significant impact on his or her own discipline and who is expected to continue producing cutting-edge achievements in the future. The 60,000 Euro award finances extended

  15. Investigation of Generation, Acceleration, Transport and Final Focusing of High-Intensity Heavy Ion Beams from Sources to Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chiping Chen

    2006-10-26

    Under the auspices of the research grant, the Intense Beam Theoretical Research Goup at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science and Fusion Center made significant contributions in a number of important areas in the HIF and HEDP research, including: (a) Derivation of rms envelope equations and study of rms envelope dynamics for high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing transport systems; (b) Identification of a new mechanism for chaotic particle motion, halo formation, and beam loss in high-intensity heavy ion beams in a small-aperture AG focusing systems; Development of elliptic beam theory; (d) Study of Physics Issues in the Neutralization Transport Experiment (NTX).

  16. Grand Junction/New Brunswick Laboratory interlaboratory measurement program. Part I. Evaluation. Part II. Methods manual. [National Uranium Resources Evaluation (NURE)

    SciTech Connect

    Trahey, N.M.; Voeks, A.M.; Soriano, M.D.

    1982-09-01

    This interlaboratory measurement program was conducted to provide a reference data base for comparison of measurements performed using various measurement methods under the National Uranium Resources Evaluation (NURE) Program. The design of the program also included an evaluation of the accuracies of the measurement methods used by the participating laboratories in measuring New Brunswick Laboratory Reference Materials (RMs) 101-A through 110-A, the low level uranium and thorium samples distributed in the program. Finally, consensus values for these RMs, based on participants measurement data, were calculated.

  17. Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. H.; Wang, Z. X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, X. G.

    2013-06-15

    Error-field penetration in reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configurations is numerically investigated by using a two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic model in slab geometry. To explore different dynamic processes in locked modes, three equilibrium states are adopted. Stable, marginal, and unstable current profiles for double tearing modes are designed by varying the current intensity between two resonant surfaces separated by a certain distance. Further, the dynamic characteristics of locked modes in the three RMS states are identified, and the relevant physics mechanisms are elucidated. The scaling behavior of critical perturbation value with initial plasma velocity is numerically obtained, which obeys previously established relevant analytical theory in the viscoresistive regime.

  18. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Michael Strasik

    2007-06-29

    Boeing Phantom Works and its team originally proposed a three-year Phase III SPI project to develop a 30-kWh flywheel with a 100 kW power capability as a power risk management system (RMS) for power users and providers. The chief objectives for the Risk Management System Flywheel were to (1) demonstrate its ability to protect a critical load such as a small data center from swings in power availability, cost, and power factor and (2) show that the RMS flywheel can perform these functions with reduced noise, emissions, and operating costs when compared with non-HTS competitors including batteries, diesel generators, and microturbines.

  19. Development of ion beam figuring system with electrostatic deflection for ultraprecise X-ray reflective optics

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Jumpei; Matsuyama, Satoshi Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2015-09-15

    We developed an ion beam figuring system that utilizes electrostatic deflection. The system can produce an arbitrary shape by deterministically scanning the ion beam. The scan of the ion beam, which can be precisely controlled using only an electrical signal, enables us to avoid degradation of the mirror shape caused by imperfect acceleration or deceleration of a mechanically scanning stage. Additionally, this surface figuring method can easily be combined with X-ray metrology because the workpiece remains fixed during the figuring. We evaluated the figuring accuracy of the system by fabricating a plano-elliptical mirror for X-ray focusing. A mirror with a shape error of 1.4 nm root mean square (RMS) with a maximum removal depth of 992 nm, which corresponds to figuring accuracy of 0.14% RMS, was achieved. After the second shape corrections, an elliptical shape with a shape error of approximately 1 nm peak-to-valley, 0.48 nm RMS could be fabricated. Then, the mirror surface was smoothed by a low-energy ion beam. Consequently, a micro-roughness of 0.117 nm RMS, measured by atomic force microscopy, was achieved over an area of 1 × 1 μm{sup 2}.

  20. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  1. Monte Carlo evidence for the deviation from the Alexander-Orbach rule in three-dimensional percolation

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, R.B.; Stauffer, D.; Zabolitzky, J.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation is used to study the diffusion at the percolation threshold on large simple cubic lattices. The exponent k for the rms displacement r with t in r - t/sup k/ is found to be smaller than 0.2, while the Alexander-Orbach 4/3 rule for the spectral dimension predicts k = 0.201 +/- 0.002.

  2. Harmonic analysis of electrical distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This report presents data pertaining to research on harmonics of electric power distribution systems. Harmonic data is presented on RMS and average measurements for determination of harmonics in buildings; fluorescent ballast; variable frequency drive; georator geosine harmonic data; uninterruptible power supply; delta-wye transformer; westinghouse suresine; liebert datawave; and active injection mode filter data.

  3. A comparison of WEC control strategies

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... faster) then is required to achieve optimal absorption. 50 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 ... by RMS power-net. - Total absolute power flow - Indication of stress on PCC. Is is ...

  4. Assessing Fossil and New Carbon in Reclaimed Mined Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rattan Lal; David Ussiri

    2008-09-30

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in the reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is the mixture of coal C originating from mining and reclamation activities and recent plant-derived organic carbon (OC). Accurate estimates of OC pools and sequestration rates in the RMS are limited by lack of standard and cost-effective method for determination of coal-C concentration. The main objective of this project was to develop and test analytical procedures for quantifying pool sizes of coal-derived C in RMS and to partition organic C in RMS into coal-derived and newly deposited SOC fractions. Analysis of soil and coal artificial mixtures indicated that the {Delta}{sup 13}C method developed was very effective in estimating coal C added in the mixtures, especially soils under C4 plants. However, most of the reclaimed sites in Ohio are under C3 plants with range of {Delta}{sup 13}C signal falling within ranges of coal. The wide range of {Delta}{sup 13}C signal observed in minesoils, (i.e. -26 to -30 for plants and -23 to -26 for coal) limits the ability of this approach to be used for southeast Ohio minesoils. This method is applicable for reclaimed prime farm land under long term corn or corn soybean rotation. Chemi-thermal method was very effective in quantifying coal-C fraction in both soil-coal artificial mixtures and minesoils. The recovery of coal-C from the mixture ranged from 93 to 100% of coal. Cross-validation of chemi-thermal method with radiocarbon analysis revealed that chemi-thermal method was as effective as radiocarbon analysis in quantifying coal-C in RMS. Coal C determined after chemi-thermal treatment of samples was highly correlated with coal C concentration calculated by radiocarbon activity (r{sup 2} = 0.95, P < 0.01). Therefore, both radiocarbon activity and chemi-thermal method were effective in estimating coal carbon concentration in reclaimed minesoils of southeast Ohio. Overall, both coal-C and recent OC fraction exhibited high spatial and depth variation, suggesting

  5. GTRI Remote Monitoring System: Training and Operational Needs Assessment Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Debra E.; Fox, Sorcha

    2012-04-20

    The mission of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA's) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to identify, secure, recover and facilitate the disposition of vulnerable nuclear and high-risk radioactive materials around the world that pose a threat to the United States and the international community. The GTRI's unique mission to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide directly addresses recommendations of the 9/11 Commission1, and is a vital part of the President's National Security Strategy and the Global Initiative. The GTRI Remote Monitoring System (RMS) is a standalone security system that includes radiation and tamper alarms, and CCTV; which can be transmitted securely over the Internet to multiple on-site and off-site locations. Through our experiences during installation of the system at 162 sites, plus feedback received from Alarm Response Training course participants, site input to project teams and analysis of trouble calls; indications were that current system training was lacking and inconsistent. A survey was undertaken to gather information from RMS users across the nation, to evaluate the current level of training and determine what if any improvements needed to be made. Additional questions were focused on the operation of the RMS software. The training survey was initially sent electronically to 245 users at the RMS sites and achieved a 37.6% return rate. Analysis of the resulting data revealed that 34.6% of the respondents had not received training or were unsure if they had, despite the fact that vendor engineers provide training at installation of the system. Any training received was referred to as minimal, and brief, not documented, and nothing in writing. 63.7% of respondents said they were either not at all prepared or only somewhat prepared to use the RMS software required to effectively operate the system. As a result

  6. Active galactic nucleus X-ray variability in the XMM-COSMOS survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzuisi, G.; Ponti, G.; Salvato, M.; Brusa, M.; Nandra, P. K.; Merloni, A.; Rosario, D.; Hasinger, G.; Sanders, D.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Bongiorno, A.; Lusso, E.; Steinhardt, C.; Silverman, J.; Schramm, M.; Trump, J.; and others

    2014-02-01

    We used the observations carried out by XMM in the COSMOS field over 3.5 yr to study the long term variability of a large sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) (638 sources) in a wide range of redshifts (0.1 < z < 3.5) and X-ray luminosities (10{sup 41} < L {sub 0.5-10} <10{sup 45.5}). Both a simple statistical method to assess the significance of variability and the Normalized Excess Variance (σ{sub rms}{sup 2}) parameter were used to obtain a quantitative measurement of the variability. Variability is found to be prevalent in most AGNs, whenever we have good statistics to measure it, and no significant differences between type 1 and type 2 AGNs were found. A flat (slope –0.23 ± 0.03) anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and X-ray luminosity is found when all significantly variable sources are considered together. When divided into three redshift bins, the anti-correlation becomes stronger and evolving with z, with higher redshift AGNs being more variable. We prove, however, that this effect is due to the pre-selection of variable sources: when considering all of the sources with an available σ{sub rms}{sup 2} measurement, the evolution in redshift disappears. For the first time, we were also able to study long term X-ray variability as a function of M {sub BH} and Eddington ratio for a large sample of AGNs spanning a wide range of redshifts. An anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and M {sub BH} is found, with the same slope of anti-correlation between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and X-ray luminosity, suggesting that the latter may be a by-product of the former. No clear correlation is found between σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and the Eddington ratio in our sample. Finally, no correlation is found between the X-ray σ{sub rms}{sup 2} and optical variability.

  7. Compositional analysis of biomass reference materials: Results from an interlaboratory study

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Templeton, David W.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Yen, James H.; Sharpless, Katherine E.

    2015-10-29

    Biomass compositional methods are used to compare different lignocellulosic feedstocks, to measure component balances around unit operations and to determine process yields and therefore the economic viability of biomass-to-biofuel processes. Four biomass reference materials (RMs NIST 8491–8494) were prepared and characterized, via an interlaboratory comparison exercise in the early 1990s to evaluate biomass summative compositional methods, analysts, and laboratories. Having common, uniform, and stable biomass reference materials gives the opportunity to assess compositional data compared to other analysts, to other labs, and to a known compositional value. The expiration date for the original characterization of these RMs was reached andmore » an effort to assess their stability and recharacterize the reference values for the remaining material using more current methods of analysis was initiated. We sent samples of the four biomass RMs to 11 academic, industrial, and government laboratories, familiar with sulfuric acid compositional methods, for recharacterization of the component reference values. In this work, we have used an expanded suite of analytical methods that are more appropriate for herbaceous feedstocks, to recharacterize the RMs’ compositions. We report the median values and the expanded uncertainty values for the four RMs on a dry-mass, whole-biomass basis. The original characterization data has been recalculated using median statistics to facilitate comparisons with this data. We found improved total component closures for three out of the four RMs compared to the original characterization, and the total component closures were near 100 %, which suggests that most components were accurately measured and little double counting occurred. Here, the major components were not statistically different in the recharacterization which suggests that the biomass materials are stable during storage and that additional components, not seen in the original

  8. Compositional analysis of biomass reference materials: Results from an interlaboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, David W.; Wolfrum, Edward J.; Yen, James H.; Sharpless, Katherine E.

    2015-10-29

    Biomass compositional methods are used to compare different lignocellulosic feedstocks, to measure component balances around unit operations and to determine process yields and therefore the economic viability of biomass-to-biofuel processes. Four biomass reference materials (RMs NIST 8491–8494) were prepared and characterized, via an interlaboratory comparison exercise in the early 1990s to evaluate biomass summative compositional methods, analysts, and laboratories. Having common, uniform, and stable biomass reference materials gives the opportunity to assess compositional data compared to other analysts, to other labs, and to a known compositional value. The expiration date for the original characterization of these RMs was reached and an effort to assess their stability and recharacterize the reference values for the remaining material using more current methods of analysis was initiated. We sent samples of the four biomass RMs to 11 academic, industrial, and government laboratories, familiar with sulfuric acid compositional methods, for recharacterization of the component reference values. In this work, we have used an expanded suite of analytical methods that are more appropriate for herbaceous feedstocks, to recharacterize the RMs’ compositions. We report the median values and the expanded uncertainty values for the four RMs on a dry-mass, whole-biomass basis. The original characterization data has been recalculated using median statistics to facilitate comparisons with this data. We found improved total component closures for three out of the four RMs compared to the original characterization, and the total component closures were near 100 %, which suggests that most components were accurately measured and little double counting occurred. Here, the major components were not statistically different in the recharacterization which suggests that the biomass materials are stable during storage and that additional components, not seen in the original

  9. Metrology for Industry for use in the Manufacture of Grazing Incidence Beam Line Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, James P.; Parks, Robert E.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this SBIR was to determine the slope sensitivity of Specular Reflection Deflectometry (SRD) and whether shearing methods had the sensitivity to be able to separate errors in the test equipment from slope error in the unit under test (UUT), or mirror. After many variations of test parameters it does not appear that SRD yields results much better than 1 μ radian RMS independent of how much averaging is done. Of course, a single number slope sensitivity over the full range of spatial scales is not a very insightful number in the same sense as a single number phase or height RMS value in interferometry does not tell the full story. However, the 1 μ radian RMS number is meaningful when contrasted with a sensitivity goal of better than 0.1 μ radian RMS. Shearing is a time proven method of separating the errors in a measurement from the actual shape of a UUT. It is accomplished by taking multiple measurements while moving the UUT relative to the test instrument. This process makes it possible to separate the two errors sources but only to a sensitivity of about 1 μ radian RMS. Another aspect of our conclusions is that this limit probably holds largely independent of the spatial scale of the test equipment. In the proposal for this work it was suggested that a test screen the full size of the UUT could be used to determine the slopes on scales of maybe 0.01 to full scale of the UUT while smaller screens and shorter focal length lenses could be used to measure shorter, or smaller, patches of slope. What we failed to take into consideration was that as the scale of the test equipment got smaller so too did the optical lever arm on which the slope was calculated. Although we did not do a test with a shorter focal length lens over a smaller sample area it is hard to argue with the logic that the slope sensitivity will be about the same independent of the spatial scale of the measurement assuming the test equipment is similarly scaled. On a more positive note

  10. The calibration of the WISE W1 and W2 Tully-Fisher relation

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, J. D. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 278-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Scowcroft, Victoria [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Tully, R. Brent [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Courtois, Hlne; Sorce, Jenny G. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universit Claude Bernard Lyon I, F-69100 Lyon (France); Jarrett, T. H. [University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Masci, Frank J. [Image Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    In order to explore local large-scale structures and velocity fields, accurate galaxy distance measures are needed. We now extend the well-tested recipe for calibrating the correlation between galaxy rotation rates and luminositiescapable of providing such distance measuresto the all-sky, space-based imaging data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) W1 (3.4 ?m) and W2 (4.6 ?m) filters. We find a correlation of line width to absolute magnitude (known as the Tully-Fisher relation, TFR) of M{sub W1}{sup b,i,k,a}=?20.35?9.56(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5) (0.54 mag rms) and M{sub W2}{sup b,i,k,a}=?19.76?9.74(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5) (0.56 mag rms) from 310 galaxies in 13 clusters. We update the I-band TFR using a sample 9% larger than in Tully and Courtois. We derive M{sub I}{sup b,i,k}=?21.34?8.95(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5) (0.46 mag rms). The WISE TFRs show evidence of curvature. Quadratic fits give M{sub W1}{sup b,i,k,a}=?20.48?8.36(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5)+3.60(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5){sup 2} (0.52 mag rms) and M{sub W2}{sup b,i,k,a}=?19.91?8.40(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5)+4.32(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5){sup 2} (0.55 mag rms). We apply an I-band WISE color correction to lower the scatter and derive M{sub C{sub W{sub 1}}}=?20.22?9.12(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5) and M{sub C{sub W{sub 2}}}=?19.63?9.11(log?W{sub mx}{sup i}?2.5) (both 0.46 mag rms). Using our three independent TFRs (W1 curved, W2 curved, and I band), we calibrate the UNION2 Type Ia supernova sample distance scale and derive H {sub 0} = 74.4 1.4(stat) 2.4(sys) km s{sup 1} Mpc{sup 1} with 4% total error.

  11. Chemical reaction and equilibration mechanisms in detonation waves

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C. M., LLNL

    1997-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical evidence for the nonequilibrium Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (NEZND) theory of self-sustaining detonation is presented. High density, high temperature transition state theory is used to calculate unimolecular reaction rate constants for the initial decomposition of gaseous norbornene, liquid nitromethane, and solid, single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate as functions of shock temperature. The calculated rate constants are compared to those derived from experimental induction time measurements at various shock and detonation states. Uncertainties in the calculated shock and von Neumann spike temperatures are the main drawbacks to calculating these reaction rates. Nanosecond measurements of the shock temperatures of unreacted explosives are necessary to reduce these uncertainties.

  12. A Pixel Readout Chip in 40 nm CMOS Process for High Count Rate Imaging Systems with Minimization of Charge Sharing Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Maj, Piotr; Grybos, P.; Szczgiel, R.; Kmon, P.; Drozd, A.; Deptuch, G.

    2013-11-07

    We present a prototype chip in 40 nm CMOS technology for readout of hybrid pixel detector. The prototype chip has a matrix of 18x24 pixels with a pixel pitch of 100 ?m. It can operate both in single photon counting (SPC) mode and in C8P1 mode. In SPC the measured ENC is 84 e? rms (for the peaking time of 48 ns), while the effective offset spread is below 2 mV rms. In the C8P1 mode the chip reconstructs full charge deposited in the detector, even in the case of charge sharing, and it identifies a pixel with the largest charge deposition. The chip architecture and preliminary measurements are reported.

  13. QUIET-SUN INTENSITY CONTRASTS IN THE NEAR-ULTRAVIOLET AS MEASURED FROM SUNRISE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Borrero, J. M.; Gandorfer, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Afram, N.; Unruh, Y. C.; Berdyugina, S. V.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Bonet, J. A.; MartInez Pillet, V.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    We present high-resolution images of the Sun in the near-ultraviolet spectral range between 214 nm and 397 nm as obtained from the first science flight of the 1 m SUNRISE balloon-borne solar telescope. The quiet-Sun rms intensity contrasts found in this wavelength range are among the highest values ever obtained for quiet-Sun solar surface structures-up to 32.8% at a wavelength of 214 nm. We compare the rms contrasts obtained from the observational data with theoretical intensity contrasts obtained from numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For 388 nm and 312 nm the observations agree well with the numerical simulations whereas at shorter wavelengths discrepancies between observed and simulated contrasts remain.

  14. Intra-beam Scattering Theory and RHIC Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Fedotov, A.; Fischer, W.; Malitsky, N.; Parzen, G.; Qiang, J.

    2005-06-08

    Intra-beam scattering is the leading mechanism limiting the luminosity in heavy-ion storage rings like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The multiple Coulomb scattering among the charged particles causes transverse emittance growth and longitudinal beam de-bunching and beam loss, compromising machine performance during collision. Theoretically, the original theories developed by Piwinski, Bjorken, and Mtingwa only describe the rms beam size growth of an unbounded Gaussian distribution. Equations based on the Fokker-Planck approach are developed to further describe the beam density profile evolution and beam loss. During the 2004 RHIC heavy-ion operation, dedicated IBS experiments were performed to bench-mark the rms beam size growth, beam loss, and profile evolution both for a Gaussian-like and a longitudinal hollow beam. This paper summarizes the IBS theory and discusses the experimental bench-marking results.

  15. Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    K. Lorenz; R. Lal

    2007-12-31

    This research project was aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of RMS and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. Restoration of disturbed land is followed by the application of nutrients to the soil to promote the vegetation development. Reclamation is important both for preserving the environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. Since reclamation treatments have significant influence on the rate of soil development, a study on subplots was designed with the objectives of assessing the potential of different biosolids on soil organic C (SOC) sequestration rate, soil development, and changes in soil physical and water transmission properties. All sites are owned and maintained by American Electric Power (AEP). These sites were reclaimed by two techniques: (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover.

  16. Approach to the fatigue analysis of vertical-axis wind-turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.

    1981-09-01

    A cursory analysis of the stress history of wind turbine blades indicates that a single stress level at each wind speed does not adequately describe the blade stress history. A statistical description is required. Blade stress data collected from the DOE/ALCOA Low Cost experimental turbines indicate that the Rayleigh probability density function adequately describes the distribution of vibratory stresses at each wind speed. The Rayleigh probability density function allows the distribution of vibratory stresses to be described by the RMS of the stress vs. time signal. With the RMS stress level described for all wind speeds, the complete stress history of the turbine blades is known. Miner's linear cumulative damage rule is used as a basis for summing the fatigue damage over all operating conditions. An analytical expression is derived to predict blade fatigue life.

  17. THE APPLICATION OF AN EVOLUTIONARY ALGORITHM TO THE OPTIMIZATION OF A MESOSCALE METEOROLOGICAL MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, D.; O'Steen, L.

    2008-02-11

    We show that a simple evolutionary algorithm can optimize a set of mesoscale atmospheric model parameters with respect to agreement between the mesoscale simulation and a limited set of synthetic observations. This is illustrated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). A set of 23 RAMS parameters is optimized by minimizing a cost function based on the root mean square (rms) error between the RAMS simulation and synthetic data (observations derived from a separate RAMS simulation). We find that the optimization can be efficient with relatively modest computer resources, thus operational implementation is possible. The optimization efficiency, however, is found to depend strongly on the procedure used to perturb the 'child' parameters relative to their 'parents' within the evolutionary algorithm. In addition, the meteorological variables included in the rms error and their weighting are found to be an important factor with respect to finding the global optimum.

  18. Precision vector control of a superconducting RF cavity driven by an injection locked magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Brian; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Cullerton, Ed; Varghese, Philip

    2015-03-01

    The technique presented in this paper enables the regulation of both radio frequency amplitude and phase in narrow band devices such as a Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity driven by constant power output devices i.e. magnetrons [1]. The ability to use low cost high efficiency magnetrons for accelerator RF power systems, with tight vector regulation, presents a substantial cost savings in both construction and operating costs - compared to current RF power system technology. An operating CW system at 2.45 GHz has been experimentally developed. Vector control of an injection locked magnetron has been extensively tested and characterized with a SRF cavity as the load. Amplitude dynamic range of 30 dB, amplitude stability of 0.3% r.m.s, and phase stability of 0.26 degrees r.m.s. has been demonstrated.

  19. Precision vector control of a superconducting RF cavity driven by an injection locked magnetron

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chase, Brian; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Cullerton, Ed; Varghese, Philip

    2015-03-01

    The technique presented in this paper enables the regulation of both radio frequency amplitude and phase in narrow band devices such as a Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity driven by constant power output devices i.e. magnetrons [1]. The ability to use low cost high efficiency magnetrons for accelerator RF power systems, with tight vector regulation, presents a substantial cost savings in both construction and operating costs - compared to current RF power system technology. An operating CW system at 2.45 GHz has been experimentally developed. Vector control of an injection locked magnetron has been extensively tested and characterized with a SRFmore » cavity as the load. Amplitude dynamic range of 30 dB, amplitude stability of 0.3% r.m.s, and phase stability of 0.26 degrees r.m.s. has been demonstrated.« less

  20. Amplitude variations on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Dillon, D; Gavel, D; Phillion, D; Macintosh, B

    2007-08-14

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. At the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed, we have already demonstrated wavefront control of better than 1 nm rms within controllable spatial frequencies. Corresponding contrast measurements, however, are limited by amplitude variations, including those introduced by the micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror. Results from experimental measurements and wave optic simulations of amplitude variations on the ExAO testbed are presented. We find systematic intensity variations of about 2% rms, and intensity variations with the MEMS to be 6%. Some errors are introduced by phase and amplitude mixing because the MEMS is not conjugate to the pupil, but independent measurements of MEMS reflectivity suggest that some error is introduced by small non-uniformities in the reflectivity.

  1. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Wright, Jason T.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Basri, Gibor; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  2. A three-body model of the {sup 11}B nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2011-08-15

    The binding energy and the rms charge and mass radii have been calculated in terms of the single-channel three-body {sup 4}He{sup 4}He{sup 3}H model of the {sup 11}B nucleus with an expansion of the three-body wave function in a nonorthogonal Gaussian basis. Parameters of the wave function are presented and convergence of the three-body energy depending on the number of expansion terms is demonstrated.

  3. SU-E-T-545: MLC Distance Travelled as a Predictor for Motor Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Stathakis, S; Defoor, D; Linden, P; Kirby, N; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the frequency of Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) leaf failures, investigate methods to predict them and reduce linac downtime. Methods: A Varian HD120 MLC was used in our study. The hyperterminal MLC errors logged from 06/2012 to 12/2014 were collected. Along with the hyperterminal errors, the MLC motor changes and all other MLC interventions by the linear accelerator engineer were recorded. The MLC dynalog files were also recorded on a daily basis for each treatment and during linac QA. The dynalog files were analyzed to calculate root mean square errors (RMS) and cumulative MLC travel distance per motor. An in-house MatLab code was used to analyze all dynalog files, record RMS errors and calculate the distance each MLC traveled per day. Results: A total of 269 interventions were recorded over a period of 18 months. Of these, 146 included MLC motor leaf change, 39 T-nut replacements, and 84 MLC cleaning sessions. Leaves close to the middle of each side required the most maintenance. In the A bank, leaves A27 to A40 recorded 73% of all interventions, while the same leaves in the B bank counted for 52% of the interventions. On average, leaves in the middle of the bank had their motors changed approximately every 1500m of travel. Finally, it was found that the number of RMS errors increased prior to an MLC motor change. Conclusion: An MLC dynalog file analysis software was developed that can be used to log daily MLC usage. Our eighteen-month data analysis showed that there is a correlation between the distance an MLC travels, the RMS and the life of the MLC motor. We plan to use this tool to predict MLC motor failures and with proper and timely intervention, reduce the downtime of the linac during clinical hours.

  4. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  5. Comment on ''Generation of cold low divergent atomic beam of indium by laser ablation'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113302 (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, A.; Booth, A.; Lee, S.; Amonson, M.; Bergeson, S. D.

    2009-04-15

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a subthermal atomic beam.

  6. Direct Search for Low Mass Dark Matter Particles with CCDs

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Barreto, J.; Cease, H.; Diehl, H. T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Harrison, N.; Jones, J.; Kilminster, B.; Molina, J.; Smith, J.; et al

    2012-05-15

    A direct dark matter search is performed using fully-depleted high-resistivity CCD detectors. Due to their low electronic readout noise (RMS ~7 eV) these devices operate with a very low detection threshold of 40 eV, making the search for dark matter particles with low masses (~5 GeV) possible. The results of an engineering run performed in a shallow underground site are presented, demonstrating the potential of this technology in the low mass region.

  7. Microdevice having interior cavity with high aspect ratio surface features and associated methods of manufacture and use

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2002-01-01

    A microdevice having interior cavity with high aspect ratio features and ultrasmooth surfaces, and associated method of manufacture and use is described. An LIGA-produced shaped bit is used to contour polish the surface of a sacrificial mandrel. The contoured sacrificial mandrel is subsequently coated with a structural material and the mandrel removed to produce microdevices having micrometer-sized surface features and sub-micrometer RMS surface roughness.

  8. Identifying Longitudinal Jitter Sources in the LCLS Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef; Akre, Ron; Brachmann, Axel; Craft, Jim; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Loos, Henrik; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Ratner, Daniel; Smith, Tonee; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is an x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) with wavelengths of 0.15 nm to 1.5 nm. The electron beam stability is important for good lasing. While the transverse jitter of the beam is about 10-20% of the rms beam sizes, the jitter in the longitudinal phase space is a multiple of the energy spread and bunch length. At the lower energy of 4.3 GeV (corresponding to the longest wavelength of 1.5 nm) the relative energy jitter can be 0.125%, while the rms energy spread is with 0.025% five times smaller. An even bigger ratio exists for the arrival time jitter of 50 fs and the bunch duration of about 5 fs (rms) in the low charge (20 pC) operating mode. Although the impact to the experiments is reduced by providing pulse-by-pulse data of the measured energy and arrival time, it would be nice to understand and mitigate the root causes of this jitter. The thyratron of the high power supply of the RF klystrons is one of the main contributors. Another suspect is the multi-pacting in the RF loads. Phase measurements down to 0.01 degree (equals 10 fs) along the RF pulse were achieved, giving hints to the impact of the different sources.

  9. Intermittent bursts induced by double tearing mode reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Lai; Wang, Zheng-Xiong, E-mail: zxwang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-06-15

    Reversed magnetic shear (RMS) configuration is assumed to be the steady-state operation scenario for the future advanced tokamaks like International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. In this work, we numerically discover a phenomenon of violent intermittent bursts induced by self-organized double tearing mode (DTM) reconnection in the RMS configuration during the very long evolution, which may continuously lead to annular sawtooth crashes and thus badly impact the desired steady-state operation of the future advanced RMS tokamaks. The key process of the intermittent bursts in the off-axis region is similar to that of the typical sawtooth relaxation oscillation in the positive magnetic shear configuration. It is interestingly found that in the decay phase of the DTM reconnection, the zonal field significantly counteracts equilibrium field to make the magnetic shear between the two rational surfaces so weak that the residual self-generated vortices of the previous DTM burst are able to trigger a reverse DTM reconnection by curling the field lines.

  10. Intraoperative Electron-Beam Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Ewing Sarcomas and Rhabdomyosarcomas: Long-Term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Sole, Claudio V.; Calvo, Felipe A.; Polo, Alfredo; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Carmen; Desco, Manuel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess long-term outcomes and toxicity of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in the management of pediatric patients with Ewing sarcomas (EWS) and rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-one sarcoma (EWS n=37, 52%; RMS n=34, 48%) patients underwent IOERT for primary (n=46, 65%) or locally recurrent sarcomas (n=25, 35%) from May 1983 to November 2012. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. For survival outcomes, potential associations were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: After a median follow-up of 72 months (range, 4-310 months), 10-year LC, disease-free survival, and OS was 74%, 57%, and 68%, respectively. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for other covariates, disease status (P=.04 and P=.05) and R1 margin status (P<.01 and P=.04) remained significantly associated with LC and OS. Nine patients (13%) reported severe chronic toxicity events (all grade 3). Conclusions: A multimodal IOERT-containing approach is a well-tolerated component of treatment for pediatric EWS and RMS patients, allowing reduction or substitution of external beam radiation exposure while maintaining high local control rates.

  11. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; et al

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-?m-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-?m-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-?m-diameter throughsilicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-?m-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using SnPb balls placed on a 320-?m pitch,moreyielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 ?W. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 ?V/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 ?V/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.less

  12. Complete multiwavelength evolution of galactic black hole transients during outburst decay. II. Compact jets and X-ray variability properties

    SciTech Connect

    Diner, T.; Kalemci, E.; Tomsick, J. A.; Buxton, M. M.; Bailyn, C. D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the relation between compact jet emission and X-ray variability properties of all black hole transients with multiwavelength coverage during their outburst decays. We studied the evolution of all power spectral components (including low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations; QPOs), and related this evolution to changes in jet properties tracked by radio and infrared observations. We grouped sources according to their tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation and show that the standards show stronger broadband X-ray variability than outliers at a given X-ray luminosity when the compact jet turns on. This trend is consistent with the internal shock model and can be important for the understanding of the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation. We also observed that the total and the QPO rms amplitudes increase together during the earlier part of the outburst decay, but after the compact jet turns, either the QPO disappears or its rms amplitude decreases significantly while the total rms amplitudes remain high. We discuss these results with a scenario including a variable corona and a non-variable disk with a mechanism for the QPO separate from the mechanism that creates broad components. Finally, we evaluated the timing predictions of the magnetically dominated accretion flow model that can explain the presence of tracks in the radio/X-ray luminosity relation.

  13. The Structure of the Proton

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Chambers, E. E.; Hofstadter, R.

    1956-04-01

    The structure and size of the proton have been studied by means of the methods of high-energy electron scattering. The elastic scattering of electrons from protons in polyethylene has been investigated at the following energies in the laboratory system: 200, 300, 400, 500, 550 Mev. The range of laboratory angles examined has been 30 degrees to 135 degrees. At the largest angles and the highest energy, the cross section for scattering shows a deviation below that expected from a point proton by a factor of about nine. The magnitude and variation with angle of the deviations determine a structure factor for the proton, and thereby determine the size and shape of the charge and magnetic-moment distributions within the proton. An interpretation, consistent at all energies and angles and agreeing with earlier results from this laboratory, fixes the rms radius at 0.77 {plus or minus} 0.10 x 10{sup -13} cm for each of the charge and moment distributions. The shape of the density function is not far from a Gaussian with rms radius 0.70 x 10{sup -13} cm or an exponential with rms radius 0.80 x 10 {sup -13} cm. An equivalent interpretation of the experiments would ascribe the apparent size to a breakdown of the Coulomb law and the conventional theory of electromagnetism.

  14. Three-dimensional hybrid simulation study of anisotropic turbulence in the proton kinetic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, Bernard J.; Markovskii, Sergei A.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: sergei.markovskii@unh.edu

    2014-06-20

    Three-dimensional numerical hybrid simulations with particle protons and quasi-neutralizing fluid electrons are conducted for a freely decaying turbulence that is anisotropic with respect to the background magnetic field. The turbulence evolution is determined by both the combined root-mean-square (rms) amplitude for fluctuating proton bulk velocity and magnetic field and by the ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. This kind of relationship had been considered in the past with regard to interplanetary turbulence. The fluctuations nonlinearly evolve to a turbulent phase whose net wave vector anisotropy is usually more perpendicular than the initial one, irrespective of the initial ratio of perpendicular to parallel wavenumbers. Self-similar anisotropy evolution is found as a function of the rms amplitude and parallel wavenumber. Proton heating rates in the turbulent phase vary strongly with the rms amplitude but only weakly with the initial wave vector anisotropy. Even in the limit where wave vectors are confined to the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field, the heating rate remains close to the corresponding case with finite parallel wave vector components. Simulation results obtained as a function of proton plasma to background magnetic pressure ratio β {sub p} in the range 0.1-0.5 show that the wave vector anisotropy also weakly depends on β {sub p}.

  15. Business Operations Organization Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Office of Business Operations Organization Chart Office of Business Operations Michael Budney, Director Project Management Coordination Office Scott Hine, Director Information and Technology Services Office Steve VonVital, Director (Acting) Workforce Management Office Jennifer Blankenheim, Director Golden Field Office Timothy Meeks, Director

  16. xwhd395.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 0.26 100 0.00 0.00 96 110 2.3 1.24 49 0.51 100 1.00 4.06 42 15 3.8 2.47 5.3 2.57 100 ... Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Carlsbad Area OffIce. von der Borch, C., 1965. The ...

  17. ELECTRONIC DIGITAL COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Stone, J.J. Jr.; Bettis, E.S.; Mann, E.R.

    1957-10-01

    The electronic digital computer is designed to solve systems involving a plurality of simultaneous linear equations. The computer can solve a system which converges rather rapidly when using Von Seidel's method of approximation and performs the summations required for solving for the unknown terms by a method of successive approximations.

  18. Reference Material for Radionuclides in Sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon Sediment)

    SciTech Connect

    Povinec, P; Pham, M; Barci-Funel, G; Bojanawski, R; Boshkova, T; Burnett, W; Carvalho, F; Chapeyron, B; Cunha, I; Dahlgaard, H; Galabov, N; Gastaud, J; Geering, J; Gomez, I; Green, N; Hamilton, T; Ibanez, F; Majah, M I; John, M; Kanisch, G; Kenna, T; Kloster, M; Korun, M; Wee Kwong, L L; La Rosa, J; Lee, S; Levy-Palomo, I; Malatova, M; Maruo, Y; Mitchell, P; Murciano, I; Nelson, R; Oh, J; Oregioni, B; Petit, G L; Pettersson, H; Reineking, A; Smedley, P; Suckow, A; der Struijs, T v; Voors, P; Yoshimizu, K; Wyse, E

    2005-09-23

    The IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory (IAEA-MEL) in Monaco has conducted intercomparison exercises on radionuclides in marine samples for many years as part of its contribution to the IAEA's program of Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS). An important part of the AQCS program has been a production of Reference Materials (RMs) and their provision to radioanalytical laboratories. The RMs have been developed for different marine matrices (sediment, water, biota), with accuracy and precision required for the present state of the art of radiometrics and mass spectrometry methods. The RMs have been produced as the final products of world-wide intercomparison exercises organized during last 30 years. A total of 44 intercomparison exercises were undertaken and 39 RMs were produced for radionuclides in the marine environment. All required matrices (seawater, biota, sediment) have been covered with radionuclide concentrations ranging from typical environmental levels to elevated levels affected by discharges from nuclear reprocessing plants. The long-term availability of RMs (over 10 years) requires the use of very specific techniques to collect and pretreat large quantities of material (e.g., in excess of 100 kg) in order to ensure sample stability and homogenization of any analytes of interest. The production of a RM is therefore a long process, covering the identification of needs, sample collection, pre-treatment, homogenization, bottling, distribution to laboratories, evaluation of data, preliminary reporting, additional analyses in expert laboratories, certification of the material, and finally issuing the RM. In this paper we describe a reference material IAEA-384, Fangataufa lagoon sediment, designed for determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in the marine environment. This RM has been prepared with the aim of testing the performance of analytical laboratories to measure the activity of these radionuclides in a sediment sample contaminated

  19. SU-E-P-36: Evaluation of MLC Positioning Errors in Dynamic IMRT Treatments by Analyzing Dynalog Files

    SciTech Connect

    Olasolo, J; Pellejero, S; Gracia, M; Gallardo, N; Martin, M; Lozares, S; Maneru, F; Bragado, L; Miquelez, S; Rubio, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of MLC positioning in Varian linear accelerator, in dynamic IMRT technique, from the analysis of dynalog files generated by the MLC controller. Methods: In Clinac accelerators (pre-TrueBeam technology), control system has an approximately 50ms delay (one control cycle time). Then, the system compares the measured position to the planned position corresponding to the next control cycle. As it has been confirmed by Varian technical support, this effect causes that measured positions appear in dynalogs one cycle out of phase with respect to the planned positions. Around 9000 dynalogs have been analyzed, coming from the three linear accelerators of our center (one Trilogy and two Clinac 21EX) equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC. In order to compare our results to recent publications, leaf positioning errors (RMS and 95th percentile) are calculated with and without delay effect. Dynalogs have been analyzed using a in-house Matlab software. Results: The RMS errors were 0.341, 0.339 and 0.348mm for each Linac; being the average error 0.343 mm. The 95th percentiles of the error were 0.617, 0.607 and 0.625; with an average of 0.617mm. A recent multi-institution study carried out by Kerns et al. found a mean leaf RMS error of 0.32mm and a 95th percentile error value of 0.64mm.Without delay effect, mean leaf RMS errors obtained were 0.040, 0.042 and 0.038mm for each treatment machine; being the average 0.040mm. The 95th percentile error values obtained were 0.057, 0.058 and 0.054 mm, with an average of 0.056mm. Conclusion: Results obtained for the mean leaf RMS error and the mean 95th percentile were consistent with the multi-institution study. Calculated error statistics with delay effect are significantly larger due to the speed proportional and systematic leaf offset. Consequently it is proposed to correct this effect in dynalogs analysis to determine the MLC performance.

  20. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M. Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Shen, Jincheng; Schipper, Matthew J.; Wilderman, Scott; Chun, Se Young

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results

  1. The Next Generation Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Dennis Thomas; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2005-09-12

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 {pi} mm mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes. The Cu QE was found to be 4.5 x 10{sup -5} with a 25% variation in the QE across the emitting surface of the cathode, while supporting a field gradient of 125 MV/m. At low charge, the transverse normalized rms emittance, {epsilon}{sub n,rms}, produced by the NGP is {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.2 {pi} mm mrad for Q{sub T} = 0.3 nC. The 95% electron beam bunch length was measured to 10.9 psec. The emittance due to the finite magnetic field at the cathode has been studied. The scaling of this magnetic emittance term as a function of cathode magnetic field was found to be 0.01 {pi} mm mrad per Gauss. The 1.6 cell rf gun has been designed to reduce the dipole field asymmetry of the longitudinal accelerating field. Low level rf measurements show that this has in fact been accomplished, with an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field. High power beam studies also show that the dipole field has been decreased. An upper limit of the intrinsic non-reducible thermal emittance of a

  2. Do Tumors in the Lung Deform During Normal Respiration? An Image Registration Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jianzhou; Lei Peng; Shekhar, Raj; Li Huiling; Suntharalingam, Mohan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether lung tumors may be described adequately using a rigid body assumption or whether they deform during normal respiration. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early stage non-small-cell lung cancer underwent four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) simulation. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4D CT images. Image registration was performed in the vicinity of the GTV. The volume of interest for registration was the GTV and minimal volume of surrounding non-GTV tissue. Three types of registration were performed: translation only, translation + rotation, and deformable. The GTV contour from end-inhale was mapped to end-exhale using the registration-derived transformation field. The results were evaluated using three metrics: overlap index (OI), root-mean-squared distance (RMS), and Hausdorff distance (HD). Results: After translation only image registration, on average OI increased by 21.3%, RMS and HD reduced by 1.2 mm and 2.0 mm, respectively. The succeeding increases in OI after translation + rotation and deformable registration were 1.1% and 1.4% respectively. The succeeding reductions in RMS were 0.1 mm and 0.2 mm respectively. No reduction in HD was observed after translation + rotation and deformable image registration compared with translation only registration. The difference in the results from the three registration scenarios was independent of GTV size and motion amplitude. Conclusions: The primary effect of normal respiration on lung tumors was the translation of tumors. Rotation and deformation of lung tumors was determined to be minimal.

  3. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. II. PARAMETER ESTIMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L. E-mail: jt@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2010-05-20

    Wide-field surveys will soon be discovering Type Ia supernovae (SNe) at rates of several thousand per year. Spectroscopic follow-up can only scratch the surface for such enormous samples, so these extensive data sets will only be useful to the extent that they can be characterized by the survey photometry alone. In a companion paper we introduced the Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT) method for analyzing SNe using direct comparison to template light curves, and demonstrated its application for photometric SN classification. In this work we extend the SOFT method to derive estimates of redshift and luminosity distance for Type Ia SNe, using light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) as a validation set. Redshifts determined by SOFT using light curves alone are consistent with spectroscopic redshifts, showing an rms scatter in the residuals of rms{sub z} = 0.051. SOFT can also derive simultaneous redshift and distance estimates, yielding results that are consistent with the currently favored {Lambda}CDM cosmological model. When SOFT is given spectroscopic information for SN classification and redshift priors, the rms scatter in Hubble diagram residuals is 0.18 mag for the SDSS data and 0.28 mag for the SNLS objects. Without access to any spectroscopic information, and even without any redshift priors from host galaxy photometry, SOFT can still measure reliable redshifts and distances, with an increase in the Hubble residuals to 0.37 mag for the combined SDSS and SNLS data set. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we predict that SOFT will be able to improve constraints on time-variable dark energy models by a factor of 2-3 with each new generation of large-scale SN surveys.

  4. Tracking Elevated Pollution Layers with a Newly Developed Hyperspectral Sun/Sky Spectrometer (4STAR): Results from the TCAP 2012 and 2013 Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, J. M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Johnson, Roy R.; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Herman, J. R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Wilson, Jacqueline M.

    2014-03-16

    Total columnar amounts of water vapor, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) are derived from a newly developed, hyperspectral airborne sun-sky spectrometer (4STAR) for the first time during the two intensive phases of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in summer 2012 and winter 2013 aboard the DOE G-1 aircraft. We compare results with coincident measurements. We find 0.045 g/cm2 (4.2%) negative bias and 0.28 g/cm2 (26.3%) root-mean-square (RMS) difference in water vapor layer comparison with in-situ hygrometer, and an overall RMS difference of 1.28 g/m3 (38%) water vapor amount in profile by profile comparisons, with differences distributed evenly around zero in most cases. The RMS differences for O3 values average to 3%, with a 1% negative bias for 4STAR compared with the spaceborne Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) along the aircraft flight-track for 14 flights during both TCAP phases. Ground-based comparisons with the Pandora spectrometer system at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland showed excellent agreement between the instruments for both O3 and NO2, further emphasizing 4STAR’s new capabilities. During the summer phase, we have succeeded in identifying variations in elevated pollution layers corresponding to urban pollution outflow and transported biomass burning. This was done using clustering analysis of the retrieved products (e.g. Ångstrom exponent, NO2 and columnar water vapor), and was confirmed by aerosol type identification by HSRL2 aboard the NASA B-200 aircraft. These newly demonstrated 4STAR capabilities are expected to be instrumental in improving our understanding of atmospheric composition variability and aerosol-trace-gas interactions; they open new horizons and opportunities in airborne sunphotometry.

  5. Fully 3D-Integrated Pixel Detectors for X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Gabriella, Carini; Enquist, Paul; Grybos, Pawel; Holm, Scott; Lipton, Ronald; Maj, Piotr; Patti, Robert; Siddons, David Peter; Szczygiel, Robert; Yarema, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The vertically integrated photon imaging chip (VIPIC1) pixel detector is a stack consisting of a 500-μm-thick silicon sensor, a two-tier 34-μm-thick integrated circuit, and a host printed circuit board (PCB). The integrated circuit tiers were bonded using the direct bonding technology with copper, and each tier features 1-μm-diameter through-silicon vias that were used for connections to the sensor on one side, and to the host PCB on the other side. The 80-μm-pixel-pitch sensor was the direct bonding technology with nickel bonded to the integrated circuit. The stack was mounted on the board using Sn–Pb balls placed on a 320-μm pitch, yielding an entirely wire-bond-less structure. The analog front-end features a pulse response peaking at below 250 ns, and the power consumption per pixel is 25 μW. We successful completed the 3-D integration and have reported here. Additionally, all pixels in the matrix of 64 × 64 pixels were responding on well-bonded devices. Correct operation of the sparsified readout, allowing a single 153-ns bunch timing resolution, was confirmed in the tests on a synchrotron beam of 10-keV X-rays. An equivalent noise charge of 36.2 e- rms and a conversion gain of 69.5 μV/e- with 2.6 e- rms and 2.7 μV/e- rms pixel-to-pixel variations, respectively, were measured.

  6. NREL: Transportation Research - Driverless Cars and Fuel Efficiency

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Spotlighted in Scientific American Driverless Cars and Fuel Efficiency Spotlighted in Scientific American January 25, 2016 The potential to slow pollution through deployment of automated vehicles is gaining more and more traction in the news. In a recent Scientific American article, reporter Camille von Kaenel asked NREL's Jeff Gonder for a transportation researcher's thoughts on both the sustainability benefits and uncertainties that will accompany an increase in driverless cars. "The

  7. Links - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma Physics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Links UW Madison Madison Dynamo Experiment Links MDE HomeLinksNewsBackgroundPublicationsPresentationsContactsMDE People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Local Links Plasma Physics in the UW Physics Department The Department of Physics University of Wisconsin - Madison Dynamo Links Riga Dynamo Experiment Karlsruhe Dynamo Experiment The Von-Karman Sodium Experiment Grenoble Geodynamo Experiment

  8. Luis W. Alvarez

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Luis W. Alvarez About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit ⇒ Navigate Section About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit Luis-W.-Alvarez 1968 Nobel Prize for Physics * Presentation of Award * Acceptance Speech * M. Alvarez, Address to the University Students on the Evening of December 10, 1968 * Biography Submitted by Dr. Alvarez to the Nobel Committee * Presentation of the 1968 Nobel Prize for Physics Professor S. Von Friesen of the Royal Academy of

  9. The Impact of using different parameterizations of unresolved horizontal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    variability of cloud water in the CCCma GCM The Impact of using different parameterizations of unresolved horizontal variability of cloud water in the CCCma GCM Cole, Jason Meteorological Service of Canada Barker, Howard Meteorological Service of Canada Li, Jiangnan Canadian Center for Climate Modelling von Salzen, Knut Category: Modeling A current area of research in atmospheric radiative transfer involves description and inclusion of unresolved cloud structure in radiative transfer models

  10. Bringing Fundamental Energy Concepts to Life ... en Español | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Bringing Fundamental Energy Concepts to Life ... en Español Bringing Fundamental Energy Concepts to Life ... en Español May 5, 2015 - 10:15am Addthis Stephanie von Numers Communications and Web Coordinator, Education & Workforce Development What are the key facts? Find energy-related educational materials in Spanish, including an Energy Literacy video series developed by the Energy Department, the American Geosciences Institute, and the National Center for Science Education.

  11. Research Highlight

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Observed Relations Between Snowfall Microphysics and Triple-Frequency Radar Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kneifel, S., McGill University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kneifel S, A von Lerber, J Tiira, D Moisseev, P Kollias, and J Leinonen. 2015. "Observed relations between snowfall microphysics and triple-frequency radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120(12),

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Students & Postdocs: Fellowships

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Fellowships Internships & Co-ops Fellowships Truman Fellowship John von Neumann Fellowship Fellowship Experiences Postdoctoral Positions Campus Recruiting Careers Fellowships Fellowships photo Test ideas, follow your dreams Your future career - including tuition and stipends for a graduate degree - awaits you at Sandia. Sandia offers various fellowship opportunities to exceptional individuals in support of our national security mission. We offer opportunities for fully funded graduate

  13. Visit of the Federal President of Germany

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le D.G. H.Schopper a le plaisir de souhaiter la bienvenue au président de la République fédérale allemande, Richard von Weizsäcker (président féderale de 1984-1994). C'est la première visite d'un président allemand dans l'histoire du Cern.

  14. Photo of the Week: Throwback Thursday with AVIDAC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Throwback Thursday with AVIDAC Photo of the Week: Throwback Thursday with AVIDAC September 19, 2013 - 4:41pm Addthis In this photo, two Argonne researchers are pictured with Argonne's first digital computer, AVIDAC. Designed and built by Argonne's Physics Division for $250,000, it began operations on January 28, 1953. AVIDAC stands for "Argonne Version of the Institute's Digital Automatic Computer" and was based on architecture developed by mathematician John von Neumann.

  15. Rainer Fries

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Website of Rainer J. Fries Associate Professor Cyclotron Insitute and Department of Physics and Astronomy Texas A&M University Brief Resume: PhD, University of Regensburg, 2001. Feodor Lynen Fellow, Duke University 2002-2003 (Feodor Lynen Fellowship of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation). Research Associate, University of Minnesota, 2003-2005 Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota, 2005-2006 Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University, 2006-2011 RHIC Fellow, RIKEN/BNL Research

  16. Behavior of a bipartite system in a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Granhen, E. R.; Linhares, C. A.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.

    2010-05-15

    We study the time evolution of a superposition of product states of two dressed atoms in a spherical cavity in the situations of an arbitrarily large cavity (free space) and a small one. In the large-cavity case, the system dissipates, whereas, for the small cavity, the system evolves in an oscillating way and never completely decays. We verify that the von Neumann entropy for such a system does depends neither on time nor the size of the cavity.

  17. Panel ensures safe operation of the $94 million NSTX Upgrade | Princeton

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Panel ensures safe operation of the $94 million NSTX Upgrade By John Greenwald January 12, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Members inspect the chief operating engineer's station in the NSTX-U control room. Seated from left, John Lacenere, Larry Dudek. Standing from left, Anthony Indelicato, Tracy Estes, Stefan Gerhardt, Tim Stevenson, Al von Halle, Jerry Levine, Charles Gentile. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Members inspect the

  18. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials Science Sponsored Seminar

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Robert L. Whetten University of Texas, San Antonio Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award recipiant Z 60 , Phantaspheraurate Thursday, September 10, 2015 3 - 4pm IMS/MPA Conference Room (TA3-0032-134) Abstract: Discovery of new substances and their underlying principles consists not so much of "new materials analyzed by established methods" but rather of ancient ones elucidated by newly developed methods. So we had better focus on the advances - new instruments and

  19. New focusing multilayer structures for X-ray plasma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bibishkin, M S; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, N N; Chernov, V V; Chkhalo, N I; Kazakov, E D; Shevelko, A P

    2008-02-28

    New focusing short-period multilayer structures are developed which opens up wide possibilities for X-ray and VUV spectroscopy. Multilayer structures are deposited on a flat surface of a mica crystal which is then bent to a small-radius cylinder. The use of this structure in a von Hamos spectrometer for X-ray laser plasma diagnostics is demonstrated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. DOE Scientists Contribute to 2007 Nobel Peace Prize Research about Climate

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Change DOE Scientists Contribute to 2007 Nobel Peace Prize about Climate Change Resources with Additional Information * Climate Change Research at Labs Documents * Additional Web Pages IPCC poster graphic showing the path to to the Nobel Peace Prize Credit: NOAA Poster, Will von Dauster The 2007 Nobel Peace Prize reflects an importance of climate change science, which, while not quite meeting the criteria for inclusion in DOE R&D Accomplishments, is extremely noteworthy and is a credit

  1. Einstein and the Daytime Sky - B

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Effects of an uneven random distribution Einstein's work involved giving some greater mathematical precision to some recent ideas of the physicist Marian von Smoluchowski. Smoluchowski considered the significant effect that variations in a fluid's density can have on how light waves travel through the fluid. When a fluid, either gas or liquid, is compressed, its molecules get crowded into a smaller space, so the fluid becomes more dense. Since molecules constantly move about in random

  2. Slide 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Atom Trap @ ATLAS Zheng-Tian Lu Li-Bang Wang 2006 APS Dissertation Award in NP Peter Mueller 2010 IUPAP Young Scientist Prize in NP Proton and Matter Radii of Proton and Matter Radii of 6 6 He & He & 8 8 He He 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 Nuclear Radii, fm 4 He rms point-proton matter Experiment Theory 8 He 6 He 4 He proton matter Experiment Theory Nuclear Radii, fm Wang et al., PRL (2004) Mueller et al., PRL (2007) Laser Spectroscopy @ CARIBU Laser Spectroscopy @ CARIBU -- -- Peter

  3. Liquid crystal terahertz phase shifters with functional indium-tin-oxide nanostructures for biasing and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chan-Shan; Tang, Tsung-Ta; Pan, Ru-Pin; Yu, Peichen; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-07

    Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowhiskers (NWhs) obliquely evaporated by electron-beam glancing-angle deposition can serve simultaneously as transparent electrodes and alignment layer for liquid crystal (LC) devices in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. To demonstrate, we constructed a THz LC phase shifter with ITO NWhs. Phase shift exceeding ?/2 at 1.0 THz was achieved in a ?517??m-thick cell. The phase shifter exhibits high transmittance (?78%). The driving voltage required for quarter-wave operation is as low as 5.66?V (rms), compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies.

  4. The JLAB UV Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschalk, Steven C.; Benson, Steven V.; Moore, Steven Wesley

    2013-05-01

    Recently the JLAB FEL has demonstrated 150 W at 400 nm and 200 W at 700 nm using a 33mm period undulator designed and built by STI Optronics. This paper describes the undulator design and performance. Two key requirements were low phase error, zero steering and offset end fields and small rms trajectory errors. We will describe a new genetic algorithm that allowed phase error minimization to 1.8 degrees while exceeding specifications. The mechanical design, control system and EPICS interface will also be summarized.

  5. First Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Nuclear Mass Model

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S.; Girod, M.; Peru, S.

    2009-06-19

    We present the first Gogny-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) model which reproduces nuclear masses with an accuracy comparable with the best mass formulas. In contrast with the Skyrme-HFB nuclear-mass models, an explicit and self-consistent account of all the quadrupole correlation energies are included within the 5D collective Hamiltonian approach. The final rms deviation with respect to the 2149 measured masses is 798 keV. In addition, the new Gogny force is shown to predict nuclear and neutron matter properties in agreement with microscopic calculations based on realistic two- and three-body forces.

  6. A=20N (1998TI06)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    98TI06) (Not illustrated) 20N is particle stable. Its atomic mass excess is 21.770 ± 0.050 MeV (1995AU04). It has been observed in heavy-ion transfer (1989OR03) and projectile fragmentation reactions (1987GI05, 1988DUZT, 1988MU08, 1990MU06, 1991OR01) and in target fragmentation reactions (1988WO09, 1991RE02, 1993WOZZ). See also the review (1988VI1D). Mass measurements were reported in (1987GI05, 1988WO09, 1989OR03, 1991OR01, 1993WOZZ). Nuclear matter rms radii have been derived from

  7. Effect of deposition temperature on the structural and optical properties of CdSe thin films synthesised by chemical bath deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Mudhafer Ali

    2013-12-16

    Cadmium selenide thin films were synthesized on glass substrates using chemical bath technique (CBD) at temperatures 320K, 330K, 340K,and 350K. The polycrystalline nature of the material was confirmed by X-ray diffraction technique and various structural parameters such as lattice parameters, grain size, dislocation density, and micro strain. The root mean square (RMS) roughness was obtained by using atomic force microscopy(AFM), which indicated a decreasing average roughness with the decrease of the bath temperature. Optical properties were carried out by UV-Visible transmittance spectra, and the band gap energy was determined.

  8. A Compact Ring Design with Tunable Momentum Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; ,

    2012-05-17

    A storage ring with tunable momentum compaction has the advantage in achieving different RMS bunch length with similar RF capacity, which is potentially useful for many applications, such as linear collider damping ring and predamping ring where injected beam has a large energy spread and a large transverse emittance. A tunable bunch length also makes the commissioning and fine tuning easier in manipulating the single bunch instabilities. In this paper, a compact ring design based on a supercell is presented, which achieves a tunable momentum compaction while maintaining a large dynamic aperture.

  9. FODO-Supercell Based Compact Ring Design with Tunable Momentum Compaction and Optimized Dynamic Aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-05-11

    A storage ring with tunable momentum compaction has the advantage in achieving different RMS bunch length with similar RF capacity, which is potentially useful for many applications, such as linear collider damping ring and pre-damping ring where injected beam has a large energy spread and a large transverse emittance. A tunable bunch length also makes the commissioning and fine tuning easier in manipulating the single bunch instabilities. In this paper, a compact ring design based on a supercell is presented, which achieves a tunable momentum compaction while maintaining a large dynamic aperture.

  10. US-Russian Cooperation in Upgrading MC&A System at Rosatom Facilities: Measurement of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Danny H; Jensen, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    Improve protection of weapons-usable nuclear material from theft or diversion through the development and support of a nationwide sustainable and effective Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program based on material measurement. The material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) cooperation has yielded significant results in implementing MC&A measurements at Russian nuclear facilities: (1) Establishment of MEM WG and MEMS SP; (2) Infrastructure for development, certification, and distribution of RMs; and (3) Coordination on development and implementation of MMs.

  11. Control and manipulation of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; /NICADD, DeKalb /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  12. Initial electron-beam characterizations for the Los Alamos APEX Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Apgar, S.A.; Feldman, D.W.; O'Shea, P.G. ); Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W. )

    1991-01-01

    The ongoing upgrade of the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Facility involves the addition of a photoelectric injector (PEI) and acceleration capability to about 40 MeV. The electron-beam and high-speed diagnostics provide key measurements of charge, beam position and profile, divergence emittance, energy (centroid, spread, slew, and extraction efficiency), micropulse duration, and phase stability. Preliminary results on the facility include optical transition radiation interferometer measurements of divergence (1 to 2 mrad), FEL extraction efficiency (0.6 {plus minus} 0.2%), and drive laser phase stability (< 2 ps (rms)). 10 refs.

  13. Initial electron-beam characterizations for the Los Alamos APEX Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Feldman, R.B.; Apgar, S.A.; Feldman, D.W.; O`Shea, P.G.; Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The ongoing upgrade of the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser (FEL) Facility involves the addition of a photoelectric injector (PEI) and acceleration capability to about 40 MeV. The electron-beam and high-speed diagnostics provide key measurements of charge, beam position and profile, divergence emittance, energy (centroid, spread, slew, and extraction efficiency), micropulse duration, and phase stability. Preliminary results on the facility include optical transition radiation interferometer measurements of divergence (1 to 2 mrad), FEL extraction efficiency (0.6 {plus_minus} 0.2%), and drive laser phase stability (< 2 ps [rms]). 10 refs.

  14. Use of an Injection Locked Magnetron to Drive a Superconducting RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang, Robert Rimmer, G. Davis, Imran Tahir, Amos Dexter, Greame Burt, Richard Carter

    2010-05-01

    The use of an injection locked CW magnetron to drive a 2.45 GHz superconducting RF cavity has been successfully demonstrated. With a locking power less than -27 dB with respect to the output and with a phase control system acting on the locking signal, cavity phase was accurately controlled for hours at a time without loss of lock whilst suppressing microphonics. The phase control accuracy achieved was 0.8 deg. r.m.s. The main contributing disturbance limiting ultimate phase control was power supply ripple from the low specification switch mode power supply used for the experiment.

  15. Titrimetric determination of hydrazine in actinide solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Polyakov, O.N.; Baranov, S.M.; Zubarev, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    A simple rapid method is proposed for the determination of hydrazine and its derivatives in actinide solutions. The potentiometric titration of acid combined with the hydrazine, using a standard NaOH solution, is carried out in a stirred aqueous acetone medium. Ammonium oxalate is added to the solution being titrated to prevent hydrolysis of the actinides. The content of hydrazine and/or its derivatives is equivalent to the amount of acid found. The method is recommended for the determination of hydrazine and its derivatives at concentration of 0.005 M and above in actinide solutions. The rms error of the measurements is 0.07.

  16. LCLS_CDR-ch06

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Injector TECHNICAL SYNOPSIS The injector for the LCLS is required to produce a single 150-MeV bunch of charge 1.0 nC and 100 A peak current at a repetition rate of 120 Hz with a normalized rms transverse emittance of 1.0 µm. The required emittance is about a factor of 2 lower than has been achieved to date. The design employs a solenoidal field near the cathode of a specially designed rf photocathode gun that allows the initial emittance growth due to space charge to be almost completely

  17. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    OBO:SWH:RMS:16-2269 4250.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 April 12, 2016 Mr. Phil Breidenbach, President and Project Manager Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC P.O. Box 2078 Carlsbad, NM 88220-2078 Subject: Contract DE-EM0001971 Nuclear Waste Partnership LLC - Award Fee Determination for the Period October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2015, and FY2015 Fee Determination Scorecard for Total Earned Award Fee and Performance Based Incentives Dear

  18. The feasibility of head motion tracking in helical CT: A step toward motion correction

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Nuyts, Johan; Kuncic, Zdenka; Fulton, Roger

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To establish a practical and accurate motion tracking method for the development of rigid motion correction methods in helical x-ray computed tomography (CT). Methods: A commercially available optical motion tracking system provided 6 degrees of freedom pose measurements at 60 Hz. A 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 calibration matrix was determined to convert raw pose data acquired in tracker coordinates to a fixed CT coordinate system with origin at the isocenter of the scanner. Two calibration methods, absolute orientation (AO), and a new method based on image registration (IR), were compared by means of landmark analysis and correlation coefficient in phantom images coregistered using the derived motion transformations. Results: Transformations calculated using the IR-derived calibration matrix were found to be more accurate, with positional errors less than 0.5 mm (mean RMS), and highly correlated image voxel intensities. The AO-derived calibration matrix yielded larger mean RMS positional errors ( Asymptotically-Equal-To 1.0 mm), and poorer correlation coefficients. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of accurate motion tracking for retrospective motion correction in helical CT. Their new IR-based calibration method based on image registration and function minimization was simpler to perform and delivered more accurate calibration matrices. This technique is a useful tool for future work on rigid motion correction in helical CT and potentially also other imaging modalities.

  19. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

  20. Fabrication of Gas-Filled Tungsten-Coated Glass Shells

    SciTech Connect

    Nikroo, A.; Baugh, W.; Steinman, D.A.

    2004-03-15

    Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx}0.15 {mu}m/hr coatings with {approx}2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {mu}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx}100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 deg. C.

  1. EUV optical design for 100 nm CD imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.W.; Hudyma, R.; Chapman, H.B.; Shafer, D.

    1998-04-09

    The imaging specifications for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) projection optics parallel those of other optical lithographies. Specifications are scaled to reflect the 100 nm critical dimension for the first generation EUVL systems. The design being fabricated for the Engineering Test Stand, an EUVL alpha tool, consists of a condenser with six channels to provide an effective partial coherence factor of 0.7. The camera contains four mirrors; three of the mirrors are aspheres and the fourth is spherical. The design of the optical package has been constrained so that the angles of incidence and the variations in the angle of incidence of all rays allow for uniform multilayer coatings. The multilayers introduce a slight shift in image position and magnification. We have shown that a system aligned with visible light is also aligned at 13.4 nm. Each mirror must be fabricated with an RMS figure error of less than 0.25 nm and better than 0.2 nm RMS roughness. Optical surfaces that exceed each of these specifications individually have been fabricated. The success of EUVL requires that these specifications be met simultaneously.

  2. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of Violin-Mode resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level Violin-Mode (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent noise-gain peaking arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillationsthis output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup ?1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 13) picometres/?Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of 0.1 mm.

  3. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  4. Variation of the matter densities of nuclei from /sup 40/Ca to /sup 68/Zn

    SciTech Connect

    Papanicolas, C N; Sumner, W Q; Blair, J S; Bernstein, A M

    1981-01-01

    Analysis is made of elastic scattering of 42 MeV ..cap alpha..-particles from 19 nuclei from /sup 40/Ca to /sup 68/Zn in terms of a folding model, allowing determination of matter densities in the nuclear surface region relative to that of /sup 40/Ca. Specifically, values are deduced for the radii at which the matter density equals 0.016 nucleon/fm/sup 3/ as well as matter RMS radii. The relative sizes vary more slowly than A/sup 1/3/ between /sup 40/Ca and /sup 54/Fe and more rapidly than A/sup 1/3/ between /sup 54/Fe and /sup 68/Zn. The overall trend gives an increase with A/sup 1/3/ but with a bowing effect. The near equality of proton and matter RMS radii indicates that the neutron-proton radii are approximately equal to within the errors of the present analysis. The results are in reasonable agreement with those obtained with other hadronic probes and with calculated Hartree-Fock Bogolyubov densities.

  5. Role of the laser pulse-length in producing high-quality electron beams in a homogenous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Ajay K.; Arun Samant, Sushil; Krishnagopal, Srinivas

    2012-07-15

    In laser wakefield acceleration, the pulse-length of the laser is an important parameter that affects the laser evolution and electron beam injection and acceleration in the bubble regime. Here, we use three-dimensional simulations to find, for a given plasma density, the optimal pulse-length that gives the best quality electron beam. For three different pulse lengths, we study the evolution dynamics of the laser spot-size and quality of the injected electron beam. We find that a pulse-length that is less than the theoretical optimum, {tau}{sub L} = {lambda}{sub p}/{radical}2{pi}c, derived from linear theory, gives the best beam quality. Conversely, our simulations suggest that for a given laser system, with a fixed pulse-length, there is an optimal value of the plasma density that will give the best quality accelerated beams in experiments. For an rms pulse-length of 10 fs (around 24 fs FWHM), this corresponds to a plasma density of around 3.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18}/cm{sup 3}. For these parameters, we obtain, in a homogenous plasma and with a single laser, an electron beam with an energy of around 700 MeV, an energy-spread less than 2%, and rms normalized emittance of a few {pi} mm-mrad.

  6. Thermal conductivity of III-V semiconductor superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, S. Knezevic, I.

    2015-11-07

    This paper presents a semiclassical model for the anisotropic thermal transport in III-V semiconductor superlattices (SLs). An effective interface rms roughness is the only adjustable parameter. Thermal transport inside a layer is described by the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation and is affected by the relevant scattering mechanisms (three-phonon, mass-difference, and dopant and electron scattering of phonons), as well as by diffuse scattering from the interfaces captured via an effective interface scattering rate. The in-plane thermal conductivity is obtained from the layer conductivities connected in parallel. The cross-plane thermal conductivity is calculated from the layer thermal conductivities in series with one another and with thermal boundary resistances (TBRs) associated with each interface; the TBRs dominate cross-plane transport. The TBR of each interface is calculated from the transmission coefficient obtained by interpolating between the acoustic mismatch model (AMM) and the diffuse mismatch model (DMM), where the weight of the AMM transmission coefficient is the same wavelength-dependent specularity parameter related to the effective interface rms roughness that is commonly used to describe diffuse interface scattering. The model is applied to multiple III-arsenide superlattices, and the results are in very good agreement with experimental findings. The method is both simple and accurate, easy to implement, and applicable to complicated SL systems, such as the active regions of quantum cascade lasers. It is also valid for other SL material systems with high-quality interfaces and predominantly incoherent phonon transport.

  7. FARADAY ROTATION MEASURE DUE TO THE INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD. II. THE COSMOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr

    2011-09-10

    We investigate the Faraday rotation measure (RM) due to the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) through the cosmic web up to cosmological distances, using a model IGMF based on turbulence dynamo in the large-scale structure of the universe. By stacking the IGMF and gas density data up to redshift z = 5 and taking account of the redshift distribution of polarized background radio sources against which the RM is measured, we simulate the sky map of the RM. The contribution from galaxy clusters is subtracted from the map, based on several different criteria of X-ray brightness and temperature. Our findings are as follows. The distribution of RM for radio sources of different redshifts shows that the rms value increases with redshift and saturates for z {approx}> 1. The saturated value is RM{sub rms} {approx} several rad m{sup -2}. The probability distribution function of |RM| follows the lognormal distribution. The power spectrum has a broad plateau over the angular scale of {approx}1{sup 0}-0.{sup 0}1 with a peak around {approx}0.{sup 0}15. The second-order structure function has a flat profile in the angular separation of {approx}> 0.{sup 0}2. Our results could provide useful insights for surveys to explore the IGMF with the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and upcoming SKA pathfinders.

  8. An integrated CMOS 0.15 ns digital timing generator for TDC`s and clock distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, J.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes the architecture and performance of a new high resolution timing generator used as a building block for time to Digital Converters (TDC) and clock alignment functions. The timing generator is implemented as an array of locked loops. This architecture enables a timing generator with sub-gate delay resolution to be implemented in a standard digital CMOS process. The TDC function is implemented by storing the state of the timing generator signals in an asynchronous pipeline buffer when a hit signal is asserted. The clock alignment function is obtained by selecting one of the timing generator signals as an output clock. The proposed timing-generator has been mapped into a 1.0 {micro}m CMOS process a RMS error of the time taps of 48 ps has been measured with a bin size 0.15 ns. Used as a TDC device a RMS error of {minus}6 ps has been obtained. A short overview of the basic principles of major TDC and timing generator architectures is given to compare the merits of the proposed scheme to other alternatives.

  9. ANTISYMMETRY IN THE FARADAY ROTATION SKY CAUSED BY A NEARBY MAGNETIZED BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Wolleben, M.; Landecker, T. L.; Fletcher, A.; Carretti, E.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Dickey, J. M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, M.; Reich, W.; Taylor, A. R.

    2010-11-20

    Rotation measures (RMs) of pulsars and extragalactic point sources have been known to reveal large-scale antisymmetries in the Faraday rotation sky with respect to the Galactic plane and halo that have been interpreted as signatures of the mean magnetic field in the Galactic halo. We describe Faraday rotation measurements of the diffuse Galactic polarized radio emission over a large region in the northern Galactic hemisphere. Through application of RM synthesis we achieve sensitive Faraday rotation maps with high angular resolution, capable of revealing fine-scale structures of {approx}1{sup 0} in the Faraday rotation sky. Our analysis suggests that the observed antisymmetry in the Faraday rotation sky at b>0{sup 0} is dominated by the magnetic field around a local H I bubble at a distance of 100 pc, and not by the magnetic field of the Galactic halo. We derive physical properties of the magnetic field of this shell, which we find to be 20-34 {mu}G strong. It is clear that the diffuse polarized radio emission contains important information about the local magneto-ionic medium, which cannot yet be derived from Faraday RMs of extragalactic sources or pulsars alone.

  10. NO EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION IN THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION OUT TO z {approx} 2 IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Minnie Y.; Huynh, Minh T.; Helou, George; Norris, Ray P.; Dickinson, Mark; Frayer, Dave; Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.

    2011-04-20

    We investigate the 70 {mu}m far-infrared-radio correlation (FRC) of star-forming galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) out to z > 2. We use 70 {mu}m data from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (FIDEL), which comprises the most sensitive ({approx}0.8 mJy rms) and extensive far-infrared deep field observations using MIPS on the Spitzer Space Telescope, and 1.4 GHz radio data ({approx}8 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms) from the Very Large Array. In order to quantify the evolution of the FRC, we use both survival analysis and stacking techniques, which we find give similar results. We also calculate the FRC using total infrared luminosity and rest-frame radio luminosity, q{sub TIR}, and find that q{sub TIR} is constant (within 0.22) over the redshift range 0-2. We see no evidence for evolution in the FRC at 70 {mu}m, which is surprising given the many factors that are expected to change this ratio at high redshifts.

  11. Fabrication and testing of diamond-machined gratings in ZnSe, GaP, and bismuth germanate for the near infrared and visible

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenko, P J; Little, S L; Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N

    2008-06-22

    High quality immersion gratings for infrared applications have been demonstrated in silicon and germanium. To extend this technology to shorter wavelengths other materials must be investigated. We selected three materials, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide and bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}), based on high refractive index, good visible transmission and commercial availability in useful sizes. Crystal samples were diamond turned on an ultra-precision lathe to identify preferred cutting directions. Using this information we diamond-flycut test gratings over a range of feed rates to determine the optimal cutting conditions. For both ZnSe and GaP good surface quality was achieved at feed rates up to 1.0 cm/minute using a special compound angle diamond tool with negative rake angles on both cutting surfaces. The surface roughness of the groove facets was about 4 nm. A Zygo interferometer measured grating wavefront errors in reflection. For the ZnSe the RMS error was < {lambda}/20 at 633nm. More extensive testing was performed with a HeNe laser source and a cooled CCD camera. These measurements demonstrated high relative diffraction efficiency (> 80%), low random groove error (2.0 nm rms), and Rowland ghost intensities at < 0.1%. Preliminary tests on bismuth germanate show high tool wear.

  12. Planar ultrananocrystalline diamond field emitter in accelerator radio frequency electron injector: Performance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Sergey V. Antipov, Sergey; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shao, Jiahang; Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Pérez Quintero, Kenneth J.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Kanareykin, Alexei D.

    2014-11-17

    A case performance study of a planar field emission cathode (FEC) based on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond, (N)UNCD, was carried out in an RF 1.3 GHz electron gun. The FEC was a 100 nm (N)UNCD film grown on a 20 mm diameter stainless steel disk with a Mo buffer layer. At surface gradients 45–65 MV/m, peak currents of 1–80 mA (equivalent to 0.3–25 mA/cm{sup 2}) were achieved. Imaging with two YAG screens confirmed emission from the (N)UNCD surface with (1) the beam emittance of 1.5 mm × mrad/mm-rms and (2) longitudinal FWHM and rms widths of non-Gaussian energy spread of 0.7% and 11% at an electron energy of 2 MeV. Current stability was tested over the course of 36 × 10{sup 3} RF pulses (equivalent to 288 × 10{sup 6 }GHz oscillations)

  13. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD FROM FARADAY ROTATION MEASURES OF DIFFUSE POLARIZED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, S. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; McConnell, D.; Gaensler, B. M.; Haverkorn, M.; Beck, R.; Wolleben, M.; Stanimirovic, S.; Dickey, J. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2012-11-01

    We present a study of the magnetic field of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), carried out using diffuse polarized synchrotron emission data at 1.4 GHz acquired at the Parkes Radio Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The observed diffuse polarized emission is likely to originate above the LMC disk on the near side of the galaxy. Consistent negative rotation measures (RMs) derived from the diffuse emission indicate that the line-of-sight magnetic field in the LMC's near-side halo is directed coherently away from us. In combination with RMs of extragalactic sources that lie behind the galaxy, we show that the LMC's large-scale magnetic field is likely to be of quadrupolar geometry, consistent with the prediction of dynamo theory. On smaller scales, we identify two brightly polarized filaments southeast of the LMC, associated with neutral hydrogen arms. The filaments' magnetic field potentially aligns with the direction toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We suggest that tidal interactions between the SMC and the LMC in the past 10{sup 9} years are likely to have shaped the magnetic field in these filaments.

  14. Characterization of the proton beam at the output of the 6.7MeV LEDA RFQ.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Lysenko, W. P.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; Schneider, J. D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Smith, H. V.; Wangler, Thomas P.,; Crandall, K. R.; Chan, D.; Garnett, R. W.; Schulze, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present configuration of the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) consists of a 75-keV proton injector, a 6.7-MeV 350-MHz cw radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with associated high-power and lowlevel rf systems, a 52-magnet periodic lattice followed by a short high-energy beam transport (HEBT) and highpower (670-kW cw) beam stop. The rms beam emittance was measured prior to the installation of the 52-magnet lattice, based on wire-scanner measurements of the beam profile at a single location in the HEBT. New measurements with additional diagnostic hardware have been performed to determine the rms transverse beam properties of the beam at the output of the 6.7-MeV LEDA RFQ. The 52-magnet periodic lattice also includes ten beam position monitors (BPMs) evenly spaced in pairs of two. The BPMs provide a measure of the bunched beam current that exhibits nulls at different locations in the lattice. Model predictions of the locations of the nulls and the strength of the bunched beam current are made to determine what information this data can provide regarding the longitudinal beam emittance.

  15. Numeric spectral radiation hydrodynamic calculations of supernova shock breakouts

    SciTech Connect

    Sapir, Nir; Halbertal, Dorri

    2014-12-01

    We present here an efficient numerical scheme for solving the non-relativistic one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics equations including inelastic Compton scattering, which is not included in most codes and is crucial for solving problems such as shock breakout. The devised code is applied to the problems of a steady-state planar radiation mediated shock (RMS) and RMS breakout from a stellar envelope. The results are in agreement with those of a previous work on shock breakout, in which Compton equilibrium between matter and radiation was assumed and the 'effective photon' approximation was used to describe the radiation spectrum. In particular, we show that the luminosity and its temporal dependence, the peak temperature at breakout, and the universal shape of the spectral fluence derived in this earlier work are all accurate. Although there is a discrepancy between the spectral calculations and the effective photon approximation due to the inaccuracy of the effective photon approximation estimate of the effective photon production rate, which grows with lower densities and higher velocities, the difference in peak temperature reaches only 30% for the most discrepant cases of fast shocks in blue supergiants. The presented model is exemplified by calculations for supernova 1987A, showing the detailed evolution of the burst spectrum. The incompatibility of the stellar envelope shock breakout model results with observed properties of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and the discrepancy between the predicted and observed rates of XRFs remain unexplained.

  16. Undulator Radiation Damage Experience at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H. D.; Field, C.; Mao, S.; Levashov, Y.; Santana, M.; Welch, J. N.; Wolf, Z.

    2015-01-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has been running the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray Free Electron Laser since 2009. Undulator magnet damage from radiation, produced by the electron beam traveling through the 133-m long straight vacuum tube, has been and is a concern. A damage measurement experiment has been performed in 2007 in order to obtain dose versus damage calibrations. Radiation reduction and detection devices have been integrated into the LCLS undulator system. The accumulated radiation dose rate was continuously monitored and recorded. In addition, undulator segments have been routinely removed from the beamline to be checked for magnetic (50 ppm, rms) and mechanic (about 0.25 µm, rms) changes. A reduction in strength of the undulator segments is being observed, at a level, which is now clearly above the noise. Recently, potential sources for the observed integrated radiation levels have been investigated. The paper discusses the results of these investigation as well as comparison between observed damage and measured dose accumulations and discusses, briefly, strategies for the new LCLS-II upgrade, which will be operating at more than 300 times larger beam rate.

  17. Generation and pointing stabilization of multi-GeV electron beams from a laser plasma accelerator driven in a pre-formed plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Mao, H.-S.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tóth, Cs.; Tilborg, J. van; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-05-15

    Laser pulses with peak power 0.3 PW were used to generate electron beams with energy >4 GeV within a 9 cm-long capillary discharge waveguide operated with a plasma density of ≈7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Simulations showed that the super-Gaussian near-field laser profile that is typical of high-power femtosecond laser systems reduces the efficacy of guiding in parabolic plasma channels compared with the Gaussian laser pulses that are typically simulated. In the experiments, this was mitigated by increasing the plasma density and hence the contribution of self-guiding. This allowed for the generation of multi-GeV electron beams, but these had angular fluctuation ≳2 mrad rms. Mitigation of capillary damage and more accurate alignment allowed for stable beams to be produced with energy 2.7±0.1 GeV. The pointing fluctuation was 0.6 mrad rms, which was less than the beam divergence of ≲1 mrad full-width-half-maximum.

  18. FACET Emittance Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  19. Carrier-envelope-phase stabilized terawatt class laser at 1 kHz with a wavelength tunable option

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Langdon, Benjamin; Crunch Technologies, Boulder, CO; Garlick, Jonathan; Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, Derrek J.; Summers, Adam M.; Zigo, Stefan; Kling, Matthias F.; Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitat; Lei, Shuting; et al

    2015-02-12

    We demonstrate a chirped-pulse-amplified Ti:Sapphire laser system operating at 1 kHz, with 20 mJ pulse energy, 26 femtosecond pulse duration (0.77 terawatt), and excellent long term carrier-envelope-phase (CEP) stability. A new vibrational damping technique is implemented to significantly reduce vibrational noise on both the laser stretcher and compressor, thus enabling a single-shot CEP noise value of 250 mrad RMS over 1 hour and 300 mrad RMS over 9 hours. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the best long term CEP noise ever reported for any terawatt class laser. This laser is also used to pump a white-light-seeded opticalmoreparametric amplifier, producing 6 mJ of total energy in the signal and idler with 18 mJ of pumping energy. Due to preservation of the CEP in the white-light generated signal and passive CEP stability in the idler, this laser system promises synthesized laser pulses spanning multi-octaves of bandwidth at an unprecedented energy scale.less

  20. Chickamauga Hydro Unit 3: History of problems, application of new technology and corrective actions

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.J. III; Thompson, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    Chickamauga Unit 3 was placed in commercial operation in 1940 and has been in operation for over fifty years. During the history of the dam, concrete growth has been the source of alignment problems with all of the turbines and generators. This problem has resulted in difficulty in the maintenance of the minimum clearance between the rotating and stationary components of the unit. Disassembly of the units has been necessary to restore these minimum clearances. Over the years several potentially damaging problems have plagued this unit. In November of 1992 a Rotor Mounted Scanner (RMS) manufactured by MCM Enterprise Limited of Bellevue, Washington was installed on this unit. The use of state of the art technology has provided information which allowed operators to prevent an in-service failure when the air gap became dangerously small. Adjustments were made in the operation of the unit to minimize the temperature cycles. This change allowed the continued operation of the unit for an additional seven months to a planned outage. The turbine was scheduled to be replaced due to worn bushings in the trunion of the Kaplan type turbine. The information from the RMS was also used to formulate corrective actions that were taken during the planned outage. The findings made during the outage and corrective actions for continued dependable service will be discussed.

  1. Observation of Nonlinear Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kotseroglou, T.

    2003-12-19

    This experiment tests Quantum Electrodynamics in the strong field regime. Nonlinear Compton scattering has been observed during the interaction of a 46.6 GeV electron beam with a 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} laser beam. The strength of the field achieved was measured by the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}{sub rms}/{omega}mc = 0.6. Data were collected with infrared and green laser photons and circularly polarized laser light. The timing stabilization achieved between the picosecond laser and electron pulses has {sigma}{sub rms} = 2 ps. A strong signal of electrons that absorbed up to 4 infrared photons (or up to 3 green photons) at the same point in space and time, while emitting a single gamma ray, was observed. The energy spectra of the scattered electrons and the nonlinear dependence of the electron yield on the field strength agreed with the simulation over 3 orders of magnitude. The detector could not resolve the nonlinear Compton scattering from the multiple single Compton scattering which produced rates of scattered electrons of the same order of magnitude. Nevertheless, a simulation has studied this difference and concluded that the scattered electron rates observed could not be accounted for only by multiple ordinary Compton scattering; nonlinear Compton scattering processes are dominant for n {ge} 3.

  2. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  3. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

  4. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Laine, Daren L.; Laine, Edwin F.

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  5. Andrei Sakharov

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Ce discours donné par Mons.Jonauch qui est né en Tchécoslovaquie et a fait ses études à Leningrad, Moscou et Prague, est organisé par le comité Youri Orlov. Le conférencier parle de Andrei Sakharov, ce physicien et homme soviétique qui fit ses études à Moscou, effectua des recherches sur les armes thermonucléaires et entra à l'Académie des Sciences d'URSS en 1953. Il participa à la mise au point de la bombe à hydrogène, mais s'opposa quelques années plus tard à la poursuite des expériences nucléaires. Il créa en 1970 le comité pour la défense des droits de l'homme ce que lui valut le prix Nobel de la paix en 1975.

  6. A test of star formation laws in disk galaxies. II. Dependence on dynamical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Suwannajak, Chutipong; Tan, Jonathan C.; Leroy, Adam K.

    2014-05-20

    We use the observed radial profiles of the mass surface densities of total, Σ {sub g}, and molecular, Σ{sub H2}, gas, rotation velocity, and star formation rate (SFR) surface density, Σ{sub sfr}, of the molecular-rich (Σ{sub H2} ≥ Σ{sub HI}/2) regions of 16 nearby disk galaxies to test several star formation (SF) laws: a 'Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S)' law, Σ{sub sfr}=A{sub g}Σ{sub g,2}{sup 1.5}; a 'Constant Molecular' law, Σ{sub sfr} = A {sub H2}Σ{sub H2,2}; the turbulence-regulated laws of Krumholz and McKee (KM05) and Krumholz, McKee, and Tumlinson (KMT09); a 'Gas-Ω' law, Σ{sub sfr}=B{sub Ω}Σ{sub g}Ω; and a shear-driven 'giant molecular cloud (GMC) Collision' law, Σ{sub sfr} = B {sub CC}Σ {sub g}Ω(1-0.7β), where β ≡ d ln v {sub circ}/d ln r. If allowed one free normalization parameter for each galaxy, these laws predict the SFR with rms errors of factors of 1.4-1.8. If a single normalization parameter is used by each law for the entire galaxy sample, then rms errors range from factors of 1.5-2.1. Although the Constant Molecular law gives the smallest rms errors, the improvement over the KMT, K-S, and GMC Collision laws is not especially significant, particularly given the different observational inputs that the laws utilize and the scope of included physics, which ranges from empirical relations to detailed treatment of interstellar medium processes. We next search for systematic variation of SF law parameters with local and global galactic dynamical properties of disk shear rate (related to β), rotation speed, and presence of a bar. We demonstrate with high significance that higher shear rates enhance SF efficiency per local orbital time. Such a trend is expected if GMC collisions play an important role in SF, while an opposite trend would be expected if the development of disk gravitational instabilities is the controlling physics.

  7. Comparison of algorithms for determination of rotation measure and Faraday structure. I. 1100–1400 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X. H.; Akahori, Takuya; Anderson, C. S.; Farnes, J. S.; O’Sullivan, S. P.; Rudnick, L.; O’Brien, T.; Bell, M. R.; Bray, J. D.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Ideguchi, S.; Kumazaki, K.; Stepanov, R.; Stil, J.; Wolleben, M.; Takahashi, K.; Weeren, R. J. van E-mail: larry@umn.edu

    2015-02-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and more general Faraday structures are key parameters for studying cosmic magnetism and are also sensitive probes of faint ionized thermal gas. A definition of which derived quantities are required for various scientific studies is needed, as well as addressing the challenges in determining Faraday structures. A wide variety of algorithms has been proposed to reconstruct these structures. In preparation for the Polarization Sky Survey of the Universe's Magnetism (POSSUM) to be conducted with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the ongoing Galactic Arecibo L-band Feeds Array Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS), we run a Faraday structure determination data challenge to benchmark the currently available algorithms, including Faraday synthesis (previously called RM synthesis in the literature), wavelet, compressive sampling, and QU-fitting. The input models include sources with one Faraday thin component, two Faraday thin components, and one Faraday thick component. The frequency set is similar to POSSUM/GALFACTS with a 300 MHz bandwidth from 1.1 to 1.4 GHz. We define three figures of merit motivated by the underlying science: (1) an average RM weighted by polarized intensity, RM{sub wtd}, (2) the separation Δϕ of two Faraday components, and (3) the reduced chi-squared χ{sub r}{sup 2}. Based on the current test data with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 32, we find the following. (1) When only one Faraday thin component is present, most methods perform as expected, with occasional failures where two components are incorrectly found. (2) For two Faraday thin components, QU-fitting routines perform the best, with errors close to the theoretical ones for RM{sub wtd} but with significantly higher errors for Δϕ. All other methods, including standard Faraday synthesis, frequently identify only one component when Δϕ is below or near the width of the Faraday point-spread function. (3) No methods as currently implemented

  8. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  9. lab_news-2013-04-05_la02_02-20-04 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    lab_news-2013-04-05_la02_02-20-04 lab_news-2013-04-05_la02_02-20-04 lab_news-2013-04-05_la02_02-20-04 labnews04-05-13.pdf (1.61 MB) More Documents & Publications Type B Accident Investigation of the October 9, 2008 Employee Injured when Rocket Motor Unexpectedly Fired at the Sandia National Laboratories Technical Area III Sled Track, Sandia Site Office Fact Sheet on Sandia Corporation PNOV TBH-0034 - In the Matter of Casey von Bargen

  10. Nonvolatile “AND,” “OR,” and “NOT” Boolean logic gates based on phase-change memory

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Zhong, Y. P.; Deng, Y. F.; Zhou, Y. X.; Xu, L.; Miao, X. S.

    2013-12-21

    Electronic devices or circuits that can implement both logic and memory functions are regarded as the building blocks for future massive parallel computing beyond von Neumann architecture. Here we proposed phase-change memory (PCM)-based nonvolatile logic gates capable of AND, OR, and NOT Boolean logic operations verified in SPICE simulations and circuit experiments. The logic operations are parallel computing and results can be stored directly in the states of the logic gates, facilitating the combination of computing and memory in the same circuit. These results are encouraging for ultralow-power and high-speed nonvolatile logic circuit design based on novel memory devices.

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - chandler2004session1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Salishan Conference on High Speed Computing - 2004 04/20/04 - 1 Nuclear Weapons Design Codes: A 50 Year Perspective Bill Chandler -- chandler@lanl.gov Mike Berry -- mberry@lanl.gov X-3 Group Los Alamos National Laboratory NTS Grable 25 May 1953 15 kT Airburst LA-UR-04-2501 X-3 Salishan Conference on High Speed Computing - 2004 04/20/04 - 2 Abstract TITLE: Nuclear Weapons De sign Cod es: A 50 Year Perspective From Von Neumann using the Eniac to today's ASCI code developers using tens of

  12. First Mott lobe of bosons with local two- and three-body interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Souza, A. M. C.

    2011-12-15

    Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we determine the phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model with local two- and three-body interactions, describing polar molecules in one-dimensional optical lattices. The difference in the block von Neumann entropy with different system sizes was used to establish the critical points. We found that the quantum critical point position increases with the three-body interaction. We show that the model studied is in the same universality class as the model with pure two-body interactions.

  13. Science on Saturday: Dealing With Iran's Nuclear Program | Princeton Plasma

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab 30, 2016, 9:30am Science On Saturday PPPL, MBG Auditorium Science on Saturday: Dealing With Iran's Nuclear Program Professor Frank von Hippel Princeton University Science_on_Saturday30Jan2016_FvonHippel Contact Information Coordinator(s): Ms. Deedee Ortiz-Arias dortiz@pppl.gov Host(s): Dr. Andrew Zwicker azwicker@pppl.gov PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor Information, Directions, Security at PPPL As a federal facility, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is operating under

  14. Dynamic properties of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Fal'kovskii, L. A.

    2012-09-15

    The phonon spectrum of graphene has been studied with the minimum set of the nearest neighbors in the Born-von Karman model taking into account the electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions. The widths, both natural and owing to interactions with defects, of phonons have been estimated. Symmetry constraints imposed on force constants are taken into account. For symmetry reasons, vibrations with the polarization normal to the plane of the layer are not related to in-plane vibrations. The phonon frequencies at symmetry points and elastic moduli are expressed in terms of force constants.

  15. Coupled-channels density-matrix approach to low-energy nuclear collision dynamics: A technique for quantifying quantum decoherence effects on reaction observables

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Torres, Alexis

    2010-11-15

    The coupled-channels density-matrix technique for nuclear reaction dynamics, which is based on the Liouville-von Neumann equation with Lindblad dissipative terms, is developed with the inclusion of full angular momentum couplings. It allows a quantitative study of the role and importance of quantum decoherence in nuclear scattering. Formulas of asymptotic observables that can reveal effects of quantum decoherence are given. A method for extracting energy-resolved scattering information from the time-dependent density matrix is introduced. As an example, model calculations are carried out for the low-energy collision of the {sup 16}O projectile on the {sup 154}Sm target.

  16. Microsoft Word - Agenda for Information Exchange Webinar 6Mar14.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Exchange Webinar Thursday, March 6, 2014 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM EST Call in number: 1-888-677-0837 Passcode: 10542 http://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=742128065&p=10312008&t=c 11:00-11:05 AM Introductions and Meeting Purpose J. Eto 11:05-11:10 AM OE and ARPA-E Welcome Remarks P. Overholt and T. Heidel 11:10-11:20 AM University of California California Institute for Energy and Environment (UC-CIEE): Micro-Synchrophasors in Distribution Systems A. VonMeier 11:20-11:30 AM Washington State

  17. Untitled

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Professor Hilbert von Löhneysen Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Director of the Institute for Solid State Physics Karlsruhe, Germany Entropy Landscape of Materials with Strong Electronic Correla$ons Near Quantum Cri$cality Tuesday, January 26, 2016 3:00 - 4:00pm MSL Auditorium (TA-03 - Bldg 1698 - Room A103) Abstract: In a number of materials, a second-order phase transi5on can be driven to zero temperature by a non-thermal control parameter such as pressure, magne5c or electric field, or

  18. Complex absorbing potential based Lorentzian fitting scheme and time dependent quantum transport

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hang Kwok, Yanho; Chen, GuanHua; Jiang, Feng; Zheng, Xiao

    2014-10-28

    Based on the complex absorbing potential (CAP) method, a Lorentzian expansion scheme is developed to express the self-energy. The CAP-based Lorentzian expansion of self-energy is employed to solve efficiently the Liouville-von Neumann equation of one-electron density matrix. The resulting method is applicable for both tight-binding and first-principles models and is used to simulate the transient currents through graphene nanoribbons and a benzene molecule sandwiched between two carbon-atom chains.

  19. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in theTheory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    ScienceCinema

    Wolf, Emil [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States

    2016-07-12

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  20. collab-list-scientific.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration ! University of Bern, Switzerland: M. Auger, A. Ereditato, D. Goeldi, I. Kreslo, D. Lorca, M. Lüethi, C. Rudolf von Rohr, J. Sinclair, M. Weber Brookhaven: M. Bishai, H. Chen, J. Joshi, B. Kirby, Y. Li, M. Mooney, X. Qian, B. Viren, C. Zhang University of Cambridge: J. Anthony, L. Escudero Sanchez, J. Jan de Vries, J. Marshall, A. Smith, M. Thomson University of Chicago: W.M. Foreman, J. Ho, A. Mastbaum, D.W. Schmitz, J. Zennamo University of Cincinnati: R. Grosso, R.A. Johnson,

  1. Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs : numerical supplement.

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2012-04-01

    This Report presents numerical tables summarizing properties of intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide, GaAs, as computed by density functional theory. This Report serves as a numerical supplement to the results published in: P.A. Schultz and O.A. von Lilienfeld, 'Simple intrinsic defects in GaAs', Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci Eng., Vol. 17, 084007 (2009), and intended for use as reference tables for a defect physics package in device models. The numerical results for density functional theory calculations of properties of simple intrinsic defects in gallium arsenide are presented.

  2. Stabilizing S.P.H. with conservative smoothing

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Y.; Hicks, D.L.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-08-01

    There is an instability in certain S.P.H. (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method) material dynamics computations. Evidence from analyses and experiments suggests that the instabilities in S.P.H. are not removable with artificial viscosities. However, the analysis shows that a type of conservative smoothing does remove the instability. Also, numerical experiments, on certain test problems, show that SPHCS, and S.P.H. code with conservative smoothing, compares well in accuracy with computations based on the von Neumann-Richtmyer method.

  3. I. V. Khalzov, B. P. Brown, F. Ebrahimi, D. D. Schnack, and C. B. Forest

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    simulation of laminar plasma dynamos in a cylindrical von Kármán flow I. V. Khalzov, B. P. Brown, F. Ebrahimi, D. D. Schnack, and C. B. Forest Citation: Phys. Plasmas 18, 032110 (2011); doi: 10.1063/1.3559472 View online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3559472 View Table of Contents: http://pop.aip.org/resource/1/PHPAEN/v18/i3 Published by the American Institute of Physics. Additional information on Phys. Plasmas Journal Homepage: http://pop.aip.org/ Journal Information:

  4. Ground potential rise monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  5. Generation of Femtosecond Electron Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jinamoon, V.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Rimjaem, S.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; Chumphongphan, S.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-09

    At the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF), Chiang Mai University (Thailand), the SURIYA project has been established aiming to produce femtosecond electron pulses utilizing a combination of an S-band thermionic rf gun and a magnetic bunch compressor ({alpha}-magnet). A specially designed rf-gun has been constructed to obtain optimum beam characteristics for the best bunch compression. Simulation results show that bunch lengths as short as about 50 fs rms can be expected at the experimental station. The electron bunch lengths will be determined using autocorrelation of coherent transition radiation (TR) through a Michelson interferometer. The paper discusses beam dynamics studies, design, fabrication and cold tests of the rf-gun as well as presents the project current status and forth-coming experiments.

  6. Vibration Testing of Dallas/Maxim iButton Temperature Logger, Model DS1999L, for Flight Qualification on Captive Flight Test Unit?B (CFTU-B)

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, G; Lavietes, A

    2005-06-20

    This report documents the flight qualification testing of the Dallas/Maxim iButton temperature logger, model DS1922L, for internal mounting to the W80 Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM). A single test was performed utilizing a Labworks Inc. LW-140-110 electro-dynamic vibration system in Building 131, Room 2272, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. Two DS1922L temperature loggers were tested simultaneously, one horizontally and one vertically. The test consisted of random excitation in the vertical axis for 5-hours. The test spectrum used is a shaped random spectrum defined by the Boeing Company for flight qualification of all modifications flown on ALCM flight tests. The spectrum is defined from 10 to 2000 Hz with a 8.52 g RMS magnitude. The spectrum is given in Table 1 and shown graphically in Figure 1.1.

  7. Single wire drift chamber design

    SciTech Connect

    Krider, J.

    1987-03-30

    This report summarizes the design and prototype tests of single wire drift chambers to be used in Fermilab test beam lines. The goal is to build simple, reliable detectors which require a minimum of electronics. Spatial resolution should match the 300 ..mu..m rms resolution of the 1 mm proportional chambers that they will replace. The detectors will be used in beams with particle rates up to 20 KHz. Single track efficiency should be at least 99%. The first application will be in the MT beamline, which has been designed for calibration of CDF detectors. A set of four x-y modules will be used to track and measure the momentum of beam particles.

  8. Particle production of a graphite target system for the intensity frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; McDonald, K. T.

    2015-05-03

    A solid graphite target system is considered for an intense muon and/or neutrino source in support of physics at the intensity frontier. We previously optimized the geometric parameters of the beam and target to maximize particle production at low energies by incoming protons with kinetic energy of 6.75 GeV and an rms geometric emittance of 5 mm-mrad using the MARS15(2014) code. In this study, we ran MARS15 with ROOT-based geometry and also considered a mercury-jet target as an upgrade option. The optimization was extended to focused proton beams with transverse emittances from 5 to 50 mm-mrad, showing that the particle production decreases slowly with increasing emittance. We also studied beam-dump configurations to suppress the rate of undesirable high-energy secondary particles in the beam.

  9. Effect of Al-mole fraction in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N grown by MOCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Jayasakthi, M. Ramesh, R. Prabakaran, K. Loganathan, R. Kuppulingam, B. Balaji, M. Arivazhagan, P. Sankaranarayanan, S. Singh, Shubra Baskar, K.

    2014-04-24

    AlGaN/AlN layers were grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire substrates. The Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N layer composition was varied from 15% to 25%. The crystalline quality, thickness and aluminum (Al) composition of AlGaN were determined using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD). The growth rate decreases on increasing Al composition. Reciprocal space mapping (RSM) was used to estimate the strain and relaxation between AlGaN and AlN. The optical properties of AlGaN layers were investigated by room temperature Photoluminescence (PL). The AlGaN peak shifts towards lower wavelength with Al composition. The surface morphology of AlGaN was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were found to be increased in AlGaN layers with composition.

  10. Ultra-stable sub-meV monochromator for hard X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Toellner, T. S.; Collins, J.; Goetze, K.; Hu, M. Y.; Preissner, C.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Yan, L.

    2015-07-17

    A high-resolution silicon monochromator suitable for 21.541 keV synchrotron radiation is presented that produces a bandwidth of 0.27 meV. The operating energy corresponds to a nuclear transition in 151Eu. The first-of-its-kind, fully cryogenic design achieves an energy-alignment stability of 0.017 meV r.m.s. per day, or a 100-fold improvement over other meV-monochromators, and can tolerate higher X-ray power loads than room-temperature designs of comparable resolution. This offers the potential for significantly more accurate measurements of lattice excitation energies using nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy if combined with accurate energy calibration using, for example, high-speed Doppler shifting. The design of the monochromator along with its performance and impact on transmitted beam properties are presented.

  11. Temperature, Oxygen, and Soot-Volume-Fraction Measurements in a Turbulent C2H4-Fueled Jet Flame

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, Sean P.; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Winters, Caroline; Farias, Paul Abraham; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed set of measurements from a piloted, sooting, turbulent C 2 H 4 - fueled diffusion flame. Hybrid femtosecond/picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to monitor temperature and oxygen, while laser-induced incandescence (LII) is applied for imaging of the soot volume fraction in the challenging jet-flame environment at Reynolds number, Re = 20,000. Single-laser shot results are used to map the mean and rms statistics, as well as probability densities. LII data from the soot-growth region of the flame are used to benchmark the soot source term for one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) modeling of this turbulent flame. The ODT code is then used to predict temperature and oxygen fluctuations higher in the soot oxidation region higher in the flame.

  12. Diagnostics for the optimization of an 11 keV inverse Compton scattering x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Chauchat, A.-S.; Brasile, J.-P; Le Flanchec, V.; Negre, J.-P.; Binet, A.; Ortega, J.-M.

    2013-04-19

    In a scope of a collaboration between Thales Communications and Security and CEA DAM DIF, 11 keV Xrays were produced by inverse Compton scattering on the ELSA facility. In this type of experiment, X-ray observation lies in the use of accurate electron and laser beam interaction diagnostics and on fitted X-ray detectors. The low interaction probability between < 100 {mu}m width, 12 ps [rms] length electron and photon pulses requires careful optimization of pulse spatial and temporal covering. Another issue was to observe 11 keV X-rays in the ambient radioactive noise of the linear accelerator. For that, we use a very sensitive detection scheme based on radio luminescent screens.

  13. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; Mazza, T.; Meyer, M.; Pfeiffer, S.; Prędki, P.; Schefer, S.; Schmidt, C.; Wegner, U.; Schlarb, H.; Cavalieri, A. L.

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarily by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.

  14. Femtosecond all-optical synchronization of an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Schulz, S.; Grguraš, I.; Behrens, C.; Bromberger, H.; Costello, J. T.; Czwalinna, M. K.; Felber, M.; Hoffmann, M. C.; Ilchen, M.; Liu, H. Y.; et al

    2015-01-20

    Many advanced applications of X-ray free-electron lasers require pulse durations and time resolutions of only a few femtoseconds. To generate these pulses and to apply them in time-resolved experiments, synchronization techniques that can simultaneously lock all independent components, including all accelerator modules and all external optical lasers, to better than the delivered free-electron laser pulse duration, are needed. Here we achieve all-optical synchronization at the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH and demonstrate facility-wide timing to better than 30 fs r.m.s. for 90 fs X-ray photon pulses. Crucially, our analysis indicates that the performance of this optical synchronization is limited primarilymore » by the free-electron laser pulse duration, and should naturally scale to the sub-10 femtosecond level with shorter X-ray pulses.« less

  15. Determination of effective acceleration for use in design at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, D.W. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    An rms-based effective acceleration study has been conducted for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The study used real time history records with epicentral distances, magnitudes and site conditions deemed appropriate for the LLNL Livermore site. Only those records having strong motion durations, T{sub D}{prime}, >3.0 seconds, and peak ground acceleration {ge} .4g were selected for determining the effective acceleration hazard curve used in design. These parameters are consistent with LLNL's use of broad-band Newmark-Hall Spectra for design, and the high peak instrumental accelerations corresponding to the return intervals of interest. Study results were used to modify the acceleration hazard curve for facility design/evaluation at LLNL.

  16. Determination of effective acceleration for use in design at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site

    SciTech Connect

    Coats, D.W. Jr.

    1991-09-01

    An rms-based effective acceleration study has been conducted for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The study used real time history records with epicentral distances, magnitudes and site conditions deemed appropriate for the LLNL Livermore site. Only those records having strong motion durations, T{sub D}{prime}, >3.0 seconds, and peak ground acceleration {ge} .4g were selected for determining the effective acceleration hazard curve used in design. These parameters are consistent with LLNL`s use of broad-band Newmark-Hall Spectra for design, and the high peak instrumental accelerations corresponding to the return intervals of interest. Study results were used to modify the acceleration hazard curve for facility design/evaluation at LLNL.

  17. JSATS Detector Field Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eric Y.; Flory, Adam E.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2014-06-01

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) Detector is a software and hardware system that captures JSATS Acoustic Micro Transmitter (AMT) signals. The system uses hydrophones to capture acoustic signals in the water. This analog signal is then amplified and processed by the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) board in the computer. This board digitizes and processes the acoustic signal to determine if a possible JSATS tag is present. With this detection, the data will be saved to the computer for further analysis. This document details the features and functionality of the JSATS Detector software. The document covers how to install the software, setup and run the detector software. The document will also go over the raw binary waveform file format and CSV files containing RMS values

  18. Sheet beam model for intense space-charge: with application to Debye screening and the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies in a thermal equilibrium beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Friedman, Alex; Bazouin, Guillaume

    2011-01-10

    A one-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson model for sheet beams is reviewed and extended to provide a simple framework for analysis of space-charge effects. Centroid and rms envelope equations including image charge effects are derived and reasonable parameter equivalences with commonly employed 2D transverse models of unbunched beams are established. This sheet beam model is then applied to analyze several problems of fundamental interest. A sheet beam thermal equilibrium distribution in a continuous focusing channel is constructed and shown to have analogous properties to two- d three-dimensional thermal equilibrium models in terms of the equilibrium structure and Deybe screening properties. The simpler formulation for sheet beams is exploited to explicitly calculate the distribution of particle oscillation frequencies within a thermal equilibrium beam. It is shown that as space-charge intensity increases, the frequency distribution becomes broad, suggesting that beams with strong space-charge can have improved stability.

  19. Methods and apparatus for broadband frequency comb stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Cox, Jonathan A; Kaertner, Franz X

    2015-03-17

    Feedback loops can be used to shift and stabilize the carrier-envelope phase of a frequency comb from a mode-locked fibers laser or other optical source. Compared to other frequency shifting and stabilization techniques, feedback-based techniques provide a wideband closed-loop servo bandwidth without optical filtering, beam pointing errors, or group velocity dispersion. It also enables phase locking to a stable reference, such as a Ti:Sapphire laser, continuous-wave microwave or optical source, or self-referencing interferometer, e.g., to within 200 mrad rms from DC to 5 MHz. In addition, stabilized frequency combs can be coherently combined with other stable signals, including other stabilized frequency combs, to synthesize optical pulse trains with pulse durations of as little as a single optical cycle. Such a coherent combination can be achieved via orthogonal control, using balanced optical cross-correlation for timing stabilization and balanced homodyne detection for phase stabilization.

  20. Tuning the narrow-band beam position monitor sampling clock to remove the aliasing errors in APS storage ring orbit measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X.; Singh, O. )

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source storage ring employs a real-time orbit correction system to reduce orbit motion up to 50 Hz. This system uses up to 142 narrow-band rf beam position monitors (Nbbpms) in a correction algorithm by sampling at a frequency of 1.53 kHz. Several Nbbpms exhibit aliasing errors in orbit measurements, rendering these Nbbpms unusable in real-time orbit feedback. The aliasing errors are caused by beating effects of the internal sampling clocks with various other processing clocks residing within the BPM electronics. A programmable external clock has been employed to move the aliasing errors out of the active frequency band of the real-time feedback system (RTFB) and rms beam motion calculation. This paper discusses the process of tuning and provides test results.

  1. X-ray metrology and performance of a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Brejnholt, Nicolai F.; Hill, Randall; Jackson, Jessie; Hagler, Lisle; Celestre, Richard; Feng, Jun

    2016-05-20

    We describe experiments with a 45-cm long x-ray deformable mirror (XDM) that have been conducted in End Station 2, Beamline 5.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source. A detailed description of the hardware implementation is provided. We explain our one-dimensional Fresnel propagation code that correctly handles grazing incidence and includes a model of the XDM. This code is used to simulate and verify experimental results. Initial long trace profiler metrology of the XDM at 7.5 keV is presented. The ability to measure a large (150-nm amplitude) height change on the XDM is demonstrated. The results agree well with the simulated experimentmore » at an error level of 1 μrad RMS. Lastly, direct imaging of the x-ray beam also shows the expected change in intensity profile at the detector.« less

  2. Collison-induced rototranslational absorption spectra of H/sub 2/-He pairs at temperatures from 40 to 3000 K

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, J.; Frommhold, L.; Birnbaum, G.

    1988-03-01

    The zeroth, first, and second spectral moments of the rototranslational collision-induced absorption (RT CIA) spectra of hydrogen-helium mixtures are calculated from the fundamental theory, for temperatures from 40 to 3000 K. With the help of simple analytical functions of three parameters and the information given, the RT CIA spectra of H/sub 2/-He pairs can be generated on computers of small capacity, with rms deviations from exact quantum profiles of not more than a few percent. Such representations of the CIA spectra are of interest for work related to the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The theoretical spectra are in close agreement with existing laboratory measurements at various temperatures from about 77 to 3000 K. 28 references.

  3. Thermo-optically tuned photonic resonators with concurrent electrical connection and thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2016-06-14

    A photonic resonator system is designed to use thermal tuning to adjust the resonant wavelength of each resonator in the system, with a separate tuning circuit associated with each resonator so that individual adjustments may be made. The common electrical ground connection between the tuning circuits is particularly formed to provide thermal isolation between adjacent resonators by including a capacitor along each return path to ground, where the presence of the capacitor's dielectric material provides the thermal isolation. The use of capacitively coupling necessarily requires the use of an AC current as an input to the heater element (conductor/resistor) of each resonator, where the RMS value of the AC signal is indicative of the amount of heat that is generated along the element and the degree of wavelength tuning that is obtained.

  4. Axial asymmetry, finite particle number and the IBA

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Although the IBA-1 contains no solutions corresponding to a rigid triaxial shape, it does contain an effective asymmetry. This arises from zero point motion in a ..gamma..-soft potential leading to a non-zero mean or rms ..gamma... Three aspects of this feature will be discussed: (1) The relation between IBA-1 calculations and the corresponding ..gamma... This point is developed in the context of the Consistent Q Formalism (CQF) of the IBA. (2) The dependence of this asymmetry on boson number, N, and the exploitation of this dependence to set limits on both the relative and absolute values of N for deformed nuclei. (3) The relation between this asymmetry and the triaxiality arising from the introduction of cubic terms into the IBA Hamiltonian. Various observables will be inspected in order both to determine their sensitivity to these two structural features and to explore empirical ways of distinguishing which origin of asymmetry applies in any given nucleus. 16 references.

  5. Pad polishing for rapid production of large flats

    SciTech Connect

    Berggren, R.R.; Schmell, R.A.

    1997-11-01

    Pad polishing is an efficient technique for polishing-out a ground surface and reaching a figure better than one wave, ready for completion with less than an hour on a planetary polisher. For the 350 mm square piece of BK-7, removal was one micrometer every 10 minutes. Polishing-out from a 5 micrometer grind took less than 3 hours, to a surface smoothness of one nm rms. Other tests verified that the pad leaves no unusual subsurface damage. Following completion on a pitch planetary polisher, surface finish is the same as obtained for conventional processing. Unlike pitch, the pad retains its surface figure, producing a uniform result when used on a production basis. Coupled with the speed of production and low capital cost of overarm machines, it provides a cost-effective approach.

  6. Sensitivity study of voxel-based PET image comparison to image registration algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Stephen Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross; Aerts, Hugo J. W. L.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable registration is essential for voxel-based comparison of sequential positron emission tomography (PET) images for proper adaptation of treatment plan and treatment response assessment. The comparison may be sensitive to the method of deformable registration as the optimal algorithm is unknown. This study investigated the impact of registration algorithm choice on therapy response evaluation. Methods: Sixteen patients with 20 lung tumors underwent a pre- and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) and 4D FDG-PET scans before and after chemoradiotherapy. All CT images were coregistered using a rigid and ten deformable registration algorithms. The resulting transformations were then applied to the respective PET images. Moreover, the tumor region defined by a physician on the registered PET images was classified into progressor, stable-disease, and responder subvolumes. Particularly, voxels with standardized uptake value (SUV) decreases >30% were classified as responder, while voxels with SUV increases >30% were progressor. All other voxels were considered stable-disease. The agreement of the subvolumes resulting from difference registration algorithms was assessed by Dice similarity index (DSI). Coefficient of variation (CV) was computed to assess variability of DSI between individual tumors. Root mean square difference (RMS{sub rigid}) of the rigidly registered CT images was used to measure the degree of tumor deformation. RMS{sub rigid} and DSI were correlated by Spearman correlation coefficient (R) to investigate the effect of tumor deformation on DSI. Results: Median DSI{sub rigid} was found to be 72%, 66%, and 80%, for progressor, stable-disease, and responder, respectively. Median DSI{sub deformable} was 63%–84%, 65%–81%, and 82%–89%. Variability of DSI was substantial and similar for both rigid and deformable algorithms with CV > 10% for all subvolumes. Tumor deformation had moderate to significant impact on DSI for progressor

  7. Composition, morphology and mechanical properties of sputtered TiAlN coating

    SciTech Connect

    Budi, Esmar; Razali, M. Mohd.; Nizam, A. R. Md.

    2014-03-24

    TiAlN coating was deposited on the tungsten carbide cutting tool by using DC magnetron sputtering system to study the influence of substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate on the composition, morphology and mechanical properties. The negatively substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate was varied from about ?79 to ?221 V and 30 sccm to 72 sccm, respectively. The coating composition and roughness were characterized by using SEM/EDX and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. The dynamic ultra micro hardness tester was used to measure the mechanical properties. The coating hardness increases to about 10-12 GPa with an increase of the negatively substrate bias up to ? 200 V and it tend to decrease with an increase in nitrogen flow rate up to 70 sccm. The increase of hardness follows the increase of Ti and N content and rms coating roughness.

  8. Ultrathin polycrystalline 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene films

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Min-Cherl; Zhang, Dongrong; Nikiforov, Gueorgui O.; Lee, Michael V.; Qi, Yabing; Joo Shin, Tae; Ahn, Docheon; Lee, Han-Koo; Baik, Jaeyoon; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2015-03-15

    Ultrathin (<6?nm) polycrystalline films of 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-P) are deposited with a two-step spin-coating process. The influence of spin-coating conditions on morphology of the resulting film was examined by atomic force microscopy. Film thickness and RMS surface roughness were in the range of 4.06.1 and 0.61.1?nm, respectively, except for small holes. Polycrystalline structure was confirmed by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements suggested that the plane through aromatic rings of TIPS-P molecules was perpendicular to the substrate surface.

  9. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of SrO buffer layers on graphite and graphene for the integration of complex oxides

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Adam S.; Wen, Hua; Ohta, Taisuke; Pinchuk, Igor V.; Zhu, Tiancong; Beechem, Thomas; Kawakami, Roland K.

    2016-04-27

    Here, we report the successful growth of high-quality SrO films on highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and single-layer graphene by molecular beam epitaxy. The SrO layers have (001) orientation as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) while atomic force microscopy measurements show continuous pinhole-free films having rms surface roughness of <1.5 Å. Moreover, transport measurements of exfoliated graphene, after SrO deposition, show a strong dependence between the Dirac point and Sr oxidation. As a result, the SrO is leveraged as a buffer layer for more complex oxide integration via the demonstration of (001) oriented SrTiO3 grown atop a SrO/HOPG stack.

  10. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  11. Chemical method for producing smooth surfaces on silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad

    2003-01-01

    An improved method for producing optically smooth surfaces in silicon wafers during wet chemical etching involves a pre-treatment rinse of the wafers before etching and a post-etching rinse. The pre-treatment with an organic solvent provides a well-wetted surface that ensures uniform mass transfer during etching, which results in optically smooth surfaces. The post-etching treatment with an acetic acid solution stops the etching instantly, preventing any uneven etching that leads to surface roughness. This method can be used to etch silicon surfaces to a depth of 200 .mu.m or more, while the finished surfaces have a surface roughness of only 15-50 .ANG. (RMS).

  12. Design of a proton-electron beam overlap monitor for the new RHIC electron lens, based on detecting energetic backscattered electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger T.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Minty, M.; Miller, T.; Montag, C.; Pikin, A.

    2012-04-15

    The optimal performance of the two electron lenses that are being implemented for high intensity polarized proton operation of RHIC requires excellent collinearity of the {approx}0.3 mm RMS wide electron beams with the proton bunch trajectories over the {approx}2m interaction lengths. The main beam overlap diagnostic tool will make use of electrons backscattered in close encounters with the relativistic protons. These electrons will spiral along the electron guiding magnetic field and will be detected in a plastic scintillator located close to the electron gun. A fraction of these electrons will have energies high enough to emerge from the vacuum chamber through a thin window thus simplifying the design and operation of the detector. The intensity of the detected electrons provides a measure of the overlap between the e- and the opposing proton beams. Joint electron arrival time and energy discrimination may be used additionally to gain some longitudinal position information with a single detector per lens.

  13. Proposed electron halo detector system as one of the beam overlap diagnostic tools for the new RHIC electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger, P.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Chasman, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Lambiase, R.; Montag, C.; Luo, Y.; Minty, M.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Tan, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    An electron lens for head-on beam-beam compensation planned for RHIC requires precise overlap of the electron and proton beams which both can have down to 0.3 mm rms transverse radial widths along the 2m long interaction region. Here we describe a new diagnostic tool that is being considered to aid in the tuning and verification of this overlap. Some of ultra relativistic protons (100 or 250 GeV) colliding with low energy electrons (2 to 10 keV) will transfer sufficient transverse momentum to cause the electrons to spiral around the magnetic guiding field in a way that will make them detectable outside of the main solenoid. Time-of-flight of the halo electron signals will provide position-sensitive information along the overlap region. Scattering cross sections are calculated and counting rate estimates are presented as function of electron energy and detector position.

  14. The effect of head-on beam-beam compensation on the stochastic boundaries and particle diffusion in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.; Beebe-Wang, J.; FischW; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23

    To compensate the effects from the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), an electron lens (elens) is proposed to collide head-on with the proton beam. We used an extended version of SixTrack for multiparticle beam-beam simulation in order to study the effect of the e-lens on the stochastic boundary and also on diffusion. The stochastic boundary was analyzed using Lyapunov exponents and the diffusion was characterized as the increase in the rms spread of the action. For both studies the simulations were performed with and without the e-lens and with full and partial compensation. Using the simulated values of the diffusion an attempt to calculate the emittance growth rate is presented.

  15. Ultra-stable sub-meV monochromator for hard X-rays

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Toellner, T. S.; Collins, J.; Goetze, K.; Hu, M. Y.; Preissner, C.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Yan, L.

    2015-07-17

    A high-resolution silicon monochromator suitable for 21.541 keV synchrotron radiation is presented that produces a bandwidth of 0.27 meV. The operating energy corresponds to a nuclear transition in 151Eu. The first-of-its-kind, fully cryogenic design achieves an energy-alignment stability of 0.017 meV r.m.s. per day, or a 100-fold improvement over other meV-monochromators, and can tolerate higher X-ray power loads than room-temperature designs of comparable resolution. This offers the potential for significantly more accurate measurements of lattice excitation energies using nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy if combined with accurate energy calibration using, for example, high-speed Doppler shifting. The design of the monochromator alongmore » with its performance and impact on transmitted beam properties are presented.« less

  16. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Groves, James R.; Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4×106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  17. Timing Characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Elagin, Andrey L.; Frisch, H.; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, E; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wagner, Robert G.; Wang, Jingbo; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Northrop, R

    2015-09-21

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultralast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub picosecond laser. We observe single photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm x 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 pm, and median gains higher than 10(7). The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with in of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  18. System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material

    DOEpatents

    Jiles, David C.; Sipahi, Levent B.

    1994-05-17

    A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

  19. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  20. Development of the third harmonic SC cavity at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolay Solyak et al.

    2004-08-05

    The third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity was recently proposed by DESY for a new generation of high brightness photo-injector (TTF photoinjector-2) to compensate nonlinear distortion of the longitudinal phase space due to RF curvature of the 1.3 GHz TESLA cavities [1,2]. Installation of the 3rd harmonic cavity will allow us to generate ultra-short (<50 {micro}m rms) highly charged electron bunches with an extremely small transverse normalized emittance (<1 {micro}m). This is required to support a new generation of linear colliders, free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation sources. In this paper we present the current status of the 3rd harmonic cavity being developed at Fermilab. We discuss the design procedure, the building and testing of the copper and niobium half-cells and components, the design of input and HOM couplers.

  1. Study on a negative hydrogen ion source with hot cathode arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S. H. Fang, X.; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 ; Zhang, H. J.; Qian, C.; Ma, B. H.; Wang, H.; Li, X. X.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-02-15

    A negative hydrogen (H{sup ?}) ion source with hot cathode arc discharge was designed and fabricated as a primary injector for a 10 MeV PET cyclotron at IMP. 1 mA dc H{sup ?} beam with ? {sub N,} {sub RMS} = 0.08 ??mm?mrad was extracted at 25 kV. Halbach hexapole was adopted to confine the plasma. The state of arc discharge, the parameters including filament current, arc current, gas pressure, plasma electrode bias, and the ratio of I{sub e{sup ?}}/I{sub H{sup ?}} were experimentally studied. The discussion on the result, and opinions to improve the source were given.

  2. New high power linacs and beam physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Crandall, K.R.; Hasegawa, K.

    1997-08-01

    New high-power proton linacs must be designed to control beam loss, which can lead to radioactivation of the accelerator. The threat of beam loss is increased significantly by the formation of beam halo. Numerical simulation studies have identified the space-charge interactions, especially those that occur in rms mismatched beams, as a major concern for halo growth. The maximum-amplitude predictions of the simulation codes must be subjected to independent tests to confirm the validity of the results. Consequently, the authors compare predictions from the particle-core halo models with computer simulations to test their understanding of the halo mechanisms that are incorporated in the computer codes. They present and discuss scaling laws that provide guidance for high-power linac design.

  3. Experimental study of proton beam halo in mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.; Chan, K. D.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Garnett, R. W.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Qiang, J.; Lysenko, W. P.; Smith, H. V.; Schneider, J. D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Wangler, Thomas P.,; Schulze, M. E.; Crandall, K. R.

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of transverse beam-halo formation in mismatched proton beams in a 52-quadrupole FODO-transport channel following the 6.7 MeV RFQ at the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Los Alamos. Beam profiles in both transverse planes were measured using a new diagnostic device that consists of a movable carbon filament for measurement of the beam core, and scraper plates for measurement of the outer part of the distributions. The initial results indicate a surprisingly strong growth rate of the rms emittance even for the modest space-charge tune depressions of the experiment. Our results are consistent with the complete transfer of free energy of the mismatched beams into emittance growth within 10 envelope oscillations for both the breathing and the quadrupole modes.

  4. Beam halo in mismatched proton beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, Thomas P.,; Allen, C. K.; Chan, D.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Crandall, K. R.; Qiang, J.; Garnett, R. W.; Lysenko, W. P.; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Schneider, J. D.; Schulze, M. E.; Sheffield, R. L.; Smith, H. V.

    2002-01-01

    Progress was made during the past decade towards a better understanding of halo formation caused by beam mismatch in high-intensity beams. To test these ideas an experiment was carried out at Los Alamos with proton beams in a 52-quadrupole focusing channel. Rms emittances and beam widths were obtained from measured beam profiles for comparison with the maximum emittance growth predictions of a free-energy model and the maximum haloamplitude predictions of a particle-core model. The experimental results are also compared with multiparticle simulations. In this paper we will present the experimental results and discuss the implications with respect to the validity of both the models and the simulations. Keywords: beam halo, emittance growth, beam profiles, simulations, space charge, mismatch

  5. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Bentefour, E; Levin, Daniel S.; Moshe, M.; Silver, Yiftah; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  6. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H. Q.; Jie, Y. X. Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Wang, Z. X.; Qian, J. P.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.; Li, G. S.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 10{sup 16} m{sup ?2} (?2), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1.

  7. LaunchMON: An Infrastructue for Large Scale Tool Daemon Launching

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2001-04-25

    LaunchMON is a tool infrastructure that allows a HPC tool to deploy tool daemons into the right remote nodes. It makes use of a target resource manager (RM)'s Automatic Process Acquisition Interface (APAI) to identify the remote nodes and processes of a parallel program, and also exploits the same RM's efficient MPI job launching capability on co-locating daemons with the job. To support a wide range of HPC tools that are inherently distributed software, LaunchMONmore » provides the tool with distributed application programming interface sets: the front end (FE) API, the back end (BE) API and the middleware (MW) API. They each support a tool's front end, back end daemons and middleware communication daemons, respectively. Using those API sets, the tool can launch and initialize their remote daemons scalably.« less

  8. Gage for micromachining system

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Donald M.

    1979-02-27

    A gage for measuring the contour of the surface of an element of a micromachining tool system and of a work piece machined by the micromachining tool system. The gage comprises a glass plate containing two electrical contacts and supporting a steel ball resting against the contacts. As the element or workpiece is moved against the steel ball, the very slight contact pressure causes an extremely small movement of the steel ball which breaks the electrical circuit between the two contacts. The contour information is supplied to a dedicated computer controlling the micromachining tool so that the computer knows the contour of the element and the work piece to an accuracy of .+-. 25 nm. The micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nanometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS.

  9. Calibration of charge state conversion surfaces for neutral particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlstroem, P.; Scheer, J. A.; Wurz, P.; Hertzberg, E.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2008-08-01

    Molecular oxygen and hydrogen ions were scattered off hydrogen terminated diamondlike carbon (DLC) charge state conversion surfaces at incident grazing angles. The energy range of the scattered particles was 390-1000 eV, and the surface roughness of the DLC surface was of the order of 1 A rms. For all surfaces almost equal angular scattering and negative ion fractions were found within the uncertainties of the measurement. This result supports the fact that charge state conversion with DLC surfaces is a reliable technology for neutral particle sensing instruments. Furthermore, these instruments can work in the laboratory as well as in the harsh environment on board a satellite.The surfaces measured here are used in the IBEX-lo sensor, a neutral particle sensing instrument on the NASA IBEX mission, which is scheduled for launch into orbit around Earth in July 2008.

  10. Event-by-event hexb pt hexb fluctuations in Au-Au collisions atsqrt(sNN) = 130 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar,A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris,J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-09-02

    We present the first large-acceptance measurement of event-wise fluctuations in Au-Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 130 GeV. Significant nonstatistical fluctuations are observed. The measured fractional r.m.s. width excess of the event-wise distribution for the 15% most-central events for charged hadrons within |{eta}| < 1 and 0.15 {le} p{sub t} {le} 2 GeV/c is 13.7 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-}1.3(syst)% relative to a statistical reference. The variation of charge-independent fluctuation excess with centrality is non-monotonic but smooth. Charge-dependent nonstatistical fluctuations are also observed.

  11. Performance of a MEMS-base Adaptive Optics Optical Coherency Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J; Zadwadzki, R J; Jones, S; Olivier, S; Opkpodu, S; Werner, J S

    2008-01-16

    We have demonstrated that a microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror can be flattened to < 1 nm RMS within controllable spatial frequencies over a 9.2-mm aperture making it a viable option for high-contrast adaptive optics systems (also known as Extreme Adaptive Optics). The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) measures wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy for metrology and wavefront control. Consistent flattening, required testing and characterization of the individual actuator response, including the effects of dead and low-response actuators. Stability and repeatability of the MEMS devices was also tested. An error budget for MEMS closed loop performance will summarize MEMS characterization.

  12. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchies, F. Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  13. One-dimensional turbulence modeling of a turbulent counterflow flame with comparison to DNS

    SciTech Connect

    Jozefik, Zoltan; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Heiko; Lyra, Sgouria; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jackie H.

    2015-06-01

    The one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is applied to a reactant-to-product counterflow configuration and results are compared with DNS data. The model employed herein solves conservation equations for momentum, energy, and species on a one dimensional (1D) domain corresponding to the line spanning the domain between nozzle orifice centers. The effects of turbulent mixing are modeled via a stochastic process, while the Kolmogorov and reactive length and time scales are explicitly resolved and a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used. Comparisons between model and DNS results for spatial mean and root-meansquare (RMS) velocity, temperature, and major and minor species profiles are shown. The ODT approach shows qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable agreement with the DNS data. Scatter plots and statistics conditioned on temperature are also compared for heat release rate and all species. ODT is able to capture the range of results depicted by DNS. However, conditional statistics show signs of underignition.

  14. High Temperature Superconducting Thick Films

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM); Groves, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Holesinger, Terry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-08-23

    An article including a substrate, a layer of an inert oxide material upon the surface of the substrate, (generally the inert oxide material layer has a smooth surface, i.e., a RMS roughness of less than about 2 nm), a layer of an amorphous oxide or oxynitride material upon the inert oxide material layer, a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure upon the amorphous oxide material layer is provided together with additional layers such as at least one layer of a buffer material upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer or a HTS top-layer of YBCO directly upon the oriented cubic oxide material layer. With a HTS top-layer of YBCO upon at least one layer of a buffer material in such an article, Jc's of 1.4106 A/cm2 have been demonstrated with projected Ic's of 210 Amperes across a sample 1 cm wide.

  15. Two-frequency lidar technique for mesospheric Na temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    She, C.Y.; Latifi, H.; Yu, J.R.; Alvarez, R.J. II ); Bills, R.E.; Gardner, C.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors describe a new two-frequency lidar for measuring Na temperature profiles that uses a stabilized cw single-mode dye laser oscillator (rms frequency jitter < 1 MHz) followed by a pulsed-dye power amplifier (140 MHz FWHM linewidth) which is pumped by an injection-locked Nd:YAG laser. The laser oscillator is tuned to the two operating frequencies by observing the Doppler-free structure of the Na D{sub 2} fluorescence spectrum in a vapor cells. The lidar technique and the initial observations of the temperature profile between 82 and 102 km at Ft. Collins, CO (40.6{degree}N,105{degree}W) are described. Absolute temperature accuracies at the Na layer peak of better than {plus minus}3 K with a vertical resolution of 1 km and an integration period of approximately 5 min were achieved.

  16. Improved Potential Energy Surface of Ozone Constructed Using the Fitting by Permutationally Invariant Polynomial Function

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ayouz, Mehdi; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    New global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state of ozone is constructed at the complete basis set level of the multireference configuration interaction theory. A method of fitting the data points by analytical permutationally invariant polynomial function is adopted. A small set of 500 points is preoptimized using the old surface of ozone. In this procedure the positions of points in the configuration space are chosen such that the RMS deviation of the fit is minimized. New ab initio calculations are carried out at these points and are used to build new surface. Additional points are addedmore » to the vicinity of the minimum energy path in order to improve accuracy of the fit, particularly in the region where the surface of ozone exhibits a shallow van der Waals well. New surface can be used to study formation of ozone at thermal energies and its spectroscopy near the dissociation threshold.« less

  17. Measurement of the tradeoff between intrinsic emittance and quantum efficiency from a NaKSb photocathode near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared Cultrera, Luca; Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-06-08

    We measure the tradeoff between the quantum efficiency and intrinsic emittance from a NaKSb photocathode at three increasing wavelengths (635, 650, and 690 nm) at or below the energy of the bandgap plus the electron affinity, hν≤E{sub g}+E{sub a}. These measurements were performed using a high voltage dc gun for varied photocathode surface fields of 1.4−4.4 MV/m. Measurements of intrinsic emittance are performed using two different methods and were found to agree. At the longest wavelength available, 690 nm, the intrinsic emittance was 0.26 μm/mm-rms with a quantum efficiency of ∼10{sup −4}. The suitability of NaKSb emitting at threshold for various low emittance applications is discussed.

  18. High quality single shot ultrafast MeV electron diffraction from a photocathode radio-frequency gun

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Feichao; Liu, Shengguang; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao Zhang, Jie; Cao, Jianming

    2014-08-15

    A compact ultrafast electron diffractometer, consisting of an s-band 1.6 cell photocathode radio-frequency gun, a multi-function changeable sample chamber, and a sensitive relativistic electron detector, was built at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. High-quality single-shot transmission electron diffraction patterns have been recorded by scattering 2.5 MeV electrons off single crystalline gold and polycrystalline aluminum samples. The high quality diffraction pattern indicates an excellent spatial resolution, with the ratio of the diffraction ring radius over the ring rms width beyond 10. The electron pulse width is estimated to be about 300 fs. The high temporal and spatial resolution may open new opportunities in various areas of sciences.

  19. The correction of linear lattice gradient errors using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,G.; Bai, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Satogata, T.

    2009-05-04

    Precise measurement of optics from coherent betatron oscillations driven by ac dipoles have been demonstrated at RHIC and the Tevatron. For RHIC, the observed rms beta-beat is about 10%. Reduction of beta-beating is an essential component of performance optimization at high energy colliders. A scheme of optics correction was developed and tested in the RHIC 2008 run, using ac dipole optics for measurement and a few adjustable trim quadruples for correction. In this scheme, we first calculate the phase response matrix from the. measured phase advance, and then apply singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm to the phase response matrix to find correction quadruple strengths. We present both simulation and some preliminary experimental results of this correction.

  20. Volunteers Leading Technology, A Case Study: Chewonki Renewable Hydrogen Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    l j l l i j Volunteers Leading Technology A Case Study: Chewonk Renewab e Hydrogen Pro ect Pau Fau st ch, Pro ect Manager � j i � li � i � l � l � Agenda Pro ect Overv ew Accomp shments Fund ng Vo unteer Labor Acknow edgements What's Next j � i l i i i i � i lly i i fi i l i l Di i i i i � i i i l i i i l i i i i i i l l i Pro ect Overview: Goals St mu ate and support ex st ng Ma ne bus nesses, Create strateg ca mportant connect ons among rms nvo ved n the Renewab e Energy and

  1. Systematic structure of the neutron drip-line {sup 22}C nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Atef; Cheong, Lee Yen; Yahya, Noorhana; Tammam, M.

    2014-10-24

    In the present work we systematically discuss the nuclear structure of the the heaviest particle-bound carbon isotope, {sup 22}C. The ground state wave function of the carbon isotope is calculated using the {sup 20}C core plus two-valence neutron based on a phenomenological mean-field MF potential. We apply the deduced wave function to provide the nuclear matter density which is necessary in the calculations of the total reaction cross section. Calculations show that there is a reasonable good description of the experimental binding energy BE and root-mean square RMS radius. The exotic structure and configuration of the ground state carbon isotope is explained and a consistent explanation on the two-neutron halo (Borromean) nucleus is given.

  2. SU-F-BRD-11: Prediction of Dosimetric Endpoints From Patient Geometry Using Neural Nets

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D; Chow, P; Agazaryan, N; Jani, S; Low, D; Lamb, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The previously-published overlap volume histogram (OVH) technique lends itself naturally to prediction of the dose received by a given volume of tissue (e.g. D90) in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment plans. Here we extend the OVH technique using artificial neural networks in order to predict the volume of tissue receiving a given dose (e.g. V90) in both prostate IMRT and conventional breast radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-nine prostate treatment plans and forty-three breast treatment plans were analyzed. The spatial relationships between the prostate and rectum and between the breast and ipsilateral lung were characterized using OVHs. The OVH is a cumulative histogram representing the fractional volume of the risk organ overlapped by a series of isotropic expansions of the planning target volume (PTV). Seven cases were identified as outliers and replanned. OVH points were used as inputs to a one hidden layer feed forward artificial neural network with quality parameters of the corresponding plan, such as the rectum V50, as targets. A 3-fold cross-validation was used to estimate the prediction error. Results: The root mean square (RMS) error between the predicted rectum V50s and the planned values was 2.3, which was 35% of the standard deviation of V50 for the twenty-nine plans. The RMS error of prediction of V20 of the ipsilateral lung in breast cases was 3.9, which was 90% of the standard deviation of the V20 values in the breast plan database. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that artificial neural nets can be used to extend the OVH technique to predict dosimetric endpoints taking the form of a volume receiving a given dose, rather than the minimum dose received by a given volume. Prediction of ipsilateral lung dose in breast radiotherapy using the OVH technique remains a work in progress.

  3. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatnikov, A.N. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96 (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  4. A Resonant Cavity Approach to Non-Invasive, Pulse-to-Pulse EmittanceMeasurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.S.; Nantista, C.D.; Miller, R.H.; Weidemann, A.W.; /FARTECH, San Diego /SLAC

    2010-06-15

    We present a resonant cavity approach for non-invasive, pulse-to-pulse, beam emittance measurements of non-circular multi-bunch beams. In a resonant cavity, desired field components can be enhanced up to Q{sub L{lambda}}/{pi}, where Q{sub L{lambda}} is the loaded quality factor of the resonant mode {lambda}, when the cavity resonant mode matches the bunch frequency of a bunch-train beam pulse. In particular, a quad-cavity, with its quadrupole mode (TM{sub 220} for rectangular cavities) at beam operating frequency, rotated 45{sup o} with respect to the beamline, extracts the beam quadrupole moment exclusively, utilizing the symmetry of the cavity and some simple networks to suppress common modes. Six successive beam quadrupole moment measurements, performed at different betatron phases in a linear transport system determine the beam emittance, i.e. the beam size and shape in the beam's phase space, if the beam current and position at these points are known. In the presence of x-y beam coupling, ten measurements are required. One measurement alone provides the rms-beam size of a large aspect ratio beam. The resolution for such a measurement of rms-beam size with the rectangular quad-cavity monitor presented in this article is estimated to be on the order of ten microns. A prototype quad-cavity was fabricated and preliminary beam tests were performed at the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Results were mainly limited by beam jitter and uncertainty in the beam position measurement at the cavity location. This motivated the development of a position-emittance integrated monitor.

  5. Local Control With Reduced-Dose Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group D9602 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Breneman, John; Meza, Jane; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Raney, R. Beverly; Wolden, Suzanne; Michalski, Jeff; Laurie, Fran; Rodeberg, David A.; Meyer, William

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of reduced-dose radiotherapy on local control in children with low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated in the Children's Oncology Group D9602 study. Methods and Materials: Patients with low-risk RMS were nonrandomly assigned to receive radiotherapy doses dependent on the completeness of surgical resection of the primary tumor (clinical group) and the presence of involved regional lymph nodes. After resection, most patients with microscopic residual and uninvolved nodes received 36 Gy, those with involved nodes received 41.4 to 50.4 Gy, and those with orbital primary tumors received 45 Gy. All patients received vincristine and dactinomycin, with cyclophosphamide added for patient subsets with a higher risk of relapse in Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV studies. Results: Three hundred forty-two patients were eligible for analysis; 172 received radiotherapy as part of their treatment. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 15% in patients with microscopic involved margins when cyclophosphamide was not part of the treatment regimen and 0% when cyclophosphamide was included. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 14% in patients with orbital tumors. Protocol-specified omission of radiotherapy in girls with Group IIA vaginal tumors (n = 5) resulted in three failures for this group. Conclusions: In comparison with Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV results, reduced-dose radiotherapy does not compromise local control for patients with microscopic tumor after surgical resection or with orbital primary tumors when cyclophosphamide is added to the treatment program. Girls with unresected nonbladder genitourinary tumors require radiotherapy for postsurgical residual tumor for optimal local control to be achieved.

  6. Real-time soft tissue motion estimation for lung tumors during radiotherapy delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross; Keall, Paul

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To provide real-time lung tumor motion estimation during radiotherapy treatment delivery without the need for implanted fiducial markers or additional imaging dose to the patient.Methods: 2D radiographs from the therapy beam's-eye-view (BEV) perspective are captured at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz with a frame grabber allowing direct RAM access to the image buffer. An in-house developed real-time soft tissue localization algorithm is utilized to calculate soft tissue displacement from these images in real-time. The system is tested with a Varian TX linear accelerator and an AS-1000 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device operating at a resolution of 512 × 384 pixels. The accuracy of the motion estimation is verified with a dynamic motion phantom. Clinical accuracy was tested on lung SBRT images acquired at 2 fps.Results: Real-time lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images without fiducial markers is successfully demonstrated. For the phantom study, a mean tracking error <1.0 mm [root mean square (rms) error of 0.3 mm] was observed. The tracking rms accuracy on BEV images from a lung SBRT patient (≈20 mm tumor motion range) is 1.0 mm.Conclusions: The authors demonstrate for the first time real-time markerless lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images alone. The described system can operate at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz and does not require prior knowledge to establish traceable landmarks for tracking on the fly. The authors show that the geometric accuracy is similar to (or better than) previously published markerless algorithms not operating in real-time.

  7. Predicting Outcome in Patients with Rhabdomyosarcoma: Role of [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Dana L.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Fox, Josef J.; Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Schoder, Heiko; Price, Alison N.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) response of the primary tumor after induction chemotherapy predicts outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Methods and Materials: After excluding those with initial tumor resection, 107 patients who underwent FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center from 2002 to 2013 were reviewed. Local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to FDG-PET response and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) at baseline (PET1/SUV1), after induction chemotherapy (PET2/SUV2), and after local therapy (PET3/SUV3). Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cutoff for dichotomization of SUV1 and SUV2 values. Results: The SUV1 (<9.5 vs ≥9.5) was predictive of PFS (P=.02) and OS (P=.02), but not LC. After 12 weeks (median) of induction chemotherapy, 45 patients had negative PET2 scans and 62 had positive scans: 3-year PFS was 72% versus 44%, respectively (P=.01). The SUV2 (<1.5 vs ≥1.5) was similarly predictive of PFS (P=.005) and was associated with LC (P=.02) and OS (P=.03). A positive PET3 scan was predictive of worse PFS (P=.0009), LC (P=.05), and OS (P=.03). Conclusions: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography is an early indicator of outcomes in patients with RMS. Future prospective trials may incorporate FDG-PET response data for risk-adapted therapy and early assessment of new treatment regimens.

  8. Two modes of surface roughening during plasma etching of silicon: Role of ionized etch products

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazaki, Nobuya Tsuda, Hirotaka; Takao, Yoshinori; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-12-14

    Atomic- or nanometer-scale surface roughening has been investigated during Si etching in inductively coupled Cl{sub 2} plasmas, as a function of rf bias power or ion incident energy E{sub i}, by varying feed gas flow rate, wafer stage temperature, and etching time. The experiments revealed two modes of surface roughening which occur depending on E{sub i}: one is the roughening mode at low E{sub i} < 200–300 eV, where the root-mean-square (rms) roughness of etched surfaces increases with increasing E{sub i}, exhibiting an almost linear increase with time during etching (t < 20 min). The other is the smoothing mode at higher E{sub i}, where the rms surface roughness decreases substantially with E{sub i} down to a low level < 0.4 nm, exhibiting a quasi-steady state after some increase at the initial stage (t < 1 min). Correspondingly, two different behaviors depending on E{sub i} were also observed in the etch rate versus √(E{sub i}) curve, and in the evolution of the power spectral density distribution of surfaces. Such changes from the roughening to smoothing modes with increasing E{sub i} were found to correspond to changes in the predominant ion flux from feed gas ions Cl{sub x}{sup +} to ionized etch products SiCl{sub x}{sup +} caused by the increased etch rates at increased E{sub i}, in view of the results of several plasma diagnostics. Possible mechanisms for the formation and evolution of surface roughness during plasma etching are discussed with the help of Monte Carlo simulations of the surface feature evolution and classical molecular dynamics simulations of etch fundamentals, including stochastic roughening and effects of ion reflection and etch inhibitors.

  9. Performance optimization of a bendable parabolic cylinder collimating X-ray mirror for the ALS micro-XAS beamline 10.3.2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Domning, Edward E.; Merthe, Daniel J.; Salmassi, Farhad; Smith, Brian V.

    2015-04-08

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline (BL) 10.3.2 is an apparatus for X-ray microprobe spectroscopy and diffraction experiments, operating in the energy range 2.4–17 keV. The performance of the beamline, namely the spatial and energy resolutions of the measurements, depends significantly on the collimation quality of light incident on the monochromator. In the BL 10.3.2 end-station, the synchrotron source is imaged 1:1 onto a set of roll slits which form a virtual source. The light from this source is collimated in the vertical direction by a bendable parabolic cylinder mirror. Details are presented of the mirror design, which allows formore » precision assembly, alignment and shaping of the mirror, as well as for extending of the mirror operating lifetime by a factor of ~10. Assembly, mirror optimal shaping and preliminary alignment were performed ex situ in the ALS X-ray Optics Laboratory (XROL). Using an original method for optimal ex situ characterization and setting of bendable X-ray optics developed at the XROL, a root-mean-square (RMS) residual surface slope error of 0.31 µrad with respect to the desired parabola, and an RMS residual height error of less than 3 nm were achieved. Once in place at the beamline, deviations from the designed optical geometry (e.g. due to the tolerances for setting the distance to the virtual source, the grazing incidence angle, the transverse position) and/or mirror shape (e.g. due to a heat load deformation) may appear. Due to the errors, on installation the energy spread from the monochromator is typically a few electron-volts. Here, a new technique developed and successfully implemented for at-wavelength (in situ) fine optimal tuning of the mirror, enabling us to reduce the collimation-induced energy spread to ~0.05 eV, is described.« less

  10. Connecting speeds, directions and arrival times of 22 coronal mass ejections from the sun to 1 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Mstl, C.; Veronig, A. M.; Rollett, T.; Temmer, M.; Peinhart, V.; Amla, K.; Hall, J. R.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Colaninno, R. C.; Davies, J. A.; Harrison, R. A.; Lugaz, N.; Farrugia, C. J.; Galvin, A. B.; Liu, Y. D.; Luhmann, J. G.; Vrnak, B.

    2014-06-01

    Forecasting the in situ properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from remote images is expected to strongly enhance predictions of space weather and is of general interest for studying the interaction of CMEs with planetary environments. We study the feasibility of using a single heliospheric imager (HI) instrument, imaging the solar wind density from the Sun to 1 AU, for connecting remote images to in situ observations of CMEs. We compare the predictions of speed and arrival time for 22 CMEs (in 2008-2012) to the corresponding interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) parameters at in situ observatories (STEREO PLASTIC/IMPACT, Wind SWE/MFI). The list consists of front- and backsided, slow and fast CMEs (up to 2700 km s{sup 1}). We track the CMEs to 34.9 7.1 deg elongation from the Sun with J maps constructed using the SATPLOT tool, resulting in prediction lead times of 26.4 15.3 hr. The geometrical models we use assume different CME front shapes (fixed-?, harmonic mean, self-similar expansion) and constant CME speed and direction. We find no significant superiority in the predictive capability of any of the three methods. The absolute difference between predicted and observed ICME arrival times is 8.1 6.3 hr (rms value of 10.9 hr). Speeds are consistent to within 284 288 km s{sup 1}. Empirical corrections to the predictions enhance their performance for the arrival times to 6.1 5.0 hr (rms value of 7.9 hr), and for the speeds to 53 50 km s{sup 1}. These results are important for Solar Orbiter and a space weather mission positioned away from the Sun-Earth line.

  11. Three-dimensional modeling of direct-drive cryogenic implosions on OMEGA

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Igumenshchev, Igor V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Marshall, F. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Campbell, E. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Froula, D. H.; Glebov, V. Yu; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; et al

    2016-05-04

    In this study, the effects of large-scale (with Legendre modes ≲10) laser-imposed nonuniformities in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA Laser System are investigated using three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations performed using the newly developed code ASTER. Sources of these nonuniformities include an illumination pattern produced by 60 OMEGA laser beams; capsule offsets (~10 to 20 μm); and imperfect pointing, power balance, and timing of the beams (with typical σrms ~10 microns, 10%, and 5 ps, respectively). Two implosion designs using 26-kJ triple-picket laser pulses were studied: a nominal design, in which an 874-μm-diameter capsule is illuminated by about the same-diameter beams,more » and a more hydrodynamically efficient ''R75" design using a 900-μm-diameter capsule and beams of 75% of this diameter. Simulations show that nonuniformities caused by capsule offsets and beam imbalance have the largest effect on implosion performance. These nonuniformities lead to significant distortions of implosion cores, resulting in an increased residual kinetic energy and incomplete stagnation. The shape of distorted cores can be well characterized using neutron images, but is less represented by 4-8 keV x-ray images. Simulated neutron spectra from perturbed implosions show large directional variations because of bulk motion effects and up to an ~2 keV variation of the hot-spot temperature inferred from these spectra. The R75 design suffers more from illumination nonuniformities. Simulations show an advantage of this design over the nominal design when the target offset and beam power imbalance σrms are reduced to less than 5 μm and 5%, respectively.« less

  12. SU-E-P-13: Quantifying the Geometric Error Due to Irregular Motion in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory correlated 4DCT images are generated under the assumption of a regular breathing cycle. This study evaluates the error in 4DCT-based target position estimation in the presence of irregular respiratory motion. Methods: A custom-made programmable externally-and internally-deformable lung motion phantom was placed inside the CT bore. An abdominal pressure belt was placed around the phantom to mimic clinical 4DCT acquisitio and the motion platform was programmed with a sinusoidal (±10mm, 10 cycles per minute) motion trace and 7 motion traces recorded from lung cancer patients. The same setup and motion trajectories were repeated in the linac room and kV fluoroscopic images were acquired using the on-board imager. Positions of 4 internal markers segmented from the 4DCT volumes were overlaid upon the motion trajectories derived from the fluoroscopic time series to calculate the difference between estimated (4DCT) and “actual” (kV fluoro) positions. Results: With a sinusoidal trace, absolute errors of the 4DCT estimated markers positions vary between 0.78mm and 5.4mm and RMS errors are between 0.38mm to 1.7mm. With irregular patient traces, absolute errors of the 4DCT estimated markers positions increased significantly by 100 to 200 percent, while the corresponding RMS error values have much smaller changes. Significant mismatches were frequently found at peak-inhale or peak-exhale phase. Conclusion: As expected, under conditions of well-behaved, periodic sinusoidal motion, the 4DCT yielded much better estimation of marker positions. When an actual patient trace is used 4DCT-derived positions showed significant mismatches with the fluoroscopic trajectories, indicating the potential for geometric and therefore dosimetric errors in the presence of cycle-to-cycle respiratory variations.

  13. HARPS-N OBSERVES THE SUN AS A STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, Xavier; Glenday, Alex; Phillips, David F.; Charbonneau, David; Latham, David W.; Li, Chih-Hao; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald; Buchschacher, Nicolas; Lovis, Christophe; Pepe, Francesco; Udry, Stéphane; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Cecconi, Massimo; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Lodi, Marcello; Molinari, Emilio

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity (RV) perturbations induced by stellar surface inhomogeneities including spots, plages and granules currently limit the detection of Earth-twins using Doppler spectroscopy. Such stellar noise is poorly understood for stars other than the Sun because their surface is unresolved. In particular, the effects of stellar surface inhomogeneities on observed stellar radial velocities are extremely difficult to characterize, and thus developing optimal correction techniques to extract true stellar radial velocities is extremely challenging. In this paper, we present preliminary results of a solar telescope built to feed full-disk sunlight into the HARPS-N spectrograph, which is in turn calibrated with an astro-comb. This setup enables long-term observation of the Sun as a star with state-of-the-art sensitivity to RV changes. Over seven days of observing in 2014, we show an average 50 cm s{sup −1} RV rms over a few hours of observation. After correcting observed radial velocities for spot and plage perturbations using full-disk photometry of the Sun, we lower by a factor of two the weekly RV rms to 60 cm s{sup −1}. The solar telescope is now entering routine operation, and will observe the Sun every clear day for several hours. We will use these radial velocities combined with data from solar satellites to improve our understanding of stellar noise and develop optimal correction methods. If successful, these new methods should enable the detection of Venus over the next two to three years, thus demonstrating the possibility of detecting Earth-twins around other solar-like stars using the RV technique.

  14. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors <1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants. During the first year a custom batch furnace was built to develop the method with high power radiative heating to simulate transfer of glass into a hot slumping zone in a production line. To preserve the original high polish of the float glass on both front and back surfaces, as required for a second surface mirror, the mold surface is machined to the required shape as grooves which intersect the glass at cusps, reducing the mold contact area to significantly less than 1%. The mold surface is gold-plated to reflect thermal radiation. Optical metrology of glass replicas made with the system has been carried out with a novel, custom-built test system. This test provides collimated, vertically-oriented parallel beams from a linear array of co-aligned lasers translated in a perpendicular direction across the reflector. Deviations of

  15. COLDER AND HOTTER: INTERFEROMETRIC IMAGING OF {beta} CASSIOPEIAE AND {alpha} LEONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Che, X.; Monnier, J. D.; Zhao, M.; Merand, A.; Ten Brummelaar, T.; McAlister, H.; Turner, N.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Ridgway, S. T.

    2011-05-10

    Near-infrared interferometers have recently imaged a number of rapidly rotating A-type stars, finding levels of gravity darkening inconsistent with theoretical expectations. Here, we present new imaging of both a cooler star {beta} Cas (F2IV) and a hotter one {alpha} Leo (B7V) using the CHARA array and the MIRC instrument at the H band. Adopting a solid-body rotation model with a simple gravity darkening prescription, we modeled the stellar geometric properties and surface temperature distributions, confirming that both stars are rapidly rotating and show gravity darkening anomalies. We estimate the masses and ages of these rapid rotators on L-R{sub pol} and H-R diagrams constructed for non-rotating stars by tracking their non-rotating equivalents. The unexpected fast rotation of the evolved sub-giant {beta} Cas offers a unique test of the stellar core-envelope coupling, revealing quite efficient coupling over the past {approx}0.5 Gyr. Lastly, we summarize all our interferometric determinations of the gravity darkening coefficient for rapid rotators, finding that none match the expectations from the widely used von Zeipel gravity darkening laws. Since the conditions of the von Zeipel law are known to be violated for rapidly rotating stars, we recommend using the empirically derived {beta} = 0.19 for such stars with radiation-dominated envelopes. Furthermore, we note that no paradigm exists for self-consistently modeling heavily gravity-darkened stars that show hot radiative poles with cool convective equators.

  16. Thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory with generalized-gradient approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Jeng-Da

    2014-05-14

    We extend the recently proposed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) [J.-D. Chai, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154104 (2012)] to generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation density functionals. Relative to our previous TAO-LDA (i.e., the local density approximation to TAO-DFT), the resulting TAO-GGAs are significantly superior for a wide range of applications, such as thermochemistry, kinetics, and reaction energies. For noncovalent interactions, TAO-GGAs with empirical dispersion corrections are shown to yield excellent performance. Due to their computational efficiency for systems with strong static correlation effects, TAO-LDA and TAO-GGAs are applied to study the electronic properties (e.g., the singlet-triplet energy gaps, vertical ionization potentials, vertical electron affinities, fundamental gaps, and symmetrized von Neumann entropy) of acenes with different number of linearly fused benzene rings (up to 100), which is very challenging for conventional electronic structure methods. The ground states of acenes are shown to be singlets for all the chain lengths studied here. With the increase of acene length, the singlet-triplet energy gaps, vertical ionization potentials, and fundamental gaps decrease monotonically, while the vertical electron affinities and symmetrized von Neumann entropy (i.e., a measure of polyradical character) increase monotonically.

  17. Oxidation state and interfacial effects on oxygen vacancies in tantalum pentoxide

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bondi, Robert J.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2015-02-28

    First-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to study the atomistic structure, structural energetics, and electron density near the O monovacancy (VOn; n=0,1+,2+) in both bulk, amorphous tantalum pentoxide (a-Ta2O5) and also at vacuum and metallic Ta interfaces. We calculate multivariate vacancy formation energies to evaluate stability as a function of oxidation state, distance from interface plane, and Fermi energy. VOn of all oxidation states preferentially segregate at both Ta and vacuum interfaces, where the metallic interface exhibits global formation energy minima. In a-Ta2O5, VO0 are characterized by structural contraction and electron density localization, while VO2+ promote structural expansion andmore » are depleted of electron density. In contrast, interfacial VO0 and VO2+ show nearly indistinguishable ionic and electronic signatures indicative of a reduced VO center. Interfacial VO2+ extract electron density from metallic Ta indicating VO2+ is spontaneously reduced at the expense of the metal. This oxidation/reduction behavior suggests careful selection and processing of both oxide layer and metal electrodes for engineering memristor device operation.« less

  18. CRADA Final Report: Application of Dual-Mode Inverter Control to Commercially Available Radial-Gap Mermanent Magnet Motors - Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, John W; Lawler, Jack; Downing, Mark; Stahlhut, Ronnie D; Bremmer, R.; Shoemaker, J. M.; Seksarian, A. K.; Poore, B.; Lutz, Jon F

    2006-05-01

    light load and higher speed. This current reduction, which is the salient feature of DMIC, may be significant when operating duty cycles have low loads at high frequencies. Reduced copper losses make operation more efficient thereby reducing operating costs. In the Deere applications selected for this study, the operating benefit was overshadowed by the motor's rotational losses. Rotational losses of Deere 1 and Deere 2 dominate the overall drive efficiency so that their reduction has the greatest potential to improve performance. A good follow-up project would be to explore cost erective ways to reduce the rotational losses buy 66%. During this analysis it has been shown that, for a PM synchronous motor (PMSM), the DMIC's salient feature is its ability to minimize the current required to deliver a given power. The root-mean-square (rms) current of a motor is determined by the speed, power, motor drive parameters, and controls as I{sub rms} = (n, P, motor drive parameters, controls), where n is the relative speed, {omega}/{omega}{sub base} = {Omega}/{Omega}{sub base}, {omega} is the mechanical frequency, {Omega} is the electrical frequency, and P is the power. The characteristic current is the rms current at infinite speed, when all resistance and rotational losses are neglected. Expressions have been derived for the characteristic currents of PMSMs when the motor is controlled by CPA and by DMIC. The expression for CPA characteristic current is I{sub n{yields}{infinity}}{sup CPA} = nE{sub base}/X = nE{sub base}/n{Omega}{sub b}L = E{sub base}/{Omega}{sub b}L, which is strictly a function of the machine parameters, back-emf at base speed, base speed electrical frequency, and inductance. At high speeds, the rms current tends to remain constant even when the load-power requirements are reduced. The expression for DMIC characteristic current is I{sub n{yields}{infinity}}{sup DMIC} = P/3V{sub max} = P{pi}/3{radical}2V{sub dc}, which has nothing to do with machine parameters

  19. A study of the effect of in-line and perpendicular magnetic fields on beam characteristics of electron guns in medical linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, Dragos E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Keall, Paul J.

    2011-07-15

    beam current increases to 40.2 and 31.4% from the original value of the current for Litton L-2087 and Varian VTC6364, respectively. In contrast, for the case when the electron gun is perpendicular to the magnetic field, the electron beam is deflected from the axis of symmetry even at small values of the magnetic field. As the strength of the magnetic field increases, so does the beam deflection, leading to a sharp decrease of the primary beam current which vanishes at about 0.007 T for Litton L-2087 and at 0.006 T for Varian VTC6364, respectively. At zero external field, the beam rms emittance computed at beam waist is 1.54 and 1.29{pi}-mm-mrad for Litton L-2087 and Varian VTC6364, respectively. For the in-line configuration, there are two particular values of the external field where the beam rms emittance reaches a minimum. Litton L-2087 rms emittance reaches a minimum of 0.72{pi} and 2.01{pi}-mm-mrad at 0.026 and 0.132 T, respectively. Varian VTC6364 rms emittance reaches a minimum of 0.34{pi} and 0.35{pi}-mm-mrad at 0.028 and 0.14 T, respectively. Beam radius dependence on the external field is shown for the in-line configuration for both electron guns. Conclusions: 3D space charge simulation of two electron guns, Litton L-2087 and Varian VTC6364, were performed for in-line and perpendicular external magnetic fields. A consistent behavior of Pierce guns in external magnetic fields was proven. For the in-line configuration, the primary beam current does not vanish but a large reduction of beam current (up to 77.1%) is observed at higher field strengths; the beam directionality remains unchanged. It was shown that for a perpendicular configuration the current vanishes due to beam bending under the action of the Lorentz force. For in-line configuration it was determined that the rms beam emittance reaches two minima for relatively high values of the external magnetic field.

  20. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Slosar, Anze; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Reza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; et al

    2015-03-15

    Ongoing and near-future imaging-based dark energy experiments are critically dependent upon photometric redshifts (a.k.a. photo-z’s): i.e., estimates of the redshifts of objects based only on flux information obtained through broad filters. Higher-quality, lower-scatter photo-z’s will result in smaller random errors on cosmological parameters; while systematic errors in photometric redshift estimates, if not constrained, may dominate all other uncertainties from these experiments. The desired optimization and calibration is dependent upon spectroscopic measurements for secure redshift information; this is the key application of galaxy spectroscopy for imaging-based dark energy experiments. Hence, to achieve their full potential, imaging-based experiments will require large setsmore » of objects with spectroscopically-determined redshifts, for two purposes: Training: Objects with known redshift are needed to map out the relationship between object color and z (or, equivalently, to determine empirically-calibrated templates describing the rest-frame spectra of the full range of galaxies, which may be used to predict the color-z relation). The ultimate goal of training is to minimize each moment of the distribution of differences between photometric redshift estimates and the true redshifts of objects, making the relationship between them as tight as possible. The larger and more complete our “training set” of spectroscopic redshifts is, the smaller the RMS photo-z errors should be, increasing the constraining power of imaging experiments; Requirements: Spectroscopic redshift measurements for ~30,000 objects over >~15 widely-separated regions, each at least ~20 arcmin in diameter, and reaching the faintest objects used in a given experiment, will likely be necessary if photometric redshifts are to be trained and calibrated with conventional techniques. Larger, more complete samples (i.e., with longer exposure times) can improve photo-z algorithms and reduce

  1. Validation of a Monte Carlo model used for simulating tube current modulation in computed tomography over a wide range of phantom conditions/challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2014-11-01

    dose estimates. This allowed direct comparisons between measured and simulated dose values under each condition of phantom, location, and scan to be made. Results: For FTC scans, the percent root mean square (RMS) difference between measurements and simulations was within 5% across all phantoms. For TCM scans, the percent RMS of the difference between measured and simulated values when using detailed TCM and z-axis-only TCM simulations was 4.5% and 13.2%, respectively. For the anthropomorphic phantom, the difference between TCM measurements and detailed TCM and z-axis-only TCM simulations was 1.2% and 8.9%, respectively. For FTC measurements and simulations, the percent RMS of the difference was 5.0%. Conclusions: This work demonstrated that the Monte Carlo model developed provided good agreement between measured and simulated values under both simple and complex geometries including an anthropomorphic phantom. This work also showed the increased dose differences for z-axis-only TCM simulations, where considerable modulation in the x–y plane was present due to the shape of the rectangular water phantom. Results from this investigation highlight details that need to be included in Monte Carlo simulations of TCM CT scans in order to yield accurate, clinically viable assessments of patient dosimetry.

  2. Resistive and ferritic-wall plasma dynamos in a sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khalzov, I. V.; Brown, B. P.; Kaplan, E. J.; Katz, N.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Rahbarnia, K.; Forest, C. B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Spence, E. J. [Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We numerically study the effects of varying electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of the bounding wall on a kinematic dynamo in a sphere for parameters relevant to Madison plasma dynamo experiment. The dynamo is excited by a laminar, axisymmetric flow of von Karman type. The flow is obtained as a solution to the Navier-Stokes equation for an isothermal fluid with a velocity profile specified at the sphere's boundary. The properties of the wall are taken into account as thin-wall boundary conditions imposed on the magnetic field. It is found that an increase in the permeability of the wall reduces the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm{sub cr}. An increase in the conductivity of the wall leaves Rm{sub cr} unaffected but reduces the dynamo growth rate.

  3. Criteria for equality in two entropic inequalities

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, M. E.

    2014-07-31

    We obtain a simple criterion for local equality between the constrained Holevo capacity and the quantum mutual information of a quantum channel. This shows that the set of all states for which this equality holds is determined by the kernel of the channel (as a linear map). Applications to Bosonic Gaussian channels are considered. It is shown that for a Gaussian channel having no completely depolarizing components the above characteristics may coincide only at non-Gaussian mixed states and a criterion for the existence of such states is given. All the obtained results may be reformulated as conditions for equality between the constrained Holevo capacity of a quantum channel and the input von Neumann entropy. Bibliography: 20 titles. (paper)

  4. Block entropy and quantum phase transition in the anisotropic Kondo necklace model

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Arenas, J. J.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2010-06-15

    We study the von Neumann block entropy in the Kondo necklace model for different anisotropies {eta} in the XY interaction between conduction spins using the density matrix renormalization group method. It was found that the block entropy presents a maximum for each {eta} considered, and, comparing it with the results of the quantum criticality of the model based on the behavior of the energy gap, we observe that the maximum block entropy occurs at the quantum critical point between an antiferromagnetic and a Kondo singlet state, so this measure of entanglement is useful for giving information about where a quantum phase transition occurs in this model. We observe that the block entropy also presents a maximum at the quantum critical points that are obtained when an anisotropy {Delta} is included in the Kondo exchange between localized and conduction spins; when {Delta} diminishes for a fixed value of {eta}, the critical point increases, favoring the antiferromagnetic phase.

  5. Ohio incinerator given the go-ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Kemezis, P.

    1992-11-25

    A federal judge has denied a request for an injunction against the startup of the long-stalled Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) commercial hazardous waste incinerator in East Liverpool, OH. The $140-million plant, owned by a US subsidiary of Swiss engineering group Von Roll Ltd. (Zuerich), will go through a startup stage and a seven-day trial burn during the next two months, according to WTI. In testimony in federal court in Huntington, WV, WTI had said it was losing $115,000/day in fixed costs because of the plant's startup delay. The company also said that long-term contracts with Chemical Waste Management (CWM; Oak Brook, IL), Du Pont (Wilmington, DE), and BASF Corp. (Parsippany, NJ) to use plant services could be jeopardized by the delay. WTI is believed to have 10-year service contracts with the three companies and also will use CWM to dispose of the ash from the incinerator.

  6. Extended Salecker-Wigner formula for optimal accuracy in reading a clock via a massive signal particle

    SciTech Connect

    Kudaka, Shoju; Matsumoto, Shuichi

    2007-07-15

    In order to acquire an extended Salecker-Wigner formula from which to derive the optimal accuracy in reading a clock with a massive particle as the signal, von Neumann's classical measurement is employed, by which simultaneously both position and momentum of the signal particle can be measured approximately. By an appropriate selection of wave function for the initial state of the composite system (a clock and a signal particle), the formula is derived accurately. Valid ranges of the running time of a clock with a given optimal accuracy are also given. The extended formula means that contrary to the Salecker-Wigner formula there exists the possibility of a higher accuracy of time measurement, even if the mass of the clock is very small.

  7. Quantum entanglement for helium atom in the Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Fang, Te-Kuei; Ho, Yew Kam

    2015-03-15

    In the present work, we present an investigation on quantum entanglement of the two-electron helium atom immersed in weakly coupled Debye plasmas, modeled by the Debye-Hckel, or screened Coulomb, potential to mimic the interaction between two charged particles inside the plasma. Quantum entanglement is related to correlation effects in a multi-particle system. In a bipartite system, a measurement made on one of the two entangled particles affects the outcome of the other particle, even if such two particles are far apart. Employing wave functions constructed with configuration interaction B-spline basis, we have quantified von Neumann entropy and linear entropy for a series of He {sup 1,3}S{sup e} and {sup 1,3}P{sup o} states in plasma-embedded helium atom.

  8. Energy flow in passive and active 3D cochlear model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2015-12-31

    Energy flow in the cochlea is an important characteristic of the cochlear traveling wave, and many investigators, such as von Békésy and Lighthill, have discussed this phenomenon. Particularly after the discovery of the motility of the outer hair cells (OHCs), the nature of the power gain of the cochlea has been a fundamental research question. In the present work, direct three-dimensional (3D) calculations of the power on cross sections of the cochlea and on the basilar membrane are performed based on a box model of the mouse cochlea. The distributions of the fluid pressure and fluid velocity in the scala vestibuli are presented. The power output from the OHCs and the power loss due to fluid viscous damping are calculated along the length of the cochlea. This work provides a basis for theoretical calculations of the power gain of the OHCs from mechanical considerations.

  9. Relating different quantum generalizations of the conditional Rényi entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Tomamichel, Marco; Berta, Mario; Hayashi, Masahito

    2014-08-15

    Recently a new quantum generalization of the Rényi divergence and the corresponding conditional Rényi entropies was proposed. Here, we report on a surprising relation between conditional Rényi entropies based on this new generalization and conditional Rényi entropies based on the quantum relative Rényi entropy that was used in previous literature. Our result generalizes the well-known duality relation H(A|B) + H(A|C) = 0 of the conditional von Neumann entropy for tripartite pure states to Rényi entropies of two different kinds. As a direct application, we prove a collection of inequalities that relate different conditional Rényi entropies and derive a new entropic uncertainty relation.

  10. On quantum Rnyi entropies: A new generalization and some properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mller-Lennert, Martin; Dupuis, Frdric; Szehr, Oleg; Fehr, Serge; Tomamichel, Marco

    2013-12-15

    The Rnyi entropies constitute a family of information measures that generalizes the well-known Shannon entropy, inheriting many of its properties. They appear in the form of unconditional and conditional entropies, relative entropies, or mutual information, and have found many applications in information theory and beyond. Various generalizations of Rnyi entropies to the quantum setting have been proposed, most prominently Petz's quasi-entropies and Renner's conditional min-, max-, and collision entropy. However, these quantum extensions are incompatible and thus unsatisfactory. We propose a new quantum generalization of the family of Rnyi entropies that contains the von Neumann entropy, min-entropy, collision entropy, and the max-entropy as special cases, thus encompassing most quantum entropies in use today. We show several natural properties for this definition, including data-processing inequalities, a duality relation, and an entropic uncertainty relation.

  11. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Alchorn, A L

    2003-04-04

    Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do not believe there's any reason to think we won

  12. Detonation Wave Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-12-14

    The Zel’dovich-von Neumann-Doering (ZND) profile of a detonation wave is derived. Two basic assumptions are required: i. An equation of state (EOS) for a partly burned explosive; P(V, e, λ). ii. A burn rate for the reaction progress variable; d/dt λ = R(V, e, λ). For a steady planar detonation wave the reactive flow PDEs can be reduced to ODEs. The detonation wave profile can be determined from an ODE plus algebraic equations for points on the partly burned detonation loci with a specified wave speed. Furthermore, for the CJ detonation speed the end of the reaction zone is sonic. A solution to the reactive flow equations can be constructed with a rarefaction wave following the detonation wave profile. This corresponds to an underdriven detonation wave, and the rarefaction is know as a Taylor wave.

  13. K-shell spectroscopy of silicon ions as diagnostic for high electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Loetzsch, R.; Jaeckel, O.; Hoefer, S.; Kaempfer, T.; Uschmann, I.; Kaluza, M. C.; Polz, J.; Foerster, E.; Stambulchik, E.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.

    2012-11-15

    We developed a detection scheme, capable of measuring X-ray line shape of tracer ions in {mu}m thick layers at the rear side of a target foil irradiated by ultra intense laser pulses. We performed simulations of the effect of strong electric fields on the K-shell emission of silicon and developed a spectrometer dedicated to record this emission. The combination of a cylindrically bent crystal in von Hamos geometry and a CCD camera with its single photon counting capability allows for a high dynamic range of the instrument and background free spectra. This approach will be used in future experiments to study electric fields of the order of TV/m at high density plasmas close to solid density.

  14. Entanglement across a transition to quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Mejia-Monasterio, Carlos [Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Universita degli Studi dell'Insubria, via Vallegio 11, Como 22100 (Italy); Benenti, Guliano; Casati, Giulio [Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Universita degli Studi dell'Insubria, via Vallegio 11, Como 22100 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unita di Como, via Vallegio 11, Como 22100 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Carlo, Gabriel G. [Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems, Universita degli Studi dell'Insubria, via Vallegio 11, Como 22100 (Italy); Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Unita di Como, via Vallegio 11, Como 22100 (Italy)

    2005-06-15

    We study the relation between entanglement and quantum chaos in one- and two-dimensional spin-1/2 lattice models, which exhibit mixing of the noninteracting eigenfunctions and transition from integrability to quantum chaos. Contrary to what occurs in a quantum phase transition, the onset of quantum chaos is not a property of the ground state but takes place for any typical many-spin quantum state. We study bipartite and pairwise entanglement measures--namely, the reduced von Neumann entropy and the concurrence--and discuss quantum entanglement sharing. Our results suggest that the behavior of the entanglement is related to the mixing of the eigenfunctions rather than to the transition to chaos.

  15. Nonlinear waves and coherent structures in the quantum single-wave model

    SciTech Connect

    Tzenov, Stephan I. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Marinov, Kiril B. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    Starting from the von Neumann-Maxwell equations for the Wigner quasi-probability distribution and for the self-consistent electric field, the quantum analog of the classical single-wave model has been derived. The linear stability of the quantum single-wave model has been studied, and periodic in time patterns have been found both analytically and numerically. In addition, some features of quantum chaos have been detected in the unstable region in parameter space. Further, a class of standing-wave solutions of the quantum single-wave model has also been found, which have been observed to behave as stable solitary-wave structures. The analytical results have been finally compared to the exact system dynamics obtained by solving the corresponding equations in Schrodinger representation numerically.

  16. Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Nika, Denis L. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of CaliforniaRiverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States); Cocemasov, Alexandr I. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Balandin, Alexander A., E-mail: balandin@ee.ucr.edu [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of CaliforniaRiverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene. The calculations were performed using the Born-von Karman model of lattice dynamics for intralayer atomic interactions and spherically symmetric interatomic potential for interlayer interactions. We found that at temperature T?

  17. Local hybrid functionals with orbital-free mixing functions and balanced elimination of self-interaction error

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Piotr de E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch; Corminboeuf, Clmence E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch

    2015-02-21

    The recently introduced density overlap regions indicator (DORI) [P. de Silva and C. Corminboeuf, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10(9), 37453756 (2014)] is a density-dependent scalar field revealing regions of high density overlap between shells, atoms, and molecules. In this work, we exploit its properties to construct local hybrid exchange-correlation functionals aiming at balanced reduction of the self-interaction error. We show that DORI can successfully replace the ratio of the von Weizscker and exact positive-definite kinetic energy densities, which is commonly used in mixing functions of local hybrids. Additionally, we introduce several semi-empirical parameters to control the local and global admixture of exact exchange. The most promising of our local hybrids clearly outperforms the underlying semi-local functionals as well as their global hybrids.

  18. International workshop on chromosome 3. Final report, April 15, 1991--April 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmill, R.M.

    1992-07-01

    The Second Workshop on Human Chromosome 3 was held on April 4--5, 1991 at Denver, Colorado. There were 43 participants representing 8 nations. The workshop participants reviewed the current state of the chromosome 3 map, both physical and genetic, and prepared lists of markers and cell lines to be made commonly available. These markers and cell lines should be incorporated into the mapping efforts of diverse groups to permit the integration of data and development of consensus maps at future workshops. Region specific efforts were described for sections of the chromosome harboring genes thought to be involved in certain diseases including Von Hippel-Lindau disease, 3p-syndrome, lung cancer and renal cancer. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  19. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying -Ping; et al

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of themore » Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.« less

  20. Application of a spring-dashpot system to clinical lung tumor motion data

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerley, E. J.; Wilson, P. L.; Cavan, A. E.; Berbeco, R. I.; Meyer, J.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The treatment efficacy of radiation therapy for lung tumors can be increased by compensating for breath-induced tumor motion. In this study, we quantitatively examine a mathematical model of pseudomechanical linkages between an external surrogate signal and lung tumor motion. Methods: A spring-dashpot system based on the Voigt model was developed to model the correlation between abdominal respiratory motion and tumor motion during lung radiotherapy. The model was applied to clinical data obtained from 52 treatments ('beams') from 10 patients, treated on the Mitsubishi Real-Time Radiation Therapy system, Sapporo, Japan. In Stage 1, model parameters were optimized for individual patients and beams to determine reference values and to investigate how well the model can describe the data. In Stage 2, for each patient the optimal parameters determined for a single beam were applied to data from other beams to investigate whether a beam-specific set of model parameters is sufficient to model tumor motion over a course of treatment. Results: In Stage 1, the baseline root mean square (RMS) residual error for all individually optimized beam data was 0.90 {+-} 0.40 mm (mean {+-} 1 standard deviation). In Stage 2, patient-specific model parameters based on a single beam were found to model the tumor position closely, even for irregular beam data, with a mean increase with respect to Stage 1 values in RMS error of 0.37 mm. On average, the obtained model output for the tumor position was 95% of the time within an absolute bound of 2.0 and 2.6 mm in Stages 1 and 2, respectively. The model was capable of dealing with baseline, amplitude and frequency variations of the input data, as well as phase shifts between the input abdominal and output tumor signals. Conclusions: These results indicate that it may be feasible to collect patient-specific model parameters during or prior to the first treatment, and then retain these for the rest of the treatment period. The model has

  1. Radiation doses in cone-beam breast computed tomography: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Ying; Lai, Chao-Jen; Han Tao; Zhong Yuncheng; Shen Youtao; Liu Xinming; Ge Shuaiping; You Zhicheng; Wang Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: In this article, we describe a method to estimate the spatial dose variation, average dose and mean glandular dose (MGD) for a real breast using Monte Carlo simulation based on cone beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) images. We present and discuss the dose estimation results for 19 mastectomy breast specimens, 4 homogeneous breast models, 6 ellipsoidal phantoms, and 6 cylindrical phantoms. Methods: To validate the Monte Carlo method for dose estimation in CBBCT, we compared the Monte Carlo dose estimates with the thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements at various radial positions in two polycarbonate cylinders (11- and 15-cm in diameter). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 19 mastectomy breast specimens, obtained with a bench-top experimental scanner, were segmented and used to construct 19 structured breast models. Monte Carlo simulation of CBBCT with these models was performed and used to estimate the point doses, average doses, and mean glandular doses for unit open air exposure at the iso-center. Mass based glandularity values were computed and used to investigate their effects on the average doses as well as the mean glandular doses. Average doses for 4 homogeneous breast models were estimated and compared to those of the corresponding structured breast models to investigate the effect of tissue structures. Average doses for ellipsoidal and cylindrical digital phantoms of identical diameter and height were also estimated for various glandularity values and compared with those for the structured breast models. Results: The absorbed dose maps for structured breast models show that doses in the glandular tissue were higher than those in the nearby adipose tissue. Estimated average doses for the homogeneous breast models were almost identical to those for the structured breast models (p=1). Normalized average doses estimated for the ellipsoidal phantoms were similar to those for the structured breast models (root mean square (rms

  2. Performance optimization of a bendable parabolic cylinder collimating X-ray mirror for the ALS micro-XAS beamline 10.3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Domning, Edward E.; Merthe, Daniel J.; Salmassi, Farhad; Smith, Brian V.

    2015-04-08

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline (BL) 10.3.2 is an apparatus for X-ray microprobe spectroscopy and diffraction experiments, operating in the energy range 2.4–17 keV. The performance of the beamline, namely the spatial and energy resolutions of the measurements, depends significantly on the collimation quality of light incident on the monochromator. In the BL 10.3.2 end-station, the synchrotron source is imaged 1:1 onto a set of roll slits which form a virtual source. The light from this source is collimated in the vertical direction by a bendable parabolic cylinder mirror. Details are presented of the mirror design, which allows for precision assembly, alignment and shaping of the mirror, as well as for extending of the mirror operating lifetime by a factor of ~10. Assembly, mirror optimal shaping and preliminary alignment were performed ex situ in the ALS X-ray Optics Laboratory (XROL). Using an original method for optimal ex situ characterization and setting of bendable X-ray optics developed at the XROL, a root-mean-square (RMS) residual surface slope error of 0.31 µrad with respect to the desired parabola, and an RMS residual height error of less than 3 nm were achieved. Once in place at the beamline, deviations from the designed optical geometry (e.g. due to the tolerances for setting the distance to the virtual source, the grazing incidence angle, the transverse position) and/or mirror shape (e.g. due to a heat load deformation) may appear. Due to the errors, on installation the energy spread from the monochromator is typically a few electron-volts. Here, a new technique developed and successfully implemented for at-wavelength (in situ) fine optimal tuning of the mirror, enabling us to reduce the collimation-induced energy spread to ~0.05 eV, is described.

  3. Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Outcomes and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Joanna C.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Meyers, Paul A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of failure in patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with PM-RMS received chemotherapy and IMRT for definitive treatment. The median age was 9 years (range, 0.5-35 years). The high-risk features were as follows: 40% alveolar histology, 72% group III and 26% group IV disease, 57% either intracranial extension (ICE) (n=25) or cranial neuropathy (n=21). The median time to RT from the start of chemotherapy was 15 weeks (range, 2-54 weeks). Patients received 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the primary tumor by use of IMRT. Thirteen patients aged {>=}14 years with alveolar histology received 36 Gy prophylactic nodal irradiation (PNI) to bilateral cervical nodes. Events were defined as local, regional (nodal), central nervous system (CNS), or distant failures. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.3 years (range, 0.5-12.8 years), 18 patients experienced failure: 5 local, 2 regional, 6 distant, and 7 CNS. The 5-year local failure-free survival was 86%. Age, histology, and time to RT did not influence the risk of local failure. The 5-year regional failure-free survival was 92%: 100% for embryonal and 74% for alveolar (P=.03). However, there were no lymph node failures in patients with alveolar histology who were given PNI. The 5-year CNS failure-free survival was 83%: 100% without and 70% with ICE (P=.01); 95% without and 69% with cranial neuropathy (P=.02). The estimated 5-year event-free survival and overall survival were 61% for group III and 58% for group IV patients. Conclusions: Distant failure was the most common type of failure among group IV patients. Patients with alveolar histology seem to benefit from PNI. The presence of ICE or cranial neuropathy portends a high risk of CNS failure, the most common pattern of failure among non-group IV patients. These patients may benefit from the addition of novel CNS

  4. Premixed flamelet modelling: Factors influencing the turbulent heat release rate source term and the turbulent burning velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Gaskell, P.H.; Sedaghat, A.; Gu, X.J.

    2005-11-01

    A flamelet approach is adopted in a study of the factors affecting the volumetric heat release source term in turbulent combustion. This term is expressed as the product of an instability enhanced burning rate factor, P{sub bi}, and the mean volumetric heat release rate in an unstretched laminar flamelet of the mixture. Included in the expression for P{sub bi} are a pdf of the flame stretch rate and a flame stretch factor. Fractal considerations link the turbulent burning velocity normalised by the effective rms turbulent velocity to P{sub bi}. Evaluation of this last parameter focuses on problems of (i) the pdfs of the flame stretch rate, (ii) the effects of flame stretch rate on the burning rate, (iii) the effects of any flamelet instability on the burning rate, (iv) flamelet extinctions under positive and negative flame stretch rates, and (v) the effects of the unsteadiness of flame stretch rates. The Markstein number influences both the rate of burning and the possibility of flamelet instabilities developing which, through their ensuing wrinkling, increase the burning rate. The flame stretch factor is extended to embrace potential Darrieus-Landau thermo-diffusive flamelet instabilities. A major limitation is the insufficient understanding of the effects of negative stretch rates that might cause flame extinction. The influences of positive and negative Markstein numbers are considered separately. For the former, a computed theoretical relationship for turbulent burning velocity, normalised by the effective rms velocity, is developed which, although close to that measured experimentally, tends to be somewhat lower at the higher values of the Karlovitz stretch factor. This might be attributed to reduced flame extinction and reduced effective Markstein numbers when the increasingly nonsteady conditions reduce the ability of the flame to respond to changes in flame stretch rates. As the pressure increases, Markstein numbers decrease. For negative Markstein numbers

  5. FARADAY ROTATION STRUCTURE ON KILOPARSEC SCALES IN THE RADIO LOBES OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Feain, I. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Norris, R. P.; Cornwell, T. J.; Murphy, T.; Gaensler, B. M.; Macquart, J-P; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Ott, J.; Middelberg, E.

    2009-12-10

    We present the results of an Australia Telescope Compact Array 1.4 GHz spectropolarimetric aperture synthesis survey of 34 deg{sup 2} centered on Centaurus A-NGC 5128. A catalog of 1005 extragalactic compact radio sources in the field to a continuum flux density of 3 mJy beam{sup -1} is provided along with a table of Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and linear polarized intensities for the 28% of sources with high signal to noise in linear polarization. We use the ensemble of 281 background polarized sources as line-of-sight probes of the structure of the giant radio lobes of Centaurus A. This is the first time such a method has been applied to radio galaxy lobes and we explain how it differs from the conventional methods that are often complicated by depth and beam depolarization effects. Assuming a magnetic field strength in the lobes of 1.3 B {sub 1} muG, where B {sub 1} = 1 is implied by equipartition between magnetic fields and relativistic particles, the upper limit we derive on the maximum possible difference between the average RM of 121 sources behind Centaurus A and the average RM of the 160 sources along sightlines outside Centaurus A implies an upper limit on the volume-averaged thermal plasma density in the giant radio lobes of (n{sub e} ) < 5 x 10{sup -5} B {sup -1} {sub 1} cm{sup -3}. We use an RM structure function analysis and report the detection of a turbulent RM signal, with rms sigma{sub RM} = 17 rad m{sup -2} and scale size 0.{sup 0}3, associated with the southern giant lobe. We cannot verify whether this signal arises from turbulent structure throughout the lobe or only in a thin skin (or sheath) around the edge, although we favor the latter. The RM signal is modeled as possibly arising from a thin skin with a thermal plasma density equivalent to the Centaurus intragroup medium density and a coherent magnetic field that reverses its sign on a spatial scale of 20 kpc. For a thermal density of n {sub 1} 10{sup -3} cm{sup -3}, the skin magnetic

  6. SU-E-T-261: Plan Quality Assurance of VMAT Using Fluence Images Reconstituted From Log-Files

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuta, Y; Shimizu, E; Matsunaga, K; Majima, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A successful VMAT plan delivery includes precise modulations of dose rate, gantry rotational and multi-leaf collimator (MLC) shapes. One of the main problem in the plan quality assurance is dosimetric errors associated with leaf-positional errors are difficult to analyze because they vary with MU delivered and leaf number. In this study, we calculated integrated fluence error image (IFEI) from log-files and evaluated plan quality in the area of all and individual MLC leaves scanned. Methods: The log-file reported the expected and actual position for inner 20 MLC leaves and the dose fraction every 0.25 seconds during prostate VMAT on Elekta Synergy. These data were imported to in-house software that developed to calculate expected and actual fluence images from the difference of opposing leaf trajectories and dose fraction at each time. The IFEI was obtained by adding all of the absolute value of the difference between expected and actual fluence images corresponding. Results: In the area all MLC leaves scanned in the IFEI, the average and root mean square (rms) were 2.5 and 3.6 MU, the area of errors below 10, 5 and 3 MU were 98.5, 86.7 and 68.1 %, the 95 % of area was covered with less than error of 7.1 MU. In the area individual MLC leaves scanned in the IFEI, the average and rms value were 2.1 – 3.0 and 3.1 – 4.0 MU, the area of errors below 10, 5 and 3 MU were 97.6 – 99.5, 81.7 – 89.5 and 51.2 – 72.8 %, the 95 % of area was covered with less than error of 6.6 – 8.2 MU. Conclusion: The analysis of the IFEI reconstituted from log-file was provided detailed information about the delivery in the area of all and individual MLC leaves scanned.

  7. Linac Sector 21-30 'QE' Quadrupole Magnet Excitation in LCLS Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Emma, P

    2010-11-24

    The existing SLAC linac quadrupole magnets, described as the 'QE' quadrupoles, are designed for excitation currents up to 200 A with length-integrated gradients up to 100 kG needed to focus up to 50-GeV electron or positron beams. The eight 'QE' magnets within a linac sector are powered in series on a single 200-A bulk power supply, and each magnet in sectors 21-29 also includes a 20-A booster supply (adds 0-20 A to each magnet) for gradient tapering within the sector. Sector 30 is different again with individual 200-A power supplies per magnet. The LCLS will use these same quadrupole magnets, mostly in their existing locations and with their present power supplies, but for an electron energy range of 0.25-14 GeV. This much lower beam energy will require good power supply regulation ({le} 0.05% rms for f > 0.5 Hz) [1] and accurate field excitation at much lower currents, as low as a few amperes. The present (pre-2006) gradient-to-current polynomials (IVBU) in the SLC database are based on magnetic measurements at excitation currents above 20 A, and are not accurate in extrapolation below about 10 A. For this reason the IVBU polynomials for all 'QE' quadrupoles in sectors 21-30 will be updated in 2007 for LCLS operation. Magnets beyond Q21601 will be updated with a new generic polynomial (with polarity considerations) based on magnetic measurements from zero current all the way up to 200 A, with additional data taken in the 0-20 A range for accuracy in LCLS mode (see Fig. 1). In addition, the first five LCLS 'QE' magnets (Q21201, Q21301, Q21401, Q21501, and Q21601), most of which run at the lowest currents of <3 A, have been individually measured and fitted with a specific polynomial to meet their special settings in LCLS mode. All changes will continue to fully support 30-50 GeV linac operations. This note describes these changes and the method used to arrive at this solution. Regulation tests have already been run on both the bulk and booster power supplies which

  8. CW/Pulsed H{sup ?} ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-08

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10?mA pulsed mode H{sup ?} beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H{sup ?} source able to produce very intense H{sup ?} beams with important variation of the duty factor{sup [1]}. Recently, a new version of 2.45?GHz microwave H{sup ?} ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H{sup ?} ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8?mA/30keV H{sup ?} beam with rms emittance about 0.16 ?mmmrad has been obtained with only 500?W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21?mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20?mA H{sup ?} ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 ?mmmrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H{sup ?} source body is ?116?mm 124?mm, and the entire H{sup ?} source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ?310 180?mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ?310?mm 230?mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  9. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, David C. Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  10. CFD study of natural convection mixing in a steam generator mock-up: Comparison between full geometry and porous media approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dehbi, A.; Badreddine, H.

    2012-07-01

    In CFD simulations of flow mixing in a steam generator (SG) during natural circulation, one is faced with the problem of representing the thousands of SG U-tubes. Typically simplifications are made to render the problem computationally tractable. In particular, one or a number of tubes are lumped in one volume which is treated as a single porous medium. This approach dramatically reduces the computational size of the problem and hence simulation time. In this work, we endeavor to investigate the adequacy of this approach by performing two separate simulations of flow in a mock-up with 262 U-tubes, i.e. one in which the porous media model is used for the tube bundle, and another in which the full geometry is represented. In both simulations, the Reynolds Stress (RMS) model of turbulence is used. We show that in steady state conditions, the porous media treatment yields results which are comparable to those of the full geometry representation (temperature distribution, recirculation ratio, hot plume spread, etc). Hence, the porous media approach can be extended with a good degree of confidence to the full scale SG. (authors)

  11. Development, characterization and experimental performance of x-ray optics for the LCLS free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Pivovaroff, M J; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Gullikson, E M; Mc Carville, T J; Stefan, P M; Aquila, A L; Ayers, J; McKernan, M A; Bionta, R M

    2008-09-10

    This manuscript discusses the development of reflective optics for the x-ray offset mirror systems of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a 0.15-1.5 nm free-electron laser (FEL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The unique properties (such as the high peak brightness) of the LCLS FEL beam translate to strict limits in terms of materials choice, thus leading to an x-ray mirror design consisting of a reflective coating deposited on a silicon substrate. Furthermore, the physics requirements for these mirrors result in stringent surface figure and finish specifications that challenge the state-of-the-art in x-ray substrate manufacturing, thin film deposition, and metrology capabilities. Recent experimental results on the development, optimization, and characterization of the LCLS soft x-ray mirrors are presented in this manuscript, including: precision surface metrology on the silicon substrates, and the development of boron carbide reflective coatings with reduced stress and thickness variation < 0.14 nm rms across the 175-mm clear aperture area of the LCLS soft x-ray mirrors.

  12. Interferometric adaptive optics for high power laser pointing, wave-front control and phasing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Homoelle, D C; Henesian, M A; Bliss, E S; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-01-21

    Implementing the capability to perform fast ignition experiments, as well as, radiography experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) places stringent requirements on the control of each of the beam's pointing and overall wavefront quality. One quad of the NIF beams, 4 beam pairs, will be utilized for these experiments and hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations indicate that for the fast ignition experiments, these beams will be required to deliver 50% (4.0 kJ) of their total energy (7.96 kJ) within a 40 {micro}m diameter spot at the end of a fast ignition cone target. This requirement implies a stringent pointing and overall phase conjugation error budget on the adaptive optics system used to correct these beam lines. The overall encircled energy requirement is more readily met by phasing of the beams in pairs but still requires high Strehl ratios, Sr, and rms tip/tilt errors of approximately one {micro}rad. To accomplish this task we have designed an interferometric adaptive optics system capable of beam pointing, high Strehl ratio and beam phasing with a single pixilated MEMS deformable mirror and interferometric wave-front sensor. We present the design of a testbed used to evaluate the performance of this wave-front sensor below along with simulations of its expected performance level.

  13. Sub-picosecond X-Rays from CEBAF at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Bogacz; Jim Boyce; Jim Clarke; David Douglas; Andrew Hutton; Geoffrey Krafft; Lia Merminga; George Neil; Mike Poole; Sue Smith; Vic Suller; Gwyn Williams

    2004-05-01

    A high brightness sub-picosecond x-ray source can be created by installing an undulator at Jefferson Lab's CEBAF, a nuclear physics electron accelerator. Although the beam current is only 100 microamps, the electron beam has an extremely small emittance and energy spread, with the result that one can produce x-ray beams tunable over the range 5-30keV with an average brightness quite comparable to beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab. In addition, with rms bunch lengths measured down to 85 fsecs, peak brightness values are much higher than at the APS. Furthermore, this x-ray source has similar emittance in both horizontal and vertical directions, (a so-called round beam) making it of very high potential for many applications. In order to determine if indeed such a source is worth pursuing we present ''tuning curve'' calculations of peak and average flux and brightness for an undulator on CEBAF. They are compared with similar calculations for a dipole and for undulator-A at the APS. Finally we calculate the impact of such a device on the CEBAF beam itself and find it to be much smaller than the natural energy spread of the beam.

  14. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  15. Testing in a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2004-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  16. N-(N-[2-(3,5-Difluorophenyl)acetyl]-(S)-alanyl)-(S)-phenylglycine tert-butyl ester (DAPT): an inhibitor of γ-secretase, revealing fine electronic and hydrogen-bonding features

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, Andrzej; Valenzuela, Francisco; Afonine, Pavel; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2010-12-01

    The title compound, C{sub 23}H{sub 26}F{sub 2}N{sub 2}O{sub 4}, is a dipeptidic inhibitor of γ-secretase, one of the enzymes involved in Alzheimer’s dis@@ease. The mol@@ecule adopts a compact conformation, without intra@@molecular hydrogen bonds. In the crystal structure, one of the amide N atoms forms the only inter@@molecular N—H⋯O hydrogen bond; the second amide N atom does not form hydrogen bonds. High-resolution synchrotron diffraction data permitted the unequivocal location and refinement without restraints of all H atoms, and the identification of the characteristic shift of the amide H atom engaged in the hydrogen bond from its ideal position, resulting in a more linear hydrogen bond. Significant residual densities for bonding electrons were revealed after the usual SHELXL refinement, and modeling of these features as additional inter@@atomic scatterers (IAS) using the program PHENIX led to a significant decrease in the R factor from 0.0411 to 0.0325 and diminished the r.m.s. deviation level of noise in the final difference Fourier map from 0.063 to 0.037 e Å{sup −3}.

  17. Decision-Making in Structure Solution using Bayesian Estimates of Map Quality: The PHENIX AutoSol Wizard

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, T. C.; Adams, P. D.; Read, R. J.; McCoy, A. J.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Grosse-Kunstleve, R. W.; Afonine, P. V.; Zwart, P. H.; Hung, L.-W.

    2009-03-01

    Estimates of the quality of experimental maps are important in many stages of structure determination of macromolecules. Map quality is defined here as the correlation between a map and the map calculated based on a final refined model. Here we examine 10 different measures of experimental map quality using a set of 1359 maps calculated by reanalysis of 246 solved MAD, SAD, and MIR datasets. A simple Bayesian approach to estimation of map quality from one or more measures is presented. We find that a Bayesian estimator based on the skew of histograms of electron density is the most accurate of the 10 individual Bayesian estimators of map quality examined, with a correlation between estimated and actual map quality of 0.90. A combination of the skew of electron density with the local correlation of rms density gives a further improvement in estimating map quality, with an overall correlation coefficient of 0.92. The PHENIX AutoSol Wizard carries out automated structure solution based on any combination of SAD, MAD, SIR, or MIR datasets. The Wizard is based on tools from the PHENIX package and uses the Bayesian estimates of map quality described here to choose the highest-quality solutions after experimental phasing.

  18. Insertion Devices for NSLS-II Baseline and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe,T.

    2008-06-23

    NSLS-II is going to employ Damping Wigglers (DWs) not only for emittance reduction but also as broad band hard X-ray source. In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) with the minimum RMS phase error (< 2 degree) and possible cryo-capability are planned for X-ray planar device. Elliptically Polarized Undulators (EPUs) are envisioned for polarization controls. Due to the lack of hard X-ray flux from weak dipole magnet field (0.4 Tesla), three pole wigglers (3PWs) of the peak field over 1 Tesla will be mainly used by NSLS bending magnet beam line users. Magnetic designs and kick maps for dynamic aperture surveys were created using the latest version of Radia [1] for Mathematica 6 which we supported the development. There are other devices planned for the later stage of the project, such as quasi-periodic EPU, superconducting wiggler/undulator, and Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) with Praseodymium Iron Boron (PrFeB) magnets and textured Dysprosium poles. For R&D, Hybrid PrFeB arrays were planned to be assembled and field-measured at room temperature, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperature using our vertical test facility. We have also developed a specialized power supply for pulsed wire measurement.

  19. Pneumatic starter for internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kristof, J.J.; Elwer, M.

    1989-07-11

    A starter arrangement for an engine is described which consists of: a fluid actuated rotary vane motor which is adapted to engage an associated engine, the rotary motor having a hub and at least one blade which is slidably mounted in the hub and is made from a fiber reinforced plastic material to reduce friction, and wherein at least one blade has a wear surface made of the same material; a housing including a sleeve in which the rotary motor is positioned, the sleeve having on its inner surface a hard metallic coating to reduce friction, wherein the sleeve inner surface coating comprises a chromium electrocuting having a hardness which measures at least 70 on the Rockwell C hardness scale and a microfinish of less than 10 micro-inches R.M.S.; and, a relay valve means for selectively providing a pressurized operating fluid to the rotary motor, wherein the blade material and the sleeve inner surface coating cooperate to enable the motor to rotate in the sleeve with a minimum of friction thereby obviating the need for a lubricating system for the starter arrangement.

  20. LLE Review. Quarterly report, July 1982-September 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Forsyth, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This edition of the LLE Review contains articles which summarize progress in various uniformity experiments on OMEGA, progress in aspects of target fabrication directly related to uniformity and transport studies, and a summary of recent user experiments performed on GDL. Some highlights of the work described in this issue are: (1) achievement of 5% RMS uniformity of irradiation in long-pulse OMEGA target experiments; (2) direct measurement of final core rho R of 2.5 x 10/sup 3/g/cm/sup 2/ in Ar-DT targets; (3) improvement of OMEGA beam profile uniformity resulting from a systematic study of stress-induced briefringence in LHG-8 laser rods; (4) successful deployment of ultra low-mass stalks for support of glass microballoon targets in OMEGA experiments; (5) the use of biased magnetron sputtering to improve the uniformity of metal coatings applied to glass microballoons; and (6) the study of the interaction of high-intensity, 0.351-..mu..m radiation with long-scalelength, completely underdense plasmas by measurement of light produced by stimulated Raman scattering.

  1. Low temperature plasma channels generated in microcavity trenches with widths of 20-150 {mu}m and aspect ratios as large as 10{sup 4}:1

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, M.; Park, S.-J.; Cunningham, B. T.; Eden, J. G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2008-03-10

    Low temperature plasma channels with widths as small as 20 {mu}m, cross-sectional areas of 400-12 000 {mu}m{sup 2}, and aspect ratios (channel length to width) of up to 10{sup 4}:1 have been generated on a steady state basis within sealed microcavity trenches fabricated by replica molding. With lengths up to 1 m and volumes of 10{sup -5}-{approx}10{sup -2} cm{sup 3}, these channels are situated in a dielectric barrier structure having a transverse, buried electrode geometry and are sustained by power loadings as high as {approx}1.2 kW cm{sup -3}. Current densities of {approx}5-10 A cm{sup -2} and estimated electron densities of {approx}10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} are produced with a 20 kHz sinusoidal voltage of V{sub rms}=225-325 V, rendering these channels of interest as on-chip plasma reactors or nonlinear optical conversion media. With the transversely excited, photolithographically defined microcavity structures reported here, plasma channels of at least several meters in length, and having an arbitrary, folded geometric pattern, can be generated.

  2. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Montenero, Giuseppe; Daponte, Vincenzo; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-15

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test, Rev. Sci. Instrum.83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  3. Structural, Morphological and Optical properties of Sputtered Nickel oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A. Mallikarjuna; Reddy, A. Sivasankar; Reddy, P. Sreedhara

    2011-10-20

    Nickel oxide (NiO) thin films have been deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering technique on glass substrates at various substrate temperatures in the range of 303 to 723 K. The influence of substrate temperature on structural, morphological, compositional and optical properties was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and spectrophotometer studies. The structural properties of the films were strongly influenced by the substrate temperature. From the microstructural studies, fine and uniform grains were grown with RMS roughness of 9.4 nm at substrate temperature of 523 K. The optical results indicated that the optical transmittance of the films increases with increasing substrate temperature up to 523 K, thereafter decreases. The optical band of the films increases with substrate temperature initially, thereafter decreased at higher temperatures. The Highest optical transmittance of 60 % and optical band gap of 3.82 eV was observed in the present study.

  4. Thickness dependent structural, optical and electrical properties of CuIn{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}Se{sub 2} thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Pradeep K.; Prasad, J. N.; Gautam, Yogendra K.; Jain, Ravish K.; Choudhary, A. K.; Chandra, Ramesh; Kumar, Ashwani

    2014-01-28

    CuIn{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) polycrystalline thin films have been deposited on soda lime glass substrate at different deposition time by pulsed laser deposition. The effect of thickness on structural, surface morphological, optical and electrical properties of thin films were investigated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer and electrical measurement unit. XRD study reveals that all deposited films are polycrystalline in nature and have tetragonal phase of CIGS. Crystallinity of CIGS films has been found to improve with increase in thickness of CIGS films as evidenced by sharp XRD peaks for (112) orientation. Grain size and rms surface roughness of CIGS films have been found to be increased with increase in thickness. All the deposited CIGS films exhibit direct band gap semiconducting behaviour with ∼10{sup 6} cm{sup −1} absorption co-efficient. Optical band gap and resistivity of CIGS films have been found to decrease with increase in thickness.

  5. Multiplexed Oversampling Digitizer in 65 nm CMOS for Column-Parallel CCD Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Carl; Walder, Jean-Pierre; von der Lippe, Henrik

    2012-04-10

    A digitizer designed to read out column-parallel charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used for high-speed X-ray imaging is presented. The digitizer is included as part of the High-Speed Image Preprocessor with Oversampling (HIPPO) integrated circuit. The digitizer module comprises a multiplexed, oversampling, 12-bit, 80 MS/s pipelined Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) and a bank of four fast-settling sample-and-hold amplifiers to instrument four analog channels. The ADC multiplexes and oversamples to reduce its area to allow integration that is pitch-matched to the columns of the CCD. Novel design techniques are used to enable oversampling and multiplexing with a reduced power penalty. The ADC exhibits 188 ?V-rms noise which is less than 1 LSB at a 12-bit level. The prototype is implemented in a commercially available 65 nm CMOS process. The digitizer will lead to a proof-of-principle 2D 10 Gigapixel/s X-ray detector.

  6. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore » true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  7. Electrodeposition, characterization and morphological investigations of NiFe/Cu multilayers prepared by pulsed galvanostatic, dual bath technique

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, S.; Bahrololoom, M.E.; Kavanagh, K.L.

    2011-02-15

    NiFe/Cu multilayers were grown sequentially by pulsed electrodeposition on copper (Cu) substrates. The layers were prepared in galvanostatic mode using a dual bath technique. The morphology, thickness, roughness and composition of the layers were studied using scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Analysis showed that the resulting multilayers were continuous layers with a root mean square roughness of 30 nm and a grain size of 20-60 nm. The Cu substrate and the electrodeposited Cu layer were preferentially (200) oriented while the NiFe layers were polycrystalline but with a preferred (200) texture. The thinnest multilayers produced were 20/40, NiFe/Cu, respectively. - Research Highlights: {yields} Thin MLs of Cu and Py can be ED utilizing a pulsed-galvanostatic, DBT. {yields} The resulting multilayers were continuous layers with an rms of 30 nm. {yields} The smallest average thickness achieved by DBT was 40 nm/20 nm for Cu/NiFe.

  8. Emittance measurements for optimum operation of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The transverse emittances of the source were measured with various conditions to find out the optimum operation conditions minimizing the horizontal and vertical rms normalized emittances. The transverse emittances were most effectively reduced by operating the source with the plasma electrode temperature lower than 70°C. The optimum value of the cesium (Cs) density around the beam hole of the plasma electrode seems to be proportional to the plasma electrode temperature. The fine control of the Cs density is indispensable, since the emittances seem to increase proportionally to the excessiveness of the Cs density. Furthermore, the source should be operated with the Cs density beyond a threshold value, since the plasma meniscus shape and the ellipse parameters of the transverse emittances seem to be changed step-function-likely on the threshold Cs value.

  9. Moment-Based Probability Modeling and Extreme Response Estimation, The FITS Routine Version 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    MANUEL,LANCE; KASHEF,TINA; WINTERSTEIN,STEVEN R.

    1999-11-01

    This report documents the use of the FITS routine, which provides automated fits of various analytical, commonly used probability models from input data. It is intended to complement the previously distributed FITTING routine documented in RMS Report 14 (Winterstein et al., 1994), which implements relatively complex four-moment distribution models whose parameters are fit with numerical optimization routines. Although these four-moment fits can be quite useful and faithful to the observed data, their complexity can make them difficult to automate within standard fitting algorithms. In contrast, FITS provides more robust (lower moment) fits of simpler, more conventional distribution forms. For each database of interest, the routine estimates the distribution of annual maximum response based on the data values and the duration, T, over which they were recorded. To focus on the upper tails of interest, the user can also supply an arbitrary lower-bound threshold, {chi}{sub low}, above which a shifted distribution model--exponential or Weibull--is fit.

  10. Structural, electronic, vibrational, and dielectric properties of LaBGeO{sub 5} from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Shaltaf, R. Juwhari, H. K.; Hamad, B.; Khalifeh, J.; Rignanese, G.-M.; Gonze, X.

    2014-02-21

    Structural, electronic, vibrational, and dielectric properties of LaBGeO{sub 5} with the stillwellite structure are determined based on ab initio density functional theory. The theoretically relaxed structure is found to agree well with the existing experimental data with a deviation of less than 0.2%. Both the density of states and the electronic band structure are calculated, showing five distinct groups of valence bands. Furthermore, the Born effective charge, the dielectric permittivity tensors, and the vibrational frequencies at the center of the Brillouin zone are all obtained. Compared to existing model calculations, the vibrational frequencies are found in much better agreement with the published experimental infrared and Raman data, with absolute and relative rms values of 6.04 cm{sup −1}, and 1.81%, respectively. Consequently, numerical values for both the parallel and perpendicular components of the permittivity tensor are established as 3.55 and 3.71 (10.34 and 12.28), respectively, for the high-(low-)frequency limit.

  11. Analysis of noise radiation mechanisms in hot subsonic jet from a validated large eddy simulation solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lorteau, Mathieu Cléro, Franck Vuillot, François

    2015-07-15

    In the framework of jet noise computation, a numerical simulation of a subsonic turbulent hot jet is performed using large-eddy simulation. A geometrical tripping is used in order to trigger the turbulence at the nozzle exit. In a first part, the validity of the simulation is assessed by comparison with experimental measurements. The mean and rms velocity fields show good agreement, so do the azimuthal composition of the near pressure field and the far field spectra. Discrepancies remain close to the nozzle exit which lead to a limited overestimation of the pressure levels in both near and far fields, especially near the 90{sup ∘} angular sector. Two point correlation analyses are then applied to the data obtained from the simulation. These enable to link the downstream acoustic radiation, which is the main direction of radiation, to pressure waves developing in the shear layer and propagating toward the potential core end. The intermittency of the downstream acoustic radiation is evidenced and related to the coherent structures developing in the shear layer.

  12. Laser energy deposition and its dynamic uniformity for direct-drive capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yan; Wu, SiZhong; Zheng, WuDi

    2015-04-15

    The total laser energy deposition of multi-laser-beam irradiation is not only associated with the dynamic behavior of capsule but also the time-dependent angular distribution of the energy deposition of each beam around its axis. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition does not linearly respond to the dynamic behavior of laser irradiation. The laser energy deposition uniformity determines the symmetry of implosion. The dynamic behavior of laser energy deposition non-uniformity in OMEGA for laser with square beam shape intensity profile is investigated. In the case of smaller laser spot, the initial non-uniformity caused by laser beam overlap is very high. The shell asymmetry caused by the high initial laser irradiation non-uniformity is estimated by the extent of distortion of shock front which is not as severe as expected before the shock driven by main pulse arrives. This suggests that the large initial non-uniformity due to smaller laser spot is one of the elements that seed disturbance before the main pulse. The rms of laser energy deposition during the main pulse remains above 2%. Since the intensity of main driving pulse usually is several times higher than that of picket pulses, the non-uniformity in main pulse period may jeopardize the symmetrical implosion. When dynamic behavior of capsule is considered, the influence of beam pointing error, the target positioning error, and beam-to-beam power unbalance is quite different for the case of static capsule.

  13. Power-law wrinkling turbulence-flame interaction model for astrophysical flames

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Townsley, Dean M.; Calder, Alan C.

    2014-04-01

    We extend a model for turbulence-flame interactions (TFI) to consider astrophysical flames with a particular focus on combustion in Type Ia supernovae. The inertial range of the turbulent cascade is nearly always under-resolved in simulations of astrophysical flows, requiring the use of a model in order to quantify the effects of subgrid-scale wrinkling of the flame surface. We provide implementation details to extend a well-tested TFI model to low-Prandtl number flames for use in the compressible hydrodynamics code FLASH. A local, instantaneous measure of the turbulent velocity is calibrated for FLASH and verification tests are performed. Particular care is taken to consider the relation between the subgrid rms turbulent velocity and the turbulent flame speed, especially for high-intensity turbulence where the turbulent flame speed is not expected to scale with the turbulent velocity. Finally, we explore the impact of different TFI models in full-star, three-dimensional simulations of Type Ia supernovae.

  14. Low noise charge sensitive preamplifier DC stabilized without a physical resistor

    DOEpatents

    Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Rehak, Pavel; Xi, Deming

    1994-09-13

    The invention is a novel charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP) which has no resistor in parallel with the feedback capacitor. No resetting circuit is required to discharge the feedback capacitor. The DC stabilization of the preamplifier is obtained by means of a second feedback loop between the preamplifier output and the common base transistor of the input cascode. The input transistor of the preamplifier is a Junction Field Transistor (JFET) with the gate-source junction forward biased. The detector leakage current flows into this junction. This invention is concerned with a new circuit configuration for a charge sensitive preamplifier and a novel use of the input Field Effect Transistor of the CSP itself. In particular this invention, in addition to eliminating the feedback resistor, eliminates the need for external devices between the detector and the preamplifier, and it eliminates the need for external circuitry to sense the output voltage and reset the CSP. Furthermore, the noise level of the novel CSP is very low, comparable with the performance achieved with other solutions. Experimental tests prove that this configuration for the charge sensitive preamplifier permits an excellent noise performance at temperatures including room temperature. An equivalent noise charge of less than 20 electrons r.m.s. has been measured at room temperature by using a commercial JFET as input device of the preamplifier.

  15. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Shixiang Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ailing; Chen, Jia'er; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049

    2014-02-15

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 ??mm?mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  16. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    SciTech Connect

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer to true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.

  17. A nonlinear MEMS electrostatic kinetic energy harvester for human-powered biomedical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Cottone, F.; Marty, F.; Basset, P.; Galayko, D.

    2015-12-21

    This article proposes a silicon-based electrostatic kinetic energy harvester with an ultra-wide operating frequency bandwidth from 1 Hz to 160 Hz. This large bandwidth is obtained, thanks to a miniature tungsten ball impacting with a movable proof mass of silicon. The motion of the silicon proof mass is confined by nonlinear elastic stoppers on the fixed part standing against two protrusions of the proof mass. The electrostatic transducer is made of interdigited-combs with a gap-closing variable capacitance that includes vertical electrets obtained by corona discharge. Below 10 Hz, the e-KEH offers 30.6 nJ per mechanical oscillation at 2 g{sub rms}, which makes it suitable for powering biomedical devices from human motion. Above 10 Hz and up to 162 Hz, the harvested power is more than 0.5 μW with a maximum of 4.5 μW at 160 Hz. The highest power of 6.6 μW is obtained without the ball at 432 Hz, in accordance with a power density of 142 μW/cm{sup 3}. We also demonstrate the charging of a 47-μF capacitor to 3.5 V used to power a battery-less wireless temperature sensor node.

  18. Performance-based assessment of reconstructed images

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    During the early 90s, I engaged in a productive and enjoyable collaboration with Robert Wagner and his colleague, Kyle Myers. We explored the ramifications of the principle that tbe quality of an image should be assessed on the basis of how well it facilitates the performance of appropriate visual tasks. We applied this principle to algorithms used to reconstruct scenes from incomplete and/or noisy projection data. For binary visual tasks, we used both the conventional disk detection and a new challenging task, inspired by the Rayleigh resolution criterion, of deciding whether an object was a blurred version of two dots or a bar. The results of human and machine observer tests were summarized with the detectability index based on the area under the ROC curve. We investigated a variety of reconstruction algorithms, including ART, with and without a nonnegativity constraint, and the MEMSYS3 algorithm. We concluded that the performance of the Raleigh task was optimized when the strength of the prior was near MEMSYS's default 'classic' value for both human and machine observers. A notable result was that the most-often-used metric of rms error in the reconstruction was not necessarily indicative of the value of a reconstructed image for the purpose of performing visual tasks.

  19. Spectral inversion of the H? line for a plasma feature in the upper chromosphere of the quiet sun

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jongchul

    2014-01-01

    We propose a generalization of Becker's cloud model (BCM): an embedded cloud model (ECM)for the inversion of the core of the H? line spectrum of a plasma feature either lying high above the forest of chromospheric features or partly embedded in the outermost part of this forest. The fundamental assumption of the ECM is that the background light incident on the bottom of the feature from below is equal to the ensemble-average light at the same height. This light is related to the observed ensemble-average light via the radiative transfer that is described by the four parameters newly introduced in addition to the original four parameters of the BCM. Three of these new parameters are independently determined from the observed rms contrast profile of the ensemble. We use the constrained ?{sup 2} fitting technique to determine the five free parameters. We find that the ECM leads to the fairly good fitting of the observed line profiles and the reasonable inference of physical parameters in quiet regions where the BCM cannot. Our first application of this model to a quiet region of the Sun indicates that the model can produce the complete velocity map and Doppler width map of the region.

  20. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  1. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  2. NSLS-II RF BEAM POSITION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, K.; Della Penna, A. J.; DeLong, J.; Kosciuk, B.; Mead, J.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.; Tian, Y.; Ha, K.; Portmann, G.; Sebek J.

    2011-03-28

    An internal R&D program has been undertaken at BNL to develop a sub-micron RF Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the NSLS-II 3rd generation light source that is currently under construction. The BPM R&D program started in August 2009. Successful beam tests were conducted 15 months from the start of the program. The NSLS-II RF BPM has been designed to meet all requirements for the NSLS-II Injection system and Storage Ring. Housing of the RF BPM's in +-0.1 C thermally controlled racks provide sub-micron stabilization without active correction. An active pilot-tone has been incorporated to aid long-term (8hr min) stabilization to 200nm RMS. The development of a sub-micron BPM for the NSLS-II has successfully demonstrated performance and stability. Pilot Tone calibration combiner and RF synthesizer has been implemented and algorithm development is underway. The program is currently on schedule to start production development of 60 Injection BPM's starting in the Fall of 2011. The production of {approx}250 Storage Ring BPM's will overlap the Injection schedule.

  3. Gain dynamics in a soft X-ray laser ampli er perturbed by a strong injected X-ray eld

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Shoujun; Oliva, E; Lu, L; Berrill, Mark A; Yin, Liang; Nejdl, J; Luther, Brad; Proux, C; Le, T. T.; Dunn, James; Ros, D; Zeitoun, Philippe; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Seeding soft X-ray plasma ampli ers with high harmonics has been demonstrated to generate high-brightness soft X-ray laser pulses with full spatial and temporal coherence. The interaction between the injected coherent eld and the swept-gain medium has been modelled. However, no exper- iment has been conducted to probe the gain dynamics when perturbed by a strong external seed eld. Here, we report the rst X-ray pump X-ray probe measurement of the nonlinear response of a plasma ampli er perturbed by a strong soft X-ray ultra-short pulse. We injected a sequence of two time-delayed high-harmonic pulses (l518.9 nm) into a collisionally excited nickel-like molybdenum plasma to measure with femto-second resolution the gain depletion induced by the saturated ampli cation of the high-harmonic pump and its subsequent recovery. The measured fast gain recovery in 1.5 1.75 ps con rms the possibility to generate ultra-intense, fully phase-coherent soft X-ray lasers by chirped pulse ampli cation in plasma ampli ers.

  4. Synthesis of nanocrystalline thin films of gold on the surface of GaSb by swift heavy ion

    SciTech Connect

    Jadhav, Vidya; Dubey, S. K.; Yadav, A. D.; Singh, A.

    2013-02-05

    Thin films of gold ({approx}100 nm thick) were deposited on p-type GaSb substrates. These samples were irradiated with 100 MeV Fe{sup 7+}ions for the fluence of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. After irradiation, samples were characterized using AFM, UV-VIS -NIR, X-Ray Diffraction techniques. AFM studies showed the presence of clusters on the surface of GaSb. R.M.S. roughness of the sample was found to increase w.r.t ion fluence. Absorption coefficient obtained from the Ultra violet - Visible NIR (UV-VIS -NIR) spectra of the samples irradiated with various fluences compared with non irradiated GaSb. The annealing experiment showed a significant improvement in the absorption coefficient after rapid thermal annealing at temperature of 400 Degree-Sign C. X-Ray Diffraction study reveals different orientations of Au film.

  5. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Erica M.; Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann; Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  6. Lubricant replacement in rolling element bearings for weapon surety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.

    1996-05-01

    Stronglink switches are a weapon surety device that is critical to the nuclear safety theme in modem nuclear weapons. These stronglink switches use rolling element bearings which contain a lubricant consisting of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fragments. Ozone-depleting solvents are used in both the manufacture and application of this lubricant. An alternate bearing lubrication for stronglink switches is needed that will provide long-term chemical stability, low migration and consistent performance. Candidates that were evaluated include bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers, bearings with TiC-coated balls, and bearings with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and steel races. These candidates were compared to the lubricants currently used which are bearings lubricated with PTFE fragments of low molecular weight in a fluorocarbon solvent. The candidates were also compared to bearings lubricated with a diester oil which is representative of bearing lubricants used in industrial applications. Evaluation consisted of cycling preloaded bearings and subjecting them to 23 gRMS random vibration. All of the candidates are viable substitutes for low load application where bearing preload is approximately 1 pound. For high load applications where the bearing preload is approximately 10 pounds, bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers appear to be the best substitutes. Bearings with TiC-coated balls also appear to be a viable candidate but these bearings did not perform as well as the sputtered MoS{sub 2}.

  7. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  8. Cell multipole method for molecular simulations in bulk and confined systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jie; Balasundaram, Ramkumar; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Heffelfinger, Grant S.; Goddard, William A. III; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2002-08-01

    One of the bottlenecks in molecular simulations is to treat large systems involving electrostatic interactions. Computational time in conventional molecular simulation methods scales with O(N{sup 2}), where N is the number of atoms. With the emergence of the cell multipole method (CMM) and massively parallel supercomputers, simulations of 10 million atoms have been performed. In this work, the optimal hierarchy cell level and the algorithm for Taylor expansion were recommended for fast and accurate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three-dimensional (3D) systems. CMM was then extended to treat quasi-two-dimensional (2D) systems, which is very important for condensed matter physics problems. In addition, CMM was applied to grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations for both 3D and 2D systems. Under the optimal conditions, the results show that computational time is approximately linear with N for large systems, average error in total potential energy is less than {approx}1%, and RMS force is about 0.015 for 3D and 2D systems when compared with the Ewald summation.

  9. THE EXTENT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AROUND GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J. E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-08-01

    Radio quasar sightlines with strong Mg II absorption lines display statistically enhanced Faraday rotation measures (RMs), indicating the presence of additional magneto-active plasma with respect to sightlines free of such absorption. In this Letter, we use multi-color optical imaging to identify the galaxies likely hosting the magneto-active plasma, and to constrain the location of the latter with respect to the putative parent halo. We find that all of the sightlines with high |RM| pass within 50 kpc of a galaxy and that the |RM| distribution for low impact parameters, D < 50 kpc, is significantly different than for larger impact parameters. In addition, we find a decrease in the ratio of the polarization at 21 cm and 1.5 cm, p{sub 21}/p{sub 1.5}, toward lower D. These two effects are most likely related, strengthen the association of excess |RM| with intervening galaxies, and suggest that intervening galaxies operate as inhomogeneous Faraday screens. These results are difficult to reconcile with only a disk model for the magnetic field, but are consistent with highly magnetized winds associated with Mg II systems. We infer strong magnetic fields of a few tens of {mu}G, consistent with the values required by the lack of evolution of the FIR-radio correlation at high redshifts. Finally, these findings lend support to the idea that the small-scale helicity bottleneck of {alpha}-{Omega} galactic dynamos can be significantly alleviated via galactic winds.

  10. The MPI/AIT X-ray Imager (MAXI): High speed pn-CCD's for x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Strueder, L.; Braeuninger, H.; Meier, M.; Predehl, P.; Reppin, C.; Sterzik, M.; Truemper, J. . Inst. fuer Astrophysik); Cattaneo, P.; Hauff, D.; Lutz, G.; Schuster, K.F.; Schwarz, A. . Werner-Heisenberg-Inst. fuer Physik); Kenziorra, E.; Staubert, A. (Tuebingen

    1989-06-01

    MAXI (MPI/AIT X-RAY Imager) is part of a proposal submitted to the European Space Agency (ESA) as focal plane instrumentation of the X-ray Multi Mission (XMM). Within a collaboration of 13 European institutes we have proposed a fully depleted (sensitive) pn CCD of 280 {mu}m thickness with a homogeneous sensitive area of 36 cm{sup 2} and a pixel size of 150 {times} 150 {mu}m{sup 2} which is well matched with the telescope's angular resolution of 30 arcsec, translating to a position resolution of approximately 1 mm in the focal plane. The X-ray sensitivity is higher than 90% from 250 eV up to 10 keV, the readout time in the full frame mode of the complete focal plane will be 2 ms with a readout noise of better than 5 e{sup {minus}} (rms). Prototypes of all individual components of the camera system have been fabricated and tested. The camera concept will be presented. The measured transfer properties of the CCD and the on-chip electronics will be treated. Taking into account the coupling of the on-chip amplifier to the following front-end electronics the expected performance will be derived.

  11. Improved global sea surface temperature analyses using optimum interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.W.; Smith, T.M. )

    1994-06-01

    The new NOAA operational global sea surface temperature (SST) analysis is described. The analyses use 7 days of in situ (ship and buoy) and satellite SST. These analyses are produced weekly and daily using optimum interpolation (OI) on a 1[degrees] grid. The OI technique requires the specification of data and analysis error statistics. These statistics are derived and show that the SST rms data errors from ships are almost twice as large as the data errors from buoys or satellites. In addition, the average e-folding spatial error scales have been found to be 850 km in the zonal direction and 615 km in the meridional direction. The analysis also includes a preliminary step that corrects any satellite biases relative to the in situ data using Poisson's equation. The importance of this correction is demonstrated using recent data following the 1991 eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo. The OI analysis has been computed using the in situ and bias-corrected satellite data for the period 1985 to present. 20 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Low-temperature growth and orientational control in RuO{sub 2} thin films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, G.R.; Wang, A.; Foster, C.M.; Vetrone, J.; Patel, J.; Wu, X.

    1996-08-01

    For growth temperatures in the range of 275 C to 425 C, highly conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films with either (110)- or (101)-textured orientations have been grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on both SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) and Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates. Both the growth temperature and growth rate were used to control the type and degree of orientational texture of the RuO{sub 2} films. In the upper part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 350 C) and at a low growth rate (< 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (110)-textured. In contrast, at the lower part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 300 C) and at a high growth rate (> 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (101)-textured. In contrast, a higher growth temperatures (> 425 C) always produced randomly-oriented polycrystalline films. For either of these low-temperature growth processes, the films produced were crack-free, well-adhered to the substrates, and had smooth, specular surfaces. Atomic force microscopy showed that the films had a dense microstructure with an average grain size of 50--80 nm and a rms. surface roughness of {approximately} 3--10 nm. Four-probe electrical transport measurements showed that the films were highly conductive with resistivities of 34--40 {micro}{Omega}-cm ({at} 25 C).

  13. Indications of flow near maximum compression in layered deuterium-tritium implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Gatu Johnson, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Munro, D. H.; Sayre, D. B.; et al

    2016-08-15

    Here, an accurate understanding of burn dynamics in implosions of cryogenically layered deuterium (D) and tritium (T) filled capsules, obtained partly through precision diagnosis of these experiments, is essential for assessing the impediments to achieving ignition at the National Ignition Facility. We present measurements of neutrons from such implosions. The apparent ion temperatures Tion are inferred from the variance of the primary neutron spectrum. Consistently higher DT than DD Tion are observed and the difference is seen to increase with increasing apparent DT Tion. The line-of-sight rms variations of both DD and DT Tion are small, ~150eV, indicating an isotropicmore » source. The DD neutron yields are consistently high relative to the DT neutron yields given the observed Tion. Spatial and temporal variations of the DT temperature and density, DD-DT differential attenuation in the surrounding DT fuel, and fluid motion variations contribute to a DT Tion greater than the DD Tion, but are in a one-dimensional model insufficient to explain the data. We hypothesize that in a three-dimensional interpretation, these effects combined could explain the results.« less

  14. A soft X-ray beam-splitting multilayer optic for the NASA GEMS Bragg Reflection Polarimeter

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Allured, Ryan; Kaaret, Philip; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Soufli, Regina; Alameda, Jennifer B.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2013-04-12

    A soft X-ray, beam-splitting, multilayer optic has been developed for the Bragg Reflection Polarimeter (BRP) on the NASA Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer Mission (GEMS). The optic is designed to reflect 0.5 keV X-rays through a 90° angle to the BRP detector, and transmit 2–10 keV X-rays to the primary polarimeter. The transmission requirement prevents the use of a thick substrate, so a 2 μm thick polyimide membrane was used. Atomic force microscopy has shown the membrane to possess high spatial frequency roughness less than 0.2 nm rms, permitting adequate X-ray reflectance. A multilayer thin film was especially developedmore » and deposited via magnetron sputtering with reflectance and transmission properties that satisfy the BRP requirements and with near-zero stress. Furthermore, reflectance and transmission measurements of BRP prototype elements closely match theoretical predictions, both before and after rigorous environmental testing.« less

  15. Photolysis rates in correlated overlapping cloud fields: Cloud-J 7.3c

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Prather, M. J.

    2015-08-14

    A new approach for modeling photolysis rates (J values) in atmospheres with fractional cloud cover has been developed and is implemented as Cloud-J – a multi-scattering eight-stream radiative transfer model for solar radiation based on Fast-J. Using observations of the vertical correlation of cloud layers, Cloud-J 7.3c provides a practical and accurate method for modeling atmospheric chemistry. The combination of the new maximum-correlated cloud groups with the integration over all cloud combinations by four quadrature atmospheres produces mean J values in an atmospheric column with root mean square (rms) errors of 4 % or less compared with 10–20 % errorsmore » using simpler approximations. Cloud-J is practical for chemistry–climate models, requiring only an average of 2.8 Fast-J calls per atmosphere vs. hundreds of calls with the correlated cloud groups, or 1 call with the simplest cloud approximations. Another improvement in modeling J values, the treatment of volatile organic compounds with pressure-dependent cross sections, is also incorporated into Cloud-J.« less

  16. Circulation in gas-slurry column reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.; Kuhlman, J.; Celik, I.; Gross, R.; Nebiolo, E.; Wang, Yi-Zun.

    1990-08-15

    Circulation in bubble columns, such as those used in fischer-tropsch synthesis, detracts from their performance in that gas is carried on average more rapidly through the column, and the residence time distribution of the gas in the column is widened. Both of these factors influence mass-transfer operations in bubble columns. Circulation prediction and measurement has been undertaken using probes, one-dimensional models, laser Doppler velocimetry, and numerical modeling. Local void fraction was measured using resistance probes and a newly developed approach to determining air/water threshold voltage for the probe. A tall column of eight inch diameter was constructed of Plexiglas and the distributor plate was manufactured to distribute air evenly through the base of the column. Data were gathered throughout the volume at three different gas throughputs. Bubble velocities proved difficult to measure using twin probes with cross-correlation because of radial bubble movement. A series of three-dimensional mean and RMS bubble and liquid velocity measurements were also obtained for a turbulent flow in a laboratory model of a bubble column. These measurements have been made using a three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV), to determine velocity distributions non-intrusively. Finally, the gas-liquid flow inside a vertically situated circular isothermal column reactor was simulated numerically. 74 refs., 170 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Axial asymmetry in the IBA and an extensive new 0(6) region near A=130

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Although the IBA-1 contains no solutions corresponding to a rigid triaxial shape, it does contain an effective asymmetry arising from zero point motion in a ..gamma..-soft potential leading to a non-zero mean or rms ..gamma... In the consistent Q Formalism (CQF) of the IBA, most results of calculation depend only on one parameter chi. A relation will be established between chi and the effective asymmetry parameter ..gamma... The relation between the asymmetry occurring naturally in IBA-1 and the triaxiality arising from the introduction of cubic terms into the IBA Hamiltonian will be discussed. It will be shown that ..gamma..-band energy staggering is a particularly sensitive indicator of the degree of ..gamma.. rigidity. Finally, an extensive new region of 0(6) like Xe and Ba nuclei near A=130 will be discussed. Their remarkable similarity to Pt will be explored. Deviations from the strict 0(6) limit can be described in terms of the interplay of soft and rigid axial asymmetry and calculations will be presented that interpret the Xe, Ba and Pt isotopes in this way. 25 references.

  18. Axial asymmetry in the IBA and an extensive new 0(6) region near A = 130

    SciTech Connect

    Casten, R.F.

    1985-01-15

    Although the IBA-1 contains no solutions corresponding to a rigid triaxial shape, it does contain an effective asymmetry arising from zero point motion in a ..gamma..-soft potential leading to a non-zero mean or rms ..gamma... In the Consistent Q Formalism (CQF) of the IBA, most results of a calculation depend only on one parameter chi. A relation will be established between chi and the effective asymmetry parameter ..gamma... The relation between the asymmetry occurring naturally in IBA-1 and the triaxiality arising from the introduction of cubic terms into the IBA Hamiltonian will be discussed. It will be shown that ..gamma..-band energy staggering is a particularly sensitive indicator of the degree of ..gamma.. rigidity. Finally, an extensive new region of 0(6) like Xe and Ba nuclei near A = 130 will be discussed. Their remarkable similarity to Pt will be explored. Deviations from the strict 0(6) limit can be described in terms of the interplay of soft and rigid axial asymmetry and calculations will be presented that interpret the Xe, Ba and Pt isotopes in this way.

  19. Performance and Applications of the first HVE 5MV Tandetron{sup TM} at the University of Madrid

    SciTech Connect

    Mous, D.J.W.; Gottdang, A.; Haitsma, R.G.; Garcia Lopez, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Agullo-Lopez, F.; Boerma, D.O.

    2003-08-26

    The first HVE Tandetron{sup TM} with a nominal terminal voltage of 5 MV has been put into operation at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain) as part of their new IBA facility. The accelerator features a coaxial structure in which the all-solid-state power supply is constructed around the high-energy acceleration tube, thereby avoiding the T-shaped tank that has characterized the HVE Tandetrons{sup TM} so far. The new IBA facility covers a number of different ion beam analysis techniques including ERD using heavy-element time-of-flight, RBS, as well as an external micro-beam for PIXE. During installation, tests have shown a stable terminal voltage of 5.5 MV. The terminal voltage ripple was deduced to be below 6 x 10-6 (RMS) for terminal voltages above 800 kV. Terminal voltage undershoot was measured to be 1.4 x 10-3 for a {approx}1 kW beam at 3 MV and recovered to 1 x 10-4 within 800 ms. IBA experiments that require low energy hydrogen beams are supported by a stable terminal voltage down to 100 kV.

  20. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic BackgroundRadiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M.V.; Smoot, G.F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup -1/2}. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360 {+-} 50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2 {+-} 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+-} 8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  1. High frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Avicola, K.; Salmon, J.T.; Brase, J.; Waltjen, K.; Presta, R.; Balch, K.S.

    1992-03-01

    A two-stage intensified 192 {times} 239 pixel imager developed by Eastman Kodak for motion analysis was used to construct a 1 kHz frame-rate Hartmann wavefront sensor. The sensor uses a monolithic array of lenslets with a focal length that is adjusted by an index fluid between the convex surface and an optical flat. The accuracy of the calculated centroid position, which is related to wavefront measurement accuracy, was obtained as a function of spot power and spot size. The sensor was then dynamically tested at a 1 kHz frame-rate with a 9 {times} 9 lenslet array and a fast steering mirror, which swept a plane wavefront across the wavefront sensor. An 8 cm diameter subaperture will provide a return signal (589 nm) level of about 1000 photons/ms using the AVLIS 1 kW laser (stretched pulse) as guide star source, which is sufficient to yield a wavefront measurement of better than {gamma}/10 rms. If an area of 6 {times} 6 pixels per Hartmann spot were allocated, this wavefront sensor could support a 32 {times} 32, or 1024, element deformable mirror.

  2. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  3. Transported PDF Modeling of Nonpremixed Turbulent CO/H-2/N-2 Jet Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, xinyu; Haworth, D. C.; Huckaby, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (syngas) flames are simulated using a transported composition probability density function (PDF) method. A consistent hybrid Lagrangian particle/Eulerian mesh algorithm is used to solve the modeled PDF transport equation. The model includes standard k? turbulence, gradient transport for scalars, and Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) mixing. Sensitivities of model results to variations in the turbulence model, the treatment of radiation heat transfer, the choice of chemical mechanism, and the PDF mixing model are explored. A baseline model reproduces the measured mean and rms temperature, major species, and minor species profiles reasonably well, and captures the scaling that is observed in the experiments. Both our results and the literature suggest that further improvements can be realized with adjustments in the turbulence model, the radiation heat transfer model, and the chemical mechanism. Although radiation effects are relatively small in these flames, consideration of radiation is important for accurate NO prediction. Chemical mechanisms that have been developed specifically for fuels with high concentrations of CO and H{sub 2} perform better than a methane mechanism that was not designed for this purpose. It is important to account explicitly for turbulencechemistry interactions, although the details of the mixing model do not make a large difference in the results, within reasonable limits.

  4. Deuteron injector for Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility project

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H. T.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X.; Lu, P. N.; Zhou, Q. F.; Yuan, Z. X.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, M.; Song, Z. Z.; Yu, J. X.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2012-02-15

    The deuteron injector developed for the PKUNIFTY (Peking University Neutron Imaging Facility) has been installed and commissioned at Peking University (PKU). The injector system must transfer 50 keV 50 mA of D{sup +} ion beam to the entrance of the 2 MeV radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with 10% duty factor (1 ms, 100 Hz). A compact 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (PMECR) ion source and a 1.36 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT) line using two solenoids was developed as the deuteron injector. A {phi}5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was used to simulate the entrance of RFQ electrodes. The beam parameters are measured after this core with an emittance measurement unit (EMU) and a bending magnet for ion fraction analysis at the end of injector. During the commissioning, 77 mA of total deuteron beam was extracted from PMECR and 56 mA of pure D{sup +} beam that passed through the {phi}5 mm four-quadrant diaphragm was obtained at the position of RFQ entrance with the measured normalized rms emittance 0.12-0.16{pi} mm mrad. Ion species analysis results show that the deuteron fraction is as high as 99.5%. All of the parameters satisfy PKUNIFTY's requirements. In this paper, we will describe the deuteron injector design and report the commissioning results as well as the initial operation.

  5. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  6. An Improved Technique for Increasing the Accuracy of Photometrically Determined Redshifts for ___Blended___ Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Ashley Marie; /Marietta Coll. /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The redshift of a galaxy can be determined by one of two methods; photometric or spectroscopic. Photometric is a term for any redshift determination made using the magnitudes of light in different filters. Spectroscopic redshifts are determined by measuring the absorption spectra of the object then determining the difference in wavelength between the 'standard' absorption lines and the measured ones, making it the most accurate of the two methods. The data for this research was collected from SDSS DR8 and then separated into blended and non-blended galaxy sets; the definition of 'blended' is discussed in the Introduction section. The current SDSS photometric redshift determination method does not discriminate between blended and non-blended data when it determines the photometric redshift of a given galaxy. The focus of this research was to utilize machine learning techniques to determine if a considerably more accurate photometric redshift determination method could be found, for the case of the blended and non-blended data being treated separately. The results show a reduction of 0.00496 in the RMS error of photometric redshift determinations for blended galaxies and a more significant reduction of 0.00827 for non-blended galaxies, illustrated in Table 2.

  7. A model for the response of vertical axis wind turbines to turbulent flow: Parts 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, D.R.

    1988-07-01

    This report describes a project intended to incorporate the effects of atmospheric turbulence into the structural response of Darrieus rotor, vertical axis wind turbines. The basis of the technique is the generation of a suitable time series of wind velocities, which are passed through a double multiple streamtube aerodynamic representation of the rotor. The aerodynamic loads are decomposed into components of the real eigenvectors of the rotor and subsequently into full-power and cross-spectral densities. These modal spectra are submitted as input to a modified NASTRAN random load analysis and the power spectra of selected responses are obtained. This procedure appears to be successful. Results at zero turbulence agree with alternative solutions, and when turbulence is included, the predicted stress spectra for the Indal 6400 rotor are in good agreement with field data. The model predicts that the effect of turbulence on harmonic frequency peaks and on all lead-lag bending will not be great. However, it appears that only 11% turbulence intensity can almost double the rms of cyclic flatwise blade bending. 23 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  9. Low noise charge sensitive preamplifier DC stabilized without a physical resistor

    DOEpatents

    Bertuccio, G.; Rehak, P.; Xi, D.

    1994-09-13

    The invention is a novel charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP) which has no resistor in parallel with the feedback capacitor. No resetting circuit is required to discharge the feedback capacitor. The DC stabilization of the preamplifier is obtained by means of a second feedback loop between the preamplifier output and the common base transistor of the input cascode. The input transistor of the preamplifier is a Junction Field Transistor (JFET) with the gate-source junction forward biased. The detector leakage current flows into this junction. This invention is concerned with a new circuit configuration for a charge sensitive preamplifier and a novel use of the input Field Effect Transistor of the CSP itself. In particular this invention, in addition to eliminating the feedback resistor, eliminates the need for external devices between the detector and the preamplifier, and it eliminates the need for external circuitry to sense the output voltage and reset the CSP. Furthermore, the noise level of the novel CSP is very low, comparable with the performance achieved with other solutions. Experimental tests prove that this configuration for the charge sensitive preamplifier permits an excellent noise performance at temperatures including room temperature. An equivalent noise charge of less than 20 electrons r.m.s. has been measured at room temperature by using a commercial JFET as input device of the preamplifier. 6 figs.

  10. Advances in the performance and understanding of the Spallation Neutron Source ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.

    2006-03-15

    The ion source developed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a radio-frequency, multicusp source designed to produce {approx}40 mA of H{sup -} with a normalized rms emittance of less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad. To date, the source has been utilized in the commissioning of the SNS accelerator and has already demonstrated stable, satisfactory operation at beam currents of 10-40 mA with duty factors of {approx}0.1% for operational periods of several weeks. Ultimately the SNS facility will require beam duty factors of 6% (1 ms pulse length, 60 Hz repetition rate). To ascertain the capability of the source to deliver beams at this duty factor over sustained periods, ongoing experiments are being performed in which the ion source is continuously operated on a dedicated test stand. The results of these tests are reported as well as a theory of the Cs release and transport processes that was derived from these data. The theory was then employed to develop a more effective source-conditioning procedure and a direct-transfer Cs collar, which led to a considerable improvement in source performance.

  11. Recent Advances in the Performance and Understanding of the SNS Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Keller, R.

    2005-04-06

    The ion source developed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is a radio frequency, multi-cusp source designed to produce {approx} 40 mA of H- with a normalized rms emittance of less than 0.2 pi mm mrad. To date, the source has been utilized in the commissioning of the SNS accelerator and has already demonstrated stable, satisfactory operation at beam currents of {approx}30 mA with duty-factors of {approx}0.1% for operational periods of several weeks. Once the SNS is fully operational in 2008, a beam current duty-factor of 6% (1 ms pulse length, 60 Hz repetition rate) will be required in order to inject the accelerator. To ascertain the capability of the source to deliver beams at this high duty-factor over sustained time periods, several experimental runs have been conducted, each {approx}1 week in length, in which the ion source was continuously operated on a dedicated test stand. The results of these tests are reported as well as a theory of the Cs release and transport processes which were derived from these data. The theory was then employed to develop a more effective source conditioning procedure as well as an improved Cs collar design. Initial results of tests employing a Cs collar with enhanced surface ionization geometry are also discussed.

  12. Study of NbC thin films for soft X-ray multilayer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Amol E-mail: rrcat.amol@gmail.com; Modi, Mohammed H.; Lodha, G. S.; Rajput, Parasmani; Jha, S. N.

    2015-06-24

    Compound materials are being used in soft x-ray and Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optics applications. Structural properties of compound materials changes drastically when ultrathin films are formed from bulk material. Structural properties need to be investigated to determine the suitability of compound materials in soft x-ray multilayer applications. In the present study Niobium carbide (NbC) thin films were deposited using ion beam sputtering of an NbC target on Si (100) substrate. Thickness roughness and film mass density was determined from the X-ray reflectivity (XRR) data. XRR data revealed that the film mass density was increasing with increase in film thickness. For 500Ǻ thick film, mass density of 6.85 g/cm{sup 3}, close to bulk density was found. Rms roughness for all the films was less than 10Å. Local structure of NbC thin films was determined from EXAFS measurements. The EXAFS data showed an increase in Nb-C and Nb-(C)-Nb peak ratio approaches towards bulk NbC with increasing thickness of NbC. From the present study, NbC thin films were found suitable for actual use in soft x-ray multilayer applications.

  13. Primordial magnetic field amplification from turbulent reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Calzetta, Esteban; Kandus, Alejandra E-mail: kandus@uesc.br

    2010-08-01

    We analyze the possibility of primordial magnetic field amplification by a stochastic large scale kinematic dynamo during reheating. We consider a charged scalar field minimally coupled to gravity. During inflation this field is assumed to be in its vacuum state. At the transition to reheating the state of the field changes to a many particle/anti-particle state. We characterize that state as a fluid flow of zero mean velocity but with a stochastic velocity field. We compute the scale-dependent Reynolds number Re(k), and the characteristic times for decay of turbulence, t{sub d} and pair annihilation t{sub a}, finding t{sub a} << t{sub d}. We calculate the rms value of the kinetic helicity of the flow over a scale L and show that it does not vanish. We use this result to estimate the amplification factor of a seed field from the stochastic kinematic dynamo equations. Although this effect is weak, it shows that the evolution of the cosmic magnetic field from reheating to galaxy formation may well be more complex than as dictated by simple flux freezing.

  14. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) CWP (Cold Water Pipe) Laboratory Test Program. Ocean Systems Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This document presents the plan for validating the ocean systems response codes used in the OTEC community. Ocean systems used here includes the platform, the CWP, and the mooring system. The objectives of the present program are to acquire test data on the response of the ocean system to wave excitation available frequency domain computer codes. If the codes are not fully validated upon comparison of the test data with the calculations, the objectives are to identify discrepancies, establish the range of code usefulness and to recommend improvements. Model tests will be conducted in the OTC model basin with the CWP extending into the 30 foot deep pit. This limits the model scale to 1:110. Three types of prototype CWP's will be modeled: rigid, articulated and compliant. Two mooring stiffnesses will be tested based on the Lockheed mooring study. The model platform is a modified version of the APL barge redesigned to improve seakeeping performance. Computer code calculations will be made with the ROTEC and NOAA/DOE frequency domain codes. Standard response parameters will be compared with the test data (stress and motion maxima, significant and RMS magnitudes as well as selected RAO's). Wave drift forces will be estimated and compared to test data.

  15. Crossing-over in rearranging chromosomes of Drosophila: The role of delayed pairing

    SciTech Connect

    Chadov, B.F.; Chadova, E.V.; Khotskina, E.A.

    1995-11-01

    A Df(2R)MS2-10 deletion of pericentromeric heterochromatin and an Is(Y;2L)419 insertion of Y material in the region 34A, as well as nondisjunction of chromosomes 2 in 2/F(2L); F(2R) females did not directly prevent chromosome arms in chromosome 2 of Drosophila from pairing. However, these events resulted in (1) two- to four-fold decrease in the rate of crossing-over in chromosome 2; (2) a decreased proportion of exchange tetrads two to three times greater for multiple-exchange tetrads than for single-exchange ones; and (3) a decreased rate of crossing-over throughout the entire chromosome arm enhanced in a proximal direction. An In(1)dl-49+B{sup M1}inversion in the X chromosome cancelled the suppression of crossing-over. Crossing-over increased due to an increasing proportion of single-exchange tretrads. The changes in crossing-over found cannot be explained by asynapsis in the chromosomes with rearrangements. According to the authors, these changes are probably accounted for by a delayed pairing of these chromosomes. The delayed pairing of individual chromosome regions or the whole chromosome is considered the most common type of pairing disturbance. It effects on meiosis are discussed. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  17. Performance of the accelerator driver of Jefferson Laboratory's free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.; Benson, S.; Biallas, G.

    1999-04-01

    The driver of Jefferson Lab's kW-level infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a superconducting, recirculating accelerator that recovers about 75% of the electron-beam power and converts it to radiofrequency power. In achieving first lasing, the accelerator operated straight-ahead to deliver 38 MeV, 1.1 mA cw current through the wiggler for lasing at wavelengths in the vicinity of 5 {mu}m. Just prior to first lasing, measured rms beam properties at the wiggler were 7.5{+-}1.5 mm-mr normalized transverse emittance, 26{+-}7 keV-deg longitudinal emittance, and 0.4{+-}0.1 ps bunch length which yielded a peak current of 60{+-}15A. The waste beam was then sent directly to a dump, bypassing the recirculation loop. Stable operation at up to 311 W cw was achieved in this mode. Commissioning the recirculation loop then proceeded. As of this Conference, the machine has recirculated cw average current up to 4 mA, and has lased cw with energy recover up to 710 W.

  18. Nucleation and growth of ZnO on PMMA by low-temperature atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Napari, Mari Malm, Jari; Lehto, Roope; Julin, Jaakko; Arstila, Kai; Sajavaara, Timo; Lahtinen, Manu

    2015-01-15

    ZnO films were grown by atomic layer deposition at 35?C on poly(methyl methacrylate) substrates using diethylzinc and water precursors. The film growth, morphology, and crystallinity were studied using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The uniform film growth was reached after several hundreds of deposition cycles, preceded by the precursor penetration into the porous bulk and island-type growth. After the full surface coverage, the ZnO films were stoichiometric, and consisted of large grains (diameter 30?nm) with a film surface roughness up to 6?nm (RMS). The introduction of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} seed layer enhanced the initial ZnO growth substantially and changed the surface morphology as well as the crystallinity of the deposited ZnO films. Furthermore, the water contact angles of the ZnO films were measured, and upon ultraviolet illumination, the ZnO films on all the substrates became hydrophilic, independent of the film crystallinity.

  19. Measurements of Martin-Puplett Interferometer Limitations using Blackbody Source

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Klopf, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Frequency domain measurements with Martin-Puplett interferometer is one of a few techniques capable of bunch length measurements at the level of ~ 100 fs. As the bunch length becomes shorter, it is important to know and be able to measure the limitations of the instrument in terms of shortest measurable bunch length. In this paper we describe an experiment using a blackbody source with the modified Martin-Puplett interferometer that is routine- ly used for bunch length measurements at the JLab FEL, as a way to estimate the shortest, measurable bunch length. The limitation comes from high frequency cut-off of the wire-grid polarizer currently used and is estimated to be 50 fs RMS. The measurements are made with the same Golay cell detector that is used for beam measure- ments. We demonstrate that, even though the blackbody source is many orders of magnitude less bright than the coherent transition or synchrotron radiation, it can be used for the measurements and gives a very good signal to noise ratio in combination with lock-in detection. We also compare the measurements made in air and in vacuum to characterize the very strong effect of the atmospheric absorption.

  20. THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM OF THE MILKY WAY: ACCRETION IN A COSMOLOGICAL CONTEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the significance of a planar arrangement in the spatial distribution of the Milky Way (MW) globular clusters (GCs). We find that, when separated on the basis of horizontal branch morphology and metallicity, the outermost canonical young halo (YH) GC sample (at galactocentric radii in excess of 10 kpc) exhibits an anisotropic distribution that may be equated to a plane (24 {+-} 4) kpc thick (rms) and inclined at 8 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign to the polar axis of the MW disk. To quantify the significance of this plane we determine the fraction of times that an isotropic distribution replicates the observed distribution in Monte Carlo trials. The plane is found to remain significant at the >95% level outside a galactocentric radius of 10 kpc, inside this radius the spatial distribution is apparently isotropic. In contrast, the spatial distribution of the old halo sample outside 10 kpc is well matched by an isotropic distribution. The plane described by the outer YH GCs is indistinguishable in orientation from that presented by the satellite galaxies of the MW. Simulations have shown that the planar arrangement of satellites can arise as filaments of the surrounding large-scale structure feed into the MW's potential. We therefore propose that our results are direct observational evidence for the accreted origin of the outer YH GC population. This conclusion confirms numerous lines of evidence that have similarly indicated an accreted origin for this set of clusters from the inferred cluster properties.

  1. Demonstration of passive plasma lensing of a laser wakefield accelerated electron bunch

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kuschel, S.; Hollatz, D.; Heinemann, T.; Karger, O.; Schwab, M. B.; Ullmann, D.; Knetsch, A.; Seidel, A.; Rodel, C.; Yeung, M.; et al

    2016-07-20

    We report on the first demonstration of passive all-optical plasma lensing using a two-stage setup. An intense femtosecond laser accelerates electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) to 100 MeV over millimeter length scales. By adding a second gas target behind the initial LWFA stage we introduce a robust and independently tunable plasma lens. We observe a density dependent reduction of the LWFA electron beam divergence from an initial value of 2.3 mrad, down to 1.4 mrad (rms), when the plasma lens is in operation. Such a plasma lens provides a simple and compact approach for divergence reduction well matchedmore » to the mm-scale length of the LWFA accelerator. The focusing forces are provided solely by the plasma and driven by the bunch itself only, making this a highly useful and conceptually new approach to electron beam focusing. Possible applications of this lens are not limited to laser plasma accelerators. Since no active driver is needed the passive plasma lens is also suited for high repetition rate focusing of electron bunches. As a result, its understanding is also required for modeling the evolution of the driving particle bunch in particle driven wake field acceleration.« less

  2. Investigations into the seeding of instabilities due to x-ray preheat in beryllium-based inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, E. N.; Greenfield, S. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Cobble, J. A.; Luo, S. N.; Montgomery, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.

    2010-05-15

    The geometry of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules makes them susceptible to various types of hydrodynamic instabilities at different stages during an ICF implosion. From the beginnings of ICF research, it has been known that grain-level anisotropy and defects could be a significant source of instability seeding in solid beryllium capsules. We report on experiments conducted at the Trident laser facility [S. H. Batha et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10F305 (2008)] to measure dynamic surface roughening from hard x-ray preheat due to anisotropic thermal expansion. M-band emission from laser-produced gold plasma was used to heat beryllium targets with different amounts of copper doping to temperatures comparable to ICF ignition preheat levels. Dynamic roughening measurements were made on the surface away from the plasma at discrete times up to 8 ns after the beginning of the drive pulse using a surface displacement interferometer with nanometer scale sensitivity. Undoped large-grained targets were measured to roughen between 15 and 50 nm rms. Fine-grained, copper-doped targets were observed to roughen near the sensitivity limit of the interferometer. The results of this work have shed light on the effects of high-Z doping and microstructural refinement on the dynamics of differential thermal expansion and have shown that current ICF capsule designs using beryllium are very effective in reducing preheat related roughening ahead of the first shock.

  3. A 120kV IGBT modulator for driving a pierce electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L. M.; Brown, R. W.; Carlson, R. L.; Ferguson, P.; Haynes, W. B.; Kirbie, H. C.; Russell, S. J.; Sigler, F. E.; Smirnova, E. I.; Wheat, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    An IGBT modulator has been developed to drive a 120 kV, 23 A Pierce electron gun. The modulator is capable of producing pulses up to 10 {mu}s in width at repetition rates up to 10Hz with no active reset. The pulse rise time on the electron gun will be approximately 2 {mu}s and the remaining 8 {mu}s of flattop is tuned to have a ripple of less than 1 percent rms. The modulator technology was developed from a previous 50 kV prototype. The modulator consists of six boards, each with one EUPEC IGBT that drives a single common step-up transformer wound on METGLAS 2605SC cores. The six transformer cores share a common bi-filar output secondary winding. The modulator uses a fiber optic trigger system and has a high voltage cable output with an epoxy receptacle on the oil end and a ceramic receptacle on the vacuum end. The 120 kV electron gun was manufactured by MDS Co. and will be used to generate sheet electron beams from the standard pencil beam produced by the Pierce electron gun.

  4. Development and calibration of mirrors and gratings for the Soft X-ray materials science beamline at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Soufli, Regina; Fernandez-Perea, Monica; Baker, Sherry L.; Robinson, Jeff C.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Heimann, Philip; Yashchuk, Valerie V.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Schlotter, William F.; Rowen, Michael

    2012-04-18

    This article discusses the development and calibration of the x-ray reflective and diffractive elements for the Soft X-ray Materials Science (SXR) beamline of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron laser (FEL), designed for operation in the 500 – 2000 eV region. The surface topography of three Si mirror substrates and two Si diffraction grating substrates was examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical profilometry. The figure of the mirror substrates was also verified via surface slope measurements with a long trace profiler. A boron carbide (B4C) coating especially optimized for the LCLS FEL conditions was deposited on allmore » SXR mirrors and gratings. Coating thickness uniformity of 0.14 nm root mean square (rms) across clear apertures extending to 205 mm length was demonstrated for all elements, as required to preserve the coherent wavefront of the LCLS source. The reflective performance of the mirrors and the diffraction efficiency of the gratings were calibrated at beamline 6.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron. To verify the integrity of the nanometer-scale grating structure, the grating topography was examined by AFM before and after coating. This is to our knowledge the first time B4C-coated diffraction gratings are demonstrated for operation in the soft x-ray region.« less

  5. Improve earthquake hypocenter using adaptive simulated annealing inversion in regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal observation

    SciTech Connect

    Ry, Rexha Verdhora; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Observation of earthquakes is routinely used widely in tectonic activity observation, and also in local scale such as volcano tectonic and geothermal activity observation. It is necessary for determining the location of precise hypocenter which the process involves finding a hypocenter location that has minimum error between the observed and the calculated travel times. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, simulated annealing inversion method can be applied to such global optimization problems, which the convergence of its solution is independent of the initial model. In this study, we developed own program codeby applying adaptive simulated annealing inversion in Matlab environment. We applied this method to determine earthquake hypocenter using several data cases which are regional tectonic, volcano tectonic, and geothermal field. The travel times were calculated using ray tracing shooting method. We then compared its results with the results using Geiger’s method to analyze its reliability. Our results show hypocenter location has smaller RMS error compared to the Geiger’s result that can be statistically associated with better solution. The hypocenter of earthquakes also well correlated with geological structure in the study area. Werecommend using adaptive simulated annealing inversion to relocate hypocenter location in purpose to get precise and accurate earthquake location.

  6. Synchronizing femtosecond laser with x-ray synchrotron operating at arbitrarily different frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Wonhyuk; Lee, Sooheyong; Eom, Intae; Landahl, Eric C.

    2014-12-15

    The ability to synchronize a femtosecond laser to x-ray pulses is crucial for performing ultrafast time-resolved x-ray scattering experiments at synchrotrons. Conventionally, the task has been achieved by locking a harmonic frequency of the laser oscillator to the storage ring master radio-frequency (RF). However, when the frequency mismatch between the two sources cannot be compensated by small adjustments to the laser cavity length, synchronization to a harmonic frequency requires modifying the optical components of the laser system. We demonstrate a novel synchronization scheme, which is a flexible alternative for synchronizing these two sources operating at arbitrarily different frequencies. First, we find the greatest common divisor (GCD) of the two frequencies that is still within the limited tuning range of the laser cavity length. The GCD is generated by dividing down from the storage ring RF, and is separately multiplied up to provide a feedback signal for synchronizing the laser cavity. Unique to our scheme, the GCD also serves as a harmonic RF source for the laser amplifier such that only laser oscillator pulses at fixed integer multiples of the storage ring RF are selected for amplification and delivery to experiments. Our method is implemented at the Photon Test Facility beamline of Pohang Light Source where timing-jitter less than 4 ps (r.m.s.) is measured using a new shot-to-shot method.

  7. Design of Low-Noise Output Amplifiers for P-channel Charge-Coupled Devices Fabricated on High-Resistivity Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, S; Frost, F Dion R.; Groulx, R; Holland, S E; Karcher, A; Kolbe, W F; Roe, N A; Wang, G; Yu, Y

    2011-12-22

    We describe the design and optimization of low-noise, single-stage output amplifiers for p-channel charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used for scientific applications in astronomy and other fields. The CCDs are fabricated on high-resistivity, 4000–5000 -cm, n-type silicon substrates. Single-stage amplifiers with different output structure designs and technologies have been characterized. The standard output amplifier is designed with an n{sup +} polysilicon gate that has a metal connection to the sense node. In an effort to lower the output amplifier readout noise by minimizing the capacitance seen at the sense node, buried-contact technology has been investigated. In this case, the output transistor has a p{sup +} polysilicon gate that connects directly to the p{sup +} sense node. Output structures with buried-contact areas as small as 2 μm × 2 μm are characterized. In addition, the geometry of the source-follower transistor was varied, and we report test results on the conversion gain and noise of the various amplifier structures. By use of buried-contact technology, better amplifier geometry, optimization of the amplifier biases and improvements in the test electronics design, we obtain a 45% reduction in noise, corresponding to 1.7 e{sup -} rms at 70 kpixels/sec.

  8. RIAPMTQ/Impact : beam-dynamics simulation tool for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T. P.; Billen, J. H.; Garnett, R. W.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Crandall, K. R.; Ostroumov, P.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.; York, R. C.; Wu, X.; Zhao, Q.; Gorelov, D.; Doleans, M.; Physics; LANL; Tech Source; Michigan State Univ.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a pair of multiparticle beam dynamics codes for end-to-end computer simulations of the proposed RIA heavy-ion driver linac. The two codes are: (1) an adaptation of PARMTEQ called RIAPMTQ for the normal-conducting-linac front end, and (2) IMPACT for the superconducting linac. The codes run on a PC as well as on parallel supercomputing platforms such as NERSC at LBNL. The parallel capability allows us to run simulations with large numbers of macroparticles for the computation of beam halo and beam-losses. The codes are being benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The work is being performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and Michigan State University (MSU). In this paper we present an overview, the status of the work, comparison of simulation results from RIAPMTQ and the ANL code TRACK for the ANL front-end design, and the first RIAPMTQ/IMPACT end-to-end multiprocessor simulation for the MSU design.

  9. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  10. Precision control of thermal transport in cryogenic single-crystal silicon devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rostem, K.; Chuss, D. T.; Colazo, F. A.; Crowe, E. J.; Denis, K. L.; Lourie, N. P.; Moseley, S. H.; Stevenson, T. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2014-03-28

    We report on the diffusive-ballistic thermal conductance of multi-moded single-crystal silicon beams measured below 1?K. It is shown that the phonon mean-free-path ? is a strong function of the surface roughness characteristics of the beams. This effect is enhanced in diffuse beams with lengths much larger than ?, even when the surface is fairly smooth, 510?nm rms, and the peak thermal wavelength is 0.6??m. Resonant phonon scattering has been observed in beams with a pitted surface morphology and characteristic pit depth of 30?nm. Hence, if the surface roughness is not adequately controlled, the thermal conductance can vary significantly for diffuse beams fabricated across a wafer. In contrast, when the beam length is of order ?, the conductance is dominated by ballistic transport and is effectively set by the beam cross-sectional area. We have demonstrated a uniformity of 8% in fractional deviation for ballistic beams, and this deviation is largely set by the thermal conductance of diffuse beams that support the micro-electro-mechanical device and electrical leads. In addition, we have found no evidence for excess specific heat in single-crystal silicon membranes. This allows for the precise control of the device heat capacity with normal metal films. We discuss the results in the context of the design and fabrication of large-format arrays of far-infrared and millimeter wavelength cryogenic detectors.

  11. Investigation of essential elements of stratified-charge combustion. Final technical report, October 1, 1985--December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, F.V.

    1989-12-31

    Laser Doppler velocimetry has been used to make cycle-resolved velocity and turbulence measurements in a homogeneous-charge, spark-ignition engine. The engine had a ported intake and disc-shaped chamber with a compression ratio of 8 to 1. It was operated at a speed of 1200 rpm and with a TDC swirl number of 4. A stoichiometric propane-air mixture was used, and ignition was near the wall. The velocity measurements were made at three spatial locations at the midpoint of the clearance height. Tests were made to determine whether the presence of the flame affected the accuracy of the velocity measurements. It was found that the ensemble-averaged mean velocity shows a small deviation, and the rms fluctuation intensity is significantly influenced, but the effects appear to be confined to the flame zone. Data rates were sufficiently high in the preflame and postflame regions to determine the velocity history in each cycle (cycle resolved) . The cycle resolved turbulence intensity was found to increase across the flame. The turbulence intensity in the burned gas was found to be homogeneous at the three spatial locations examined and to decay rapidly. There was little or no increase in turbulence intensity ahead of the flame.

  12. Investigation of essential elements of stratified-charge combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    Laser Doppler velocimetry has been used to make cycle-resolved velocity and turbulence measurements in a homogeneous-charge, spark-ignition engine. The engine had a ported intake and disc-shaped chamber with a compression ratio of 8 to 1. It was operated at a speed of 1200 rpm and with a TDC swirl number of 4. A stoichiometric propane-air mixture was used, and ignition was near the wall. The velocity measurements were made at three spatial locations at the midpoint of the clearance height. Tests were made to determine whether the presence of the flame affected the accuracy of the velocity measurements. It was found that the ensemble-averaged mean velocity shows a small deviation, and the rms fluctuation intensity is significantly influenced, but the effects appear to be confined to the flame zone. Data rates were sufficiently high in the preflame and postflame regions to determine the velocity history in each cycle (cycle resolved) . The cycle resolved turbulence intensity was found to increase across the flame. The turbulence intensity in the burned gas was found to be homogeneous at the three spatial locations examined and to decay rapidly. There was little or no increase in turbulence intensity ahead of the flame.

  13. A study of density modulation index in the inner heliospheric solar wind during solar cycle 23

    SciTech Connect

    Bisoi, Susanta Kumar; Janardhan, P.; Ingale, M.; Subramanian, P.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Tokumaru, M.; Fujiki, K. E-mail: jerry@prl.res.in E-mail: p.subramanian@iiserpune.ac.in E-mail: tokumaru@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2014-11-01

    The ratio of the rms electron density fluctuations to the background density in the solar wind (density modulation index, ? {sub N} ? ?N/N) is of vital importance for understanding several problems in heliospheric physics related to solar wind turbulence. In this paper, we have investigated the behavior of ? {sub N} in the inner heliosphere from 0.26 to 0.82 AU. The density fluctuations ?N have been deduced using extensive ground-based observations of interplanetary scintillation at 327 MHz, which probe spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers. The background densities (N) have been derived using near-Earth observations from the Advanced Composition Explorer. Our analysis reveals that 0.001 ? ? {sub N} ? 0.02 and does not vary appreciably with heliocentric distance. We also find that ? {sub N} declines by 8% from 1998 to 2008. We discuss the impact of these findings on problems ranging from our understanding of Forbush decreases to the behavior of the solar wind dynamic pressure over the recent peculiar solar minimum at the end of cycle 23.

  14. Spectral encoding method for measuring the relative arrival time between x-ray/optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bionta, M. R.; Hartmann, N.; Weaver, M.; French, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Bostedt, C.; Chollet, M.; Ding, Y.; Fritz, D. M.; Fry, A. R.; Krzywinski, J.; Lemke, H. T.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schorb, S.; Zhu, D.; White, W. E.; Nicholson, D. J.; Cryan, J. P.; Baker, K.; Kane, D. J.; and others

    2014-08-15

    The advent of few femtosecond x-ray light sources brings promise of x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments that can measure chemical and structural changes in the 10100 fs time regime. Widely distributed timing systems used at x-ray Free-Electron Laser facilities are typically limited to above 50 fs fwhm jitter in active x-ray/optical synchronization. The approach of single-shot timing measurements is used to sort results in the event processing stage. This has seen wide use to accommodate the insufficient precision of active stabilization schemes. In this article, we review the current technique for measure-and-sort at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The relative arrival time between an x-ray pulse and an optical pulse is measured near the experimental interaction region as a spectrally encoded cross-correlation signal. The cross-correlation provides a time-stamp for filter-and-sort algorithms used for real-time sorting. Sub-10 fs rms resolution is common in this technique, placing timing precision at the same scale as the duration of the shortest achievable x-ray pulses.

  15. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  16. TARGET AND HORN COOLING FOR THE VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    BELLAVIA, S.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; LUDEWIG, H.; RAPARIA, D.; SIMOS, N.

    2005-05-16

    Thermodynamic studies have been performed for the beam target and focusing horn system to be used in a very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment [1]. A 2mm rms beam spot with power deposition of over 18 KW presents challenging material and engineering solutions to this project. Given that the amount of heat transferred by radiation alone from the target to the horn is quite small, the primary mechanism is heat removal by forced convection in the annular space between the target and the horn. The key elements are the operating temperature of the target, the temperature of the cooling fluid and the heat generation rate in the volume of the target that needs to be removed. These working parameters establish the mass flow rate and velocity of the coolant necessary to remove the generated heat. Several cooling options were explored using a carbon-carbon target and aluminum horn. Detailed analysis, trade studies and simulations were performed for cooling the horn and target with gaseous helium as well as water.

  17. PROPERTIES OF UMBRAL DOTS FROM STRAY LIGHT CORRECTED HINODE FILTERGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, Rohan E.; Mathew, Shibu K.; Bayanna, A. Raja; Rubio, Luis R. Bellot; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ravindra, B.

    2012-06-20

    High-resolution blue continuum filtergrams from Hinode are employed to study the umbral fine structure of a regular unipolar sunspot. The removal of scattered light from the images increases the rms contrast by a factor of 1.45 on average. Improvement in image contrast renders identification of short filamentary structures resembling penumbrae that are well separated from the umbra-penumbra boundary and comprise bright filaments/grains flanking dark filaments. Such fine structures were recently detected from ground-based telescopes and have now been observed with Hinode. A multi-level tracking algorithm was used to identify umbral dots (UDs) in both the uncorrected and corrected images and to track them in time. The distribution of the values describing the photometric and geometric properties of UDs is more easily affected by the presence of stray light while it is less severe in the case of kinematic properties. Statistically, UDs exhibit a peak intensity, effective diameter, lifetime, horizontal speed, and a trajectory length of 0.29I{sub QS}, 272 km, 8.4 minutes, 0.45 km s{sup -1}, and 221 km, respectively. The 2 hr 20 minute time sequence depicts several locations where UDs tend to appear and disappear repeatedly with various time intervals. The correction for scattered light in the Hinode filtergrams facilitates photometry of umbral fine structure, which can be related to results obtained from larger telescopes and numerical simulations.

  18. Experimental investigation of 3-D turbulent free shear flow past propellers and windmills

    SciTech Connect

    Kotb, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flowfield region near a 0.49 m (1.615 ft), 3 bladed, horizontal axis rotor was conducted in the VPI 2 m x 2 m (6 ft x 6 ft) wind tunnel. Two different modes of operations were studied - propeller and windmill. For each case, tests were run with a uniform approach flow as a base line condition, and the main test series was run with a variable mesh wire grid upstream to produce an approach flow with an essentially linear velocity gradient. The results are compared to elucidate the effects of the non-uniform approach flow. Several types of measurements are reported. First are gross quantities such as overall thrust and power. The second type of measurements are mean (in the turbulence sense) quantities obtained with a five port yawhead tube. All three components of mean velocity and static pressure were obtained. The third type of measurements were made with an x-wire anemometer and an r.m.s. meter. These measurements yield all components of the turbulence intensities and stresses at a point averaged over many passes of the rotor blades.

  19. One-dimensional turbulence modeling of a turbulent counterflow flame with comparison to DNS

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jozefik, Zoltan; Kerstein, Alan R.; Schmidt, Heiko; Lyra, Sgouria; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jackie H.

    2015-06-01

    The one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is applied to a reactant-to-product counterflow configuration and results are compared with DNS data. The model employed herein solves conservation equations for momentum, energy, and species on a one dimensional (1D) domain corresponding to the line spanning the domain between nozzle orifice centers. The effects of turbulent mixing are modeled via a stochastic process, while the Kolmogorov and reactive length and time scales are explicitly resolved and a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used. Comparisons between model and DNS results for spatial mean and root-meansquare (RMS) velocity, temperature, and major and minor species profiles aremore » shown. The ODT approach shows qualitatively and quantitatively reasonable agreement with the DNS data. Scatter plots and statistics conditioned on temperature are also compared for heat release rate and all species. ODT is able to capture the range of results depicted by DNS. However, conditional statistics show signs of underignition.« less

  20. Investigation of load reduction for a variable speed, variable pitch, and variable coning wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, K.

    1997-12-31

    A two bladed, variable speed and variable pitch wind turbine was modeled using ADAMS{reg_sign} to evaluate load reduction abilities of a variable coning configuration as compared to a teetered rotor, and also to evaluate control methods. The basic dynamic behavior of the variable coning turbine was investigated and compared to the teetered rotor under constant wind conditions as well as turbulent wind conditions. Results indicate the variable coning rotor has larger flap oscillation amplitudes and much lower root flap bending moments than the teetered rotor. Three methods of control were evaluated for turbulent wind simulations. These were a standard IPD control method, a generalized predictive control method, and a bias estimate control method. Each control method was evaluated for both the variable coning configuration and the teetered configuration. The ability of the different control methods to maintain the rotor speed near the desired set point is evaluated from the RMS error of rotor speed. The activity of the control system is evaluated from cycles per second of the blade pitch angle. All three of the methods were found to produce similar results for the variable coning rotor and the teetered rotor, as well as similar results to each other.

  1. Electrical properties and surface morphology of electron beam evaporated p-type silicon thin films on polyethylene terephthalate for solar cells applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, P. C.; Ibrahim, K.; Pakhuruddin, M. Z.

    2015-04-24

    One way to realize low-cost thin film silicon (Si) solar cells fabrication is by depositing the films with high-deposition rate and manufacturing-compatible electron beam (e-beam) evaporation onto inexpensive foreign substrates such as glass or plastic. Most of the ongoing research is reported on e-beam evaporation of Si films on glass substrates to make polycrystalline solar cells but works combining both e-beam evaporation and plastic substrates are still scarce in the literature. This paper studies electrical properties and surface morphology of 1 µm electron beam evaporated Al-doped p-type silicon thin films on textured polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate for application as an absorber layer in solar cells. In this work, Si thin films with different doping concentrations (including an undoped reference) are prepared by e-beam evaporation. Energy dispersion X-ray (EDX) showed that the Si films are uniformly doped by Al dopant atoms. With increased Al/Si ratio, doping concentration increased while both resistivity and carrier mobility of the films showed opposite relationships. Root mean square (RMS) surface roughness increased. Overall, the Al-doped Si film with Al/Si ratio of 2% (doping concentration = 1.57×10{sup 16} atoms/cm{sup 3}) has been found to provide the optimum properties of a p-type absorber layer for fabrication of thin film Si solar cells on PET substrate.

  2. A proposed visible FEL Facility at Boeing

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Adamski, J.L.; Hayward, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    A 1-kW average power, visible wavelength FEL is described, based on a 120-MeV, 0.1. A macropulse average current linac operating at a duty factor of 0. 6% and having average beam power of 70 kW. The accelerator will employ a demonstrated photoinjector, 18-MeV, 433-MHz linac as an injector, followed by a 1300-MHz longitudinal phase space {open_quotes} linearizer,{close_quotes} a magnetic buncher chicane, and seven 1300-MHz, pulsed traveling wave linac sections. The magnets used to transport the beam from the linac to the FEL centerline, the 5-m THUNDER wiggler, and the optical resonator will be reclaimed from previous FEL demonstration experiments. We expect to attain pulse lengths of 7 ps for 3.5 nC, with minimal distortion of the pulse profile and normalized rms emittance of 7.5 {+-} 2.5 {pi} mm-mr. FELEX projects a laser conversion efficiency of 4.3 %, yielding average output of 3 kW.

  3. DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD RESONATOR ACCELERATOR MODULE

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-06

    Results are presented from experiments, and numerical analysis of wake fields set up by electron bunches passing through a cylindrical or rectangular dielectric-lined structure. These bunches excite many TM-modes, with Ez components of the wake fields sharply localized on the axis of the structure periodically behind the bunches. The experiment with the cylindrical structure, carried out at ATF Brookhaven National Laboratory, used up to three 50 MeV bunches spaced by one wake field period (21 cm) to study the superposition of wake fields by measuring the energy loss of each bunch after it passed through the 53-cm long dielectric element. The millimeter-wave spectrum of radiation excited by the passage of bunches is also studied. Numerical analysis was aimed not only to simulate the behavior of our device, but in general to predict dielectric wake field accelerator performance. It is shown that one needs to match the radius of the cylindrical dielectric channel with the bunch longitudinal rms-length to achieve optimal performance.

  4. DETECTION OF THE PULSAR WIND NEBULA HESS J1825-137 WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Grondin, M.-H.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Hinton, J. A.; Camilo, F.; Cognard, I.; Theureau, G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Guillemot, L.; Grove, J. E.; Johnston, S.; Possenti, A.; Skilton, J. L. E-mail: lemoine@cenbg.in2p3.fr E-mail: ave@stanford.edu

    2011-09-01

    We announce the discovery of 1-100 GeV gamma-ray emission from the archetypal TeV pulsar wind nebula (PWN) HESS J1825-137 using 20 months of survey data from the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT). The gamma-ray emission detected by the LAT is significantly spatially extended, with a best-fit rms extension of {sigma} = 0.{sup 0}56 {+-} 0.{sup 0}07 for an assumed Gaussian model. The 1-100 GeV LAT spectrum of this source is well described by a power law with a spectral index of 1.38 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.16 and an integral flux above 1 GeV of (6.50 {+-} 0.21 {+-} 3.90) x 10{sup -9} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The first errors represent the statistical errors on the fit parameters, while the second ones are the systematic uncertainties. Detailed morphological and spectral analyses bring new constraints on the energetics and magnetic field of the PWN system. The spatial extent and hard spectrum of the GeV emission are consistent with the picture of an inverse Compton origin of the GeV-TeV emission in a cooling-limited nebula powered by the pulsar PSR J1826-1334.

  5. Accurate determination of pair potentials for a C{sub w}H{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} system of molecules: A semiempirical method

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, M. van; Ree, F.H.; Haselman, L.C.

    1995-03-01

    Statistical mechanical chemical equilibrium calculations of the properties of high-pressure high-temperature reactive C,H,N,O mixtures are made to derive an accurate self-consistent set of inter-molecular potentials for the product molecules. Previous theoretical efforts to predict such properties relied in part on Corresponding States theory and shock wave data of argon. More recent high-pressure Hugoniot measurements on a number of elements and molecules allow more accurate determination of the potentials of these materials, and explicit inclusion of additional dissociation products. The present discussion briefly reviews the previous analysis and the method used to produce a self-consistent set of potentials from shock data on N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO, an N{sub 2} + O{sub 2} mixture, carbon, CO{sub 2}, and CO, as well as some simple explosive product mixtures from detonation of hexanitrobenzene, PETN, and a mixture of hydrazine nitrate, hydrazine and water. The results are tested using the data from an HMX explosive formulations. The effect of the non-equilibrium nature of carbon clusters is estimated using data for TNT as a standard to determine a nonequilibrium equation of state for carbon. The resulting parameter set is used in a survey of 27 explosives. For the subset that contains no fluorine or two-phase carbon effects the rms deviation from experimental detonation velocity is 1.2%.

  6. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SPECTROPHOTOMETRY AND MODELS FOR SOLAR ANALOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2010-04-15

    Absolute flux distributions for seven solar analog stars are measured from 0.3 to 2.5 {mu}m by Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectrophotometry. In order to predict the longer wavelength mid-IR fluxes that are required for James Webb Space Telescope calibration, the HST spectral energy distributions are fit with Castelli and Kurucz model atmospheres; and the results are compared with fits from the MARCS model grid. The rms residuals in 10 broadband bins are all <0.5% for the best fits from both model grids. However, the fits differ systematically: the MARCS fits are 40-100 K hotter in T {sub eff}, 0.25-0.80 higher in log g, 0.01-0.10 higher in log z, and 0.008-0.021 higher in the reddening E(B - V), probably because their specifications include different metal abundances. Despite these differences in the parameters of the fits, the predicted mid-IR fluxes differ by only {approx}1%; and the modeled flux distributions of these G stars have an estimated ensemble accuracy of 2% out to 30 {mu}m.

  7. Geometric correction and digital elevation extraction using multiple MTI datasets.

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Smith, Jody Lynn; Storey, James C.

    2004-08-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are traditionally acquired from a stereo pair of aerial photographs sequentially captured by an airborne metric camera. Standard DEM extraction techniques can be naturally extended to satellite imagery, but the particular characteristics of satellite imaging can cause difficulties. The spacecraft ephemeris with respect to the ground site during image collects is the most important factor in the elevation extraction process. When the angle of separation between the stereo images is small, the extraction process typically produces measurements with low accuracy, while a large angle of separation can cause an excessive number of erroneous points in the DEM from occlusion of ground areas. The use of three or more images registered to the same ground area can potentially reduce these problems and improve the accuracy of the extracted DEM. The pointing capability of some sensors, such as the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), allows for multiple collects of the same area from different perspectives. This functionality of MTI makes it a good candidate for the implementation of a DEM extraction algorithm using multiple images for improved accuracy. Evaluation of this capability and development of algorithms to geometrically model the MTI sensor and extract DEMs from multi-look MTI imagery are described in this paper. An RMS elevation error of 6.3-meters is achieved using 11 ground test points, while the MTI band has a 5-meter ground sample distance.

  8. A scaling relation of the evolving tidal fields in a ?CDM cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Springel, Volker, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: volker@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-01

    We report the finding of a scaling relation among the cosmic-web anisotropy parameter A, the linear density rms fluctuation ?(r) and the linear growth factor D(z). Using the tidal field derived from the Millennium Simulation on 512{sup 3} grids at z = 0,2,5 and 127, we calculate the largest eigenvalues ? of the local tidal tensor at each grid resolution and measure its distance-averaged two-point correlation function, ?{sub ?}, as a function of the cosines of polar angles cos ? in the local principal axis frame. We show that ?{sub ?} is quite anisotropic, increasing toward the directions of minimal matter compression, and that the anisotropy of ?{sub ?} increases as the redshift z decreases and as the upper distance cutoff r{sub c} decreases. Fitting the numerical results to an analytic fitting model ?{sub ?}(cos ?)?(1+Acos {sup n}?){sup ?1}, it is found that the best fit value of A, dubbed the cosmic-web anisotropy parameter, varies systematically with ?(r{sub c}) and D(z), allowing us to determine the simple empiral scaling relation A(r{sub c},z) = 0.8 D{sup 0.76}(z) ?(r{sub c})

  9. Design, conditioning, and performance of a high voltage, high brightness dc photoelectron gun with variable gap

    SciTech Connect

    Maxson, Jared; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Dobbins, John; Liu, Xianghong; Smolenski, Karl

    2014-09-15

    A new high voltage photoemission gun has been constructed at Cornell University which features a segmented insulator and a movable anode, allowing the cathode-anode gap to be adjusted. In this work, we describe the gun's overall mechanical and high voltage design, the surface preparation of components, as well as the clean construction methods. We present high voltage conditioning data using a 50 mm cathode-anode gap, in which the conditioning voltage exceeds 500 kV, as well as at smaller gaps. Finally, we present simulated emittance results obtained from a genetic optimization scheme using voltage values based on the conditioning data. These results indicate that for charges up to 100 pC, a 30 mm gap at 400 kV has equal or smaller 100% emittance than a 50 mm gap at 450 kV, and also a smaller core emittance, when placed as the source for the Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector with bunch length constrained to be <3 ps rms. For 100 pC up to 0.5 nC charges, the 50 mm gap has larger core emittance than the 30 mm gap, but conversely smaller 100% emittance.

  10. Femtosecond time-resolved MeV electron diffraction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhu, Pengfei; Zhu, Y.; Hidaka, Y.; Wu, L.; Cao, J.; Berger, H.; Geck, J.; Kraus, R.; Pjerov, S.; Shen, Y.; et al

    2015-06-02

    We report the experimental demonstration of femtosecond electron diffraction using high-brightness MeV electron beams. High-quality, single-shot electron diffraction patterns for both polycrystalline aluminum and single-crystal 1T-TaS2 are obtained utilizing a 5 fC (~3 × 104 electrons) pulse of electrons at 2.8 MeV. The high quality of the electron diffraction patterns confirms that electron beam has a normalized emittance of ~50 nm rad. The transverse and longitudinal coherence length is ~11 and ~2.5 nm, respectively. The timing jitter between the pump laser and probe electron beam was found to be ~100 fs (rms). The temporal resolution is demonstrated by observing themore » evolution of Bragg and superlattice peaks of 1T-TaS2 following an 800 nm optical pump and was found to be 130 fs. Lastly, our results demonstrate the advantages of MeV electrons, including large elastic differential scattering cross-section and access to high-order reflections, and the feasibility of ultimately realizing below 10 fs time-resolved electron diffraction.« less

  11. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Yee, H.K.C.; Lin, H.; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  12. Omega-X micromachining system

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Donald M.

    1978-01-01

    A micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nonometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS. The omega axis, named for the angular measurement of the rotation of an eccentric mechanism supporting one end of a tool bar, enables the pulse increments of the tool toward the workpiece to be as little as 0 to 4.4 nm. A dedicated computer coordinates motion in the two axes to produce the workpiece contour. Inertia is reduced by reducing the mass pulsed toward the workpiece to about one-fifth of its former value. The tool system includes calibration instruments to calibrate the micromachining tool system. Backlash is reduced and flexing decreased by using a rotary table and servomotor to pulse the tool in the omega-axis instead of a ball screw mechanism. A thermally-stabilized spindle rotates the workpiece and is driven by a motor not mounted on the micromachining tool base through a torque-smoothing pulley and vibrationless rotary coupling. Abbe offset errors are almost eliminated by tool setting and calibration at spindle center height. Tool contour and workpiece contour are gaged on the machine; this enables the source of machining errors to be determined more readily, because the workpiece is gaged before its shape can be changed by removal from the machine.

  13. Longitudinal Space Charge Effect in Slowly Converging/Diverging Relativistic Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    2002-07-22

    Beginning with the Green function for a rod beam in a round beam pipe we derive the space charge induced average energy change and rms spread for relativistic beams that are slowly converging or diverging in round beam pipes, a result that tends to be much larger than the 1/{gamma}{sup 2} dependence for parallel beams. Our results allow for beams with longitudinal-transverse correlation, and for slow variations in beam pipe radius. We calculate, in addition, the space charge component of energy change and spread in a chicane compressor. This component indicates source regions of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) energy change in systems with compression. We find that this component, at the end of example compressors, approximates the total induced voltage obtained by more detailed CSR calculations. Our results depend on beam pipe radius (although only weakly) whereas CSR calculations do not normally include this parameter, suggesting that results of such calculations, for systems with beam pipes, are not complete.

  14. The Genesis Mission: Solar Wind Conditions, and Implications for the FIP Fractionation of the Solar Wind.

    SciTech Connect

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Wiens, R. C.; Barraclough, B. L.; Steinberg, J. T; Dekoning, C. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Genesis mission collected solar wind on ultrapure materials between November 30, 2001 and April 1, 2004. The samples were returned to Earth September 8, 2004. Despite the hard landing that resulted from a failure of the avionics to deploy the parachute, many samples were returned in a condition that will permit analyses. Sample analyses of these samples should give a far better understanding of the solar elemental and isotopic composition (Burnett et al. 2003). Further, the photospheric composition is thought to be representative of the solar nebula, so that the Genesis mission will provide a new baseline for the average solar nebula composition with which to compare present-day compositions of planets, meteorites, and asteroids. Sample analysis is currently underway. The Genesis samples must be placed in the context of the solar and solar wind conditions under which they were collected. Solar wind is fractionated from the photosphere by the forces that accelerate the ions off of the Sun. This fractionation appears to be ordered by the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements, with the tendency for low-FIP elements to be over-abundant in the solar wind relative to the photosphere, and high-FIP elements to be under-abundant (e.g. Geiss, 1982; von Steiger et al., 2000). In addition, the extent of elemental fractionation differs across different solarwind regimes. Therefore, Genesis collected solar wind samples sorted into three regimes: 'fast wind' or 'coronal hole' (CH), 'slow wind' or 'interstream' (IS), and 'coronal mass ejection' (CME). To carry this out, plasma ion and electron spectrometers (Barraclough et al., 2003) continuously monitored the solar wind proton density, velocity, temperature, the alpha/proton ratio, and angular distribution of suprathermal electrons, and those parameters were in turn used in a rule-based algorithm that assigned the most probable solar wind regime (Neugebauer et al., 2003). At any given time, only one of three

  15. Study on the well-posedness, convergence and the stability of the semi-implicit upwind numerical solver for the multi-fluid model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Park, C. E.; Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M.; Ransom, V. H.

    2012-07-01

    The well-posedness, convergence and the stability of the two-fluid code has been studied for a long time. Most of the investigations concern the semi-implicit upwind solution scheme for the six equation two-fluid model such as used in RELAP5 3 or TRACE 21. Since the system code, SPACE 2, adopts one more field, a droplet field, it consists of nine equations (3 mass, 3 momentum and 3 energy balance equations) and thus more involved investigations are necessary to confirm the stability and convergence. For this objective, the old issue of the well-posedness, convergence and the stability is revisited and some general guidelines to develop a well-posed numerical multi-fluid model are derived as follows; (1) Hyperbolicity of the corresponding system of partial differential equations is not a necessary condition for the development of a numerical model for multi-phase flow, but whether or not it is hyperbolic can provide guidance relative to initial conditions, boundary conditions, and expected high frequency behavior of the model. (2) A necessary condition for a well-posed numerical model is stability in the von Neumann sense, i.e. growth factor less than 1.0 for the shortest wave-length, 2{Delta}x. (3) The smallest node size used for convergence studies should be of the order of the characteristic dimension of the average description, i.e. smaller nodes can be used so long as they do not result in unphysical growth of wave-lengths less than the characteristic dimension. The usual mathematical definition of convergence i.e. the behavior of the solution as the node size approaches zero, is not appropriate for the discrete averaged numerical model, since there is diminished physical meaning to behavior at wavelengths less than the characteristic dimension of the average description. Under these guidelines, dispersion analysis and von Neumann stability analysis are performed for the three field multi-fluid, semi-implicit, upwind numerical model to show that the necessary

  16. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above

  17. Structure in the Proton and the Neutron

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Hofstadter, R.

    1958-06-01

    A survey of the recent work on the structures of the proton and the neutron carried out by high-energy electron-scattering methods is presented. Early work established finite size effects in the proton and led to information about the charge and magnetic density distributions in the proton. The rms size was established to be close to (0.77 plus or minus 0.10) x 10{sup -13} cm, and the density distributions of charge and anomalous magnetic moment were shown to be approximately of the same shape. The form factors could be described in terms of several alternative models given, for example, by an exponential, gaussian, hollow exponential, hollow gaussian, etc., distribution of densities. Many other shapes were excluded by the experimental data. Recent work by Bumiller and Hofstadter now fixes one among these models that is appropriate to the proton and provides an extremely good fit at all angles between energies of 200 and 650 Mev. The new evidence clearly favors the exponential model with rms radius (0.80 plus or minus 0.04) 10{sup -13} cm. Recent studies of the proton have attempted to answer the question: how closely similar are the charge and magnetic form factors? This work now shows that the distributions have the same sizes and shapes to within 10 per cent, and each distribution is given very closely by the exponential model described above with radius (0.80 plus or minus 0.04) x 10{sup -13}. Certain other similar models will be discussed. Early work on the inelastic continuum in the deuteron established that the neutron's magnetic structure was extended and not a point. It was further shown that the neutron's size was approximately the same as that of the proton. This work has recently been extended by Yearian and Hofstadter to a determination of the variation of the neutron's magnetic form factor over the range where the proton's form factor is known. The new results show: (1) the neutron is not a point, (2) the neutron's magnetic structure has a size lying

  18. An externally and internally deformable, programmable lung motion phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit

    2015-05-15

    .25 mm RMS error. The motion trajectories of internal and external radio-opaque markers as measured by fluoroscopy were found to be highly correlated (R > 0.95). Using the phantom, it was demonstrated that the motion trajectories of regions-of-interest on the surface as measured by VisionRT are highly consistent with corresponding fluoroscopically acquired surface marker trajectories, with RMS errors within 0.26 mm. Furthermore, it was shown that the trajectories of external and internal marker trajectories derived from NiftyReg deformation vector fields were within 1 mm root mean square errors comparing to trajectories obtained by segmenting markers from individual fluoro frames. Finally, it was shown that while 4DCT can be used to localize internal markers for sinusoidal motion with reasonable accuracy, the localization error increases significantly (by a factor of ∼2) in the presence of cycle-to-cycle variations that are observed in patient-derived respiratory motion. Conclusions: The authors have developed a realistic externally and internally deformable, programmable lung phantom that will serve as a valuable tool for clinical and investigational motion management studies in thoracic and abdominal radiation therapies.

  19. The Milky Way Tomography with SDSS. 2. Stellar Metallicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ivezic, Zeljko; Sesar, Branimir; Juric, Mario; Bond, Nicholas; Dalcanton, Julianne; Rockosi, Constance M.; Yanny, Brian; Newberg, Heidi J.; Beers, Timothy C.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Wilhelm, Ron; /Texas Tech. /Michigan State U.

    2008-04-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is producing a massive spectroscopic database which already contains over 280,000 stellar spectra. Using effective temperature and metallicity derived from SDSS spectra for {approx}60,000 F and G type main sequence stars (0.2 < g-r < 0.6), we develop polynomial models, reminiscent of traditional methods based on the UBV photometry, for estimating these parameters from the SDSS u-g and g-r colors. These estimators reproduce SDSS spectroscopic parameters with a root-mean-square scatter of 100 K for effective temperature, and 0.2 dex for metallicity (limited by photometric errors), which are similar to random and systematic uncertainties in spectroscopic determinations. We apply this method to a photometric catalog of coadded SDSS observations and study the photometric metallicity distribution of {approx}200,000 F and G type stars observed in 300 deg{sup 2} of high Galactic latitude sky. These deeper (g < 20.5) and photometrically precise ({approx}0.01 mag) coadded data enable an accurate measurement of the unbiased metallicity distribution for a complete volume-limited sample of stars at distances between 500 pc and 8 kpc. The metallicity distribution can be exquisitely modeled using two components with a spatially varying number ratio, that correspond to disk and halo. The best-fit number ratio of the two components is consistent with that implied by the decomposition of stellar counts profiles into exponential disk and power-law halo components by Juric et al. (2008). The two components also possess the kinematics expected for disk and halo stars. The metallicity of the halo component can be modeled as a spatially invariant Gaussian distribution with a mean of [Fe/H] = -1.46 and a standard deviation of {approx}0.3 dex. The disk metallicity distribution is non-Gaussian, with a remarkably small scatter (rms {approx}0.16 dex) and the median smoothly decreasing with distance

  20. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  1. Stellar kinematics and metallicities in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum II

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J. D.

    2015-07-23

    With this study, we present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of $62.8\\pm 0.5\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion of $3.3\\pm 0.7\\;\\mathrm{km}\\;{{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is $470\\pm 210\\ {M}_{\\odot }/{L}_{\\odot }$, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 $\\mathrm{km}\\ {{\\rm{s}}}^{-1}$, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3$. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of ${\\rm{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65\\pm 0.07$, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is ${\\mathrm{log}}_{10}(J)=18.8\\pm 0.6\\;\\;\\mathrm{GeV}{\\;}^{2}\\;{\\mathrm{cm}}^{-5}\\;$ within 0fdg2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies.

  2. The copper-pumped dye laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, R.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-12

    The Atomic Vapor Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program has developed a high-average-power, pulsed, tunable, visible laser system. Testing of this hardware is in progress at industrial scales. The copper-dye Laser system is prototypical of a basic module of a uranium-AVLIS plant The laser demonstration facility (LDF) system consists of copper vapor lasers arranged in oscillator-amplifier chains providing optical pump power to dye-laser master-oscillator-power-amplifier chains. This system is capable of thousands of watts (average) tunable between 550 and 650 mm. The copper laser system consists of 12 chains operating continuously. The copper lasers operate at nominally 4.4 kHz, with 50 ns pulse widths and produce 20 W at near the diffraction limit from oscillators and >250 W from each amplifier. Chains consist of an oscillator and three amplifiers and produce >750 W average, with availabilities >95% (i.e., >8300 h/y). The total copper laser system power averages {approximately}9000 W and has operated at over 10,000 W for extended intervals. The 12 copper laser beams are multiplexed and delivered to the dye laser system where they pump multiple dye laser chains. Each dye chain consists of a master oscillator and three or four power amplifiers. The master oscillator operates at nominally 100 mW with a 50 MHz single mode bandwidth. Sustained dye chain powers are up to 1400 W with dye conversion efficiency >50%, ASE content <5%, and wavefront quality correctable to <{lambda}/10 RMS, using deformable mirrors. The dye laser system is capable of repetition rates which are multiples of 4.4 kHz, up to 26 kHz.

  3. The copper-pumped dye laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, R.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-12

    The Atomic Vapor Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program has developed a high-average-power, pulsed, tunable, visible laser system. Testing of this hardware is in progress at industrial scales. The copper-dye Laser system is prototypical of a basic module of a uranium-AVLIS plant The laser demonstration facility (LDF) system consists of copper vapor lasers arranged in oscillator-amplifier chains providing optical pump power to dye-laser master-oscillator-power-amplifier chains. This system is capable of thousands of watts (average) tunable between 550 and 650 mm. The copper laser system consists of 12 chains operating continuously. The copper lasers operate at nominally 4.4 kHz, with 50 ns pulse widths and produce 20 W at near the diffraction limit from oscillators and >250 W from each amplifier. Chains consist of an oscillator and three amplifiers and produce >750 W average, with availabilities >95% (i.e., >8300 h/y). The total copper laser system power averages [approximately]9000 W and has operated at over 10,000 W for extended intervals. The 12 copper laser beams are multiplexed and delivered to the dye laser system where they pump multiple dye laser chains. Each dye chain consists of a master oscillator and three or four power amplifiers. The master oscillator operates at nominally 100 mW with a 50 MHz single mode bandwidth. Sustained dye chain powers are up to 1400 W with dye conversion efficiency >50%, ASE content <5%, and wavefront quality correctable to <[lambda]/10 RMS, using deformable mirrors. The dye laser system is capable of repetition rates which are multiples of 4.4 kHz, up to 26 kHz.

  4. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 215

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Balraj; Mukherjee, Gopal; Abriola, Daniel; Basu, Swapan Kumar; Demetriou, Paraskevi; Jain, Ashok; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, Sukhjeet; Tuli, Jagdish

    2013-12-15

    The evaluated spectroscopic data are presented for 12 known nuclides of mass 215 (Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Po, At, Rn, Fr, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa). For {sup 215}Hg, {sup 215}Tl, {sup 215}Pb, and {sup 215}Pa nuclei, no excited states are known. The decay characteristics of {sup 215}Hg and {sup 215}Tl are unknown. The decay scheme of {sup 215}Pb is considered as incomplete. Ordering of γ cascades in the decay of 36.9–s isomer of {sup 215}Bi and for high–spin states above 2251 keV in {sup 215}Fr are not established. High–spin excitations, including several isomeric states, are well known in {sup 215}Bi, {sup 215}Po, {sup 215}Rn, {sup 215}Fr, {sup 215}Ra, and {sup 215}Ac. No particle–transfer reaction data are available for any of the A=215 nuclei. The rms charge radii for {sup 215}Pb, {sup 215}Bi, {sup 215}Po, {sup 215}Rn, {sup 215}Fr and {sup 215}Ra have been evaluated by Daniel Abriola, from extrapolation or interpolation of available evaluated data in 2013An02 for radii of respective Z chains using formula 9 in 2004An14. This evaluation was carried out as part of ENSDD–workshop at VECC, Kolkata for Nuclear Structure and Decay Data, organized and hosted by VECC and Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS) in Kolkata, India, November 26–29, 2012. This work supersedes the previous A = 215 evaluation (2001Br31) published by E. Browne which covered literature prior to May 2001.

  5. Key Laser Technologies for X-Ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Kaertner, Franz

    2013-08-31

    In the final project period, we demonstrated sub femtosecond timing distribution over a 1.2 km polarization-maintaining (PM) fiber-optic link using balanced optical cross-correlators (BOCs) for link stabilization. By eliminating polarization mode dispersion, link operation for 16 days maintained 0.6 fs RMS timing drift and during a 3-day interval only 0.13 fs drift, which corresponds to a stability level of 10-21. To improve the overall system efficiency and robustness, we developed fiber-coupled, hybrid-integrated BOCs using waveguides in periodically-poled KTiOPO4 (PPKTP). The measured second-harmonic conversion efficiency in the waveguides is a factor of 50 higher than that of bulk-optic crystals. Characterization of 1st-generation devices shows performance comparable to free-space BOCs, with the potential for significant improvement in future devices. For optical-to-RF conversion, we developed two balanced optical-microwave phase detectors (BOM-PD) based on the Sagnac and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF extraction using BOM-PDs in phase-locked loops yielded sub-10-fs residual timing jitter for locking bandwidths on the order of several hundred kHz. Finally, we characterized the timing jitter of ultralow-noise Ti:Sapphire oscillators, demonstrating an unprecedented 13 as of jitter integrated over the entire Nyquist band. Our measurements agreed well with theory, confirming our models for quantum-limited laser noise. Measurements of commercially available solid-state lasers at 1550 nm showed that there are laser sources already available with sufficiently low noise to achieve sub-femtosecond performance as master oscillators within a timing distribution system.

  6. Monitoring of vibrating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Uhrig, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The primary source of vibration in complex engineering systems is rotating machinery. Vibration signatures collected from these components render valuable information about the operational state of the system and may be used to perform diagnostics. For example, the low frequency domain contains information about unbalance, misalignment, instability in journal bearing and mechanical looseness; analysis of the medium frequency range can render information about faults in meshing gear teeth; while the high frequency domain will contain information about incipient faults in rolling-element bearings. Trend analysis may be performed by comparing the vibration spectrum for each machine with a reference spectrum and evaluating the vibration magnitude changes at different frequencies. This form of analysis for diagnostics is often performed by maintenance personnel monitoring and recording transducer signals and analyzing the signals to identify the operating condition of the machine. With the advent of portable fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers and laptop'' computers, it is possible to collect and analyze vibration data an site and detect incipient failures several weeks or months before repair is necessary. It is often possible to estimate the remaining life of certain systems once a fault has been detected. RMS velocity, acceleration, displacements, peak value, and crest factor readings can be collected from vibration sensors. To exploit all the information embedded in these signals, a robust and advanced analysis technique is required. Our goal is to design a diagnostic system using neural network technology, a system such as this would automate the interpretation of vibration data coming from plant-wide machinery and permit efficient on-line monitoring of these components.

  7. Monitoring of vibrating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E. |

    1991-12-31

    The primary source of vibration in complex engineering systems is rotating machinery. Vibration signatures collected from these components render valuable information about the operational state of the system and may be used to perform diagnostics. For example, the low frequency domain contains information about unbalance, misalignment, instability in journal bearing and mechanical looseness; analysis of the medium frequency range can render information about faults in meshing gear teeth; while the high frequency domain will contain information about incipient faults in rolling-element bearings. Trend analysis may be performed by comparing the vibration spectrum for each machine with a reference spectrum and evaluating the vibration magnitude changes at different frequencies. This form of analysis for diagnostics is often performed by maintenance personnel monitoring and recording transducer signals and analyzing the signals to identify the operating condition of the machine. With the advent of portable fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers and ``laptop`` computers, it is possible to collect and analyze vibration data an site and detect incipient failures several weeks or months before repair is necessary. It is often possible to estimate the remaining life of certain systems once a fault has been detected. RMS velocity, acceleration, displacements, peak value, and crest factor readings can be collected from vibration sensors. To exploit all the information embedded in these signals, a robust and advanced analysis technique is required. Our goal is to design a diagnostic system using neural network technology, a system such as this would automate the interpretation of vibration data coming from plant-wide machinery and permit efficient on-line monitoring of these components.

  8. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO{sub 2} with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Biraud, S. C.; Nassar, R.; Jones, D. B.A.; Olsen, E. T.; Osterman, G. B.

    2012-02-01

    Comparisons are made between mid-tropospheric Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) satellite measurements and ocean profiles from three Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns and land aircraft profiles from the United States Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site over a 4-yr period. These comparisons are used to characterize the bias in the TES CO{sub 2} estimates and to assess whether calculated and actual uncertainties and sensitivities are consistent. The HIPPO dataset is one of the few datasets spanning the altitude range where TES CO{sub 2} estimates are sensitive, which is especially important for characterization of biases. We find that TES CO{sub 2} estimates capture the seasonal and latitudinal gradients observed by HIPPO CO{sub 2} measurements; actual errors range from 0.8–1.2 ppm, depending on the campaign, and are approximately 1.4 times larger than the predicted errors. The bias of TES versus HIPPO is within 0.85 ppm for each of the 3 campaigns; however several of the sub-tropical TES CO{sub 2} estimates are lower than expected based on the calculated errors. Comparisons of aircraft flask profiles, which are measured from the surface to 5 km, to TES CO{sub 2} at the SGP ARM site show good agreement with an overall bias of 0.1 ppm and rms of 1.0 ppm. We also find that the predicted sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} estimates is too high, which results from using a multi-step retrieval for CO{sub 2} and temperature. We find that the averaging kernel in the TES product corrected by a pressure-dependent factor accurately reflects the sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} product.

  9. Pulsed-Laser Deposited Amorphous Diamond and Related Materials: Synthesis, Characterization, and Field Emission Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Geohegan, D.B.; Jellison, G.E., Jr.; Lowndes, D.H.; Merkulov, V.I.; Puretzky, A.A.

    1999-01-23

    Amorphous carbon films with variable sp{sup 3} content were produced by ArF (193nm) pulsed laser deposition. An in-situ ion probe was used to measure kinetic energy of C{sup +} ions. In contrast to measurements made as a function of laser fluence, ion probe measurements of kinetic energy are a convenient as well as more accurate and fundamental method for monitoring deposition conditions, with the advantage of being readily transferable for inter-laboratory comparisons. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements reveal that tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with the most diamond-like properties are obtained at the C ion kinetic energy of {approximately}90 eV. Film properties are uniform within a 12-15{degree} angle from the plume centerline. Tapping-mode atomic force microscope measurements show that films deposited at near-optimum kinetic energy are extremely smooth, with rms roughness of only {approximately} 1 {angstrom} over distances of several hundred nm. Field emission (FE) measurements show that ta-C does not appear to be a good electron emitter. After conditioning of ta-C films deposited on n-type Si a rather high turn-on voltage of {approximately}50 V/{micro}m was required to draw current of {approximately}1 nA to the probe. The emission was unstable and typically ceased after a few minutes of operation. The FE tests of ta-C and other materials strongly suggest that surface morphology plays a dominant role in the FE process, in agreement with conventional Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  10. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: project overview with analysis of dense gas structure and kinematics in Barnard 1

    SciTech Connect

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Lee, Katherine I.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Gong, Hao; Fernndez-Lpez, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Hctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L.; Ostriker, Eve C.; Volgenau, Nikolaus H.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Tobin, John J.; Kwon, Woojin; Isella, Andrea; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), while focusing on observations of Barnard 1. CLASSy is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, and HCN (J = 1 ? 0 transitions) across over 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. The observations have angular resolution near 7'' and spectral resolution near 0.16 km s{sup 1}. We imaged ?150 square arcminutes of Barnard 1, focusing on the main core, and the B1 Ridge and clumps to its southwest. N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows the strongest emission, with morphology similar to cool dust in the region, while HCO{sup +} and HCN trace several molecular outflows from a collection of protostars in the main core. We identify a range of kinematic complexity, with N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity dispersions ranging from ?0.05 to 0.50 km s{sup 1} across the field. Simultaneous continuum mapping at 3 mm reveals six compact object detections, three of which are new detections. A new, non-binary dendrogram algorithm is used to analyze dense gas structures in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} position-position-velocity (PPV) cube. The projected sizes of dendrogram-identified structures range from about 0.01 to 0.34 pc. Size-linewidth relations using those structures show that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with projected size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity rises steeply with projected size. Comparing these relations, we propose that all dense gas structures in Barnard 1 have comparable depths into the sky, around 0.1-0.2 pc; this suggests that overdense, parsec-scale regions within molecular clouds are better described as flattened structures rather than spherical collections of gas. Science-ready PPV cubes for Barnard 1 molecular emission are available for download.

  11. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  12. Regionalization and calibration of seismic discriminants, path effects and signal-to-noise for station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A.J.; Walter, W.R.

    1997-07-01

    We report measurements and analysis of regional seismic phase amplitude ratios and signal-to-noise for earthquakes observed at the International Monitoring System primary station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan). We measured noise and phase amplitudes of the regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg in four frequency bands between 0.75-9.0 Hz. Measurements were made in both the time and frequency domains. The spatial variation of amplitude ratios (e.g., Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg, Pn/Sn, Pg/Sn) and signal-to-noise (phase/noise) reveal significant path effect differences between the Hindu Kush, Kazahk Platform, Iranian Plateau and Caspian Sea. In order to represent this behavior, we have investigated several techniques for characterizing the data. These techniques are: 1) correlation with along-path distance and waveguide properties; 2) sector analysis; and 3) spatial averaging. Along-path waveguide properties, such as mean elevation and rms topographic slope are found to be the strongest factors related to Pg/Lg amplitude ratios at the lowest frequencies (<3.0 Hz). Other path properties such as mean crustal thickness and basement depth are not strongly correlated with Pg/Lg ratios. For sector analysis we divided the data into four (4) azimuthal sectors and characterized the data within each sector by a distance trend. Sectors were chosen based on the behavior of Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg and Pn/Sn amplitude ratios as well as topographic and tectonic character. Results reveal significant reduction (up to a factor of two) in the scatter of the Pn/Lg and Pg/Lg amplitude ratios for the sectorized data compared to the entire data set from all azimuths. Spatial averaging involves smoothing and interpolation for the ratios projected at the event location. Methods such as cap averaging and kriging will be presented at the meeting. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  13. CO (3 – 2) HIGH-RESOLUTION SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC PLANE: R1

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, J. T.; Thomas, H. S.; Currie, M. J. E-mail: h.thomas@jach.hawaii.edu

    2013-11-01

    We present the first release (R1) of data from the CO High-Resolution Survey (COHRS), which maps a strip of the inner Galactic plane in {sup 12}CO (J = 3 → 2). The data are taken using the Heterodyne Array Receiver Programme on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii, which has a 14 arcsec angular resolution at this frequency. When complete, this survey will cover |b| ≤ 0.°5 between 10° < l < 65°. This first release covers |b| ≤ 0.°5 between 10.°25 < l < 17.°5 and 50.°25 < l < 55.°25, and |b| ≤ 0.°25 between 17.°5 < l < 50.°25. The data are smoothed to a velocity resolution of 1 km s{sup –1}, a spatial resolution of 16 arcsec and achieve a mean rms of ∼1 K. COHRS data are available to the community online at http://dx.doi.org/10.11570/13.0002. In this paper we describe the data acquisition and reduction techniques used and present integrated intensity images and longitude-velocity maps. We also discuss the noise characteristics of the data. The high resolution is a powerful tool for morphological studies of bubbles and filaments while the velocity information shows the spiral arms and outflows. These data are intended to complement both existing and upcoming surveys, e.g., the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), ATLASGAL, the Herschel Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-GAL) and the JCMT Galactic Plane Survey with SCUBA-2 (JPS)

  14. Influence of microstructural changes due to tempering at 923 K and 1,023 K on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior in normalized 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, B.; Moorthy, V.; Vaidyanathan, S.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis has been used to characterize the microstructural changes in normalized and tempered 2.25 Cr-1Mo steel. It is observed that tempering at 923 K shows a single peak behavior up to 20 h and tempering at 1,023 K shows a two peak behavior. This has been explained on the basis of the two stage process of irreversible domain wall movement during magnetization, associated with two major obstacles to domain wall movement: namely lath/grain boundaries and secondary phase precipitates. At lower fields, existing reverse domain walls at lath/grain boundaries overcome the resistance offered by the grain boundaries and move to a distance before they are pined by the precipitates. Then, at higher field, they overcome these precipitates. These two processes occur over a range of critical field strengths with some mean values. If these two mean values are close to each other, then a single peak in the rms voltage of the magnetic Barkhausen noise, with the associated changes in its shape, is observed. On the other hand, if the mean values of the critical fields for these two barriers are widely separated, then a two peak behavior is the clear possibility. The effect of the microstructural changes due to tempering for different durations at 923 K and 1,023 K in 2.25 Cr-1Mo ferritic steel on magnetic Barkhausen noise is explained based on these two stage processes. The influence of high dislocation density in bainitic structure, dissociation of bainite, and precipitation of different carbides such as Fe{sub 3}C, Mo{sub 2}C, Cr{sub 7}Ce{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, etc., on magnetic Barkhausen noise behavior has been analyzed in this study.

  15. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, ?{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with ?{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at ?{sub p,} {sub l} = ?{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For ?{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with ?{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with ?{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ? ?{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  16. The Effect of Radiation Timing on Patients With High-Risk Features of Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: An Analysis of IRS-IV and D9803

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, Aaron C.; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Anderson, James R.; Lyden, Elizabeth; Laurie, Fran; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Arndt, Carola A.S.; Michalski, Jeff M.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy remains an essential treatment for patients with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PMRMS), and early radiation therapy may improve local control for patients with intracranial extension (ICE). Methods and Materials: To address the role of radiation therapy timing in PMRMS in the current era, we reviewed the outcome from 2 recent clinical trials for intermediate-risk RMS: Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS)-IV and Children's Oncology Group (COG) D9803. The PMRMS patients on IRS-IV with any high-risk features (cranial nerve palsy [CNP], cranial base bony erosion [CBBE], or ICE) were treated immediately at day 0, and PMRMS patients without any of these 3 features received week 6-9 radiation therapy. The D9803 PMRMS patients with ICE received day 0 X-Ray Therapy (XRT) as well; however, those with either CNP or CBBE had XRT at week 12. Results: Compared with the 198 PMRMS patients from IRS-IV, the 192 PMRMS patients from D9803 had no difference (P<.05) in 5-year local failure (19% vs 19%), failure-free-survival (70% vs 67%), or overall survival (75% vs 73%) in aggregate. The 5-year local failure rates by subset did not differ when patients were classified as having no risk features (None, 15% vs 19%, P=.25), cranial nerve palsy/cranial base of skull erosion (CNP/CBBE, 15% vs 28%, P=.22), or intracranial extension (ICE, 21% vs 15%, P=.27). The D9083 patients were more likely to have received initial staging by magnetic resonance imaging (71% vs 53%). Conclusions: These data support that a delay in radiation therapy for high-risk PMRMS features of CNP/CBBE does not compromise clinical outcomes.

  17. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.

  18. Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    M.K. Shukla; K. Lorenz; R. Lal

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 1994 (R94-F), in 1987 (R87-G), in 1982 (R82-F), in 1978 (R78-G), in 1969 (R69-F), in1956 (R56-G), and from the unmined control (UMS-G). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and three under forest cover since reclamation. The samples were air dried and fractionated using a wet sieving technique into macro (> 2.0 mm), meso (0.25-2.0 mm) and microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm). The soil C and N concentrations were determined by the dry combustion method on these aggregate fractions. Soil C and N concentrations were higher at the forest sites compared to the grass sites in each aggregate fraction for both depths. Statistical analyses indicated that the number of random samples taken was probably not sufficient to properly consider distribution of SOC and TN concentrations in aggregate size fractions for both depths at each site. Erosional effects on SOC and TN concentrations were, however, small. With increasing time since reclamation, SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations also increased. The higher C and N concentrations in each aggregate size fraction in older than the newly reclaimed sites demonstrated the C sink capacity of newer sites.

  19. PIV, 2D-LIF and 1D-Raman measurements of flow field, composition and temperature in premixed gas turbine flames

    SciTech Connect

    Stopper, U.; Aigner, M.; Ax, H.; Meier, W.; Sadanandan, R.; Stoehr, M.; Bonaldo, A.

    2010-04-15

    Several laser diagnostic measurement techniques have been applied to study the lean premixed natural gas/air flames of an industrial swirl burner. This was made possible by equipping the burner with an optical combustion chamber that was installed in the high-pressure test rig facility at the DLR Institute of Combustion Technology in Stuttgart. The burner was operated with preheated air at various operating conditions with pressures up to p = 6 bar and a maximum thermal power of P = 1 MW. The instantaneous planar flow field inside the combustor was studied with particle image velocimetry (PIV). Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals on a single-shot basis was used to determine the shape and the location of the flame front as well as the spatial distribution of reaction products. 1D laser Raman spectroscopy was successfully applied for the measurement of the temperature and the concentration of major species under realistic gas turbine conditions. Results of the flow field analysis show the shape and the size of the main flow regimes: the inflow region, the inner and the outer recirculation zone. The highly turbulent flow field of the inner shear layer is found to be dominated by small and medium sized vortices. High RMS fluctuations of the flow velocity in the exhaust gas indicate the existence of a rotating exhaust gas swirl. From the PLIF images it is seen that the primary reactions happened in the shear layers between inflow and the recirculation zones and that the appearance of the reaction zones changed with flame parameters. The results of the multiscalar Raman measurements show a strong variation of the local mixture fraction allowing conclusions to be drawn about the premix quality. Furthermore, mixing effects of unburnt fuel and air with fully reacted combustion products are studied giving insights into the processes of the turbulence-chemistry interaction. (author)

  20. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 9: PRAISE computer code user's manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, E.Y.

    1981-08-01

    The PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) computer code estimates the influence of earthquakes on the probability of failure at a weld joint in the primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor. Failure, either a through-wall defect (leak) or a complete pipe severance (a large-LOCA), is assumed to be caused by fatigue crack growth of an as-fabricated interior surface circumferential defect. These defects are assumed to be two-dimensional and semi-elliptical in shape. The distribution of initial crack sizes is a function of crack depth and aspect ratio. Crack propagation rates are governed by a Paris-type relationship with separate RMS cyclic stress intensity factors for the depth and length. Both uniform through the wall and radial gradient thermal stresses are included in the calculation of the stress intensity factors. The failure probabilities are estimated by applying Monte Carlo methods to simulate the life histories of the selected weld joint. In order to maximize computational efficiency, a stratified sampling procedure is used to select the initial crack size. Hydrostatic proof test, pre-service inspection, and in-service inspection can be simulated. PRAISE treats the inter-arrival times of operating transients either as a constant or exponentially distributed according to observed or postulated rates. Leak rate and leak detection models are also included. The criterion for complete pipe severance is exceedance of a net section critical stress. Earthquakes of various intensity and arbitrary occurrence times can be modeled. PRAISE presently assumes that exactly one initial defect exists in the weld and that the earthquake of interest is the first earthquake experienced at the reactor.