National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for residential housing units

  1. High Performance Residential Housing Units at U.S. Coast Guard Base Kodiak: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, R.; Hickey, J.

    2013-10-01

    The United States Coast Guard (USCG) constructs residential housing throughout the country using a basic template that must meet the minimum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver criteria or better for the units. In Kodiak, Alaska, USCG is procuring between 24 and 100 residential multi-family housing units. Priorities for the Kodiak project were to reduce overall energyconsumption by at least 20% over existing units, improve envelope construction, and evaluate space heating options. USCG is challenged with maintaining similar existing units that have complicated residential diesel boilers. Additionally, fuel and material costs are high in Kodiak. While USCG has worked to optimize the performance of the housing units with principles of improved buildingenvelope, the engineers realize there are still opportunities for improvement, especially within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and different envelope measures. USCG staff also desires to balance higher upfront project costs for significantly reduced life-cycle costs of the residential units that have an expected lifetime of 50 or more years. To answer thesequestions, this analysis used the residential modeling tool BEoptE+ to examine potential energy- saving opportunities for the climate. The results suggest criteria for achieving optimized housing performance at the lowest cost. USCG will integrate the criteria into their procurement process. To achieve greater than 50% energy savings, USCG will need to specify full 2x 6 wood stud R-21 insulationwith two 2 inches of exterior foam, R-38 ceiling insulation or even wall insulation in the crawl space, and R-49 fiberglass batts in a the vented attic. The air barrier should be improved to ensure a tight envelope with minimal infiltration to the goal of 2.0 ACH50. With the implementation of an air source heat pump for space heating requirements, the combination of HVAC and envelope savings inthe residential unit can save

  2. Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential Efficiency Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential Efficiency September 25, 2014 - 1:40pm ...

  3. Total U.S. Housing Units...................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Space Heating Usage Indicators Million U.S. Housing Units Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing ...

  4. Housing characteristics, 1987: Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-26

    This report is the first of a series of reports based on data from the 1987 RECS. The 1987 RECS is the seventh in the series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers. These surveys provide baseline information on how households in the United States use energy. A cross section of housing types such as single-family detached homes, townhouses, large and small apartment buildings, condominiums, and mobile homes were included in the survey. Data from the RECS and a companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public use tapes. 10 figs., 69 tabs.

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... central air conditioning equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  6. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... for Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  9. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied

  10. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Total square footage includes all basements, finished or conditioned (heated ...

  11. White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives...

    Energy Savers

    White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as Market Grows The HERO logo. The Obama Administration's Clean Energy Savings for All Initiative is working to ...

  12. Residential energy demand and the taxation of housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentry, W.M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines how the favorable tax treatment of housing capital in the U.S. affects the demand for residential energy. Relative to a tax system that is neutral between different investments, the current taxation of housing lowers the cost of housing capital by 23%. The tax subsidy for housing capital increases the demand for housing services and the concomitant energy demand and creates an incentive for the substitution of capital for energy in the production of housing services. Eliminating this tax subsidy for housing would lower the demand for housing services by 11.8% and residential energy demand by 6.8%. Alternatively, the same reduction in residential energy demand could be obtained through a 20% tax on residential energy. 13 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Market Grows | Department of Energy White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as Market Grows White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as Market Grows The HERO logo. The Obama Administration's Clean Energy Savings for All Initiative is working to provide American households with more tools to complete renewable and home energy efficiency improvements. As part of this effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released updated "Best

  14. Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential Efficiency |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential Efficiency Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential Efficiency September 25, 2014 - 1:40pm Addthis One Sky Homes, San Jose, CA, Custom Builder, Grand Award Winner. | California prides itself on energy efficiency, so achieving the designation of first net zero energy new home builder in the state is an honor indeed. One Sky Homes, San Jose, CA, Custom Builder, Grand Award Winner. |

  15. Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. ...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment3" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Housing ...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment3" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Housing ...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment4" ... 4Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 5Housing ...

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Units" ,,"UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Space ... ,,"RSEs for UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"RSEs for Housing Units " "Space ...

  20. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 5Rented includes households that occupy their primary housing unit without payment of rent. ...

  1. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Gehl, Anthony C; Christian, Jeffrey E

    2012-01-01

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  2. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  3. 120 Years of U.S. Residential Housing Stock and Floor Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto de Moura, Maria C.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.

    2015-08-11

    Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO2 emissions. Floor space is a major driver of building energy demand. This paper develops a historical time series of total residential floor space for 1891-2010 and examines the role of socio-economic drivers GDP, population and household size on floor space. Using primarily data from the U.S. Census Bureau, we develop new construction and vintage-disaggregated housing stock for three building types, and address various data inconsistency issues. An examination of the long-term relationship of GDP and total residential floor space shows a remarkably constant trend over the period. While population increases five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributes towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. Total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years.

  4. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million squaremore » feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.« less

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    4 Region Single-Family Multi-Family Mobile Homes Northeast 54 11% 26 17% 4 8% 84 12% Midwest 82 17% 25 16% 6 11% 113 16% South 258 52% 59 38% 34 68% 351 50% West 103 21% 45 29% 6 13% 154 22% Total 496 100% 155 100% 50 100% 702 100% Source(s): 2010 New Homes Completed/Placed, by Census Region (Thousand Units and Percent of Total Units) Total DOC, Manufacturing, Mining and Construction Statistics: New Residential Construction: New Privately Owned Housing Units Completed, 2010; and DOC,

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    5 2010 Construction Method of Single-Family Homes, by Region (Thousand Units and Percent of Total Units) Region Total Northeast 49 10% 4 33% 2 18% 54 Midwest 76 16% 3 25% 2 18% 82 South 247 52% 4 33% 6 55% 258 West 101 21% 1 8% 1 9% 103 Total 473 100% 12 100% 11 100% 497 Source(s): Stick-Built Modular Panelized/Precut DOC, Manufacturing, Mining and Construction Statistics, New Residential Construction: Type of Construction Method of New Single-Family Houses Completed

  7. Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,"5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes"

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes"

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Air

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment"

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Televisions" "Number of

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Fuels Used for Any

  20. "Table HC3.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  1. Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

    2012-03-01

    This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

  2. Estimated United States Residential Energy Use in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Johnson, D M; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-12-12

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the residential sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 11,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of electricity and fuels were used throughout the United States residential sector in lighting, electronics, air conditioning, space heating, water heating, washing appliances, cooking appliances, refrigerators, and other appliances. The residential sector is powered mainly by electricity and natural gas. Other fuels used include petroleum products (fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas and kerosene), biomass (wood), and on-premises solar, wind, and geothermal energy. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the residential sector.

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Census Region and

  4. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Florida Solar Energy Center; IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-08-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Indoor Lights

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Home

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT"

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Air

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Appliances",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Appliances",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)","Census Region" "Appliances",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,19.2,23.9,38.2,20.9

  13. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division

  14. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.7 66.0 142.2 36 16 28.0 10 708 0.33 558 204 Census Region and Division

  15. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division

  16. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division

  17. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and

  18. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division

  19. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census

  20. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region

  1. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census

  2. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census

  3. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census

  4. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census

  5. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census

  6. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census

  7. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census

  8. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census

  9. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26

  10. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Long Island | Department of Energy United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Personal

  13. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Personal

  14. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)"

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Space Heating

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Cooling

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Cooling

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Number of Water

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT,

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" "Structural

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" "Structural and Geographic

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT,

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD,

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT,

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC,

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT,

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD,

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE,

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Fuels Used for Any Use"

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,,,"5 or More Members" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Census Region and Division"

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT"

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN,

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD"

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Televisions",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.6,0.4,0.2,0.2,0.2

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD"

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Computers and Other Electronics",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Computers" "Number of Computers"

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Computers and Other

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Computers and Other

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Space

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Space

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Water

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,,,,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Fuels Used for Any Use"

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Total

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" ,,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Census Region and Division"

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,19.9,28.6,21.5 "Rural",25.5,2.8,6,13.4,3.3

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Space Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Air

  14. Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ......................................

  15. Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy ... Type of Supplemental Heating Equipment Used Heat Pump......0.6 SteamHot Water System......

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.4,0.7,0.5 1,108.1,19.3,25,40.2,23.6 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,0.5,1.2,0.7 "Number of Tankless Water

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,19.4,17.7,18.3

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Televisions"

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Televisions",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,1,0.3,"Q","Q",0.1

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Televisions" "Total

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Storage

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.9,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.3

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Cooking Appliances"

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Appliances" "Total

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.3,0.5,0.4 1,24.2,4.6,5.4,8.1,6.1 2,37.5,7,8,13.8,8.5 3,26.6,4.5,6.1,10.5,5.3 4,14.2,2.2,3.4,5.7,2.9 "5 or

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,6.7,11.1,4.8 1,46.9,8.7,10.6,17.2,10.3 2,24.3,4.3,5.5,8.7,5.8

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Space Heating

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Air

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Water Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.1

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Number of Household Members" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,7.4,11.5,6.3 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,8.5,13.4,7.6 "3

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Computers and Other Electronics"

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Air Conditioning" "Total

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Household Demographics" "Total

  17. Residential

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Census

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,6.9,6,4.4,3.2 "New England",5.5,2.2,1.9,0.5,0.9 "Middle

  20. Residential Network Members Unite to Form Green Bank Network...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The NY Green Bank logo. Residential Network members Connecticut Green Bank and NY Green Bank, a division of Residential Network member New York State Energy Research and ...

  1. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership; Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Davis Energy Group; IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-12-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  2. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL...

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,8.5,2.7,2.6,4 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,38.6,16.2,20.1,18.4 "Use Cooling

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per

  6. Table HC1.1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Housing Unit Characteristics by" " Total, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace, 2005" ,,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units",,"Total",,"Heated",,"Cooled" "Housing Unit Characteristics","Millions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent" "Total",111.1,100,256.5,100,179.8,100,114.5,100 "Census Region

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Census Region

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing

  9. Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Now in its eighth edition, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)’s Tracking the Sun report series is dedicated to summarizing trends in the installed price of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States. The present report focuses on residential and nonresidential systems installed through year-end 2014, with preliminary trends for the first half of 2015.

  10. Residential Network Members Unite to Form Green Bank Network

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential Network members Connecticut Green Bank and NY Green Bank, a division of Residential Network member New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, have helped launch the Green Bank Network, a new international organization focused on collaborating to scale up private financing to meet the challenge of climate change.

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2

  13. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  14. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Floorspace

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Living Space Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,2.1,0.6,"Q",0.4 "500 to

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer

  1. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,8.5,2.7,2.6,4 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,38.6,16.2,20.1,18.4 "Use

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Main

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Cooling

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,16.9,6.5,4.6,7.6 "Use a Personal

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC8.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total U.S.",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,46.2,18.8,22.5,22.1

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Number

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Coolling

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,45.5,18.2,21.6,21 "2 or More",3.7,1,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot

  13. "Table HC1.1.3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" " Single-Family Housing Units and Mobile Homes, 2005" ,,"Single- Family and Mobile Homes (millions)","Average Square Feet per Housing Unit-- Single-Family and Mobile Homes" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Detached",,,"Single-Family Attached",,,"Mobile Homes" "Housing Unit

  14. DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island 1 of 16 United Way built this 1,890-square-foot home in Deer Park, Long Island, New York, to the performance criteria of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 16 The United Way home's average projected utility bills will be less than $60 a month thanks to a solar photovoltaic system and a high-performance building envelope.

  15. DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island Addthis 1 of 16 United Way built this 1,890-square-foot home in Deer Park, Long Island, New York, to the performance criteria of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 16 The United Way home's average projected utility bills will be less than $60 a month thanks to a solar photovoltaic system and a high-performance building

  16. Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Van Geet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

    2012-04-01

    This abbreviated report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project.

  17. Tracking the Sun VIII. The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen L.; Darghouth, Naïm R.; Millstein, Dev; Spears, Mike; Wiser, Ryan H.; Buckley, Michael; Widiss, Rebecca; Grue, Nick

    2015-08-01

    Now in its eighth edition, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)’s Tracking the Sun report series is dedicated to summarizing trends in the installed price of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States. The present report focuses on residential and nonresidential systems installed through year-end 2014, with preliminary trends for the first half of 2015. As noted in the text box below, this year’s report incorporates a number of important changes and enhancements. Among those changes, this year's report focuses solely on residential and nonresidential PV systems; data on utility-scale PV are reported in LBNL’s companion Utility-Scale Solar report series. Installed pricing trends presented within this report derive primarily from project-level data reported to state agencies and utilities that administer PV incentive programs, solar renewable energy credit (SREC) registration systems, or interconnection processes. In total, data were collected for roughly 400,000 individual PV systems, representing 81% of all U.S. residential and non-residential PV capacity installed through 2014 and 62% of capacity installed in 2014, though a smaller subset of this data were used in analysis.

  18. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

    2010-12-31

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper

  19. Case study of the regional manufacturers not participating in the manufactured housing RCDP (Residential Construction Demonstration Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.D.; Baechler, M.C.

    1990-03-01

    To develop reliable alternatives for building energy-efficient homes, the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is conducting the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP). RCDP Cycle 2 is the subject of this report and involves manufactured housing (commonly called mobile homes) constructed to US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) codes. The primary objectives of the RCDP include: develop conservation techniques and innovations, assess these techniques and innovations, and introduce exhibiting the potential to be cost-effective, reliable, and marketable. 1 ref., 1 tab.

  20. Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Figure R1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) the number of U.S. households, 2) the average size of those housing units, 3) residential source energy consumption, 4...

  1. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC5.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Indoor Lights

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Floorspace

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Number of

  11. Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Better Buildings Residential Network case studies feature members to fulfill our mission to share best practices and learn from one another to increase the number of homes that are energy efficient. This case study addresses multifamily energy upgrade experiences by two members of the Better Buildings Residential Network-Elevate Energy and the International Center for Appropriate and Sustainable Technology

  12. United Cooperative Services- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    United Cooperative Services offers a one-time rebate program for new home construction and retrofit upgrades. The following equipment are eligible under United's Rebate Program:

  13. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Mixed-Humid Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership; Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Davis Energy Group; IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-12-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Mixed-Humid Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY | Department of Energy United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with

  15. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Single-Family",78.6,2422,2002,1522,880,727,553 "Census

  16. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Multi-Family",28.1,930,807,535,453,393,261 "Census Region"

  17. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Mobile Homes",6.9,1087,985,746,413,375,283 "Census Region"

  18. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total",113.6,1971,1644,1230,766,639,478 "Census Region"

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million U.S. Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000

  20. "Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,6.9,4.7,2.2 "Town",19,6,4.2,1.9

  1. "Table HC12.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,9.7,7.3,2.4

  2. "Table HC13.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)"

  3. "Table HC14.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,12.8,3.2,9.6 "Town",19,3,1.1,1.9

  4. Table HC1.1.2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace, 2005 " ,,"Average Square Feet per--" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Housing Unit",,,"Household Member" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,2171,1618,1031,845,630,401 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,2334,1664,562,911,649,220

  5. Maximizing Residential Energy Savings: Net Zero Energy House (ZEH) Technology Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.; Roberts, D.

    2008-11-01

    To meet current U.S. Department of Energy zero-energy home performance goals, new technologies and solutions must increase whole-house efficiency savings by an additional 40% relative to those provided by best available components and systems.

  6. Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    "Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

  7. Impacts of alternative residential energy standards - Rural Housing Amendments Study, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balistocky, S.; Bohn, A.A.; Heidell, J.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lee, A.D.; Pratt, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1985-11-01

    This report has examined the role of manufactured housing in the housing market, the energy impacts of three manufactured housing standards and three site-built standards in 13 cities, and the economic impacts of those standards in 6 cities. The three standards applied to manufactured housing are the HUD Title VI standard (Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards, or MHCSS), the Hud Title II-E standard, and the existing FmHA Title V standard. Those applied to site-built homes are the HUD Minimum Property Standards (MPS), the ASHRAE 90A-80 standard, and the FmHA Title V standard. Based on energy consumption alone, these analyses show that the FmHA Title V standard is the most stringent standard for both housing types (a single-section menufactured home and a single-story detached ''ranch house''). The HUD Title VI standard is the least stringent for manufactured homes, while the HUD Minimum Property Standards are the least stringent for site-built homes. Cost-effectiveness comparisons required by the Act were made for the two prototypical homes. Results of this preliminary economic analysis indicate that none of the site-built standards reflect minimum life-cycle cost as a basic criterion of their development. For manufactured homes, both the FmHA standard and the HUD Title II-E standard reduce life-cycle cost and effect positive first-year cash flows in all cities analyzed when electric resistance heating is assumed. When natural gas heating is used, both standards pass the life-cycle cost test in all cities, but the FmHA standard fails the cash flow test in all but one city. However, in the worst case, net monthly expenditures in the first year are increased by less than $9.

  8. Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441

  9. "Table HC3.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  10. "Table HC3.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  11. "Table HC3.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  12. "Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  13. "Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  14. "Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  15. "Table HC3.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  16. "Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  17. "Table HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  18. "Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  19. "Table HC4.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  20. "Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  1. "Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  2. "Table HC4.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  3. "Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  4. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Davis Energy Group; Florida Solar Energy Center; IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-01-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Hot-Dry/Mixed-Dry Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  5. "Table HC4.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More

  6. "Table HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More

  7. An Analysis of Residential PV System Price Differences between the United States and Germany

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems were twice as expensive in the United States as in Germany (median of $5.29/W vs. $2.59/W) in 2012. This price discrepancy stems primarily from differences in non-hardware or "soft" costs between the two countries, which can only be explained in part by differences in cumulative market size and associated learning. A survey of German PV installers was deployed to collect rough data on PV soft costs in Germany to compare to results of a similar survey of U.S. PV installers. Non-module hardware costs and all analyzed soft costs are lower in Germany, especially for customer acquisition, installation labor, and profit/overhead costs, but also for expenses related to permitting, interconnection, and inspection procedures. Additional costs occur in the United States due to state and local sales taxes, smaller average system sizes, and longer project development times. To reduce the identified additional costs of residential PV systems, the United States could introduce policies that enable a robust and lasting market while minimizing market fragmentation.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    6 2010 Mobile Home Placements, by Census Region and Top Five States (Percent of National Total) Region Top Five States Northeast 8% Texas 15.2% Midwest 11% Louisiania 8.6% South 69% Florida 5.4% West 13% Tennessee 4.8% Total 100% North Carolina (1) 4.6% Kentucky 4.6% Note(s): 1) North Carolina and Kentucky are tied for fifth with 4.6% of the national total. Source(s): DOC, Manufactured Housing Statistics, New Manufactured Homes Placed: by Size of Home by State - 2010, Placements of New

  9. Table HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 3.0 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 28.7 9.2 6.5 12.1 0.9 7.5 Personal Computers 1

  10. Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

  11. Table 2.7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units, 1950-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... For 2001 data consistent with the 1990 Census, see American Housing Survey for the United States: 2001. 2Includes briquettes (made of pitch and sawdust), coal dust, waste material ...

  12. Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing...

    Energy Savers

    Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily ...

  13. Energy Savings and Breakeven Costs for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Burch, Jay; Merrigan, Tim; Ong, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently re-emerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, NREL performed simulations of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern United States. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern United States, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    0 Home Price Index (HPI), All-Transactions, by Census Region (1)(2) New Mid. S. E-S W-S E-N W-N United Eng. Atl. Atl. Centrl Centrl Centrl Centrl MT Pacific States 1975 63.1 71.8 68.5 68.8 56.0 63.5 62.1 56.5 46.2 61.3 1976 69.2 73.9 71.5 71.7 62.8 68.7 68.1 61.6 54.7 66.6 1977 73.1 78.0 76.0 79.8 69.0 76.8 77.0 70.8 68.4 74.3 1978 86.3 82.7 85.6 90.7 81.6 89.5 88.4 83.9 80.1 85.3 1979 97.9 94.4 94.6 99.3 95.4 99.0 98.7 96.7 93.9 96.4 1980 106.6 106.4 104.1 103.9 104.0 102.3 104.0 105.3 105.8

  15. Comparison of Advanced Residential Water Heating Technologies in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, Jeff; Fang, Xia; Wilson, Eric

    2013-05-01

    In this study, gas storage, gas tankless, condensing, electric storage, heat pump, and solar water heaters were simulated in several different climates across the United States, installed in both conditioned and unconditioned space and subjected to several different draw profiles. While many pre-existing models were used, new models of condensing and heat pump water heaters were created specifically for this work. In each case modeled, the whole house was simulated along with the water heater to capture any interactions between the water heater and the space conditioning equipment.

  16. Measure Guideline. Five Steps to Implement the Public Housing Authority Energy-Efficient Unit Turnover Checklist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaukus, Christine

    2015-07-09

    Five Steps to Implementing the PHA Energy Efficient Unit Turnover Package (ARIES, 2014) is a guide to prepare for the installation of energy efficient measures during a typical public housing authority unit turnover. While a PHA is cleaning, painting and readying a unit for a new resident, there is an opportunity to incorporate energy efficiency measures to further improve the unit's performance. The measures on the list are simple enough to be implemented by in-house maintenance personnel, inexpensive enough to be folded into operating expenses without needing capital budget, and fast enough to implement without substantially changing the number of days between occupancies, a critical factor for organizations where the demand for dwelling units far outweighs the supply. The following guide lays out a five step plan to implement the EE Unit Turnover Package in your PHA, from an initial Self-Assessment through to Package Implementation.

  17. Earth sheltered housing in the south central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grondzik, W.T. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater); Grondzik, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study of identified, occupied earth sheltered residences in the south central United States has been conducted by the Oklahoma State University. Selected results from this investigation of more than 150 residences in the states of Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas are presented, focusing upon the issues of habitability and energy performance of such structures.

  18. Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

    2013-07-01

    Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

  19. Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast

  20. Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United ...

  1. "Table HC10.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,20.6,"N","N","N" "New

  2. "Table HC15.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,7.1,"N","N","N" "New

  3. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2007-02-01

    The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

  4. Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

    2009-12-01

    Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  5. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage patterns, and household demographics. This information is combined with data from energy suppliers to these homes to estimate

  6. Healthy and Affordable Housing: Practical Recommendations for Building, Renovating and Maintaining Housing: Read This Before You Turn Over a Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-09-06

    This document helps landlords provide safe housing, keeping in mind the issues of asthma, health, ventilation, pests, and chemicals.

  7. Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast

  8. Table HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 0.8 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.5 2.4 2.1 2.8 3.0 8.5 8.8 New

  9. Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel

  10. Table HC4.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 Q Q Q 0.3 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 32.3 8.0 3.3 5.8 14.1 1.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 31.8 8.0 3.2 5.6 13.9 1.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.5 N Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel

  11. Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5

  12. An Analysis of Residential PV System Price Differences between...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems were twice as expensive in the United States as in ... Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic ...

  13. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  14. Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0

  15. Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York Better Buildings Residential Network member PUSH (People United for Sustainable Housing) Buffalo broke ground in March 2014 on its Massachusetts Avenue Sustainable Homes (MASH) project. The initiative will create energy-efficient, affordable housing by renovating two vacant historic buildings and building one new multifamily structure. Part of the project's

  16. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household RECS 2009 - Release date: June 6, 2012 Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units

  17. Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

  18. Table HC2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 71.3 7.4 7.7 16.4 6.8 1.............................................................. 103.3 66.2 7.2 7.4 15.9 6.7 2 or More................................................. 6.2 5.1 Q 0.3 0.5 Q Do Not Use an Oven................................... 1.5 0.7 Q Q 0.4 Q

  19. Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Energy Efficiency Upgrades in ...

  20. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS IN TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-04-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. Based on a previous study 1, 2, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using natural log of percentage relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as predictor variables, and natural log of emission factors as the target variable. The coefficients of both inverse temperature and log relative humidity with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. This study should assist to retrospectively estimate indoor formaldehyde exposures of occupants of temporary housing units (THUs).

  1. Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

    2012-08-01

    In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  2. Energy Use Savings for a Typical New Residential Dwelling Unit Based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) require a substantial improvement in energy efficiency compared to the 2006 IECC. This report averages the energy use savings for a typical new residential dwelling unit based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Results are reported by the eight climate zones in the IECC and for the national average.

  3. Building America Case Study: Philadelphia Housing Authority Energy-Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Philadelphia Housing Authority Energy-Efficiency Turnover Protocols Philadelphia, Pennsylvania PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Philadelphia Housing Authority Unit Turnover Retrofit Program Location: Philadelphia, PA Partners: Philadelphia Housing Authority, pha.phila.gov Advanced Residential Integrated Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), levypartnership.com Building Component: Whole-building Application: Retrofit; multifamily Year Tested: 2014 Applicable Climate Zones: All, with greater benefits

  4. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  5. Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction...

    Energy Savers

    Test a new "smart" ventilation system innovation aimed at saving space conditioning energy ... PROJECT IMPACT This project will study advanced whole-house residential construction ...

  6. Chamberlain Heights Redevelopment: A Large Scale, Cold Climate Study of Affordable Housing Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, K.; Mahle, M.

    2012-03-01

    The City of Meriden Housing Authority (MHA) collaborated with affordable housing developer Jonathon Rose Companies (JRC) to complete a gut renovation of 124 residential units in the Chamberlain Heights retrofit project. The affordable housing community is made up of 36 buildings in duplex and quad configurations located on 22 acres within two miles of downtown Meriden, CT. The final post-retrofit analysis showed 40%-45% source energy savings over the existing pre-retrofit conditions.

  7. Chamberlain Heights Redevelopment: A Large Scale, Cold Climate Study of Affordable Housing Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, K.; Mahle, M.

    2012-03-01

    The City of Meriden Housing Authority (MHA) collaborated with affordable housing developer Jonathon Rose Companies (JRC) to complete a gut renovation of 124 residential units in the Chamberlain Heights retrofit project. The affordable housing community is made up of 36 buildings in duplex and quad configurations located on 22 acres within two miles of downtown Meriden, CT. The final post-retrofit analysis showed 40-45% source energy savings over the existing pre-retrofit conditions.

  8. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: EcoVillage: A Net Zero Energy Ready Community, Ithaca, New York

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings is working with the EcoVillage co-housing community in Ithaca, New York, on their third neighborhood called the Third Residential EcoVillage Experience (TREE). This community-scale project consists of 40 housing units-15 apartments and 25 single family residences. The community is pursing DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH), US Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold, and ENERGY STAR certifications for the entire project.

  9. Residential Lighting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  10. Residential Weatherization

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  11. Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found

  12. Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York...

    Energy Savers

    Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York Better Buildings Residential Network member PUSH ...

  13. 2013-02-26 11.00 Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United States_

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United States? Transcript February 26, 2013 Speakers: Galen Barbose, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joachim Seel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Courtney Kendall, U.S. Department of Energy Solar Technologies Office [Courtney Kendall - Slide 1]: Good afternoon. My name is Courtney Kendall from the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Technologies Office and I'd like to welcome you to today's webinar titled, "Why Are

  14. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds

  15. List of Whole House Fans Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    upgrades Water Heaters Whole House Fans LED Exit Signs CHPCogeneration Biomass Photovoltaics Yes Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency...

  16. Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Multifamily, Affordable Housing Rehabilitation Projects (201)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Incorporating Energy Efficiency into Multifamily, Affordable Housing Rehabilitation Projects (201).

  17. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Where does RECS square footage data come from? RECS 2009 - Release date: July 11, 2012 The size of a home is a fixed characteristic strongly associated with the amount of energy consumed within it, particularly for space heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other appliances. As a part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), trained interviewers measure the square footage of each housing unit. RECS square footage data allow

  18. Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (February 11 2016)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives February 11, 2016.

  19. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (March 24, 2015)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives March 24, 2015

  20. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  1. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-31

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Residential commissioning is a solution to this problem. This guide is the culmination of a 30-month project that began in September 1999. The ultimate objective of the project is to increase the number of houses that undergo commissioning, which will improve the quality, comfort, and safety of homes for California citizens. The project goal is to lay the groundwork for a residential commissioning industry in California focused on end-use energy and non-energy issues. As such, we intend this guide to be a beginning and not an end. Our intent is that the guide will lead to the programmatic integration of commissioning with other building industry processes, which in turn will provide more value to a single site visit for people such as home energy auditors and raters, home inspectors, and building performance contractors. Project work to support the development of this guide includes: a literature review and annotated bibliography, which facilitates access to 469 documents related to residential commissioning published over the past 20 years (Wray et al. 2000), an analysis of the potential benefits one can realistically expect from commissioning new and existing California houses (Matson et al. 2002), and an assessment of 107 diagnostic tools for evaluating residential commissioning metrics (Wray et al. 2002). In this guide, we describe the issues that non-experts should consider in developing a commissioning program to achieve the benefits we have identified. We do this by providing specific recommendations about: how to structure the commissioning process, which diagnostics to use, and how to use them to commission new and existing houses. Using examples, we also demonstrate the potential benefits of applying the recommended whole-house commissioning approach to

  2. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo...

  3. Low-rise Residential New Construction Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

     NYSERDA’s Low-rise Residential New Construction Programs are designed to encourage more industry involvement in the building of single-family homes and low-rise residential units that are more...

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing

  5. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S.

    1996-08-01

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  6. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Ventilation dilutes or removes indoor contaminants to reduce occupant exposure. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there...

  7. DOE ZERH Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with PV, with 2x4 16: on center walls with R-13.5 dense packed cellulose and 1.5” polyiso rigid; basement with 2.5: polyiso on interior; unvented attic with R-48 ocsf under roof deck; ERV tied to wall hung boiler with hydro coil.

  8. Development of Residential Prototype Building Models and Analysis System for Large-Scale Energy Efficiency Studies Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Taylor, Zachary T.

    2014-09-10

    ABSTRACT: Recent advances in residential building energy efficiency and codes have resulted in increased interest in detailed residential building energy models using the latest energy simulation software. One of the challenges of developing residential building models to characterize new residential building stock is to allow for flexibility to address variability in house features like geometry, configuration, HVAC systems etc. Researchers solved this problem in a novel way by creating a simulation structure capable of creating fully-functional EnergyPlus batch runs using a completely scalable residential EnergyPlus template system. This system was used to create a set of thirty-two residential prototype building models covering single- and multifamily buildings, four common foundation types and four common heating system types found in the United States (US). A weighting scheme with detailed state-wise and national weighting factors was designed to supplement the residential prototype models. The complete set is designed to represent a majority of new residential construction stock. The entire structure consists of a system of utility programs developed around the core EnergyPlus simulation engine to automate the creation and management of large-scale simulation studies with minimal human effort. The simulation structure and the residential prototype building models have been used for numerous large-scale studies, one of which is briefly discussed in this paper.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was

  10. Housing characteristics 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This report, Housing Characteristics 1993, presents statistics about the energy-related characteristics of US households. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) -- the ninth in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. Over 7 thousand households were surveyed, representing 97 million households nationwide. A second report, to be released in late 1995, will present statistics on residential energy consumption and expenditures.

  11. Baseline data for the residential sector and development of a residential forecasting database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanford, J.W.; Koomey, J.G.; Stewart, L.E.; Lecar, M.E.; Brown, R.E.; Johnson, F.X.; Hwang, R.J.; Price, L.K.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) residential forecasting database. It provides a description of the methodology used to develop the database and describes the data used for heating and cooling end-uses as well as for typical household appliances. This report provides information on end-use unit energy consumption (UEC) values of appliances and equipment historical and current appliance and equipment market shares, appliance and equipment efficiency and sales trends, cost vs efficiency data for appliances and equipment, product lifetime estimates, thermal shell characteristics of buildings, heating and cooling loads, shell measure cost data for new and retrofit buildings, baseline housing stocks, forecasts of housing starts, and forecasts of energy prices and other economic drivers. Model inputs and outputs, as well as all other information in the database, are fully documented with the source and an explanation of how they were derived.

  12. White_House_0921.pdf

    Energy Savers

    Market Grows | Department of Energy White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as Market Grows White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as Market Grows The HERO logo. The Obama Administration's Clean Energy Savings for All Initiative is working to provide American households with more tools to complete renewable and home energy efficiency improvements. As part of this effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released updated "Best

  13. Table HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.7 Total ... RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.7 Ownership of Unit ...

  14. DOE ZERH Case Study: Mutual Housing California, Mutual Housing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office (EE-5B) (Building America) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Building America; Residential Construction; Home Builder; Zero Energy

  15. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, a.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-12-01

    This research conducted by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical air conditioner pre-cooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling evaluated two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes.

  16. AEP SWEPCO- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    SWEPCO Arkansas offers a variety of rebates to residential customers in its service territory. Eligible equipment includes central ac units, heat pumps, insulation, air sealing, duct sealing,...

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics"

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics"

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics"

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics"

  1. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators"

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics"

  4. DOE Tour of Zero: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing...

    Energy Savers

    Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of Zero: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California 1 of 14 Mutual Housing built this 62-unit ...

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    2 Share of Households, by Housing Type and Type of Ownership, as of 2005 (Percent) Housing Type Owned Rented Total Single-Family: 61.5% 10.3% 71.7% Detached 57.7% 7.2% 64.9% Attached 3.8% 3.1% 6.8% Multi-Family: 3.7% 18.3% 22.0% 2 to 4 units 1.6% 5.3% 6.9% 5 or more units 2.1% 13.0% 15.0% Mobile Homes 5.1% 1.1% 6.2% Total 70.3% 29.6% 100% Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC3-1 and HC4

  6. Residential Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5, 2009 10:18 AM http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecspba99residential.html If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA...

  7. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home Multifamily Project: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Springer and A. German

    2015-09-01

    Building cost effective, high performance homes that provide superior comfort, health, and durability is the goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Zero Energy Ready Homes (ZERH) program. This case study describes the development of a 62-unit multifamily community constructed by nonprofit developer Mutual Housing at the Spring Lake subdivision in Woodland, California. The Spring Lake project is expected to be the first ZERH-certified multifamily project nationwide. Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation worked with Mutual Housing throughout the project. An objective of this project was to gain a highly visible foothold for residential buildings built to the DOE ZERH specification that can be used to encourage participation by other California builders.

  8. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: August 19, 2011 line chart:air conditioning in U.S. figure dataExcept in the temperate climate regions along the West coast, air conditioners (AC) are now standard equipment in most U.S. homes (Figure 1). As recently as 1993, only 68% of all occupied housing units had AC. The latest results from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) show that 87 percent of

  9. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2009-12-02

    With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering wind power development nearby, there is an urgent need to empirically investigate common community concerns about wind project development. The concern that property values will be adversely affected by wind energy facilities is commonly put forth by stakeholders. Although this concern is not unreasonable, given property value impacts that have been found near high voltage transmission lines and other electric generation facilities, the impacts of wind energy facilities on residential property values had not previously been investigated thoroughly. The present research collected data on almost 7,500 sales of singlefamily homes situated within 10 miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from eight different hedonic pricing models, as well as both repeat sales and sales volume models. The various analyses are strongly consistent in that none of the models uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts that might be present in communities surrounding wind energy facilities. Specifically, neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have any consistent, measurable, and statistically significant effect on home sales prices. Although the analysis cannot dismiss the possibility that individual homes or small numbers of homes have been or could be negatively impacted, it finds that if these impacts do exist, they are either too small and/or too infrequent to result in any widespread, statistically observable impact.

  10. Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Sunnyvale Marine Climate Deep Retrofit The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Allen Gilliland of One Sky Homes collaborated ...

  11. Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily / Low-Income Peer Exchange Call Series: Strengthening Relationships Between Energy and Housing Programs, October 31, 2013.

  12. Vermont Member Helps House Hunters Come Home to Energy Savings...

    Energy Savers

    Vermont Member Helps House Hunters Come Home to Energy Savings Photo of the outside of a two-story house, with a tree nearby. Better Buildings Residential Network member ...

  13. 5 Common Myths About Residential Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Common Myths About Residential Solar 5 Common Myths About Residential Solar July 26, 2016 - 10:00am Addthis There are a lot of misconceptions about residential solar. | Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development There are a lot of misconceptions about residential solar. | Photo courtesy of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Odette Mucha Odette Mucha Technology Manager, SunShot Initiative Fast Facts The real estate market is embracing solar, making it

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,..."Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to ... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.9,0.8,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.7,2.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.7,10.1,... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,7.2,3.4,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5,3.9,2.9... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.1,0.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line3" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5.4,5.6,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.9,0.9,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.4,1,2.1... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Central Air" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Energy ...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Central Air" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Energy ...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,40.5,21.2,2.8,3.4,6.7,3.2,5.1,6.9,2.4,4.5,12.4,8.2,4.1 "Water Heating",47.1,27.3,16.1,1.8,1.8,6.2,2.2,4.2,5,1.8,3.1,6.2,4,2.3 "Cooking",71.2,31.7,17.9,2....

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,65.8,28.3,54.6,6.5,3.4,2.2,1.1,5.1,2,13.2,4.7,1.2 "Water Heating",47.1,30.8,16.4,23.9,3.6,1.3,1.1,0.3,3,1,7.7,4.2,1 "Cooking",71.2,48.4,22.8,40.8,5....

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...3,1.3,0.6,0.7,2.9,1,1.5,0.4 "Air Conditioning",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Water Heating",47.1,5.1,1.4,0.5,0.9,3.7,1.2,2.1,0.4 "Cooking",71.2,10.1,3.6,1.4,2.3,6.5,2.3,3.2,1 ...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,22.4,15,4.3,3.1,1.8,5.9,7.4,2.3,3.4,1.7 "Water Heating",47.1,7.6,4.8,0.7,0.8,0.7,2.7,2.8,1,1.4,0.4 "Cooking",71.2,15.4,9.7,1.6,1.9,1.6,4.7...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,14.6,5.7,2.4,0.9,1.4,3.3,2.1,1.2,8.9,6.9,2.1 "Water Heating",47.1,7,2.5,0.9,0.3,0.6,1.6,1.2,0.4,4.5,1.4,3.1 "Cooking",71.2,13.9,5.1,3,1.4,1.6,2...

  11. Tracking the Sun VIII. The Installed Price of Residential and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tracking the Sun VIII. The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tracking the Sun ...

  12. Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing. This case study addresses multifamily energy upgrade experiences by two members of the Better Buildings Residential Network-Elevate Energy and the International Center for Appropriate and Sustainable Technology (ICAST). Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing (426.94 KB) More Documents

  13. Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant- Residential and Non-Profit Weatherization Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) offers the 'House N Home' Thermal Rebate Program, which provides financial incentives to residential and non-profit customers for making buildings more...

  14. "Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Heated Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "No Main Space Heating

  15. "Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Cooled Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,49.2,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Have Cooling

  16. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  17. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    either air or liquid as the working fluid. It does not refer :<: passive collection of solar thermal energy. Fuel Oil Paid by Household: The household paid directly to the fuel...

  18. Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols Islip, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Islip Housing Authority Unit Turnover Retrofit Program Location: ...

  19. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and Economy September 11, 2015

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and Economy September 11, 2015

  20. Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Steve Erario Energy Programs Associate at Alarm.com March 13, 2013 2 * Steve Erario served as the Carbon Project Coordinator at MaineHousing, which houses the state of Maine's weatherization program. In that role, he helped develop the certified carbon offsets project from 2010 to 2012. Ultimately Steve managed the sale of carbon offsets to Chevrolet Motors, and the revenue from the sales are currently being used to weatherize

  1. Residential Marketing Toolkit

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  2. Optional Residential Program Benchmarking

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Optional Residential Program Benchmarking, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, January 23, 2014.

  3. residential-lighting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Progress Report Evaluation Utility Toolkit Residential Lighting Market Research The Residential Lighting Market Research Project will estimate market savings from...

  4. Energy data sourcebook for the US residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, T.P.; Koomey, J.G.; Sanchez, M.

    1997-09-01

    Analysts assessing policies and programs to improve energy efficiency in the residential sector require disparate input data from a variety of sources. This sourcebook, which updates a previous report, compiles these input data into a single location. The data provided include information on end-use unit energy consumption (UEC) values of appliances and equipment efficiency; historical and current appliance and equipment market shares; appliances and equipment efficiency and sales trends; appliance and equipment efficiency standards; cost vs. efficiency data for appliances and equipment; product lifetime estimates; thermal shell characteristics of buildings; heating and cooling loads; shell measure cost data for new and retrofit buildings; baseline housing stocks; forecasts of housing starts; and forecasts of energy prices and other economic drivers. This report is the essential sourcebook for policy analysts interested in residential sector energy use. The report can be downloaded from the Web at http://enduse.lbl. gov/Projects/RED.html. Future updates to the report, errata, and related links, will also be posted at this address.

  5. Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    Residential Buildings Better Buildings Residential Network Better Buildings Residential Network Better Buildings Residential Network Explore Latest Peer Exchange Call Summaries ...

  6. About the Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    About the Better Buildings Residential Network About the Better Buildings Residential Network The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to increase the number of homes that are energy efficient. Better Buildings Residential programs and partners have invested more than $3 billion from federal funding and local resources to build more energy-efficient communities across the United States. The U.S.

  7. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Information Resources » Publications » Market Studies » Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3)

  8. Better Buildings Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Better Buildings Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Danielle Byrnett, U.S. Department of Energy The Better Buildings Residential Program works with residential efficiency programs and their partners to improve homeowners' lives, the economy, and the environment by increasing the number of high-performing, energy-efficient existing homes in the United States. The program supports activities focusing in the areas of strategic

  9. residential load | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL Files: applicationzip icon System Advisor Model Tool for Downloading Load Data...

  10. Residential Air-Source Heat Pump Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Massachusetts offers rebates of up to $2,500 for the installation of high-efficiency, cold-climate air-source heat pumps (ASHPs) in residential buildings of one to four units

  11. Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant- Residential Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential customers of Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) are eligible for rebates on energy efficient appliances. Clothes washers, dishwashers, refrigerators, and room A/C units are...

  12. Capitalizing on Multibenefits of Energy Upgrades at Multifamily Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (301) | Department of Energy Capitalizing on Multibenefits of Energy Upgrades at Multifamily Housing (301) Capitalizing on Multibenefits of Energy Upgrades at Multifamily Housing (301) Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Capitalizing on Multibenefits of Energy Upgrades at Multifamily Housing (301), call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (3.36 MB) More Documents & Publications Staged Upgrades as a Strategy for Residential Energy

  13. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation Patchogue, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced

  14. Enact legislation supporting residential property assessed clean energy financing (PACE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Devashree

    2012-11-15

    Congress should enact legislation that supports residential property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs in the nation’s states and metropolitan areas. Such legislation should require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to allow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to purchase residential mortgages with PACE assessments while at the same time providing responsible underwriting standards and a set of benchmarks for residential PACE assessments in order to minimize financial risks to mortgage holders. Congressional support of residential PACE financing will improve energy efficiency, encourage job creation, and foster economic growth in the nation’s state and metropolitan areas.

  15. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: 56th...

    Energy Savers

    America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: 56th and Walnut: A Philly Gut Rehab Development In this project, CPM partnered with the Consortium for Advanced Residential...

  16. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, Alea; Hoeschele, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Residential air conditioning (AC) represents a challenging load for many electric utilities with poor load factors. Mechanical precooling improves the load factor by shifting cooling operation from on-peak to off-peak hours. This provides benefits to utilities and the electricity grid, as well as to occupants who can take advantage of time-of-use (TOU) electricity rates. Performance benefits stem from reduced compressor cycling, and shifting condensing unit operation to earlier periods of the day when outdoor temperatures are more favorable to operational efficiency. Finding solutions that save energy and reduce demand on the electricity grid is an important national objective and supports key Building America goals. The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical AC precooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling was used to evaluate two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes. A successful off-peak AC strategy offers the potential for increased efficiency and improved occupant comfort, and promotes a more reliable and robust electricity grid. Demand response capabilities and further integration with photovoltaic TOU generation patterns provide additional opportunities to flatten loads and optimize grid impacts.

  17. Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Heaters | Department of Energy Water Heaters Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers Webinar on Residential Water Heaters 20110222_webinar_transcript.pdf (117.27 KB) More Documents & Publications Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Energy Efficiency in Multifamily Housing through Partnerships overcoming_persistent_barriers_energy_efficiency_multifamily_housing.doc Recording of SERC Monitoring Technologies - Solar Photovoltaics

  18. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 1.0 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.3 Q 28.6 Solar ...... Notes: * To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding ...

  19. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 3.4 4.6 2.9 4.0 4.9 1.8 18.8 Solar ......Notes: * To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding ...

  20. An Assessment of the U.S. Residential Lighting Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Judy; Brown, Rich; Moezzi, Mithra; Mills, Evan; Sardinsky, Robert

    1995-10-01

    This report provides background data upon which residential lighting fixture energy conservation programs can be built. The current stock of residential lighting is described by usage level, lamp wattage, fixture type, and location within the house. Data are discussed that indicate that 25% of residential fixtures are responsible for 80% of residential lighting energy use, and that justify targeting these fixtures as candidates for retrofit with energy-efficient fixtures. Fixtures determined to have the highest energy use are hardwired ceiling fixtures in kitchens, living/family rooms, dining rooms, and outdoors. An assessment of the market for residential fixtures shows that nearly half of new residential fixtures are imported, 61% of new fixtures sold are hardwired, and about half of all new fixtures sold are for ceiling installation.

  1. Energy House

    Education Teach & Learn

    Students learn about energy conservation and efficiency by using various materials to insulate a cardboard house.

  2. Building America Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home Multifamily Project: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    Building cost effective, high performance homes that provide superior comfort, health, and durability is the goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Zero Energy Ready Homes (ZERH) program. Through Building America research and other innovative programs throughout the country, many of the technical challenges to building to the ZERH standard have been addressed. This case study describes the development of a 62-unit multifamily community constructed by nonprofit developer Mutual Housing at the Spring Lake subdivision in Woodland, CA. The Spring Lake project is expected to be the first ZERH-certified multifamily project nationwide. Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation worked with Mutual Housing throughout the project. The case study discusses challenges encountered, lessons learned, and how obstacles were overcome. An objective of this project was to gain a highly visible foothold for residential buildings built to the DOE ZERH specification that can be used to encourage participation by other California builders.

  3. Leasing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The article discusses the adoption, consequences and current market status of the leasing of residential photovoltaic systems. It addresses attributed energy savings and market potential of residential system leasing.

  4. Residential Solar Investment Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2012, the CT Green Bank* unveiled its solar photovoltaic residential investment program with the ultimate goal to support 30 megawatts of residential solar photovoltaics (PV). HB 6838...

  5. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    05, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 2.40 per gallon, down 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  6. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.48 per gallon, down 15.9 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  7. Residential propane price decreases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    8, 2015 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.34 per gallon, down 1.7 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by ...

  8. Residential propane prices available

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.92 per gallon, up 1.4 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by ...

  9. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.03 per gallon, down 2-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  10. Residential propane prices available

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.91 per gallon, up 1.4 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by ...

  11. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.30 per gallon, down 17.5 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  12. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.02 per gallon, down 5-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  13. Residential propane prices decreases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5, 2014 Residential propane prices decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.89 per gallon, that's down 11.9 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating ...

  14. Residential propane prices available

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 1.91 per gallon, down 6.7 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the ...

  15. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.17 per gallon, down 13.1 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  16. Residential propane price increases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Residential propane virtually unchanged The average retail price for propane is 2.02 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  17. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.94 per gallon, up 2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the ...

  18. Residential propane prices available

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 1.92 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  19. Residential propane prices available

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.90 per gallon, up 2-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  20. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.01 per gallon, down 8-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  1. Residential propane prices surges

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.08 per gallon, down 8.6 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  2. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.03 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  3. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.36 per gallon, up half of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  4. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential propane price virtually unchanged The average retail price for propane is 2.03 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  5. Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption

    Reports and Publications

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census division (1998 through 2009).

  6. Residential Buildings Integration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Program Existing Homes HUD The residential program is grounded on technology and research. ... * Quantitative (reporting) * Qualitative (account management, peer exchange ...

  7. Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... ...*...,,.<,<,...,,.,,.,,. 97 Table 6. Residential Fuel Oil and Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures April 1979 Through March 1980 Northeast...

  8. Residential Buildings Integration (RBI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov David Lee Program Manager Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) April 22, 2014 Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) Mission/Vision The Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) program's mission: To accelerate energy performance improvements in residential buildings by developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of cost-effective technologies, tools, and solutions to achieve peak performance in new and existing homes. RBI Vision,

  9. RCS auditor trainee manual: renewable resource measures (revised). United States Department of Energy Technical Assistance Program for the Residential Conservation Service Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This manual describes the use of renewable measures and the procedures used to audit for them. Included are active solar space and water heating systems, passive solar space and water heating systems, and wind energy systems. Sample audit forms are completed for a house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A summary of installation standards for active solar systems is included. (WHK)

  10. Development and certification of the innovative pioneer oil burner for residential heating appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, B.

    1997-09-01

    The Pioneer burner represents another important milestone for the oil heat industry. It is the first practical burner design that is designated for use in small capacity heating appliances matching the needs of modern energy efficient home designs. Firing in the range of 0.3 GPH to 0.65 GPH (40,000-90,000 Btu/hr) it allows for new oil heating appliance designs to compete with the other major fuel choices in the small design load residential market. This market includes energy efficient single family houses, town-houses, condominiums, modular units, and mobile homes. The firing range also is wide enough to cover a large percentage of more conventional heating equipment and home designs as well. Having recently passed Underwriters Laboratory certification tests the burner in now being field tested in several homes and samples are being made available to interested boiler and furnace manufacturers for product development and application testing.

  11. National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    < Back Eligibility Residential InstallersContractors Multifamily Residential Low Income Residential Savings Category RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment Insulation Water Heaters...

  12. National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentive...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Construction Residential Multifamily Residential Low Income Residential Savings Category RefrigeratorsFreezers Dehumidifiers Water Heaters Lighting Heat Pumps Air conditioners...

  13. Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    Messaging Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging, call slides and ...

  14. Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Program ...

  15. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building America Top

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Innovation | Department of Energy National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building America Top Innovation National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building America Top Innovation Image of a man insulating the ceiling of a home. Robust cost data for energy-efficiency measures provide an essential framework for transforming the housing industry to high-performance homes. These data allow for effective optimization capabilities to guide builders, researchers, HERS raters,

  16. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  17. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  18. Staged Upgrades as a Strategy for Residential Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2_Title Slide Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Staged Upgrades as a Strategy for Residential Energy Efficiency June 18, 2015 Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda  Call Logistics and Introductions  Residential Network and Peer Exchange Call Overview  Overview of DOE Staged Upgrades Initiative  Steve Dunn, U.S. Department of Energy  Participant Poll  Featured Presenters  Jennifer Parsons, United Illuminating Company, Southern Connecticut

  19. Education Office Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Office Housing Housing A housing forum and listings for housing in and around Los Alamos. Contact Postdoc Housing Email LANL Students' Association Email LANL postdoc...

  20. An analysis of residential energy consumption in a temperate climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Y.Y.; Vincent, W.

    1987-06-01

    Electrical energy consumption data have been recorded for several hundred submetered residential structures in Middle Tennessee. All houses were constructed with a common energy package.'' Specifically, daily cooling usage data have been collected for 130 houses for the 1985 and 1986 cooling seasons, and monthly heating usage data for 186 houses have been recorded by occupant participation over a seven-year period. Cooling data have been analyzed using an SPSSx multiple regression analysis and results are compared to several cooling models. Heating, base, and total energy usage are also analyzed and regression correlation coefficients are determined as a function of several house parameters.

  1. Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments: A Case Study on the Creation of a New Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program, September 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Smith-Dreier, C.; Mekonnen, G.; Hawthorne, W.

    2011-09-01

    This case study covers the process of successfully integrating photovoltaic (PV) systems into a low-income housing development in northeast Denver, Colorado, focusing specifically on a new financing model and job training. The Northeast Denver Housing Center (NDHC), working in cooperation with Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation, Groundwork Denver, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was able to finance the PV system installations by blending private equity funding with utility rebates, federal tax credits, and public sector funding. A grant provided by the Governor's Energy Office allowed for the creation of the new financing model. In addition, the program incorporated an innovative low-income job training program and an energy conservation incentive program.

  2. Residential Building Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building...

  3. Kenergy- Residential Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kenergy is an electric cooperative that serves 51,000 households and commercial customers in 14 western Kentucky counties. Currently, Kenergy offers three rebate programs for residential customers...

  4. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nbehmans A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of

  5. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...llinois",4.8,2186,1911,1451,860,752,571 "Michigan",3.8,1954,1559,962,729,582,359 ...Kerosene",0.4,2093,1774,1155,682,578,376 "Solar",0.2,2313,1861,1337,1145,921,662 "Main ...

  6. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,0.5,1030,968,711,524,492,362 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",5.6,1991,1428,573,826,5... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  7. Postdoc Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdocs » Postdoc Housing Postdoc Housing Point your career towards Los Alamos Laboratory: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. CONTACT Postdoc Program Office Email Housing in Los Alamos, nearby communities Disclaimer: Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) provides these listings as a convenience for postdocs who will be working or participating in programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Meadowlark House

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Greensburg GreenTown Chain of Eco-Homes Meadowlark House in Greensburg, Kansas.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average

  10. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

  11. Simplified method for calculating heating and cooling energy in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, R.C.; Garnier, J.Y.

    1981-10-01

    A microcomputer-based program, Computerized, Instrumented, Residential Audit (CIRA), for determining economically optimal mixes of energy-saving measures in existing residential buildings was developed which requires extensive calculation of heating and cooling energy consumptions. In this paper, a simplified method of calculation that satisfies the requirements of speed and memory imposed by the type of microcomputer on which CIRA runs is presented. The method is based on monthly calculations of degree days and degree nights for both heating and cooling seasons. The base temperatures used in calculating the degree days and degree nights are derived from thermostat settings, solar and internal gains, sky radiation losses, and the thermal characteristics of the building envelope. Thermostat setbacks are handled by using the concept of effective thermal mass of the house. Performance variations of HVAC equipment with changes of part load and ambient conditions are taken into account using correlation curves based on experimental data. Degree days and nights for different base temperatures are evaluated by using a climate-specific empirical correlation with monthly average daily and nightly temperatures. Predictions obtained by this method and by DOE-2.1 are compared for the so-called Hastings ranch house for seven different climates in the United States. Heating and cooling energy consumptions predicted by CIRA lie generally within +- 10% of DOE-2.1 predictions.

  12. Residential propane prices available

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane prices available The average retail price for propane is $1.99 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.40

  13. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    United States | Department of Energy Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado. cq8_residential_hpwh_costs_maguire.pdf (4.46 MB) More Documents & Publications Critical Question #8: When are Heat Pump Water

  14. Fort Pierce Utilities Authority- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Fort Pierce Utilities Authority offers a variety of incentives for their residential customers to save energy in their homes. Rebates are available for room A/C units, insulation upgrades, central...

  15. Residential On-Bill Financing Programs- Nicor Gas, North Shore Gas, Peoples Gas, Ameren and ComEd

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    S.B. 2350 expanded the loan program to include loans of up to $150,000 to retail customers that own multi-family residential or mixed-use buildings with no more than 50 residential units. The int...

  16. Japan's Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Market: An Analysis of Residential System Prices (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Ted; Feldman, David; Margolis, Robert

    2014-03-01

    This presentation summarizes market and policy factors influencing residential solar photovoltaic system prices in Japan, and compares these factors to related developments in the United States.

  17. Cost Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairey, Philip

    2012-11-01

    This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous United States. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

  18. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were

  19. San Diego Residential Development with Photovoltaics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this photograph, William Lyon Homes selected Open Energy’s SolarSave Roofing Tiles for its 77-unit housing development in Claremont in northern San Diego. The solar tiles will be used on the...

  20. 2013 Housing Innovation Award Winners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Housing Innovation Award Winners 2013 Housing Innovation Award Winners The 2013 Housing Innovation Awards were presented on October 4, 2013, at a breakfast ceremony during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Decathlon 2013 in Irvine, CA. The awards showcased a number of the Building Technologies Office residential programs under one umbrella event. Learn more about the 2013 winners below. Systems Builders Clifton View Homes [Winner] Dwell Development [Winner] Weiss Building &

  1. Funding Opportunity: Building America High Performance Housing Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Opportunity: Building America High Performance Housing Innovation Funding Opportunity: Building America High Performance Housing Innovation November 19, 2015 - 11:51am Addthis The Building Technologies Office (BTO) Residential Buildings Integration Program has announced the availability of $5.5 million for Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001395, "Building America Industry Partnerships for High Performance Housing Innovation." DOE seeks to fund up

  2. Solar Leasing for Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This publication examines the solar lease option for residential PV systems and describes two solar lease programs already in place. As a result of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC being lifted in 2009, the expansion of the solar lease model across the United States may be slower than anticipated. The lease model, though, still offers homeowners some distinct advantages. This publication helps homeowners revisit the comparison between the solar lease and home-equity financing in light of the change to the ITC.

  3. Residential Solar Data Center: grant reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher, P.M.; Charlton, L.L.

    1981-09-01

    The Residential Solar Data Center project staff in the Center for Building Technology, National Bureau of Standards, has been responsible for the establishment and operation of a computerized data base containing non-instrumented residential data generated by the Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DoE) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This document includes computer reports of data contained in the Grant file, one of six computer files comprising the data base. These reports contain data recorded on applications submitted to HUD by organizations or individual builders applying for grants to build solar energy systems in new and/or existing homes. Approximately 668 grants have been awarded in six award cycles.

  4. Open House Archive | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Open House Archive 2014 Open House 2012 Open House 2010 Open House 2007 Open House 2005 Open House 2003 Open House 2001 Open House Back to the main Open House Page

  5. Student Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    In order to create a profile you will need a temporary access password. If you would like to take advantage of this housing resource you can request an access password at: ...

  6. Residential, Commercial, and Utility-Scale Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices in the United States: Current Drivers and Cost-Reduction Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich, A.; James, T.; Woodhouse, M.

    2012-02-01

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. However, system cost reductions are not necessarily realized or realized in a timely manner by many customers. Many reasons exist for the apparent disconnects between installation costs, component prices, and system prices; most notable is the impact of fair market value considerations on system prices. To guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, it is necessary to develop a granular perspective on the factors that underlie PV system prices and to eliminate subjective pricing parameters. This report's analysis of the overnight capital costs (cash purchase) paid for PV systems attempts to establish an objective methodology that most closely approximates the book value of PV system assets.

  7. TES for Residential Settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-07-31

    The article discusses thermal energy storage approaches for residential buildings. This article addresses both brick bank storage and phase change material technologies. The energy savings and market potential of these thermal energy storage methods are reviewed as well.

  8. Residential New Construction Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Residential New Construction Program includes two levels that can be achieved by completing various energy efficiency measures: Base Level and High Performance Level. Projects meeting the req...

  9. Residential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy use and the...

  10. Residential propane price decreases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.32 per gallon, down 2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  11. Residential propane price increases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.98 per gallon, up 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  12. Residential propane prices increase

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 3.9 cents from a week ago to 2.80 per gallon. That's up 53.7 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  13. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.39 per gallon, up 3.9 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  14. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.38 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  15. Residential propane prices stable

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.40 per gallon, down 9-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  16. Residential propane price

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.29 per gallon, down 3.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  17. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane prices surges The average retail price for propane rose to an all-time high of 4.01 a gallon, that's up 1.05 from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  18. Residential propane price increases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.96 per gallon, up 1.8 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  19. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.36 per gallon, down 7-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  20. Residential propane price

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.35 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  1. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.39 per gallon, down 2.2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  2. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.03 per gallon, up 1 cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  3. Residential propane prices increase

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose to 2.40 per gallon, up 1.1 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  4. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.36 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  5. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.36 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  6. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.41 per gallon, up 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  7. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.96 per gallon, up 7-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  8. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane prices available The average retail price for propane is 2.30 per gallon, based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration's weekly residential heating fuel survey. ...

  9. Residential propane prices increase

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 4.8 cents from a week ago to 2.76 per gallon. That's up 51.2 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  10. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.01 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  11. Residential propane prices increase

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 5.5 cents per gallon from last week to 2.62 per gallon; up 37.4 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  12. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.00 per gallon, up 7-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  13. Residential propane prices increase

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 10.3 cents from a week ago to 2.96 per gallon. That's up 68.1 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  14. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 3.2 cents from a week ago to 2.86 per gallon. That's up 59.3 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  15. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.35 per gallon, down 3-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  16. Residential propane prices increase

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 9.1 cents from a week ago to 2.71 per gallon. That's up 46.9 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  17. Residential propane prices increase

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 2.3 cents per gallon from last week to 2.57 per gallon; up 32.2 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  18. Residential propane price increases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.02 per gallon, up 5-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  19. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane prices available The average retail price for propane is 1.94 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. ...

  20. Residential propane prices increase

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 2.5 cents from a week ago to 2.83 per gallon. That's up 56 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  1. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.98 per gallon, up 5-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  2. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.99 per gallon, up 3-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  3. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.01 per gallon, up 1.2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  4. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.02 per gallon, up 4-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  5. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.36 per gallon, down 1 cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  6. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.37 per gallon, down 9-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  7. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.97 per gallon, up 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  8. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decrease The average retail price for propane is 2.37 per gallon, down 1.3 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  9. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is $2.05 per gallon, down 1.6 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.49 per gallon, up 5-tenths of a cent from last week, and up 7.5

  10. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.05 per gallon, up 3.5 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.46 per gallon, up 3.9 cents from last week, and up 8.3 cents

  11. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.07 per gallon, up 1.4 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.47 per gallon, up 1.5 cents from last week, and up 8.5 cents from a year ago.

  12. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.06 per gallon, down 9-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.48 per gallon, up 8-tenths of a cents from last week, and up 6.8

  13. Residential Absorption Water Heater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Residential Absorption Water Heater 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Kyle Gluesenkamp, gluesenkampk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Start date: Oct 1, 2009 Planned end date: Sep 30, 2015 Key Milestones 1. Glycol additive report; Dec 2013 2. Prototype EF>1.0; March 2014 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $2,429k Total future DOE $: $250k Target Market/Audience: Residential gas water heating Key Partners: GE CRADA partner SRA International Market

  14. Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting |...

    Energy Savers

    Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting Benefits of Better Buildings Residential Network Reporting Better Buildings Residential Network All-Member Peer Exchange ...

  15. Shark Tank: Residential Energy Efficiency Edition | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Edition Shark Tank: Residential Energy Efficiency Edition Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Shark Tank: Residential Energy Efficiency Edition, call ...

  16. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...

    Energy Savers

    Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program ... Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration from the U.S. Department of Energy. ...

  17. Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices...

    Energy Savers

    Customer Service Best Practices Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Residential Energy ...

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration NEMS Residential Demand...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Geothermal Heat Pump Natural Gas Heat Pump Variables: HSYSSHR 200678,eg,b,r Benchmarking Data from Short-Term Energy Outlook Definition: Housing unit energy consumption by...

  19. Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

    2004-02-01

    In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

  20. Residential energy consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1982-March 1983. Part 1, national data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, W.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) from April 1982 through March 1983. Data on the consumption of wood for this period are also presented. The consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills, obtained, with the permission of the household. from the companies supplying energy to the household. Data on wood consumption are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the winter and are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors described in the report. These data come from the 1982 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the fifth in a series of comparable surveys beginning in 1978. The 1982 survey is the first survey to include, as part of its sample, a portion of the same households interviewed in the 1980 survey. A separate report is planned to report these longitudinal data. This summary gives the highlights of a comparison of the findings for the 5 years of RECS data. The data cover all types of housing units in the 50 states and the District of Columbia including single-family units, apartments, and mobile homes. For households with indirect energy costs, such as costs that are included in the rent or paid by third parties, the sonsumption and expenditures data are estimated and included in the figures reported here. The average household consumption of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and LPG dropped in 1982 from the previous year, hitting a 5-year low since the first Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was conducted in 1978. The average consumption was 103 (+-3) million Btu per household in 1982, down from 114 (+-) million Btu in 1981. The weather was the main contributing factor. 8 figures, 46 tables.

  1. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (5 1/4 inch, 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  2. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon survey: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  3. Savings from energy efficient windows: Current and future savings from new fenestration technologies in the residential market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, K.; Arasteh, D.; Eto, J.

    1993-04-01

    Heating and cooling energy lost through windows in the residential sector (estimated at two-thirds of the energy lost through windows in all sectors) currently accounts for 3 percent (or 2.8 quads) of total US energy use, costing over $26 billion annually in energy bills. Installation of energy-efficient windows is acting to reduce the amount of energy lost per unit window area. Installation of more energy efficient windows since 1970 has resulted in an annual savings of approximately 0.6 quads. If all windows utilized existing cost effective energy conserving technologies, then residential window energy losses would amount to less than 0.8 quads, directly saving $18 billion per year in avoided energy costs. The nationwide installation of windows that are now being developed could actually turn this energy loss into a net energy gain. Considering only natural replacement of windows and new construction, appropriate fenestration policies could help realize this potential by reducing annual residential window energy losses to 2.2 quids by the year 2012, despite a growing housing stock.

  4. Residential Buildings Leader Speaks at Congressional Expo on Zero Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ready Homes | Department of Energy Residential Buildings Leader Speaks at Congressional Expo on Zero Energy Ready Homes Residential Buildings Leader Speaks at Congressional Expo on Zero Energy Ready Homes August 9, 2016 - 12:37pm Addthis New Town Builders built this 2,115-square-foot home in Denver, Colorado, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. The project won a 2015 DOE Housing Innovation Award. Photo courtesy of New Town

  5. New Whole-House Case Study: William Ryan Homes, Tampa, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01

    The builder worked with Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings to design HERS-65 homes with energy-efficient heat pumps and programmable thermostats with humidity controls, foam-filled concrete block walls, draining house wrap, and airsealed kneewalls.

  6. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: High-Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    New Homes: High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: High-Performance Ducts in Hot-Dry Climates The Alliance for Residential...

  7. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: EcoVillage...

    Energy Savers

    Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: EcoVillage: A Net Zero Energy Ready Community, Ithaca, New York Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings is working with ...

  8. Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Federal Government Multifamily Residential Savings Category Clothes Washers RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment...

  9. Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled This webinar presented an overview ...

  10. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides Presentation slides for the Building Technologies ...

  11. Designing Effective Incentives to Drive Residential Retrofit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Incentives to Drive Residential Retrofit Program Participation Designing Effective Incentives to Drive Residential Retrofit Program Participation This webinar covered retrofit ...

  12. Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Presents conference agenda including a general ...

  13. EASI HOUSE

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A first-time Solar Decathlon entrant in 2015, the Western New England University, Universidad Tecnológica de Panamá, and Universidad Tecnológica Centroamericana team is seeking a blend in its Efficient, Affordable, Solar, Innovation--or EASI--House.

  14. Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The New York Department of Taxation and Finance publishes a variety of sales tax reports detailing local tax rates and exemptions, including those for residential energy services. The residential...

  15. Residential propane price is unchanged

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    13, 2014 Residential propane price is unchanged The average retail price for propane is 2.40 per gallon, down one-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating ...

  16. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Floorspace - Housing Characteristics PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.1.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.1.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.1.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.1.4) PDF XLS Usage Indicators Heated Floorspace

  17. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is $2.03 per gallon, up 4.3 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.44 per gallon, up 4.3 cents from last week, and up 7 cents from a year ago. This is Marcela Rourk, with EIA, in Washington. For more information, contact Marcela Rourk at 202-586-4412

  18. Education Office Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Office Housing Housing A housing forum and listings for housing in and around Los Alamos. Contact Postdoc Housing Email LANL Students' Association Email LANL postdoc program housing The Lab's postdoc program has a postdoc housing listing. If you are interested in posting a housing opportunity, send an email with the pertinent information to postdocprogram@lanl.gov. Housing listings will be posted for 1 month. If you wish for the listing to remain on the web site longer, please contact

  19. Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covered the Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide and its elements, including assess, plan, implement, and evaluate.

  20. Retrofitting the Southeast: The Cool Energy House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoeller, W.; Shapiro, C.; Vijayakumar, G.; Puttagunta, S.

    2013-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings has provided the technical engineering and building science support for a highly visible demonstration home in connection with the National Association of Home Builders' International Builders Show. The two previous projects, the Las Vegas net-zero ReVISION House and the 2011 VISION and ReVISION Houses in Orlando, met goals for energy efficiency, cost effectiveness, and information dissemination through multiple web-based venues. This project, which was unveiled at the 2012 International Builders Show in Orlando on February 9, is the deep energy retrofit Cool Energy House (CEH). The CEH began as a mid-1990s two-story traditional specification house of about 4,000 ft2 in the upscale Orlando suburb of Windermere.