National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for residential electricity consumption

  1. Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

    2012-03-30

    A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

  2. Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... ...*...,,.<,<,...,,.,,.,,. 97 Table 6. Residential Fuel Oil and Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures April 1979 Through March 1980 Northeast...

  3. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    none of which were elec- trically heated; each had an electric stove, dryer, dishwasher, and water heater. The researchers installed 24-h chart recorders in each residence...

  4. Determinants of residential electricity consumption: Using smart meter data to examine the effect of climate, building characteristics, appliance stock, and occupants' behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Kavousian, A; Rajagopal, R; Fischer, M

    2013-06-15

    We propose a method to examine structural and behavioral determinants of residential electricity consumption, by developing separate models for daily maximum (peak) and minimum (idle) consumption. We apply our method on a data set of 1628 households' electricity consumption. The results show that weather, location and floor area are among the most important determinants of residential electricity consumption. In addition to these variables, number of refrigerators and entertainment devices (e.g., VCRs) are among the most important determinants of daily minimum consumption, while number of occupants and high-consumption appliances such as electric water heaters are the most significant determinants of daily maximum consumption. Installing double-pane windows and energy-efficient lights helped to reduce consumption, as did the energy-conscious use of electric heater. Acknowledging climate change as a motivation to save energy showed correlation with lower electricity consumption. Households with individuals over 55 or between 19 and 35 years old recorded lower electricity consumption, while pet owners showed higher consumption. Contrary to some previous studies, we observed no significant correlation between electricity consumption and income level, home ownership, or building age. Some otherwise energy-efficient features such as energy-efficient appliances, programmable thermostats, and insulation were correlated with slight increase in electricity consumption. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption ...

  6. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  7. DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  8. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  9. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  10. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  11. Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    t 7 Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, Preliminary Estimates, 1991 (See Page 1) This publication and other Energy Information Administration...

  12. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census ...

  13. Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  14. Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  15. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    AC: 30 Recycling RefrigeratorFreezer: 50 ACDehumidifier: 25 Summary The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the...

  16. Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Figure R1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) the number of U.S. households, 2) the average size of those housing units, 3) residential source energy consumption, 4...

  17. Non-Space Heating Electrical Consumption in Manufactured Homes: Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Onisko, Stephen A.; Roos, Carolyn; Baylon, David

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes submeter data of the non-space heating electrical energy use in a sample of manufactured homes. These homes were built to Super Good Cents insulation standards in 1988 and 1989 under the auspices of RCDP Cycle 2 of the Bonneville Power Administration. They were designed to incorporate innovations in insulation and manufacturing techniques developed to encourage energy conservation in this important housing type. Domestic water heating (DWH) and other non-space heat energy consumption, however, were not generally affected by RCDP specifications. The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline for energy conservation in these areas and to present a method for estimating total energy saving benefits associated with these end uses. The information used in this summary was drawn from occupant-read submeters and manufacturersupplied specifications of building shell components, appliances and water heaters. Information was also drawn from a field review of ventilation systems and building characteristics. The occupant survey included a census of appliances and occupant behavior in these manufactured homes. A total of 150 manufactured homes were built under this program by eight manufacturers. An additional 35 homes were recruited as a control group. Of the original 185 houses, approximately 150 had some usable submeter data for domestic hot water and 126 had usable submeter data for all other nonheating consumption. These samples were used as the basis for all consumption analysis. The energy use characteristics of these manufactured homes were compared with that of a similar sample of RCDP site-built homes. In general, the manufactured homes were somewhat smaller and had fewer occupants than the site-built homes. The degree to which seasonal variations were present in non-space heat uses was reviewed.

  18. PIA - Form EIA-475 A/G Residential Energy Consumption Survey...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA ...

  19. Detailed residential electric determination

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    Data on residential loads has been collected from four residences in real time. The data, measured at 5-second intervals for 53 days of continuous operation, were statistically characterized. An algorithm was developed and incorporated into the modeling code SOLCEL. Performance simulations with SOLCEL using these data as well as previous data collected over longer time intervals indicate that no significant errors in system value are introduced through the use of long-term average data.

  20. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Information Resources » Publications » Market Studies » Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3)

  1. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  2. East Central Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    East Central Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers to install energy-efficient ground source heat pumps, electric water heaters, and air conditioners. To qualify for the...

  3. Tampa Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tampa Electric provides a variety of financial incentives to promote energy efficiency in the residential sector. The Ductwork Rebate Program gives Tampa Electric customers the opportunity to have...

  4. El Paso Electric Company- Residential Solutions Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program offers El Paso Electric customers and participating contractors cash and non-cash incentives for implementing energy efficiency improvements in...

  5. Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Washer: 75 Solar Water Heater: 500 Summary Lane Electric Cooperative offers energy efficient Weatherization Grant Programs to Lane Electric residential and commercial members: a...

  6. Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    63 dollars per thousand cubic feet 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Notes: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. Prices are in nominal dollars. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910,

  7. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration (EIA) ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2009 2005 2001 1997 1993 Previous Analysis & Projections RECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ A Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial,"

  8. Edmond Electric- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Edmond Electric offers rebates to residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps. This program applies to installations in both new and existing residential homes and complexes. Air...

  9. Housing characteristics, 1987: Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-26

    This report is the first of a series of reports based on data from the 1987 RECS. The 1987 RECS is the seventh in the series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers. These surveys provide baseline information on how households in the United States use energy. A cross section of housing types such as single-family detached homes, townhouses, large and small apartment buildings, condominiums, and mobile homes were included in the survey. Data from the RECS and a companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public use tapes. 10 figs., 69 tabs.

  10. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-05-15

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. This poster: examines the history of the residential pricing structure and key milestones; summarizes and analyzes the usage between 2006 and 2009 for different baseline/climate areas; discusses the residential electricity Smart Meter roll out; and compares sample bills for customers in two climates under the current pricing structure and also the future time of use (TOU) structure.

  11. Midstate Electric Cooperative- Residential Conservation Rebates

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midstate Electric Cooperative offers its residential customers a variety of cash rebates for energy efficient improvements and new energy efficient homes. Rebates are awarded for the installation...

  12. Empire District Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Empire District Electric Company offers rebates for customers who construct highly efficient homes and purchase efficient central air conditioners. Eligible customers include residential...

  13. Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- Sustainable Energy Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to their residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment. 

  14. Mass Save (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save organizes residential energy conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies, and municipal aggregators. Rebates for various energy...

  15. Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S.

    1996-08-01

    Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

  16. Residential energy consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1982-March 1983. Part 1, national data

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) from April 1982 through March 1983. Data on the consumption of wood for this period are also presented. The consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills, obtained, with the permission of the household. from the companies supplying energy to the household. Data on wood consumption are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the winter and are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors described in the report. These data come from the 1982 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the fifth in a series of comparable surveys beginning in 1978. The 1982 survey is the first survey to include, as part of its sample, a portion of the same households interviewed in the 1980 survey. A separate report is planned to report these longitudinal data. This summary gives the highlights of a comparison of the findings for the 5 years of RECS data. The data cover all types of housing units in the 50 states and the District of Columbia including single-family units, apartments, and mobile homes. For households with indirect energy costs, such as costs that are included in the rent or paid by third parties, the sonsumption and expenditures data are estimated and included in the figures reported here. The average household consumption of natural gas, electricity, fuel oil or kerosene, and LPG dropped in 1982 from the previous year, hitting a 5-year low since the first Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was conducted in 1978. The average consumption was 103 (+-3) million Btu per household in 1982, down from 114 (+-) million Btu in 1981. The weather was the main contributing factor. 8 figures, 46 tables.

  17. Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption

    Reports and Publications

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census division (1998 through 2009).

  18. An analysis of residential energy consumption in a temperate climate

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Y.Y.; Vincent, W.

    1987-06-01

    Electrical energy consumption data have been recorded for several hundred submetered residential structures in Middle Tennessee. All houses were constructed with a common energy package.'' Specifically, daily cooling usage data have been collected for 130 houses for the 1985 and 1986 cooling seasons, and monthly heating usage data for 186 houses have been recorded by occupant participation over a seven-year period. Cooling data have been analyzed using an SPSSx multiple regression analysis and results are compared to several cooling models. Heating, base, and total energy usage are also analyzed and regression correlation coefficients are determined as a function of several house parameters.

  19. Kirkwood Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kirkwood Electric offers rebates to its residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps and electric hot water heaters in their new and existing homes. Customers will be given a...

  20. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Residential Electric Storage Water...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy-Efficient Residential Electric Storage Water Heaters Purchasing Energy-Efficient Residential Electric Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) ...

  1. Driving Change in Residential Energy Efficiency: Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Driving Change in Residential Energy Efficiency: Electric Vehicles Advanced Programs (301) Driving Change in Residential Energy Efficiency: Electric Vehicles Advanced Programs ...

  2. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Administration U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption &

  3. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Rebates are available for ENERGY STAR clothes washers,...

  4. UES (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    UniSource Energy Services (UES) offers rebates to its residential customers who have certain energy efficient equipment installed by participating contractors. The rebate is provided directly to...

  5. Chicopee Electric Light- Residential Solar Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Chicopee Electric Light offers rebates to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. Customer rebates are $0.50 per watt for a maximum of $2,500 per...

  6. Lakeland Electric- Residential Conservation Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lakeland Electric offers a conservation program for residential customers to save energy in homes. Rebates are available for Heat Pumps, HVAC tune-ups, attic insulation upgrades, and Energy Star...

  7. Residential

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  8. Driving Change in Residential Energy Efficiency: Electric Vehicles (301)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Driving Change in Residential Energy Efficiency: Electric Vehicles (301), call slides and discussion summary.

  9. Holyoke Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Conservation Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Holyoke Gas & Electric (HG&E) Residential Energy Conservation Program provides residential customers with loans to help make energy saving improvements to eligible homes. The loan...

  10. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo...

  11. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Residential heating oil and propane prices at levels similar to last winter's low prices November 17, 2016 U.S. residential electricity prices decline for the first time in many years October 6, 2016 Total U.S. electricity sales projected to grow slowly as electricity intensity declines June 15, 2016 All 72 related articles › Residential Available formats PDF Primary

  12. Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

    1981-10-01

    The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation. The third chapter contains information regarding households' willingness to make energy conserving investments and their ranking of various conservation features. In the final chapter conclusions and recommendations are presented with an emphasis on the policy implications of this study. (MCW)

  13. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  14. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household RECS 2009 - Release date: June 6, 2012 Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the newly released data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units

  15. National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    < Back Eligibility Residential InstallersContractors Multifamily Residential Low Income Residential Savings Category RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment Insulation Water Heaters...

  16. National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentive...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Construction Residential Multifamily Residential Low Income Residential Savings Category RefrigeratorsFreezers Dehumidifiers Water Heaters Lighting Heat Pumps Air conditioners...

  17. Lane Electric Cooperative- Residential and Commercial Weatherization & Energy Efficiency Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lane Electric Cooperative offers energy efficient Weatherization Grant Programs to Lane Electric residential and commercial members: a residential cash grant for 25% of measure costs up to $1,000,...

  18. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    This rise has occurred while Federal energy efficiency standards were enacted on every major appliance, overall household energy consumption actually decreased from 10.58 quads to ...

  19. Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- 2015 Sustainable Energy Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment.

  20. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  1. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  2. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy ...

  3. DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents comprising a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. * Wood used for heating. Although wood consumption data...

  4. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage patterns, and household demographics. This information is combined with data from energy suppliers to these homes to estimate

  5. Firelands Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Firelands Electric Cooperative (FEC) is offering rebates on energy efficient equipment to residential customers receiving electric service from FEC. Eligible equipment includes:

  6. Ozark Border Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ozark Border Electric Cooperative has made rebates available to residential members for the installation of energy efficient geothermal and air source heat pumps, electric water heaters, and room...

  7. Dixie Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dixie Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Electric Cooperative, offers the Energy Resources Conservation (ERC) loan to residential customers pursue energy efficiency measures. The program allows a...

  8. Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative (VVEC) offers rebates for residential customers who purchase energy efficient home equipment. Rebates are available for room air conditioners, electric water...

  9. Salt River Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for...

  10. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    India's Housing Sector - Energy Information Administration Canadian Energy Demand Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector SERIES: Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis Canadian Energy Demand Release date: June 2, 2015 The residential sector is one of the main end-use sectors in Canada accounting for 16.7% of total end-use site energy consumption in 2009 (computed from NRCan 2012. pp, 4-5). In this year, the residential sector accounted for 54.5% of buildings total site

  11. Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Federal Government Multifamily Residential Savings Category Clothes Washers RefrigeratorsFreezers Equipment...

  12. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    SciTech Connect

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

    2009-05-18

    The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

  13. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-03-22

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. A relatively simple two-tiered pricing system (charges by usage under/over baseline for the home's climate zone) was replaced in the summer of 2001 by a more complicated five-tiered system (usage below baseline and up to 30percent, 100percent, 200percent, and 300percent+ over baseline). In 2009, PG&E began the process of upgrading its residential customers to Smart Meters and laying the groundwork for time of use pricing, due to start in 2011. This paper examines the history of the tiered pricing system, discusses the problems the utility encountered with its Smart Meter roll out, and evaluates the proposed dynamic pricing incentive structures. Scenario analyses of example PG&E customer bills will also be presented. What would these residential customers pay if they were still operating under a tiered structure, and/or if they participated in peak hour reductions?

  14. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Where does RECS square footage data come from? RECS 2009 - Release date: July 11, 2012 The size of a home is a fixed characteristic strongly associated with the amount of energy consumed within it, particularly for space heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other appliances. As a part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), trained interviewers measure the square footage of each housing unit. RECS square footage data allow

  15. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  16. Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: ...

  17. Citizens Electric Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Citizens Electric Corporation offers rebates and price reductions to its residential customers for purchasing and installing energy efficient equipment. Eligible equipment and measures include a...

  18. Central Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Electric Cooperative (CEC) offers a variety of financial incentives to promote energy efficiency among residential members. Rebates are provided for qualifying weatherization measures,...

  19. Ozarks Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ozarks Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, offers the Energy Resource Conservation (ERC) Loan Program to residential members to help make energy efficiency improvements in...

  20. Empire District Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire District Electric Company (EDEC) offers rebates to residential customers for energy audits, weatherization measures, central air conditioning systems, and energy efficient home appliances. ...

  1. Ames Electric Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Ames Electric Services offers a variety of services and rebates for residential customers interested in purchasing energy efficient appliances or making energy efficiency improvements...

  2. San Isabel Electric Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    San Isabel Electric Association (SIEA) provides incentives for its residential customers to install energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available for certain water heaters, washers, dryers,...

  3. Farmers Electric Cooperative- Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmers Electric Cooperative offers incentives for its residential and agricultural members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. In order to receive rebates,...

  4. Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential and commercial members for purchasing energy efficient add-on heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, dishwashers...

  5. Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative (MREC) offers a number of rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient equipment. Eligible equipment includes room air...

  6. Empire Electric Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Credit Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire Electric Association provides financial incentives to its residential consumers who upgrade to energy efficient appliances and HVAC equipment.  These rebates are offered in conjunction with...

  7. Gunnison County Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Gunnison County Electric Association (GCEA), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, has a residential rebate program for eligible Energy Star appliances including clothes washers, dishwashers,...

  8. Redding Electric- Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redding Electric Utility offers a variety of financial incentives for energy efficiency through its Residential and Commercial Rebate Programs. Rebates are for weatherization measures, HVAC...

  9. Lodi Electric Utility- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lodi Electric Utility (LEU) offers several residential energy efficiency programs, including the Appliance Rebate Program and the Home Improvement Rebate Program. 

  10. Burlington Electric Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Burlington Electric Department offers a variety of rebate incentives that encourage residential customers to upgrade to energy efficient equipment in the their homes.. Rebates are available for...

  11. Covered Product Category: Residential Electric Resistance Water Heaters

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP sets federal efficiency requirements and provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential electric resistance water heaters.

  12. Chicopee Electric Light Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chicopee Electric Light Department (CELD) offers a variety of energy efficiency rebates for its residential customers. CELD provides rebates for heat pump water heaters, refrigerators, freezers,...

  13. Louisville Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisville Gas & Electric's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

  14. Driving Change in Residential Energy Efficiency: Electric Vehicles...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Change in Residential Energy Efficiency: Electric Vehicles (301), call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (4.41 MB) More Documents & Publications ...

  15. Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative (CNMEC) provides an incentive for its residential members to purchase energy efficient water heaters, clothes washers, dishwashers, refrigerators, and...

  16. Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative (GVC) offers a variety of incentives to help residential customers save energy. Rebates are available for energy efficient new homes and improvements to...

  17. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  18. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  19. El Paso Electric Company- Residential Efficiency Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    EPE offers incentives to residential customers in its New Mexico service territory that purchase and install high efficiency equipment for residential use. Some incentives, including insulation,...

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    20 Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 5% 28% 8% 56% | 8% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 5% 26% 7% 59% | 7% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 5% 26% 5% 61% | 6% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 6% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 5% 26% 4% 61% | 6% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 5% 24% 5% 63% | 7% 25%

  1. Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

  2. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: August 19, 2011 line chart:air conditioning in U.S. figure dataExcept in the temperate climate regions along the West coast, air conditioners (AC) are now standard equipment in most U.S. homes (Figure 1). As recently as 1993, only 68% of all occupied housing units had AC. The latest results from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) show that 87 percent of

  3. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers Natural Gas Connection program to residential customers to switch from electric to natural gas for heat. The program waives connection charge (...

  4. Aiken Electric Cooperative Inc- Residential Water Heater Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aiken Electric Cooperative offers residential members rebates for installing high-efficiency electric water heaters and/or timers in their homes. Customers have four rebate options: 

  5. Energy Savings Potential and Opportunities for High-Efficiency Electric Motors in Residential and Commercial Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Goetzler, William; Sutherland, Timothy; Reis, Callie

    2013-12-04

    This report describes the current state of motor technology and estimates opportunities for energy savings through application of more advanced technologies in a variety of residential and commercial end uses. The objectives of this report were to characterize the state and type of motor technologies used in residential and commercial appliances and equipment and to identify opportunities to reduce the energy consumption of electric motor-driven systems in the residential and commercial sectors through the use of advanced motor technologies. After analyzing the technical savings potential offered by motor upgrades and variable speed technologies, recommended actions are presented.

  6. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC ...

  8. An analysis of residential energy consumption in a temperate climate. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Y.Y.; Vincent, W.

    1987-06-01

    Electrical energy consumption data have been recorded for several hundred submetered residential structures in Middle Tennessee. All houses were constructed with a common ``energy package.`` Specifically, daily cooling usage data have been collected for 130 houses for the 1985 and 1986 cooling seasons, and monthly heating usage data for 186 houses have been recorded by occupant participation over a seven-year period. Cooling data have been analyzed using an SPSSx multiple regression analysis and results are compared to several cooling models. Heating, base, and total energy usage are also analyzed and regression correlation coefficients are determined as a function of several house parameters.

  9. Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type | Department of Energy Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial Miscellaneous Electric Loads Report: Energy Consumption Characterization and Savings Potential in 2008 by Building Type Commercial miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) are generally defined as all electric loads except those related to main systems for heating,

  10. South Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps Heat Pumps Building Insulation Windows Doors Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator South Alabama...

  11. Xcel Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Residential Savings Category Geothermal Heat Pumps RefrigeratorsFreezers Lighting Lighting ControlsSensors Furnaces Heat Pumps Air conditioners Programmable Thermostats DuctAir...

  12. Consumers Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Residential Income Qualified Energy Efficiency Program is working with existing Michigan Weatherization Assistance Program delivery to support weatherization providers with more funding for...

  13. Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Residential Agricultural Savings Category Solar Photovoltaics Wind (All) Geothermal Heat Pumps Water Heaters Lighting Heat Pumps CaulkingWeather-stripping Building Insulation...

  14. (Electric and Gas) Residential New Construction Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energize CT offers a program designed to encourage the construction of energy efficient homes. The Residential New Construction Program offers incentives targeted at increasing energy...

  15. NIPSCO (Gas & Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    and Air Sealing: 40% of total cost up to 450 Lighting: Varies Summary Northern Indiana Public Service Corporation (NIPSCO) offers rebates to residential customers that install...

  16. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  17. Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

    2004-02-01

    In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

  18. Pee Dee Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pee Dee Electric Cooperative offers a variety of programs for residential members to save energy in participating homes. Rebates are available for dual fuel heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, and...

  19. Chicopee Electric Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chicopee Electric Light (CEL) offers a variety of incentives for its residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of participating homes. CEL provides rebates for heat pump water heaters...

  20. City of Concord Electric Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Concord Electric Department offers an incentive program encouraging its residential customers to replace their existing HVAC system with a more energy efficient heat pump system.  Heat...

  1. CoServ Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    CoServ Electric Cooperative's "Think Green Rebate Program" provides a range of incentives encouraging its residential customers to upgrade to high efficiency equipment in their homes. Rebates are...

  2. Module Embedded Microninverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Impact $3/W total installed price vs. GE base residential system @ $4/W; $0.13/kWh LCOE (< average EIA 2015 retail electricity price) $0.10/W (30%) reduction of microinverter cost, and >$0.25/W reduction of installed price; Safety, MPPT and grid support functions including Volt/VAR support Module Embedded Microninverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar Electric System RUI ZHOU/ GE GLOBAL RESEARCH Develop and demonstrate power electronics technologies that address the following

  3. Appalachian Power (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 24, 2015 the Virginia State Corporation Commission approved various rate-payer funding energy efficiency programs for residential Appalachian Power customers in Virginia. Appalachian Power...

  4. OTEC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oregon Trail Electric Cooperative (OTEC) assists residential members in reducing electric consumption by providing rebates for energy efficient equipment. Rebates are for appliances, heat pumps,...

  5. Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 12.0 12.1

  6. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Fact 840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Excel file with ...

  7. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

  8. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    installation Heat pump installation Heat pump with high efficient gas furnace Electric heating solutions to supplement propane heat Electric heat product installations (i.e....

  9. Lane Electric Cooperative- Residential Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lane Electric Cooperative provides rebates for duct sealing measures, heat pumps, and newly constructed Energy Star Homes. Lane Electric Cooperative must receive the necessary application forms in...

  10. Investigation of structural changes in residential electricity demand

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, W.S.; Bouis, H.E.

    1982-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of aggregate national residential electricity demand coefficients over time. The hypothesis is maintained that the aggregate residential demand is the sum of various end-use demand components. Since the end-use composition changes over time, the demand relationship may change as well. Since the end-use composition differs among regions, the results obtained from this study can be used for making inferences about regional differences in electricity demand relationships. There are two additional sources for a possible structural change. One is that consumers may react differently to declining and rising prices, secondly, the impact of the 1973 oil embargo may have shifted demand preferences. The electricity demand model used for this study is presented. A moving regression method was employed to investigate changes in residential electricity demand over time. The statistical results show a strikingly consistent pattern of change for most of the structural variables. The most important finding of this study is that the estimated structure of residential electricity demand changes systematically over time as a result of changes in the characteristics (both durability and saturation level) of the stock of appliances. Furthermore, there is not strong evidence that the structural changes in demand occurred due to either the reversal of the declining trend of electricity prices or the impact of the 1973 oil embarge. (LCL)

  11. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  12. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  13. (Electric and Gas) Residential Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energize CT in coordination with participating utilities offers various rebates for energy efficient electric and natural gas equipment.  

  14. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    DOEpatents

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  15. Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and...

  16. Impact of conservation measures on Pacific Northwest residential energy consumption. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Owzarski, S.L.; Streit, L.P.

    1983-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the relationship between residential space conditioning energy use and building conservation programs in the Pacific Northwest. The study was divided into two primary tasks. In the first, the thermal relationship between space conditioning energy consumption under controlled conditions and the physical characteristics of the residence was estimated. In this task, behavioral characteristics such as occupant schedules and thermostat settings were controlled in order to isolate the physical relationships. In the second task, work from the first task was used to calculate the thermal efficiency of a residence's shell. Thermal efficiency was defined as the ability of a shell to prevent escapement of heat generated within a building. The relationship between actual space conditioning energy consumption and the shell thermal efficiency was then estimated. Separate thermal equations for mobile homes, single-family residences, and multi-family residences are presented. Estimates of the relationship between winter electricity consumption for heating and the building's thermal shell efficiency are presented for each of the three building categories.

  17. Dynamic pricing for residential electric customers: a ratepayer advocate's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, Stefanie A.

    2010-07-15

    New Jersey's Rate Counsel urges that the consideration of alternative pricing mechanisms aimed at encouraging a reduction or shift in residential electricity usage include recognition of the needs and wishes of consumers. Without consumer buy-in, any such pricing mechanisms will fail. To achieve the desired goals, customers must be able to understand and react to the pricing signals. (author)

  18. Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-09-01

    Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

  19. Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    REU for Commercial Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Redding Electric Utility Website http:www2.reupower.comrebates.asp State California Program Type Rebate...

  20. Florida Keys Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: The Florida Keys Electric Cooperative rebates were depleted in June of 2015. According to the website, rebates will be offered again dependent upon future funding.

  1. Shrewsbury Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In collaboration with EFI, Shrewsbury Electric offers rebates on ENERGY STAR appliances. Eligible products include washing machines, dishwashers, refrigerators, and room air conditioners. Customers...

  2. Roseville Electric- Residential New Construction Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Roseville Electric provides financial incentives to encourage local builders to construct energy efficient homes which incorporate  photovoltaics (PV). Participating builders can choose from three...

  3. Golden Valley Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    30 Timer Controlling Exterior Vehicle Plug-In Outlet: 20 Switch Controlling Exterior Vehicle Plug-In Outlet: 10 Summary Golden Valley Electric Association's (GVEA) Builder...

  4. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    heat pumps, ground-source heat pumps, Energy Star appliances, and electric resistance heating products. Equipment rebates are only available to those participating in the...

  5. Douglas Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loans

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Douglas Electric Cooperative offers financing for heat pumps and weatherization. Insulation levels for this climate zone should be a minimum of R-38 in the ceiling, R-30 in the floor and R-11 in...

  6. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  7. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  8. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  9. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  10. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  11. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  12. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  13. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  14. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  15. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  16. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  17. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  18. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  19. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  20. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  1. Analysis of changes in residential energy consumption, 1973-1980

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; Callaway, J.M.; Adams, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    The progress of energy conservation in the residential sector since the 1973 to 1974 Arab oil embargo is assessed. To accomplish this goal, the reduction in residential energy use per household since 1973 is disaggregated into six possible factors. The factors considered were: (1) building shell efficiencies, (2) geographic distribution of households, (3) appliance efficiency, (4) size of dwelling units, (5) fuel switching, and (6) consumer attitudes. The most important factor identified was improved building shell efficiency, although the impact of appliance efficiency is growing rapidly. Due to data limitations, PNL was not able to quantify the effects of two factors (size of dwelling units and fuel switching) within the framework of this study. The total amount of the energy reduction explained ranged from 18 to 46% over the years 1974 to 1980.

  2. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) State fact sheets on household energy use RECS 2009 - Release date: August 13, 2013 (Correction) The RECS gathers information through personal interviews with a nationwide sample of homes and energy suppliers. The 2009 survey was the largest RECS to date and the larger sample size allowed for the release of data for 16 individual states, in addition to national, regional, and division-level estimates. See a closer look at residential energy

  3. Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total...

  4. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Brandon J; Starke, Michael R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Jackson, Roderick K; Tolbert, Leon M

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  5. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were

  6. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Floorspace - Housing Characteristics PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.1.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.1.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.1.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.1.4) PDF XLS Usage Indicators Heated Floorspace

  7. Residential energy consumption across different population groups: Comparative analysis for Latino and non-Latino households in U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Henderson, L.

    1998-05-01

    Residential energy cost, an important part of the household budget, varies significantly across different population groups. In the United States, researchers have conducted many studies of household fuel consumption by fuel type -- electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) -- and by geographic areas. The results of past research have also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest-growing population group in the United States, has not been explained by economic and noneconomic factors in any available statistical model. This paper presents a discussion of energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States. The statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households is based on Stone and Geary`s linear expenditure system model. For comparison, the authors also developed models for energy consumption in non-Latino, black, and nonblack households. These models estimate consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. The study revealed significant variations in the patterns of fuel consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researchers, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups.

  8. Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association provides incentives through its Comfort Advantage Program to encourage energy efficiency within the residential sector. Rebates are available for heat...

  9. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) 9 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing characteristics tables + EXPAND ALL Fuels used & end uses Preliminary release date: March 28, 2011 Final release date: May 6, 2013 ZIP (all tables) by Type of housing unit (HC1.1) XLS by Owner-renter (HC1.2) XLS by Year of construction (HC1.3) XLS by Number of household members (HC1.4) XLS by Household income

  10. Duke Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Smart $aver® program offers incentives for residential customers to increase residential energy efficiency. Incentives are provided for qualifying heating and cooling equipment installation and...

  11. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2009-11-22

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling residential appliance uptake as a function of root macroeconomic drivers. The analysis concentrates on four major energy end uses in the residential sector: refrigerators, washing machines, televisions and air conditioners. The model employs linear regression analysis to parameterize appliance ownership in terms of household income, urbanization and electrification rates according to a standard binary choice (logistic) function. The underlying household appliance ownership data are gathered from a variety of sources including energy consumption and more general standard of living surveys. These data span a wide range of countries, including many developing countries for which appliance ownership is currently low, but likely to grow significantly over the next decades as a result of economic development. The result is a 'global' parameterization of appliance ownership rates as a function of widely available macroeconomic variables for the four appliances studied, which provides a reliable basis for interpolation where data are not available, and forecasting of ownership rates on a global scale. The main value of this method is to form the foundation of bottom-up energy demand forecasts, project energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and allow for the construction of detailed emissions mitigation scenarios.

  12. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

  13. User-needs study for the 1993 residential energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-24

    During 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducted a user-needs study for the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Every 3 years, the RECS collects information on energy consumption and expenditures for various classes of households and residential buildings. The RECS is the only source of such information within EIA, and one of only a few sources of such information anywhere. EIA sent letters to more than 750 persons, received responses from 56, and held 15 meetings with users. Written responses were also solicited by notices published in the April 14, 1992 Federal Register and in several energy-related publications. To ensure that the 1993 RECS meets current information needs, EIA made a specific effort to get input from policy makers and persons needing data for forecasting efforts. These particular needs relate mainly to development of the National Energy Modeling System and new energy legislation being considered at the time of the user needs survey.

  14. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Growing - Dataset | Department of Energy 40: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing - Dataset Excel file with dataset for Fact #840: World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing fotw#840_web.xlsx (19.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Quarterly Analysis Review February 2015 Fact #892: September 28, 2015 Over One-Million in Plug-in Vehicle Sales Worldwide -

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished

  16. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Grades: All Topics: Biomass, Wind Energy, Hydropower, Solar, Geothermal Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

  17. City of New Bern Electric Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of New Bern Electric Department offers rebates to its residential customers for installing new replacement energy efficient water heaters and heat pumps. Appliances must be electric and...

  18. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-09

    Customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States are often compensated at the customer’s underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. Calculations of the customer economics of PV, meanwhile, often assume that retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms will not change and that retail electricity prices will increase (or remain constant) over time, thereby also increasing (or keeping constant) the value of bill savings from PV. Given the multitude of potential changes to retail rates and PV compensation mechanisms in the future, however, understanding how such changes might impact the value of bill savings from PV is critical for policymakers, regulators, utilities, the solar industry, and potential PV owners, i.e., any stakeholder interested in understanding uncertainties in and potential changes to the long-term customer economics of PV. This scoping study investigates the impact of, and interactions among, three key sources of uncertainty in the future value of bill savings from customer-sited PV, focusing in particular on residential customers. These three sources of uncertainty are: changes to electricity market conditions that would affect retail electricity prices, changes to the types of retail rate structures available to residential customers with PV, and shifts away from standard net-metering toward other compensation mechanisms for residential PV.

  19. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

    2009-06-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

  20. Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

    2009-05-30

    The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

  1. Residential Lighting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  2. Residential Weatherization

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  3. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nbehmans A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of

  4. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Barbara C. Farhar Colleen Fitzpatrick January 1989 Prepared under Task No. BE911041 Solar Energy Research Institute A Division of MidwestResearch Institute 1617 Cole...

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    9 Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 24% 41% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 23% 42% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 26% 39% 18% 3% | 32% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 26% 39% 17% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 25% 40% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 25% 40% 18% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 26% 40% 16% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 25% 41% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 26% 42% 15% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 25% 41% 16% 3% | 30% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 23%

  6. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

    2008-12-01

    China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

  7. Norwich Public Utilities (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Norwich Public Utilities (NPU) provides residential customers with rebates on the ENERGY STAR-qualified appliances and energy efficient HVAC equipment. Eligible appliance purchases include...

  8. Ashland Electric Utility- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ashland Conservation District also encourages energy efficiency within the residential sector through the Energy Conservation Programs. Among the services offered through these programs, reside...

  9. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    efficiency incentive programs for its residential members. First, members can receive a free Home Energy Analysis through the Home Performance with Energy Star Program. The...

  10. Duke Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Smart $aver® program offers incentives for residential customers to increase their energy efficiency. Incentives are provided for qualifying heating and cooling equipment installation and...

  11. CPS Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    CPS Energy offers a variety of rebates for energy efficiency related improvements to residential homes, including: appliances, HVAC equipment, insulation, and equipment recycling.. Rebate...

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was

  14. Ameren Missouri (Electric)- Residential Heating and Cooling Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ameren Missouri offers rebates to its residential electric customers for the installation of new energy-efficient heating and cooling equipment. Rebates are available for single-family residences,...

  15. City of Statesville Electric Utility Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Statesville Electric Utility Department offers rebates to its residential customers for installing new, energy efficient water heaters and heat pumps. To qualify for the heat pump...

  16. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy

  17. PPL Electric Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Additional incentives are available for qualifying low-income residential customers. The E-power Wise program provides energy education workshops and provides low cost energy efficiency kits to...

  18. Duke Energy (Electric)- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duke Energy’s Smart $aver Incentive program offers prescriptive and custom rebates to non-residential customers to install energy efficient equipment in their facilities. All Duke Energy South...

  19. Duke Energy (Gas & Electric)- Residential Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duke Energy provides a financial incentive for its residential customers to purchase energy efficient HVAC products through the Smart $aver program. A $200 rebate is available for geothermal heat...

  20. Appalachian Power (Electric)- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appalachian Power provides financial incentives to its non-residential customers to promote energy efficiency in their facilities. The incentive is designed as a custom program which provides $0.05...

  1. MidAmerican Energy (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    MidAmerican Energy offers a variety of incentives for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible homes. The Iowa Energy Efficiency Rebate Information For Your Home brochure...

  2. Electricity in US energy consumption. [Percentages for 1973 to 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1984-09-13

    The share of US energy consumption devoted to electric generation rose sharply again in 1983. Of 70.573 quadrillion Btu consumed nationally last year, 35.4% or 24.975 quadrillion Btu were used for electric generation. This represented an increase from 34.3% in 1982. Significantly, the share of the nation's energy consumption accounted for by electric generation has risen just as rapidly during the ten years since the Arab oil embargo in 1973 as it did during the decade leading up to the embargo. Electricity's share of energy consumption rose 7.3 percentage points from only 19.5% in 1963 to 26.8% in 1973 and another 8.6 percentage points during the last ten years to 35.4% in 1983. Moreover, electricity's share of energy consumption has grown in each of the ten years since the embargo. The nation's energy consumption actually fell 0.4% in 1983, and it declined 4.9% or roughly 0.4% per year during 1973 to 1983. By contrast, energy consumed in electric generation rose 2.9% last year and grew 2.3% per year during the last decade.

  3. "Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",10.31,10.36,10.36,10.37,10.38,10.4,10.4,10.41,10.43,10.43,10.44,10.45,10.46,10.49,10.51,10.53,10.56,10.6 "AEO 1995",,10.96,10.8,10.81,10.81,10.79,10.77,10.75,10.73,10.72,10.7,10.7,10.69,10.7,10.72,10.75,10.8,10.85 "AEO

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 = 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55 1992 0.77 2002 0.92 1983 0.58 1993 0.78 2003 0.94 1984 0.60 1994 0.80 2004 0.97 1985 0.62 1995 0.82 2005 1.00 1986 0.63 1996 0.83 2006 1.03 1987 0.65 1997 0.85 2007 1.06 1988 0.67 1998 0.86 2008 1.09 1989 0.70 1999 0.87 2009 1.10 2010 1.11 Source(s): EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, August 2011, Appendix D, p. 353.

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    8 2009 Annual Natural Gas Consumption per Appliance by Census Division Census Division New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific United States Average Total Source(s): 515,657 208,173 43,648 42,723 90,171 American Gas Association, Residential Natural Gas Market Survey, Jan. 2011, Table 10-1. 61,928 23,005 5,238 5,135 10,270 44,675 20,232 3,286 3,286 29,064 33,891 24,648 3,595 3,081 5,135 58,334 26,702

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    9 Northeast Midwest South West National Space Heating 70.3 56.6 20.4 23.8 38.7 Space Cooling 3.6 5.6 13.9 4.0 7.9 Water Heating 21.1 20.4 15.8 21.2 19.0 Refrigerator 5.4 7.0 6.6 5.7 6.3 Other Appliances & Lighting 23.0 25.9 25.0 24.1 24.7 Total (1) 79.9 77.4 95.0 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Delivered Energy End-Uses for an Average Household, by Region (Million Btu per Household) 122.2 113.5 1) Due to rounding, sums do not add up to totals. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct.

  7. Central Alabama Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central Alabama Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Electric Cooperative, offers the Touchstone Energy Home Program. Touchstone Energy Homes with a dual-fuel or geothermal heat pump qualify for...

  8. Delta-Montrose Electric Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Delta-Montrose Electric Association (DMEA) offers a variety of rebates for customers who buy energy efficient appliances and equipment. Rebates are available for energy efficient electric water...

  9. South Alabama Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    South Alabama Electric Cooperative (SAEC) is a part owner of Alabama Electric Cooperative which has a generation facility in Andalusia, Alabama. The Energy Resources Conservation Loan (ERC) helps...

  10. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total ... 123.9 26 1,450 0.64 1,293 272 (1) Major Energy Sources include: electricity, natural ...

  11. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total ... 115.7 42 1,423 0.65 1,423 512 (1) Major Energy Sources include: electricity, natural ...

  12. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per ... 112.0 41 1,469 0.79 1,469 541 (1) Major Energy Sources include: electricity, natural ...

  13. Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Marriott; H. Scott Matthews

    2005-11-15

    Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative- Residential Water Heater Rebate

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Blue Ridge Electric Cooperative offers up to $300 for the purchase of an electric water heater. The rebate amount varies based on the size of the water heater purchased.

  15. Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    County Rural Electric Cooperative Association Website http:www.linncountyrec.comenergy-efficiencyincentivescurrent-incent... State Iowa Program Type Rebate Program Rebate...

  16. SCE&G (Electric)- Residential EnergyWise Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Carolina Electric and Gas (SCE&G) provides energy efficiency incentives to home owners in its service territory.

  17. Salem Electric- Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salem Electric provides incentives for members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. Available rebates include:

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities of Public Multi-Family Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Thousand Btu/SF) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 27.7 45.9 39.9 71.5 Midwest 22.5 49.9 N.A. 70.3 South 53.5 27.9 N.A. 65.9 West 22.0 25.3 N.A. 46.2 National Average 33.0 43.4 68.3

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    2 Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities of Public Multi-Family Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Million Btu/Household) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 21.2 34.9 36.2 54.7 Midwest 16.6 36.6 N.A. 51.8 South 39.4 20.0 N.A. 48.5 West 16.6 19.3 N.A. 34.8 National Average 24.6 32.2 51.0

  1. North Arkansas Electric Cooperative, Inc- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Arkansas Electric Cooperative (NAEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, serves approximately 35,000 member accounts in seven different counties. The coop provides low interest rates for energy...

  2. Douglas Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Douglas Electric Cooperative offers rebates to its members for the purchase of energy efficient products and measures.  Rebates include clothes washers, heat pumps, manufactured homes, and...

  3. MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    include Columbia Gas of Massachusetts, The Berkshire Gas Company, Cape Light Compact, National Grid, New England Gas Company, NSTAR, Unitil, and Western Massachusetts Electric...

  4. Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmers Electric Cooperative (FEC) offers a variety of rebates for the purchase and proper installation of energy efficient equipment for the home. Incentives are available for geothermal heat...

  5. Southern Pine Electric Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Pine Electric Power Association offers the Comfort Advantage Home Program which provides rebates on heat pumps to new homes which meet certain Comfort Advantage weatherization standards....

  6. Mansfield Municipal Electric Department- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mansfield Municipal Electric Department encourages energy efficiency through the ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Incentive Program. Cash rebates are offered for ENERGY STAR central air conditioners,...

  7. VersiCharge-SG - Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) for Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Dong; Haas, Harry; Terricciano, Paul

    2015-09-30

    In his 2011 State of the Union address, President Obama called for one million electric vehicles on the road by 2015 [1]. With large-scale Electric Vehicle (EV) or Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV or EV for short) or Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) penetration into the US market, there will be drastic reduction in fossil fuel consumption, thus significantly reducing our dependency on foreign oil [2-6]. There will also be significant reduction on Green House Gas (GHG) emissions and smog in the major US cities [3, 7, 8]. Similar studies have also been done other industrial counties [9]. For the fuel cost, with the home electricity rate around $0.13 per kWh, it would cost about $0.05 per mile for DC operation and $0.03 cents per mile for AC operation. But, assuming 25 miles per gallon for a typical vehicle and $4 per gallon, fossil fuel will cost $0.16 per mile [10]. The overall lifecycle cost of PEVs will be several folds lower than the existing fossil fueled vehicles. Despite the above advantages of the EVs, the current cost of EVSE is not affordable for the average consumer. Presently, the cost of installing state-of-the-art residential EVSE ranges from $1500 to $2500 [11]. Low priced EVSE technology, which is easy to install, and affordable to operate and maintain by an average consumer, is essential for the large-scale market penetration of EVs. In addition, the long-term success of this technology is contingent on the PEVs having minimal excessive load and shift impact on the grid, especially at peak times. In a report [2] published by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the exiting electric power generation infrastructure, if used at its full capacity 24 hours a day, would support up to 84% of the nation’s cars, pickup trucks and SUVs for an average daily drive of 33 miles. This mileage estimate is certainly much below what an average driver would drive his/her vehicle per day. Another report [3] by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  8. Lane Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lane Electric provides 0% loans to residents for the installation of efficient heat pumps and weatherization measures through the Home Energy Loan Program. Participating single or multi-family...

  9. Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona)- Residential Efficiency Matching Grant Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmers Electric Cooperative (FEC) offers a grant program which splits the cost of simple energy efficient improvements to the home. The utility will cover 50% of the cost of eligible improvements...

  10. New Hampshire Electric Co-Op- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire Electric Co-op offers On Bill Financing Loans to be used for eligible projects under the NHEC Home Performance with ENERGY STAR program for weatherization. This loan program can be...

  11. Analysis of highly-efficient electric residential HPWHs

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D; Murphy, Richard W; Rice, C Keith; Shen, Bo; Gao, Zhiming

    2011-09-01

    A scoping level analysis was conducted to identify electric HPWH concepts that have the potential to achieve or exceed 30% source energy savings compared to a gas tankless water heater (GTWH) representative of the type represented in version 0.9.5.2 beta of the BEopt software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The analysis was limited to evaluation of options to improve the energy efficiency of electric HPWH product designs currently on the market in the US. The report first defines the baseline GTWH system and determines its efficiency (source-energy-based adjusted or derated EF of ~0.71). High efficiency components (compressors, pumps, fans, heat exchangers, etc.) were identified and applied to current US HPWH products and analyzed to determine the viability of reaching the target EF. The target site-based energy factor (EF) required for an electric HPWH necessary to provide 30% source energy savings compared to the GTWH baseline unit is then determined to be ~3.19.

  12. Reducing Residential Peak Electricity Demand with Mechanical Pre-Cooling of Building Thermal Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Will; Walker, Iain; Roux, Jordan

    2014-08-01

    This study uses an advanced airflow, energy and humidity modelling tool to evaluate the potential for residential mechanical pre-cooling of building thermal mass to shift electricity loads away from the peak electricity demand period. The focus of this study is residential buildings with low thermal mass, such as timber-frame houses typical to the US. Simulations were performed for homes in 12 US DOE climate zones. The results show that the effectiveness of mechanical pre-cooling is highly dependent on climate zone and the selected pre-cooling strategy. The expected energy trade-off between cooling peak energy savings and increased off-peak energy use is also shown.

  13. Energy Savings Potential and Opportunities for High-Efficiency Electric Motors in Residential and Commercial Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Opportunities for High-Efficiency Electric Motors in Residential and Commercial Equipment December 2013 i NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

  14. Survey Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  15. Electric and gas utility marketing of residential energy conservation case studies

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain information about utility conservation marketing techniques from companies actively engaged in performing residential conservation services. Many utilities currently are offering comprehensive services (audits, listing of contractors and lenders, post-installation inspection, advertising, and performing consumer research). Activities are reported for the following utilities: Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; Tampa Electric Company; Memphis Light, Gas, and Water Division; Northern States Power-Wisconsin; Public Service Company of Colorado; Arizona Public Service Company; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Sacramento Municipal Utility District; and Pacific Power and Light Company.

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA,

  17. Residential Marketing Toolkit

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  18. Consumption of the electric power inside silent discharge reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yehia, Ashraf

    2015-01-15

    An experimental study was made in this paper to investigate the relation between the places of the dielectric barriers, which cover the surfaces of the electrodes in the coaxial cylindrical reactors, and the rate of change of the electric power that is consumed in forming silent discharges. Therefore, silent discharges have been formed inside three coaxial cylindrical reactors. The dielectric barriers in these reactors were pasted on both the internal surface of the outer electrode in the first reactor and the external surface of the inner electrode in the second reactor as well as the surfaces of the two electrodes in the third reactor. The reactor under study has been fed by atmospheric air that flowed inside it with a constant rate at normal temperature and pressure, in parallel with the application of a sinusoidal ac voltage between the electrodes of the reactor. The electric power consumed in forming the silent discharges inside the three reactors was measured as a function of the ac peak voltage. The validity of the experimental results was investigated by applying Manley's equation on the same discharge conditions. The results have shown that the rate of consumption of the electric power relative to the ac peak voltage per unit width of the discharge gap improves by a ratio of either 26.8% or 80% or 128% depending on the places of the dielectric barriers that cover the surfaces of the electrodes inside the three reactors.

  19. Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

  20. Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant ... Plants Into Energy-Use Sectors," at end of section. * Totals may not equal sum ...

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 Residential Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 3,400 1985 3,320 1990 3,390 1995 3,390 2000 (3) (3) 3,590 2005 3,830 Note(s): Source(s): 29,430 25,600 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not provide

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    6 Residential Water Billing Rate Structures for Community Water Systems Rate Structure Uniform Rates Declining Block Rate Increasing Block Rate Peak Period or Seasonal Rate Separate Flat Fee Annual Connection Fee Combined Flat Fee Other Rate Structures Note(s): Source(s): 3.0% 9.0% 1) Systems serving more than 10,000 users provide service to 82% of the population served by community water systems. Columns do not sum to 100% because some systems use more than one rate structure. 2) Uniform rates

  3. Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey data Energy intensity Consumption summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All consumption & efficiency data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular All sectors Commercial buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    5 Load (quads) and Percent of Total Load Component Heating Cooling Roof -0.65 12% 0.16 14% Walls -1.00 19% 0.11 10% Foundation -0.76 15% -0.07 - Infiltration -1.47 28% 0.19 16% Windows (conduction) -1.34 26% 0.01 1% Windows (solar gain) 0.43 - 0.37 32% Internal Gains 0.79 - 0.31 27% Net Load -3.99 100% 1.08 100% Note(s): Source(s): Aggregate Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy losses/gains that when combined will be offset by a

  5. A High-Resolution Spatially Explicit Monte-Carlo Simulation Approach to Commercial and Residential Electricity and Water Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, April M; McManamay, Ryan A; Nagle, Nicholas N; Piburn, Jesse O; Stewart, Robert N; Surendran Nair, Sujithkumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As urban areas continue to grow and evolve in a world of increasing environmental awareness, the need for high resolution spatially explicit estimates for energy and water demand has become increasingly important. Though current modeling efforts mark significant progress in the effort to better understand the spatial distribution of energy and water consumption, many are provided at a course spatial resolution or rely on techniques which depend on detailed region-specific data sources that are not publicly available for many parts of the U.S. Furthermore, many existing methods do not account for errors in input data sources and may therefore not accurately reflect inherent uncertainties in model outputs. We propose an alternative and more flexible Monte-Carlo simulation approach to high-resolution residential and commercial electricity and water consumption modeling that relies primarily on publicly available data sources. The method s flexible data requirement and statistical framework ensure that the model is both applicable to a wide range of regions and reflective of uncertainties in model results. Key words: Energy Modeling, Water Modeling, Monte-Carlo Simulation, Uncertainty Quantification Acknowledgment This manuscript has been authored by employees of UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Accordingly, the United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  6. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C. )

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child's sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children's electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  7. Exposure to residential electric and magnetic fields and risk of childhood leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, J.M.; Thomas, D.C.; Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Cheng, T.C.

    1991-11-01

    This study was conducted on 232 cases of childhood leukemia occurring in children age 10 and under between 1980 and 1987 in Los Angeles County. Two hundred thirty-two controls were selected from the same geographic area and were matched on sex, age and race. The parents of the 464 subjects were interviewed by telephone to elicit information on medical histories of the parents and child, residential histories of the subjects, occupational histories of both parents, environmental chemical histories, personal histories including drug use and smoking habits, and time and space occupancy of subjects, including exposures to electrical appliances. An extensive assessment of exposure to electric and magnetic fields was made by determining wiring configurations of most subjects (90%), by measuring electric and magnetic fields in various areas of the inside and outside of the home, and by measuring magnetic fields for 24 to 72 hours in the child`s sleeping area (66%). We conclude that our data offer no support for a relationship between measured electric field exposure and leukemia risk, little support for the relationship between measured magnetic field exposure and leukemia risk, considerable support for a relationship between wiring configuration and leukemia risk, and considerable support for a relationship between children`s electrical appliance use and leukemia risk. The reason(s) why wiring configuration correlates with leukemia risk better than measured exposure are not clear. It is also not clear whether short-term, very high exposure of children to magnetic (or electric) fields from electric appliances are responsible for the observed risk or whether associated exposures or recall biases are responsible. These latter two issues deserve continued research. 41 refs., 31 tabs.

  8. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity - Energy...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Overview Data Summary Biomass Geothermal Hydropower Solar Wind Alternative transportation ... Wind was the source of 11 percent of total renewable energy consumption, and solar and ...

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    2 1999 Single-Family Home Daily Water Consumption by End Use (Gallons per Capita) (1) Fixture/End Use Toilet 18.5 18.3% Clothes Washer 15 14.9% Shower 11.6 11.5% Faucet 10.9 10.8% Other Domestic 1.6 1.6% Bath 1.2 1.2% Dishwasher 1 1.0% Leaks 9.5 9.4% Outdoor Use (2) 31.7 31.4% Total (2) 101 100% Note(s): Source(s): Average gallons Total Use per capita per day Percent 1) Based analysis of 1,188 single-family homes at 12 study locations. 2) Total Water use derived from USGS. Outdoor use is the

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    5 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.50 0.53 0.30 0.04 0.43 0.44 5.23 44.7% | 1.35 6.15 27.8% Water Heating 1.29 0.10 0.07 0.01 0.45 1.92 16.4% | 1.38 2.86 12.9% Space Cooling 0.00 1.08 1.08 9.2% | 3.34 3.34 15.1% Lighting 0.69 0.69 5.9% | 2.13 2.13 9.7% Refrigeration (6) 0.45 0.45 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 6.4% Electronics (5) 0.54 0.54 4.7% | 1.68 1.68 7.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.38 3.3% |

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    6 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.40 0.48 0.26 0.03 0.44 0.42 5.03 44.2% | 1.27 5.88 27.9% Water Heating 1.31 0.07 0.05 0.02 0.48 1.92 16.9% | 1.44 2.88 13.7% Space Cooling 0.00 1.02 1.02 8.9% | 3.07 3.07 14.6% Lighting 0.53 0.53 4.6% | 1.60 1.60 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 0.45 0.45 4.0% | 1.37 1.37 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.33 0.33 2.9% | 0.99 0.99 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.39 3.4% |

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    7 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.28 0.38 0.24 0.03 0.46 0.46 4.85 41.5% | 1.40 5.78 25.8% Water Heating 1.32 0.05 0.04 0.02 0.53 1.96 16.8% | 1.60 3.03 13.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.12 1.12 9.6% | 3.38 3.38 15.1% Lighting 0.47 0.47 4.0% | 1.42 1.42 6.3% Refrigeration (5) 0.48 0.48 4.1% | 1.45 1.45 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.37 0.37 3.2% | 1.12 1.12 5.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.30 0.37 3.1% |

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    8 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.20 0.31 0.22 0.03 0.46 0.49 4.72 38.9% | 1.45 5.67 23.9% Water Heating 1.27 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.54 1.90 15.6% | 1.60 2.96 12.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.25 1.25 10.3% | 3.68 3.68 15.5% Lighting 0.48 0.48 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 5.9% Refrigeration (5) 0.52 0.52 4.3% | 1.54 1.54 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.44 0.44 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.4% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.07 0.32 0.39 3.2% |

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    0 Region (1) Northeast 73.5 122.2 47.7 24% New England 77.0 129.4 55.3 7% Middle Atlantic 72.2 119.7 45.3 17% Midwest 58.9 113.5 46.0 28% East North Central 61.1 117.7 47.3 20% West North Central 54.0 104.1 42.9 8% South 51.5 79.8 31.6 31% South Atlantic 47.4 76.1 30.4 16% East South Central 56.6 87.3 36.1 6% West South Central 56.6 82.4 31.4 9% West 56.6 77.4 28.1 18% Mountain 54.4 89.8 33.7 6% Pacific 58.0 71.8 25.7 11% U.S. Average 58.7 94.9 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    4 Primary Energy Consumption Total Per Household 1980 79.6 N.A. 123.5 15.72 197.4 1981 82.8 N.A. 114.2 15.23 184.0 1982 83.7 N.A. 114.6 15.48 184.9 1983 84.6 N.A. 110.6 15.38 181.9 1984 86.3 N.A. 113.9 15.90 184.2 1985 87.9 N.A. 111.7 16.02 182.3 1986 89.1 N.A. 108.4 15.94 178.8 1987 90.5 N.A. 108.2 16.21 179.1 1988 92.0 N.A. 112.7 17.12 186.0 1989 93.5 N.A. 113.7 17.76 190.0 1990 94.2 N.A. 102.7 16.92 179.5 1991 95.3 N.A. 104.6 17.38 182.4 1992 96.4 N.A. 104.7 17.31 179.6 1993 97.7 N.A. 107.5

  16. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  17. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil...

  18. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Electricity generated from sources that are renewable - hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste - have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year ...

  20. Residential Building Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building...

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 4.79 30% 1.72 11% 0.03 0% 0.85 5% 2.45 5.89 8.33 53% 15.72 100% - 1981 4.57 30% 1.52 10% 0.03 0% 0.87 6% 2.46 5.77 8.24 54% 15.23 100% - 1982 4.68 30% 1.42 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.49 5.89 8.38 54% 15.48 100% - 1983 4.45 29% 1.33 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.56 6.03 8.59 56% 15.38 100% - 1984 4.64 29% 1.51 10% 0.04 0% 0.98 6% 2.66 6.07 8.73 55% 15.90 100% - 1985 4.51 28% 1.55 10% 0.04 0% 1.01 6%

  2. Kentucky Utilities Company and Louisville Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

     Kentucky Utilities Company's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

  3. Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Interstate Power and Light (Alliant Energy) offers residential energy efficiency rebates for Iowa customers for a variety of technologies. Rebates are available for certain HVAC equipment,...

  4. Fuel consumption of freight trains hauled by diesel electric locomotives

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, R.W.

    1983-05-01

    The cost of railway diesel fuel has become an increasingly high proportion of railway operating expenses. The paper analyzes the generation and utilization of rail horsepower in freight train operations. The effects on fuel consumption of variations in several parameters including train consist, car weight, gradient, average speed, meet strategy, throttle control, locomotive axle arrangement, and train marshalling are examined. Estimates are made of the value, in terms of fuel cost, of weight reduction of freight cars and of selective train marshalling.

  5. Development of an Energy-Savings Calculation Methodology for Residential Miscellaneous Electric Loads: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Eastment, M.

    2006-08-01

    In order to meet whole-house energy savings targets beyond 50% in residential buildings, it will be essential that new technologies and systems approaches be developed to address miscellaneous electric loads (MELs). These MELs are comprised of the small and diverse collection of energy-consuming devices found in homes, including what are commonly known as plug loads (televisions, stereos, microwaves), along with all hard-wired loads that do not fit into other major end-use categories (doorbells, security systems, garage door openers). MELs present special challenges because their purchase and operation are largely under the control of the occupants. If no steps are taken to address MELs, they can constitute 40-50% of the remaining source energy use in homes that achieve 60-70% whole-house energy savings, and this percentage is likely to increase in the future as home electronics become even more sophisticated and their use becomes more widespread. Building America (BA), a U.S. Department of Energy research program that targets 50% energy savings by 2015 and 90% savings by 2025, has begun to identify and develop advanced solutions that can reduce MELs.

  6. Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  7. Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2007-05-01

    The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

  8. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the...

  9. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  10. MidAmerican Energy (Gas and Electric)- Residential EnergyAdvantage Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    MidAmerican Energy's EnergyAdvantage Financing Program, in partnership with First American Bank, offers Iowa residential energy customers below-prime financing on installation of qualifying energy...

  11. Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Aaron; New, Joshua Ryan; Chandler, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

  12. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  13. Kenergy- Residential Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kenergy is an electric cooperative that serves 51,000 households and commercial customers in 14 western Kentucky counties. Currently, Kenergy offers three rebate programs for residential customers...

  14. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India’s Housing Sector

    Reports and Publications

    2014-01-01

    India offers a unique set of features for studying electricity use in the context of a developing country. First, it has a rapidly developing economy with high yearly growth rates in gross domestic product (GDP). Second, it has the second -largest population in the world and is likely to have the largest population in the future. Third, its electric system is maturing—with known difficulties (outages, shortages, issues with reliability and quality) that are characteristic of a developing country. This article focuses on electricity use in the residential sector of India and discusses key trends and provides an overview of available usage estimates from various sources. Indian households are an interesting environment where many of India’s unique features interact. The recent economic gains correlate with rising incomes and possible changes in living standards, which could affect electricity or other energy use within households. Additionally, the maturing electric system and large population in India both offer opportunities to study a range of interactions between electrification and electricity usage in a developing country.

  15. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency

    Education - Teach & Learn

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  16. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  17. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption and Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    DOE / EERE / NEED Project

    2011-06-07

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  18. Final Technical Report: Residential Fuel Cell Demonstration by the Delaware County Electric Cooperative, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Hilson Schneider

    2007-06-06

    This demonstration project contributes to the knowledge base in the area of fuel cells in stationary applications, propane fuel cells, edge-of-grid applications for fuel cells, and energy storage in combination with fuel cells. The project demonstrated that it is technically feasible to meet the whole-house electrical energy needs of a typical upstate New York residence with a 5-kW fuel cell in combination with in-home energy storage without any major modifications to the residence or modifications to the consumption patterns of the residents of the home. The use of a fuel cell at constant output power through a 120-Volt inverter leads to system performance issues including: • relatively poor power quality as quantified by the IEEE-defined short term flicker parameter • relatively low overall system efficiency Each of these issues is discussed in detail in the text of this report. The fuel cell performed well over the 1-year demonstration period in terms of availability and efficiency of conversion from chemical energy (propane) to electrical energy at the fuel cell output terminals. Another strength of fuel cell performance in the demonstration was the low requirements for maintenance and repair on the fuel cell. The project uncovered a new and important installation consideration for propane fuel cells. Alcohol added to new propane storage tanks is preferentially absorbed on the surface of some fuel cell reformer desulfurization filters. The experience on this project indicates that special attention must be paid to the volume and composition of propane tank additives. Size, composition, and replacement schedules for the de-sulfurization filter bed should be adjusted to account for propane tank additives to avoid sulfur poisoning of fuel cell stacks. Despite good overall technical performance of the fuel cell and the whole energy system, the demonstration showed that such a system is not economically feasible as compared to other commercially available

  19. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  20. SMECO- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative's (SMECO) Residential Energy Efficiency Program helps residential customers save energy by providing rebates for home weatherization and the installation of...

  1. Residential Transportation Historical Publications reports, data...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    May 2008 The Energy Information Administration conducts several core consumption surveys. Among them was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS)....

  2. Denton Municipal Electric- GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Denton Municipal Electric pays residential and small commercial customers to reduce energy demand and consumption in order to reduce the utility bills of DME customers, reduce peak load, reduce...

  3. Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Richard "Barney" Carlson; Matthew G. Shirk; Benjamin M. Geller

    2001-11-01

    Primary Factors that Impact the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles RICHARD ‘BARNEY’ CARLSON, MATTHEW G. SHIRK Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption as compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) by utilizing electrical energy for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEV’s, analysis has shown that the fuel consumption of PHEV’s is more significantly affected than conventional vehicles by either the driver’s input or by the environmental inputs around the vehicle. Six primary factors have been identified that significantly affect the fuel consumption of PHEV’s. In this paper, these primary factors are analyzed from on-road driving and charging data from over 200 PHEV’s throughout North America that include Hymotion Prius conversions and Hybrids Plus Escape conversions. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) tests plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles as part of its conduct of DOE’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). In collaboration with its 75 testing partners located in 23 states and Canada, INL has collected data on 191 PHEVs, comprised of 12 different PHEV models (by battery manufacturer). With more than 1 million PHEV test miles accumulated to date, the PHEVs are fleet, track, and dynamometer tested. Six Primary Factors The six primary factors that significantly impact PHEV fuel consumption are listed below. Some of the factors are unique to plug-in vehicles while others are common for all types of vehicles. 1. Usable Electrical Energy is dictated by battery capacity, rate of depletion as well as when the vehicle was last plugged-in. With less electrical energy available the powertrain must use more petroleum to generate the required power output. 2. Driver Aggressiveness impacts the fuel consumption of nearly all vehicles but

  4. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative-Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    ERC loans are available only for replacement items, not for new homes. Loans of up to $5,000 are available for heat pumps, electric water heaters, and other electric heating products.  Weatheriza...

  5. Residential | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy consumption. The residential sector accounted for 57 percent of that energy use and the...

  6. Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

    2010-03-01

    This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

  7. Building Technologies Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy Consumption in Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy Consumption in Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) Pat Phelan (patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov) BTO Emerging Technologies June 3, 2016 2 Why Do We Care About MELs? Problem: Fraction of energy consumption due to MELs is rising as other building technologies become more efficient. DOE Quadrennial Technology Review (2015)  60% of remaining energy consumption after 2020 R&D targets are achieved, the majority of which are MELs. FY16 Activities: * Panel

  8. Profiling Real-Time Electricity Consumption Data for Process Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2013-01-01

    Today, smart meters serve as key assets to utilities and their customers because they are capable of recording and communicating real-time energy usage data; thus, enabling better understanding of energy usage patterns. Other potential benefits of smart meters data include the ability to improve customer experience, grid reliability, outage management, and operational efficiency. Despite these tangible benefits, many utilities are inundated by data and remain uncertain about how to extract additional value from these deployed assets outside of billing operations. One way to overcome this challenge is the development of new metrics for classifying utility customers. Traditionally, utilities classified their customers based on their business nature (residential, commercial, and industrial) and/or their total annual consumption. While this classification is useful for some operational functions, it is too limited for designing effective monitoring and control strategies. In this paper, a data mining methodology is proposed for clustering and profiling smart meters data in order to form unique classes of customers exhibiting similar usage patterns. The developed clusters could help utilities in identifying opportunities for achieving some of the benefits of smart meters data.

  9. Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu) End Use Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other 1 Total All Buildings 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 3,559 Principal Building Activity Education 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 371 Food Sales 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 208 Food Service 10 28 24 10 42 13 70 2 2 15 217 Health Care 6 34 42 2 105 1 8 4 10 36 248 Inpatient 3 25 38 2 76 1 4 2 7 21

  10. Customer-Economics of Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Impact of High Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings with Net Metering

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential photovoltaic (PV) systems in the US are often compensated at the customer's underlying retail electricity rate through net metering. There is growing interest in understanding how potential changes in rates may impact the value of bill savings from PV. This article uses a production cost and capacity expansion model to project California hourly wholesale electricity market prices under a reference scenario and a 33% renewables scenario. Second, based on the wholesale electricity market prices generated by the model, the article develops retail rates (i.e., flat, time-of-use, and real-time pricing) for each future scenario based on standard retail rate design principles. Finally, based on these retail rates, the bill savings from PV are estimated for 226 California residential customers under two types of net metering, for each scenario. The article finds that high renewable penetrations can drive substantial changes in residential retail rates and that these changes, together with variations in retail rate structures and PV compensation mechanisms, interact to place substantial uncertainty on the future value of bill savings from residential PV.

  11. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for CFL and LED light bulbs,...

  12. Residential electricity rates for the United States for Solcost Data Bank cities

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L. E.

    1981-05-01

    Electricity rates are given for selected cities in each state, first of the Southern Solar Energy Center region and then of the rest of the US, for an average residence that uses 1000 kWh a month. (LEW)

  13. Global residential appliance standards

    SciTech Connect

    Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E.; Lebot, B.

    1993-03-01

    In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

  14. Natural Gas Residential Price (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  15. Natural Gas Residential Price (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  16. Impact of Rate Design Alternatives on Residential Solar Customer Bills. Increased Fixed Charges, Minimum Bills and Demand-based Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, Lori; Davidson, Carolyn; McLaren, Joyce; Miller, John

    2015-09-01

    With rapid growth in energy efficiency and distributed generation, electric utilities are anticipating stagnant or decreasing electricity sales, particularly in the residential sector. Utilities are increasingly considering alternative rates structures that are designed to recover fixed costs from residential solar photovoltaic (PV) customers with low net electricity consumption. Proposed structures have included fixed charge increases, minimum bills, and increasingly, demand rates - for net metered customers and all customers. This study examines the electricity bill implications of various residential rate alternatives for multiple locations within the United States. For the locations analyzed, the results suggest that residential PV customers offset, on average, between 60% and 99% of their annual load. However, roughly 65% of a typical customer's electricity demand is non-coincidental with PV generation, so the typical PV customer is generally highly reliant on the grid for pooling services.

  17. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumption and Expenditures Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Consumption Wood and Solar Energy Consumption Fuel Oil and District Heat Consumption Energy Consumption in...

  18. Power consumption and byproducts in electron beam and electrical discharge processing of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.C.; Bardsley, J.N.

    1996-02-20

    Among the new methods being investigated for the post-process reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in atmospheric-pressure air streams are based on non-thermal plasmas. Electron beam, pulsed corona and dielectric-barrier discharge methods are among the more extensively investigated techniques for producing non-thermal plasmas. In order to apply non-thermal plasmas in an industrial scale, it is important to establish the electrical power requirements and byproducts of the process. In this paper the authors present experimental results using a compact electron beam reactor, a pulsed corona and a dielectric-barrier discharge reactor. They have used these reactors to study the removal of a wide variety of VOCs. The effects of background gas composition and gas temperature on the decomposition chemistry have been studied. They present a description of the reactions that control the efficiency of the plasma process. They have found that pulsed corona and other types of electrical discharge reactors are most suitable only for processes requiring O radicals. For VOCs requiring copious amounts of electrons, ions, N atoms or OH radicals, the use of electron beam reactors is generally the best way of minimizing the electrical power consumption. Electron beam processing is remarkably more effective for all of the VOCs tested. For control of VOC emissions from dilute, large volume sources such as paint spray booths, cost analysis shows that the electron beam method is cost-competitive to thermal and catalytic methods that employ heat recovery or hybrid techniques.

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% |

  20. Poudre Valley REA- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association (PVREA), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, offers residential energy efficiency rebate programs for qualified residential heat pumps, air conditioners...

  1. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  2. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households ...

  3. Miscellaneous Electricity Services in the Buildings Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications

    2007-01-01

    Residential and commercial electricity consumption for miscellaneous services has grown significantly in recent years and currently accounts for more electricity use than any single major end-use service in either sector (including space heating, space cooling, water heating, and lighting). In the residential sector, a proliferation of consumer electronics and information technology equipment has driven much of the growth. In the commercial sector, telecommunications and network equipment and new advances in medical imaging have contributed to recent growth in miscellaneous electricity use.

  4. Pilot Evaluation of Energy Savings from Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Danny S.; Hoak, David; Cummings, Jamie

    2008-01-01

    This report discusses instantaneous feedback on household electrical demand has shown promise to reduce energy consumption. This report reviews past research and describes a two year pilot evaluation of a low cost residential energy feedback system installed in twenty case study homes in FL.

  5. Updated Miscellaneous Electricity Loads and Appliance Energy Usage Profiles for Use in Home Energy Ratings, the Building America Benchmark Procedures and Related Calculations. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Danny; Fairey, Philip; Hendron, Robert

    2011-06-10

    This report discusses how TIAX data, supplemented by the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)public use data set was used to make significant improvements in the prediction metods for estimating energy use of miscellaneous electric loads.

  6. Electric sales and revenue 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  7. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division

  8. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.7 66.0 142.2 36 16 28.0 10 708 0.33 558 204 Census Region and Division

  9. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division

  10. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division

  11. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and

  12. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division

  13. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under ...

  14. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist.. This report is mandatory under ...

  15. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Street Address Contractor's City, State, and ZIP Code Or you may FAX the completed ... and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and ...

  16. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... foot at a pressure base of 14.73 pounds standard per square inch absolute and a temperature base of 60 degrees Fahrenheit; Cubic meter is a unit of measure which equals 35.314 ...

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88

  18. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  19. Thermal Profiling of Residential Energy Use

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, A; Rajagopal, R

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology for informing targeted demand-response (DR) and marketing programs that focus on the temperature-sensitive part of residential electricity demand. Our methodology uses data that is becoming readily available at utility companies-hourly energy consumption readings collected from "smart" electricity meters, as well as hourly temperature readings. To decompose individual consumption into a thermal-sensitive part and a base load (non-thermally-sensitive), we propose a model of temperature response that is based on thermal regimes, i.e., unobserved decisions of consumers to use their heating or cooling appliances. We use this model to extract useful benchmarks that compose thermal profiles of individual users, i.e., terse characterizations of the statistics of these users' temperature-sensitive consumption. We present example profiles generated using our model on real consumers, and show its performance on a large sample of residential users. This knowledge may, in turn, inform the DR program by allowing scarce operational and marketing budgets to be spent on the right users-those whose influencing will yield highest energy reductions-at the right time. We show that such segmentation and targeting of users may offer savings exceeding 100% of a random strategy.

  20. Electric Storage Water Heaters

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  1. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal 5 Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 1,995,055 414,632 569,375 NA 2,979,062 0 1,349,185 5,803 NA NA NA NA 1,354,988 NA 5,420 4,339,470 1950 2,199,111

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    3A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings...

  3. Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL 3 Natural Gas Coal 4 Total 5 Million Kilowatthours Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Million Short Tons Indirect End Use (Boiler Fuel) 12,109 21 4 2 2,059 25 – – Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 2 1,245 6 – – CHP 6 and/or Cogeneration Process – – 10 1 (s) 814 19 – – Direct End Use All Process Uses 657,810

  4. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  5. Analysis of residential, industrial and commercial sector responses to potential electricity supply constraints in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Z.J.; Fang, J.M.; Lyke, A.J.; Krudener, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    There is considerable debate over the ability of electric generation capacity to meet the growing needs of the US economy in the 1990s. This study provides new perspective on that debate and examines the possibility of power outages resulting from electricity supply constraints. Previous studies have focused on electricity supply growth, demand growth, and on the linkages between electricity and economic growth. This study assumes the occurrence of electricity supply shortfalls in the 1990s and examines the steps that homeowners, businesses, manufacturers, and other electricity users might take in response to electricity outages.

  6. MassSAVE (Gas)- Residential Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    MassSAVE, through Gas Networks, organizes residential conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These utilities...

  7. Florida Public Utilities- Residential HVAC Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida Public Utilities offers rebates to electric residential customers who improve the efficiency of homes. Central air conditioners and heat pumps which meet program requirements are eligible...

  8. EWEB- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) provides cash incentives to help residential customers increase the energy efficiency of homes through several different rebate programs. Rebates are provided...

  9. Piedmont EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Electric Membership Corporation (PEMC) offers a financial incentive for residential members to install energy efficient heat pumps and LED lighting in eligible homes. Rebates are available...

  10. TEP- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tucson Electric Power (TEP) offers rebates to its residential customers who have certain energy efficient equipment installed by participating contractors. The rebate is provided directly to the...

  11. Farmers RECC- Residential Insulation Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative (RECC) Button-Up Program provides free energy audits and rebates for insulation upgrades to its residential customers. Farmers RECC's energy advisor will...

  12. Electric sales and revenue 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  13. Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S.

  14. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC's residential rebate program offers a $500 rebate for the installation of 15 SEER or higher electric...

  15. Residential Demand Sector Data, Commercial Demand Sector Data, Industrial Demand Sector Data - Annual Energy Outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-18

    Tables describing consumption and prices by sector and census division for 2006 - includes residential demand, commercial demand, and industrial demand

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81

  17. Total Natural Gas Consumption (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  18. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rábago Rábago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff ‣ Fair to the utility and non-solar customers ‣ Fair compensation to the solar customer ‣ Decouple compensation from incentives ‣ Align public policy goals (decouple compensation from consumption) ‣ Intuitively sound and administratively simple 2 Historical Antecedents ‣ Externalities ‣ Price ≠ Cost ‣ Green Power ‣ Small Is Profitable (http://www.smallisprofitable.org/) ‣ Local

  19. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electricity generated from sources that are renewable – hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste – have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  1. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  2. Residential applliance data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.J,; Johnson, F.X.; Brown, R.E.; Hanford, J.W.; Kommey, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    This report details the data, assumptions and methodology for end-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the US residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. In this modeling framework, appliances include essentially all residential end-uses other than space conditioning end-uses. We have defined a distinct appliance model for each end-use based on a common modeling framework provided in the REEPS software. This report details our development of the following appliance models: refrigerator, freezer, dryer, water heater, clothes washer, dishwasher, lighting, cooking and miscellaneous. Taken together, appliances account for approximately 70% of electricity consumption and 30% of natural gas consumption in the US residential sector. Appliances are thus important to those residential sector policies or programs aimed at improving the efficiency of electricity and natural gas consumption. This report is primarily methodological in nature, taking the reader through the entire process of developing the baseline for residential appliance end-uses. Analysis steps documented in this report include: gathering technology and market data for each appliance end-use and specific technologies within those end-uses, developing cost data for the various technologies, and specifying decision models to forecast future purchase decisions by households. Our implementation of the REEPS 2.1 modeling framework draws on the extensive technology, cost and market data assembled by LBL for the purpose of analyzing federal energy conservation standards. The resulting residential appliance forecasting model offers a flexible and accurate tool for analyzing the effect of policies at the national level.

  3. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... heating and cooling behavior in homes with connected thermostats * 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Establishes baseline for TCC t-stat homes - Preceded ...

  4. PNM- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    PNM also offers the PNM Home Energy Checkup, which gives residential customers a snapshot of their home's electricity use and identifies opportunities to reduce electricity waste. There are three...

  5. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-22

    This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

  6. Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    national concerns about dependence on foreign oil and the deleterious effect on the environment of fossil fuel combustion, residential vehicle fleet fuel consumption was...

  7. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on...

  8. Residential Buildings

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5, 2009 10:18 AM http:www.eia.govconsumptioncommercialdataarchivecbecspba99residential.html If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA...

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014

  10. EWEB- Solar Electric Program (Rebate)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Eugene Water & Electric Board's (EWEB) Solar Electric Program offers financial incentives for residential, nonprofit, and government customers that generate electricity solar photovoltaic...

  11. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric LoadReduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak PricingTariff

    SciTech Connect

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-11-14

    The goal of this investigation was to characterize themanual and automated response of residential customers to high-price"critical" events dispatched under critical peak pricing tariffs testedin the 2003-2004 California Statewide Pricing Pilot. The 15-monthexperimental tariff gave customers a discounted two-price time-of-userate on 430 days in exchange for 27 critical days, during which the peakperiod price (2 p.m. to 7 p.m.) was increased to about three times thenormal time-of-use peak price. We calculated response by five-degreetemperature bins as the difference between peak usage on normal andcritical weekdays. Results indicatedthat manual response to criticalperiods reached -0.23 kW per home (-13 percent) in hot weather(95-104.9oF), -0.03 kW per home (-4 percent) in mild weather (60-94.9oF),and -0.07 kW per home (-9 percent) during cold weather (50-59.9oF).Separately, we analyzed response enhanced by programmable communicatingthermostats in high-use homes with air-conditioning. Between 90oF and94.9oF, the response of this group reached -0.56 kW per home (-25percent) for five-hour critical periods and -0.89 kW/home (-41 percent)for two-hour critical periods.

  12. "YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK ...

  13. Average Residential Price

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Gas Producing Oil Wells Estimated Production Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals

  14. Average Residential Price

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground

  15. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census

  16. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    questionnaires 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998

  19. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    for 1994, will continue the 3-year cycle. The RTECS, a subsample of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), is an integral part of a series of surveys designed by...

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5%

  1. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    SciTech Connect

    German, Alea; Hoeschele, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Residential air conditioning (AC) represents a challenging load for many electric utilities with poor load factors. Mechanical precooling improves the load factor by shifting cooling operation from on-peak to off-peak hours. This provides benefits to utilities and the electricity grid, as well as to occupants who can take advantage of time-of-use (TOU) electricity rates. Performance benefits stem from reduced compressor cycling, and shifting condensing unit operation to earlier periods of the day when outdoor temperatures are more favorable to operational efficiency. Finding solutions that save energy and reduce demand on the electricity grid is an important national objective and supports key Building America goals. The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical AC precooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling was used to evaluate two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes. A successful off-peak AC strategy offers the potential for increased efficiency and improved occupant comfort, and promotes a more reliable and robust electricity grid. Demand response capabilities and further integration with photovoltaic TOU generation patterns provide additional opportunities to flatten loads and optimize grid impacts.

  2. Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-31

    The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

  3. Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

    1995-01-01

    Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

  4. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10<//td> 1989 9,135 6,901 18,424 1,143 35,603 [–] 685 1,781 9,112 [–] – – 11,578 – –

  5. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  6. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  8. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  10. Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

  11. Jones-Onslow EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation offers rebates to residential members who install energy efficient heating and cooling equipment. Members can replace an existing central AC or heat...

  12. Module Embedded Microinverter Smart Grid Ready Residential Solar...

    Energy Saver

    along with functional redundancies, present barriers to achieving an unsubsidized residential system cost that is competitive with the average U.S. retail electricity price. ...

  13. SMECO - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Clothes Washer: 200 Water Cooler: 100 Room AC: 25 Dehumidifier: 25 Spray Rinse Valves: 75 Summary Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative's (SMECO) Non-Residential Energy...

  14. Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Cooperative Utilities)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Associated Electric Cooperative and many of its member cooperatives offer rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment for the home. Eligible equipment...

  15. Montana-Dakota Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers several residential rebates on energy efficient equipment for natural gas and electric customers. Natural gas customers are eligible for rebates on furnaces...

  16. South Kentucky RECC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation (RECC) provides service to more than 60,000 customers in southeastern Kentucky. To promote energy efficiency to residential customers, South...

  17. Bartholomew County REMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bartholomew County Rural Electric Membership (BCREM) Cooperative provides its residential customers with rebates for geothermal and air source heat pumps, central air conditioners, and new high...

  18. PG&E (Gas)- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) offers rebates and other incentives to non-residential natural gas customers to increase energy efficiency. 

  19. Jones-Onslow EMC- Residential Heating and Cooling Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jones-Onslow Electric Membership Corporation offers rebates to residential members who install energy efficient heating and cooling equipment. Members can replace an existing central AC or heat...

  20. Johnson County REMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Johnson County Rural Electric Membership Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers who install or replace new water heating and HVAC equipment. Rebates are available on the purchase and...

  1. Share of Total U.S. Natural Gas Residential Deliveries

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data Series: Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, ...

  2. Plumas-Sierra REC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plumas-Sierra Rural Electric Cooperative (PSREC) offers several financial incentives for residential customers to improve the efficiency of their homes by upgrading to energy saving appliances and...

  3. Middle Tennessee EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation (MTEMC) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offer incentives for residential customers through the eScore Program by:

  4. Monmouth Power & Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Monmouth Power & Light offers a wide range of energy efficiency rebates that encourage residential customers to save energy in their homes. To qualify for these incentives electricity must be...

  5. Lumbee River EMC- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation (LREMC) offers low interest loans to help residential members increase the energy efficiency of homes. Loans up to $17,000 are available for the...

  6. Idaho Falls Power- Residential Weatherization Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Residential customers with permanently installed electric heat who receive service from the City of Idaho Falls, are eligible for 0% weatherization loans. City Energy Service will conduct an energy...

  7. EWEB- Residential Solar Water Heating Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Water & Electric Board (EWEB) offers residential customers a loan and cash discount program called, "The Bright Way To Heat Water." The program is designed to promote the installation of...

  8. EWEB- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB) assists residential customers in financing energy efficiency improvements through a variety of loan programs.  Zero interest loans of varying amounts and...

  9. Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  10. Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  11. Commercial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  12. Industrial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  13. Industrial Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  14. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity,...

  15. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-10

    Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1987, Part 1: National Data is the second publication in a series from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is prepared by the Energy End Use Division (EEUD) of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Information Administration (EIA). The EIA collects and publishes comprehensive data on energy consumption in occupied housing units in the residential sector through the RECS. 15 figs., 50 tabs.

  16. Residential Buildings Integration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Residential Buildings Integration Residential Buildings Integration Zero Energy Ready Home Zero Energy Ready Home Zero Energy Ready Homes are so efficient that a renewable energy system can offset all or most of its annual energy consumption. Read more Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Home Performance with ENERGY STAR The Home Performance with ENERGY STAR (HPwES) program connects homeowners with experienced and trusted contractors that can help explain a home's energy use and identify home

  17. Stochastic Optimal Scheduling of Residential Appliances with Renewable Energy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hongyu; Pratt, Annabelle; Chakraborty, Sudipta

    2015-07-03

    This paper proposes a stochastic, multi-objective optimization model within a Model Predictive Control (MPC) framework, to determine the optimal operational schedules of residential appliances operating in the presence of renewable energy source (RES). The objective function minimizes the weighted sum of discomfort, energy cost, total and peak electricity consumption, and carbon footprint. A heuristic method is developed for combining different objective components. The proposed stochastic model utilizes Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) for representing uncertainties in electricity price, outdoor temperature, RES generation, water usage, and non-controllable loads. The proposed model is solved using a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) solver and numerical results show the validity of the model. Case studies show the benefit of using the proposed optimization model.

  18. Optional Residential Program Benchmarking

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Optional Residential Program Benchmarking, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, January 23, 2014.

  19. residential-lighting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Progress Report Evaluation Utility Toolkit Residential Lighting Market Research The Residential Lighting Market Research Project will estimate market savings from...

  20. Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Residential Buildings Better Buildings Residential Network Better Buildings Residential Network Better Buildings Residential Network Explore Latest Peer Exchange Call Summaries ...

  1. Residential photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The photovoltaics overview section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  2. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

  3. Key Residential Building Equipment Technologies for Control and Grid Support PART I (Residential)

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, Michael R; Onar, Omer C; DeVault, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    Electrical energy consumption of the residential sector is a crucial area of research that has in the past primarily focused on increasing the efficiency of household devices such as water heaters, dishwashers, air conditioners, and clothes washer and dryer units. However, the focus of this research is shifting as objectives such as developing the smart grid and ensuring that the power system remains reliable come to the fore, along with the increasing need to reduce energy use and costs. Load research has started to focus on mechanisms to support the power system through demand reduction and/or reliability services. The power system relies on matching generation and load, and day-ahead and real-time energy markets capture most of this need. However, a separate set of grid services exist to address the discrepancies in load and generation arising from contingencies and operational mismatches, and to ensure that the transmission system is available for delivery of power from generation to load. Currently, these grid services are mostly provided by generation resources. The addition of renewable resources with their inherent variability can complicate the issue of power system reliability and lead to the increased need for grid services. Using load as a resource, through demand response programs, can fill the additional need for flexible resources and even reduce costly energy peaks. Loads have been shown to have response that is equal to or better than generation in some cases. Furthermore, price-incentivized demand response programs have been shown to reduce the peak energy requirements, thereby affecting the wholesale market efficiency and overall energy prices. The residential sector is not only the largest consumer of electrical energy in the United States, but also has the highest potential to provide demand reduction and power system support, as technological advancements in load control, sensor technologies, and communication are made. The prevailing loads

  4. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 279,817 285,978 295,027 1970's 297,022 304,327 305,492 292,531 271,877 272,634 290,439 277,340 ...

  5. Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 26,177 26,437 29,048 1970's 31,187 31,878 32,879 30,261 33,417 32,143 32,310 31,069 31,800 ...

  6. Tennessee Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 41,659 43,784 45,396 1970's 46,571 46,992 53,763 45,993 43,586 44,020 43,749 43,530 39,807 ...

  7. Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 90,994 93,425 101,124 1970's 105,208 109,758 104,648 110,524 116,314 119,981 122,786 119,292 ...

  8. Mississippi Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 26,145 29,526 30,233 1970's 36,642 40,196 39,334 31,422 28,900 29,530 26,584 25,949 30,387 ...

  9. Louisiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 74,386 77,762 82,965 1970's 86,148 79,893 82,847 93,072 91,844 96,221 95,457 94,350 81,978 ...

  10. Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 23,160 26,342 30,479 1970's 31,929 33,934 38,631 36,468 35,525 34,349 32,348 30,533 27,437 ...

  11. Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 73,471 74,919 78,451 1970's 82,646 83,434 86,171 83,988 85,495 90,226 95,107 93,214 86,756 ...

  12. Minnesota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 89,020 90,410 95,580 1970's 101,764 102,325 107,119 102,671 112,922 114,416 105,760 100,483 ...

  13. Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    457,353 330,184 195,534 123,438 107,521 101,728 1973-2016 Alabama 2,811 1,678 997 875 675 659 1989-2016 Alaska 1,886 1,233 864 534 479 534 1989-2016 Arizona 3,064 2,402 1,750 1,314 1,072 1,021 1989-2016 Arkansas 2,654 1,457 902 665 564 529 1989-2016 California 39,564 28,039 24,628 21,129 19,421 18,507 1989-2016 Colorado 14,346 10,396 6,531 2,956 2,597 2,751 1989-2016 Connecticut 5,562 4,229 2,385 1,365 1,075 933 1989-2016 Delaware 1,135 823 475 231 171 160 1989-2016 District of Columbia 1,107

  14. Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 23,160 26,342 30,479 1970's 31,929 33,934 38,631 36,468 35,525 34,349 32,348 30,533 27,437...

  15. California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 522,122 517,636 562,127 1970's 552,544 630,998 637,289 615,719 580,009 631,398 599,631 541,728 ...

  16. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    either air or liquid as the working fluid. It does not refer :<: passive collection of solar thermal energy. Fuel Oil Paid by Household: The household paid directly to the fuel...

  17. Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4,782,412 4,713,777 4,149,519 4,897,372 5,087,471 4,609,670 1930-2015 Alabama 42,215 36,582 27,580 35,059 39,006 32,709 1967-2015 Alaska 18,714 20,262 21,380 19,215 17,734 18,574 1967-2015 Arizona 37,812 38,592 34,974 39,692 32,397 34,507 1967-2015 Arkansas 36,240 33,737 26,191 34,989 38,127 32,998 1967-2015 California 494,890 512,565 477,931 481,773 397,489 401,172 1967-2015 Colorado 131,224 130,116 115,695 134,936 132,106 122,364 1967-2015 Connecticut 42,729 44,719 41,050 46,802 51,193 50,975

  18. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Residential...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    for specific manufacturing industries, size categories, and broad geographic regions. ... 164 148 10.8% * Kerosene 35 30 16.7% * Motor Gasoline 8 7 14.3% Crude Oil for Fuel 0 0 ...

  19. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... For more statistics on fuel usage patterns see the Fuels Used and End-Uses data tables. Entertainment and communication equipment has grown rapidly Nearly every home in the United ...

  20. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  1. Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,229,870 169,653,294 133,545,718 363,247 4,365,768 1,828,157,897 13,815,263 832 809,873 6,874

  2. Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

    2010-05-03

    The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar

  3. Residential Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps Sized to Heating Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Odukomaiya, Adewale; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps are an emerging technology offering significant energy savings potential and improved efficiency. With conventional single-speed systems, it is important to appropriately size heat pumps for the cooling load as over-sizing would result in cycling and insufficient latent capacity required for humidity control. These appropriately sized systems are often under-sized for the heating load and require inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat to meet the heating demand. Variable capacity heat pumps address these shortcomings by providing an opportunity to intentionally size systems for the dominant heating season load without adverse effects of cycling or insufficient dehumidification in the cooling season. This intentionally-sized system could result in significant energy savings in the heating season, as the need for inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat is drastically reduced. This is a continuation of a study evaluating the energy consumption of variable capacity heat pumps installed in two unoccupied research homes in Farragut, a suburb of Knoxville, Tennessee. In this particular study, space conditioning systems are intentionally sized for the heating season loads to provide an opportunity to understand and evaluate the impact this would have on electric resistance heat use and dehumidification. The results and conclusions drawn through this research are valid and specific for portions of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States falling in the mixed-humid climate zone. While other regions in the U.S. do not experience this type of climate, this work provides a basis for, and can help understand the implications of other climate zones on residential space conditioning energy consumption. The data presented here will provide a framework for fine tuning residential building EnergyPlus models that are being developed.

  4. Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The market for heat pumps is signifcant. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 9.8 million American homes are heated ...

  5. Is Efficiency Enough? Towards a New Framework for Carbon Savingsin the California Residential Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Moezzi, Mithra; Diamond, Rick

    2005-10-01

    The overall implementation of energy efficiency in the United States is not adequately aligned with the environmental benefits claimed for efficiency, because it does not consider absolute levels of energy use, pollutant emissions, or consumption. In some ways, promoting energy efficiency may even encourage consumption. A more effective basis for environmental policy could be achieved by recognizing the degree and nature of the synchronization between environmental objectives and efficiency. This research seeks to motivate and initiate exploration of alternative ways of defining efficiency or otherwise moderating energy use toward reaching environmental objectives, as applicable to residential electricity use in California. The report offers three main recommendations: (1) produce definitions of efficiency that better integrate absolute consumption, (2) attend to the deeper social messages of energy efficiency communications, and (3) develop a more critical perspective on benefits and limitations of energy efficiency for delivering environmental benefits. In keeping with the exploratory nature of this project, the report also identifies ten questions for further investigation.

  6. SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar Transcript A presentation sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy about using solar photovoltaics (PV) systems to provide electricity for homes. 20110125_pv_webinar.pdf (109.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) - Solar Hot Water Solar Webinar Text Version TAP Webcast Transcript July-29, 2009

  7. BPM Motors in Residential Gas Furnaces: What are theSavings?

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, James; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

    2006-05-12

    Residential gas furnaces contain blowers to distribute warm air. Currently, furnace blowers use either a Permanent Split Capacitor (PSC) or a Brushless Permanent Magnet (BPM) motor. Blowers account for the majority of furnace electricity consumption. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important for understanding electricity consumption of furnaces. The electricity consumption of blower motors depends on the static pressure across the blower. This paper examines both types of blower motors in non-condensing non-weatherized gas furnaces at a range of static pressures. Fan performance data is based on manufacturer product literature and laboratory tests. We use field-measured static pressure in ducts to get typical system curves to calculate how furnaces would operate in the field. We contrast this with the electricity consumption of a furnace blower operating under the DOE test procedure and manufacturer rated conditions. Furnace electricity use is also affected by operating modes that happen at the beginning and end of each furnace firing cycle. These operating modes are the pre-purge and post-purge by the draft inducer, the on-delay and off-delay of the blower, and the hot surface ignitor operation. To accurately calculate this effect, we use the number of firing cycles in a typical California house in the Central Valley of California. Cooling hours are not considered in the DOE test procedure. We also account for furnace blower use by the air conditioner and stand-by power. Overall BPM motors outperform PSC motors, but the total electricity savings are significantly less than projected using the DOE test procedure conditions. The performance gains depend on the static pressure of the household ducts, which are typically much higher than in the test procedures.

  8. Post-Retrofit Residential Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Ross; lutzenhiser, Loren; Moezzi, Mithra; Widder, Sarah H.; Chandra, Subrato; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-04-30

    This study examined a range of factors influencing energy consumption in households that had participated in residential energy-efficiency upgrades. The study was funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and was conducted by faculty and staff of Portland State University Center for Urban Studies and Department of Economics. This work was made possible through the assistance and support of the Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO), whose residential energy-efficiency programs provided the population from which the sample cases were drawn. All households in the study had participated in the ETO Home Performance with Energy Star (HPwES) program. A number of these had concurrently pursued measures through other ETO programs. Post-retrofit energy outcomes are rarely investigated on a house-by-house basis. Rather, aggregate changes are ordinarily the focus of program impact evaluations, with deviation from aggregate expectations chalked up to measurement error, the vagaries of weather and idiosyncrasies of occupants. However, understanding how homes perform post-retrofit on an individual basis can give important insights to increase energy savings at the participant and the programmatic level. Taking a more disaggregated approach, this study analyzed energy consumption data from before and after the retrofit activity and made comparisons with engineering estimates for the upgrades, to identify households that performed differently from what may have been expected based on the estimates. A statistical analysis using hierarchal linear models, which accounted for weather variations, was performed looking separately at gas and electrical use during the periods before and after upgrades took place. A more straightforward comparison of billing data for 12-month periods before and after the intervention was also performed, yielding the majority of the cases examined. The later approach allowed total energy use and costs to be

  9. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

  10. American Solar Electric Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Electric Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Solar Electric Inc Place: Scottsdale, Arizona Zip: 85251 Product: US installer of residential, commercial and industrial PV...

  11. Residential Energy Conservation Subsidy Exclusion (Personal)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The term "energy conservation measure" includes installations or modifications primarily designed to reduce consumption of electricity or natural gas, or to improve the management of energy deman...

  12. Residential Energy Conservation Subsidy Exclusion (Corporate)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The term "energy conservation measure" includes installations or modifications primarily designed to reduce consumption of electricity or natural gas, or to improve the management of energy demand....

  13. Leasing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rutberg, Michael; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    The article discusses the adoption, consequences and current market status of the leasing of residential photovoltaic systems. It addresses attributed energy savings and market potential of residential system leasing.

  14. Residential Solar Investment Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2012, the CT Green Bank* unveiled its solar photovoltaic residential investment program with the ultimate goal to support 30 megawatts of residential solar photovoltaics (PV). HB 6838...

  15. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    05, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 2.40 per gallon, down 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  16. Residential propane price decreases

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.48 per gallon, down 15.9 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  17. Residential propane price decreases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    8, 2015 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.34 per gallon, down 1.7 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by ...

  18. Residential propane prices available

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.92 per gallon, up 1.4 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by ...

  19. Residential propane price increases

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.03 per gallon, down 2-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  20. Residential propane prices available

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.91 per gallon, up 1.4 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by ...

  1. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.30 per gallon, down 17.5 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  2. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.02 per gallon, down 5-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  3. Residential propane prices decreases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    5, 2014 Residential propane prices decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.89 per gallon, that's down 11.9 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating ...

  4. Residential propane prices available

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 1.91 per gallon, down 6.7 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the ...

  5. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.17 per gallon, down 13.1 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  6. Residential propane price increases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Residential propane virtually unchanged The average retail price for propane is 2.02 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  7. Residential propane prices available

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.94 per gallon, up 2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the ...

  8. Residential propane prices available

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 1.92 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  9. Residential propane prices available

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.90 per gallon, up 2-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  10. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.01 per gallon, down 8-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  11. Residential propane prices surges

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2014 Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane fell to 3.08 per gallon, down 8.6 cents from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  12. Residential propane price increases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Residential propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.03 per gallon, down 6-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  13. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2015 Residential propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.36 per gallon, up half of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  14. Residential propane price increases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Residential propane price virtually unchanged The average retail price for propane is 2.03 per gallon, up 1-tenth of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel ...

  15. Residential Buildings Integration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Program Existing Homes HUD The residential program is grounded on technology and research. ... * Quantitative (reporting) * Qualitative (account management, peer exchange ...

  16. Residential Buildings Integration (RBI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov David Lee Program Manager Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) April 22, 2014 Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) Mission/Vision The Residential Buildings Integration (RBI) program's mission: To accelerate energy performance improvements in residential buildings by developing, demonstrating, and deploying a suite of cost-effective technologies, tools, and solutions to achieve peak performance in new and existing homes. RBI Vision,

  17. Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History ...

  18. Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 1231 Reserves ...

  19. Dynamic pricing? Not so fast. a residential consumer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Barbara R.

    2010-07-15

    With the installation of smart metering, will residential customers be moved to ''dynamic'' pricing? Some supporters of changing residential rate design from a fixed and stable rate structure believe customers should be required to take electric service with time-variant price signals. Not so fast, though. There are real implications associated with this strategy. (author)

  20. Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Messaging Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Residential Energy Efficiency Messaging, call slides and ...

  1. Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency Collaborating With Utilities on Residential Energy Efficiency Better Buildings Residential Network Program ...

  2. Residential Transactive Control Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-02-19

    Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

  3. Standby power consumption in U.S. residences

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, W.

    1997-12-01

    {open_quotes}Leaking electricity{close_quotes} is the electricity consumed by appliances while they are switched {open_quotes}off{close_quote} or not performing their principal function. Leaking electricity represents approximately 5 % of U.S. residential electricity. This is a relatively new phenomenon and is a result of proliferation of electronic equipment in homes. The standby losses in TVs, VCRs, compact audio systems, and cable boxes account for almost 40% of all leaking electricity. There is a wide range in standby losses in each appliance group. For example, standby losses in compact audio systems range from 2.1 to 28.6 W, even though their features are identical. In some cases, leaking electricity while switched off was only slightly less than energy consumption in the on mode. New features in these appliances may greatly increase leaking electricity, such as electronic program guides in TVs and cable boxes. In the standby mode, these new features require many extra components energized to permit the downloading of information. Several techniques are available to cut standby losses, most without using any new technologies. Simple redesign of circuits to avoid energizing unused components appears to save the most energy. A separate power supply, precisely designed for the actual power needed, is another solution. A switch mode power supply can substitute for the less efficient linear power supply. Switch mode power supplies cut no-load and standby losses by 60-80%. The combination of these techniques can cut leaking electricity by greater than 75%.

  4. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  5. The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-03-30

    Net metering has become a widespread policy in the U.S. for supporting distributed photovoltaics (PV) adoption. Though specific design details vary, net metering allows customers with PV to reduce their electric bills by offsetting their consumption with PV generation, independent of the timing of the generation relative to consumption - in effect, compensating the PV generation at retail electricity rates (Rose et al. 2009). While net metering has played an important role in jump-starting the residential PV market in the U.S., challenges to net metering policies have emerged in a number of states and contexts, and alternative compensation methods are under consideration. Moreover, one inherent feature of net metering is that the value of the utility bill savings it provides to customers with PV depends heavily on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate, as well as on the characteristics of the customer and PV system. Consequently, the value of net metering - and the impact of moving to alternative compensation mechanisms - can vary substantially from one customer to the next. For these reasons, it is important for policymakers and others that seek to support the development of distributed PV to understand both how the bill savings varies under net metering, and how the bill savings under net metering compares to other possible compensation mechanisms. To advance this understanding, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE). The analysis is based on hourly load data from a sample of 215 residential customers located in the service territories of the two utilities, matched with simulated hourly PV production for the same time period based on data from the nearest of 73 weather stations in the state.

  6. "YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ...

  7. Central Georgia EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central Georgia Electric Member Corporation (CGEMC) offers rebates for residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of existing homes or to build new energy efficient homes.  This year,...

  8. City of Danville Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Danville Utilities offers a variety of rebates to all electric residential customers served by the department. Rebates are available for washers, refrigerators, water heaters, heat pump...

  9. PG&E- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) offers a variety of rebates for residential customers who install energy efficient equipment in eligible homes. Prescriptive rebates are available for...

  10. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC offers the Member Loan Program to residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible...

  11. PG&E (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) offers rebates for residential gas customers who install energy efficient furnaces or water heaters in homes. More information and applications for...

  12. White River Valley Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White River Electric Coop's Rebate Program offers both residential and commercial rebates. Items available in the program include:

  13. Chapter 6: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Dimetrosky, S.; Parkinson, K.; Lieb, N.

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, residential lighting has represented a significant share of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency electricity savings. Utilities have achieved the majority of these savings by promoting the purchase and installation of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), both standard 'twister' bulbs and specialty CFLs such as reflectors, A-Lamps, globes, and dimmable lights.

  14. Miscellaneous electricity use in U.S. homes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Marla C.; Koomey, Jonathan G.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Meier, Alan; Huber, Wolfgang

    1999-09-30

    Historically, residential energy and carbon saving efforts have targeted conventional end uses such as water heating, lighting and refrigeration. The emergence of new household appliances has transformed energy use from a few large and easily identifiable end uses into a broad array of ''miscellaneous'' energy services. This group of so called miscellaneous appliances has been a major contributor to growth in electricity demand in the past two decades. We use industry shipment data, lifetimes, and wattage and usage estimates of over 90 individual products to construct a bottom-up end use model (1976-2010). The model is then used to analyze historical and forecasted growth trends, and to identify the largest individual products within the miscellaneous end use. We also use the end use model to identify and analyze policy priorities. Our forecast projects that over the period 1996 to 2010, miscellaneous consumption will increase 115 TWh, accounting for over 90 percent of future residential electricity growth. A large portion of this growth will be due to halogen torchiere lamps and consumer electronics, making these two components of miscellaneous electricity a particularly fertile area for efficiency programs. Approximately 20 percent (40 TWh) of residential miscellaneous electricity is ''leaking electricity'' or energy consumed by appliances when they are not performing their principal function. If the standby power of all appliances with a standby mode is reduced to one watt, the potential energy savings equal 21 TWh/yr, saving roughly $1-2 billion annually.

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    6 Residential Heated Floorspace, as of 2005 (Percent of Total Households) Floorspace (SF) Fewer than 500 6% 500 to 999 26% 1,000 to 1,499 24% 1,500 to 1,999 16% 2,000 to 2,499 9% 2,500 to 2,999 7% 3,000 or more 11% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC1-3.

  16. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

  17. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  18. Residential propane prices available

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential propane prices available The average retail price for propane is $1.99 per gallon, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices in the Midwest region averaged $1.40

  19. Household energy consumption and expenditures, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-02

    This report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990, is based upon data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Focusing on energy end-use consumption and expenditures of households, the 1990 RECS is the eighth in a series conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Over 5,000 households were surveyed, providing information on their housing units, housing characteristics, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information provided represents the characteristics and energy consumption of 94 million households nationwide.

  20. Chicopee Electric Light- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Chicopee Electric Light Department (CELD) is participating in the Massachusetts Municipal Whoesale Electric Company's Green Opportunity Proagram to encourage non-residential, commercial, and...

  1. Consolidated Electric Cooperative- Heat Pump and Water Heating Rebates

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consolidated Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential customers who install electric water heaters, dual-fuel heating system or geothermal heat pumps. A dual-fuel heating systems...

  2. Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Loan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Type Loan Program Summary The City of Ashland Conservation Division offers a solar water heating program to residential electric customers who currently use an electric...

  3. Residential and commercial buildings data book: Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Amols, G.R.; Howard, K.B.; Nicholls, A.K.; Guerra, T.D.

    1988-02-01

    This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in September, 1986 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; and Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. 12 refs., 59 figs., 118 tabs.

  4. 2015 Average Monthly Bill- Residential

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Number of Customers Average Monthly Consumption (kWh) Average Price (cents/kWh) Average Monthly Bill (Dollar and cents) New England 6,322,833 626 19.43 121.60 Connecticut 1,468,958 731 20.94 153.13 Maine 699,241 556 15.61 86.75 Massachusetts 2,794,918 602 19.83 119.26 New Hampshire 607,465 621 18.50 114.90 Rhode Island 440,191 594 19.29 114.50 Vermont 312,060 558 17.09 95.33 Middle Atlantic 15,872,487 707 15.97

  5. Residential-energy-demand modeling and the NIECS data base: an evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Cowing, T.G.; Dubin, J.A.; McFadden, D.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the 1978-1979 National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS) data base in terms of its usefulness for estimating residential energy demand models based on household appliance choice and utilization decisions. The NIECS contains detailed energy usage information at the household level for 4081 households during the April 1978 to March 1979 period. Among the data included are information on the structural and thermal characteristics of the housing unit, demographic characteristics of the household, fuel usage, appliance characteristics, and actual energy consumption. The survey covers the four primary residential fuels-electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas - and includes detailed information on recent household conservation and retrofit activities. Section II contains brief descriptions of the major components of the NIECS data set. Discussions are included on the sample frame and the imputation procedures used in NIECS. There are also two extensive tables, giving detailed statistical and other information on most of the non-vehicle NIECS variables. Section III contains an assessment of the NIECS data, focusing on four areas: measurement error, sample design, imputation problems, and additional data needed to estimate appliance choice/use models. Section IV summarizes and concludes the report.

  6. U.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption Estimate Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-09-01

    Multiyear study to evaluate light sources and identify opportunities for saving energy. This report estimates energy consumption for residential, commercial, industrial, and outdoor stationary.

  7. TES for Residential Settings

    SciTech Connect

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-07-31

    The article discusses thermal energy storage approaches for residential buildings. This article addresses both brick bank storage and phase change material technologies. The energy savings and market potential of these thermal energy storage methods are reviewed as well.

  8. Residential New Construction Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Residential New Construction Program includes two levels that can be achieved by completing various energy efficiency measures: Base Level and High Performance Level. Projects meeting the req...

  9. Residential propane price decreases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.32 per gallon, down 2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  10. Residential propane price increases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.98 per gallon, up 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  11. Residential propane prices increase

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane prices increase The average retail price for propane rose 3.9 cents from a week ago to 2.80 per gallon. That's up 53.7 cents from a year ago, based on the residential ...

  12. Residential propane price

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.39 per gallon, up 3.9 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  13. Residential propane price decreases

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.38 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  14. Residential propane prices stable

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.40 per gallon, down 9-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  15. Residential propane price

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 2.29 per gallon, down 3.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  16. Residential propane prices surges

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    propane prices surges The average retail price for propane rose to an all-time high of 4.01 a gallon, that's up 1.05 from a week ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey ...

  17. Residential propane price increases

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price increases The average retail price for propane is 1.96 per gallon, up 1.8 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  18. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.36 per gallon, down 7-tenths of a cent from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. ...

  19. Residential propane price

    Annual Energy Outlook

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.35 per gallon, down 1.1 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...

  20. Residential propane price decreases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    propane price decreases The average retail price for propane is 2.39 per gallon, down 2.2 cents from last week, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy ...