National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for represent retail at-the-pump

  1. Average household expected to save $675 at the pump in 2015

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average household expected to save $675 at the pump in 2015 Although retail gasoline prices have risen in recent weeks U.S. consumers are still expected to save about $675 per household in motor fuel costs this year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says the average pump price for regular grade gasoline in 2015 will be $2.43 per gallon. That's about 93 cents lower than last year's average. The savings for consumers will be even bigger during the

  2. Top 3 Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump...

    Energy Saver

    Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump Top 3 Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump November 25, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Save time and money on ...

  3. Save at the Pump and Charge While You Work | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    at the Pump and Charge While You Work Save at the Pump and Charge While You Work May 22, 2013 - 4:46pm Addthis An increasing number of employers are offering workplace charging. | ...

  4. CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road March 8, 2012 - 4:02pm Addthis Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new fast-fill CNG fueling station located at the city's main maintenance facility. | Courtesy of the City of Oklahoma City. Andy Mitchell, Public Works Project Manager for the City of Oklahoma City, refills a vehicle at the new

  5. Retail Unbundling

    Reports and Publications

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides a brief summary of the status of retail unbundling programs (also known as "customer choice" programs) for residential natural gas customers in various states,

  6. Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets

    Annual Energy Outlook

    & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price...

  7. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This is a special CALiPER report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. It follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012 (products purchased in 2010 and 2011), and is intended as a continuation that identifies long-term trends. For this report, products were selected to investigate specific hypotheses, rather than represent a sample of the increasingly large retail LED market.

  8. Retailer Energy Alliance Subcommittees

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Retailer Energy Alliances Subcommittees: Lighting and Electrical, Restaurant and Food Preparation, Refrigeration, HVAC, and Whole Building Systems.

  9. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of...

    Energy Saver

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the...

  10. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-216-3718 Website: www.dominionenergy.comen Outage...

  11. Retail Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CALiPER Testing » Application Reports » Retail Replacement Lamps Retail Replacement Lamps Annual CALiPER testing of A19, G25, candelabra, night light, MR16/PAR16, PAR20, and PAR30 replacement lamps - purchased directly from store shelves - offers insights on performance trends from year to year. The report findings offer valuable insights for manufacturers and retailers alike. Retail Lamps Study 3 (48 pages, February 2014) Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

  12. Financing Energy Efficiency in Retail

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Driving the reduction of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through efficiency projects in the retail sector can be difficult, particularly when many energy managers lack awareness of financing mechanisms available to them to fund their projects.

  13. Category:StandAloneRetail | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    IN Duke Energy Indiana Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Ind... 66 KB SVStandAloneRetail Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Jac... 63 KB SVStandAloneRetail...

  14. Facility Representatives

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-03-01

    This standard, DOE-STD-1063, Facility Representatives, defines the duties, responsibilities and qualifications for Department of Energy (DOE) Facility Representatives, based on facility hazard classification; risks to workers, the public, and the environment; and the operational activity level. This standard provides the guidance necessary to ensure that DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities have sufficient staffing of technically qualified facility representatives (FRs) to provide day-to-day oversight of contractor operations.

  15. Facility Representatives

    Energy Saver

    Program Manager Office of the Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DOE DR-1) DOE Headquarters, Forrestal Building 1000 Independence ...

  16. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-866-366-4357 Website: www.dom.com Outage Hotline: 1-866-366-4357...

  17. ,"New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ...

  18. The calm before the storm. [Retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect

    Studness, C.M.

    1993-05-15

    The right to refuse retail wheeling requests is one of the cornerstones of a utility's monopoly power. Utilities have fought staunchly to preserve it, most recently in preventing retail wheeling from becoming an important issue in the congressional debate over deregulation; the Energy Policy Act of 1992 steered clear of it. For the present, the prohibition of retail wheeling gives utilities enormous power over the retail electric power market. The ability to refuse retail wheeling requests, of course, prevents retail customers from buying power from third parties. This enables a utility to sell retail customers all the power it can generate, at a price that covers its cost plus an allowed return-even if its price exceeds that of power available in the wholesale market. The denial of retail wheeling thus protects a utility's inefficiencies, whose price is ultimately shouldered onto customers through cost-plus electric rates. Allowing retail wheeling would remove the foundation for much of the current monopoly power that utilities enjoy. Third parties could sell power to a utility's retail customers, since the utility would be required to wheel it. Retail customers would be able to bypass the local distribution utility to buy power from the cheapest source available. Market forces would drive pricing rather than the cost-plus ratemaking process. A utility whose electric rates were above market would have to meet the competitive price or lose sales.

  19. Facility Representatives

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-06

    REPLACED BY DOE-STD-1063 | SUPERSEDING DOE-STD-1063-2000 (MARCH 2000) The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that competent DOE staff personnel are assigned to oversee the day-to-day contractor operations at DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities.

  20. Factors affecting robust retail energy markets

    SciTech Connect

    Michelman, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper briefly defines an active retail market, details the factors that influence market activity and their relative importance, compares activity in various retail energy markets to date, and predicts future retail energy market activity. Three primary factors translate into high market activity: supplier margins, translated into potential savings for actively shopping customers; market size; and market barriers. The author surveys activity nationwide and predicts hot spots for the coming year.

  1. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  2. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release...

  3. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",2528,132247,20623,15.594305 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",48809,3782815,310903,8.2188265 ...

  4. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",39180,688117,81287,11.812962 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",283628,3270075,385380.5,11.785066 ...

  5. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Retailer Insights.

  6. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the information below to help their customers better understand energy-efficient lighting choices. New information will be added as it becomes available. U.S. retailers are welcome to use parts of these materials in their retail displays. In those cases, please do so without the Department of Energy's name, since we will

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on ...

  8. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Energy Saver

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) ...

  9. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Delaware References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  10. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  11. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  12. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Find the ...

  13. Effect of increases in energy-related labor forces upon retailing in Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The heightened mining employment that will result from increased extraction of coal from Alabama's Warrior Coal Basin will boost retail sales and employment. The Warrior Coal Basin counties (Fayette, Jefferson, Tuscaloosa and Walker) are heavily dependent upon coal mining as a source of employment and wages. Further, since the counties' economies grew increasingly dependent upon coal mining activities throughout the 1970s, it was believed that it would be possible to measure, with some acceptable level of reliability, the impact of the steadily rising mining activity upon the area's retailing sector. Therefore, a small scale econometric model was developed which represents the interrelationships among income, mining and trade employment and retail sales in the four-county Warrior Coal Basin area. The results of two versions of the model are presented. In the first version, area-wide retail sales are treated in the aggregate. In the second version, retail sales are disaggregated into twelve categories (e.g., food, apparel, furniture, etc.). The models were specified using 1960 to 1976 data. The mining employment growth scenario used in this report called for steady increases in mining employment that culminated in an employment level that is 4000 above the baseline employment projections by 1985. Both versions of the model predicted that cumulative real regional income would increase by $1.39 billion over seven years with the added mining employment. The predicted impacts on trade employment and real retail sales varied between the two models, however. The aggregate model predicts the addition of 7500 trade workers and an additional $1.35 billion in real retail sales. The disaggregate model suggests that food stores, automobile dealers, general merchandise stores, gas stations and lumber and building materials retailers would enjoy the greatest positive benefits.

  14. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 50046 Utility Location Yes Ownership R ISO Ercot Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  15. CPL Retail Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13151 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  16. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Budget History April 9, 2015 - FY 2015 (past) FY 2016 (current) FY 2017 - Dec. 31, 2018 ... retail financial calendars 3.1 Program Benchmarking Calls Q1, Q2 Q1 delayed less than a ...

  17. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  18. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and ...

  19. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website:...

  20. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Retail Energy, LLC Address: 2001 SE 10th St Place: Bentonville, AR Zip: 72712 Phone Number: (479) 204-0845...

  1. ,"New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ...

  2. Retail wheeling: Is this revolution necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Cudahy, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    As of a former state regulator and a once enthusiastic practitioner of public utility law, I find it fascinating to see the latest nostrum to burst on the electric utility scene: retail wheeling. Wheeling became a personal interest in the Texas interconnection fight of the late seventies and may have led to the interconnection and wheeling provision of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Retail wheeling contemplates that every electric power customer should be given an opportunity to seek out the lowest cost source of power wherever it can be found. As a practical matter, the drums for retail wheeling are presently being beaten by large industrial users, who believe that they have the capability to find low cost sources and to make advantageous commercial arrangements to acquire electricity. Large industrials have long been fighting the utilities for cheaper electricity, frequently using the threat of self-generation and cogeneration.

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4560,1201929.7,"NA","NA","NA",7923662.4 "Percentage of revenue",62.5,18.74,3.59,15.17,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",9.02,9.15,4.92,11.02,"NA","NA","NA",9.02...

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3,"NA",1063623.3,"NA","NA","NA",3703710.6 "Percentage of revenue",58.49,12.8,"NA",28.72,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",7.81,7.9,"NA",8.22,"NA","NA","NA",7.93...

  5. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) – Arlington, VA Partners: -- Deloitte – New York, NY -- Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) – Boston, MA -- Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) – Washington, D.C. -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) – Boston, MA

  6. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other

  7. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2009 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was

  8. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Regional Support Office (Purchase Order DE-AP45-97R553188). Funding was provided by the Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies, Ofiice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection (1.3 MB) More

  9. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Pennsylvania) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Pennsylvania References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  10. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

  11. Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC Smart Grid Project | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    deploys new services and market offerings for retail customers in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region. Reliant is deploying in-home energy displays,...

  12. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We ...

  13. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for ... determined that most compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicle owners in New Zealand were ...

  14. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  15. CALiPER Special Summary Report: Retail Replacement Lamp Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-01

    CALiPER testing has evaluated many products for commercial lighting markets and found some excellent performers. However, many of these are not available on the retail market. This special testing was undertaken to identify and test solid-state lighting (SSL) replacement lamp products that are available to the general public through retail stores and websites.

  16. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  17. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alaska" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Connecticut" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Idaho" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kansas" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kentucky" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nevada" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hampshire" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Jersey" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mexico" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    York" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rhode Island" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Washington" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wisconsin" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Wyoming" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Alabama" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  15. The great ``retail wheeling`` illusion, and more productive energy futures

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper sets out the reasons why many environmental and public interest organizations oppose retail wheeling. Cavanagh argues that retail wheeling would destroy incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation--benefits that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. The current debate over the competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is critical from both economic and environmental perspectives. All attempts to introduce broad-scale retail wheeling in the United States have failed; instead, state regulators are choosing a path that emphasizes competition and choice, but acknowledges fundamental differences between wholesale and retail markets. Given the physical laws governing the movement of power over centrally controlled grids, the choice offered to customers through retail wheeling of electricity is a fiction -- a re-allocation of costs is all that is really possible. Everyone wants to be able to claim the cheapest electricity on the system; unfortunately, there is not enough to go around. By endorsing the fiction of retail wheeling for certain types of customers, regulators would be recasting the retail electricity business as a kind of commodity exchange. That would reward suppliers who could minimize near-term unit costs of electricity while simultaneously destroying incentives for many investments, including cost-effective energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation, that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. This result, which has been analogized unpersuasively to trends in telecommunications and natural gas regulation, is neither desirable nor inevitable. States should go on saying no to retail wheeling in order to be able to create something better: regulatory reforms that align utility and societal interests in pursuing a least-cost energy future. An appendix contains notes on some recent Retail Wheeling Campaigns.

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    3 2010 Top Supermarkets, by Sales 2010 All Commodity Supermarket Wal-Mart Stores 3,001 Kroger Co. 2,460 Safeway, Inc. 1,461 Supervalu, Inc. 1,504 Ahold USA, Inc. (Stop and Shop, Giant) 746 Publix Super Markets, Inc. 1,035 Delhaize America, Inc. (Food Lion) 1,641 H.E. Butt Grocery Co. (HEB) 291 Meijer Inc. 195 Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. (Pathmark) 373 Note(s): Source(s): All commodity volume in this example represents the "annualized range of the estimated retail sales volume of

  17. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maryland References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form...

  18. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 212-997-8500 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  19. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  20. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  1. DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released another special report on LED lamps that are available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. CALiPER...

  2. Mercantile (Retail Other Than Mall) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Other Than Mall) Definition Buildings used for the sale and display of goods other than food. Sub Categories retail store; beer, wine, or liquor store; rental center; dealership or...

  3. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56620 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  4. Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56502 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  5. Net-Zero Energy Retail Store Debuts in Illinois

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Walgreens on November 21 opened a net-zero energy retail store in Evanston, Illinois that it anticipates will generate at least as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year.

  6. Efficiency Treasure Chest: How Cities, Manufacturers, and Retailers are

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Unlocking Energy Savings in Warehouses and Distribution Centers | Department of Energy Efficiency Treasure Chest: How Cities, Manufacturers, and Retailers are Unlocking Energy Savings in Warehouses and Distribution Centers Efficiency Treasure Chest: How Cities, Manufacturers, and Retailers are Unlocking Energy Savings in Warehouses and Distribution Centers January 10, 2017 3:00PM to 4:00PM EST Hear how partners are addressing energy use in warehouses and distributions and gain ideas for you

  7. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Digg Find

  9. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources

  10. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A ...

  11. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality...

    Energy Saver

    Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality ...

  12. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Melendez, M.

    2007-12-01

    NREL developed a model to test the investment profitability of adding E85 to retail stations. This report discusses this model and how retailers can make E85 a profitable business venture.

  13. Energy options: Cogen V and retail wheeling alternatives technical conference

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Energy Options technical conference proceedings contains 265 papers, of which 17 were selected for the database. The conference was split into two primary topics: cogeneration and retail wheeling. Subtopics under cogeneration included: the state of cogeneration in the United States, case studies in facility ownership, fuels considerations for tomorrow, and plant design considerations for cogeneration systems. Retail wheeling alternatives subtopics included U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rulings, end-user options for retail wheeling, deregulation issues, and forecasting of electricity generating costs. Papers not selected for the database, while clearly pertinent topics of interest, consisted of viewgraphs which were judged not to have sufficient technical information and coherence without the corresponding presentation. However, some papers which did consist of viewgraphs were included.

  14. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  15. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. CALiPER Exploratory Study Retail Replacement Lamps – 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-02

    In 2010, CALiPER conducted a study on LED replacement lamps found in retail stores. The results were less than satisfactory, and many products were classified as being unlikely to meet consumer expectations. In November 2011, CALiPER purchased a new sample of products for a follow-up study, with the intent of characterizing the progress of this essential market segment.

  17. DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps January 16, 2015 - 4:00pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. While previous reports in the CALiPER retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality, the new report - CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1 -

  18. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  19. UESC Training for Utility Representatives

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides utility representatives with additional training to meet their responsibilities with respect to Utility Energy Savings Contracts (UESC).

  20. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY Pursuant to Section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force Members: J. Bruce McDonald, Department of Justice Michael Bardee, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission John H. Seesel, Federal Trade Commission David Meyer, Department of Energy Karen Larsen, Department of Agriculture Report Contributors: Robin Allen -

  1. FGD markets & business in an age of retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Dalton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses (1) the market and technology outlook for flue gas desulfurization ({open_quotes}FGD{close_quotes}) systems, with particular emphasis on wet systems in North America and the implications of retail wheeling of electricity and emission allowances for the utility industry, and (2) implications for the utility industry of architect/engineering ({open_quotes}A/E{close_quotes}) firm tendencies to reduce greatly the FGD vendor`s scope of award. The paper concludes that (1) the FGD market will be modest domestically and robust offshore over the forecast period (5-10 years), although the utility industry`s response to federal and state air toxics rules and retail wheeling may eventually grow the FGD market domestically beyond that created by compliance with Phase II of the Clean Air Act`s Title IV acid rain program alone, (2) new designs are likely to follow trends established in the past few years, but will likely include advanced processes that use higher velocity and smaller space, and possibly multi-pollutant control to remain competitive, and (3) shrinking of the FGD vendor`s scope may have adverse implications for the utility end-user, while retail wheeling may increase third-party ownership of FGD technology

  2. Occupant Perceptions and a Health Outcome in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Mingjie; Kim, Yang-Seon; Srebric, Jelena

    2015-11-02

    Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) in commercial buildings, such as retail stores, can affect employee satisfaction, productivity, and health. This study administered an IEQ survey to retail employees and found correlations between measured IEQ parameters and the survey responses. The survey included 611 employees in 14 retail stores located in Pennsylvania (climate zone 5A) and Texas (climate zone 2A). The survey questionnaire featured ratings of different aspects of IEQ, including thermal comfort, lighting and noise level, indoor smells, overall cleanness, and environmental quality. Simultaneously with the survey, on-site physical measurements were taken to collect data of relative humidity levels, air exchange rates, dry bulb temperatures, and contaminant concentrations. This data was analyzed using multinomial logit regression with independent variables being the measured IEQ parameters, employees’ gender, and age. This study found that employee perception of stuffy smells is related to formaldehyde and PM10 concentrations. Furthermore, the survey also asked the employees to report an annual frequency of common colds as a health indicator. The regression analysis showed that the cold frequency statistically correlates with the measured air exchange rates, outdoor temperatures, and indoor PM concentrations. Overall, the air exchange rate is the most influential parameter on the employee perception of the overall environmental quality and self-reported health outcome.

  3. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  4. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  5. The Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Impact of Retail Rate Structure on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California Ryan Wiser, Andrew Mills, Galen Barbose & William Golove State Energy Advisory ...

  6. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year to year.

  7. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 4:23pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year to year.

  8. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact 858 February 2, ... highly volatile and often varies substantially throughout any given year. ...

  9. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",38670...

  10. The next gordian knot for state regulators and electric utilities: The unbundling of retail services

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, K.W.

    1995-11-01

    Unbundling of retail electric services will accelerate competitive forces in a way that could radically change the future course of the electric power industry. Although simple in concept, unbundling raises a broad range of complex issues, many of which are fundamental to today`s concepts of regulation and utility management. This article addresses four questions: (1) What is retail unbundling? (2) What role might it play in the future electric power industry? (3) What lessons can be learned from retail unbundling in other regulated industries, specifically the natural gas industry? (4) What are the major issues associated with retail unbundling for electric utilities and state regulators?

  11. CRAD, NNSA- Facility Representatives (FR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CRAD for Facility Representatives (FR). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  12. TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Member Organizations Representatives TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives PDF icon TEC MEMBER ORGANIZATION REPRESENTATIVES TOPIC GROUP PARTICIPATION February 2006...

  13. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.

    2007-08-30

    Agenda: {lg_bullet} Convey current state of the retail gasoline market {lg_bullet} Explore E85 as part of the solution {lg_bullet} Test the profitability of E85 as an investment {lg_bullet} Give retailers guidance to assess if E85 would be a good investment for them

  14. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than

  15. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Operated in Steady-State Conditions | Department of Energy Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions (42 pages, December 2014) (2.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Report 20.5: Chromaticity Shift Modes

  16. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience The referenced ...

  17. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New York References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 22509 This article is a...

  18. Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

  19. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an on-site senior technical representative, and Facility Representative, with responsibility for evaluating contractor environmental, nuclear...

  1. Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Designated Representative (AODR) Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) student-849822_960_720.jpg The Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) provides technical and organizational support to the Authorizing Official (AO). Individual(s) in the AO Representative role must possess a working knowledge of: system function security policies technical security safeguards AODR Core Competency Training Worksheet (152.05

  2. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  3. The political economy of retail wheeling, or how to not re-fight the last war

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.; Kihm, S.

    1994-04-01

    Disparities in utility rates - observably the result of poor supply-side resource planning - have been small before and will be small once again. Retail wheeling`s promise of short-run gains for a few would, ironically, destroy integrated resource processes in place today that guard against a repeat of yesterday`s planning mistakes. The authors argue that retail wheeling is a troubling answer to a mis-diagnosis of yesterday`s problem. They believe that a variety of other policies offer most of the benefits and few of the risks that retail wheeling poses. These include aggressive wholesale competition, judicious pruning of uneconomic capacity, and serious incorporation of environmental risks into utility planning and regulation.

  4. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  5. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines the characteristics of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3 in more detail. Specifically, it focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers.

  6. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to $3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region, at 4.16 a gallon, down a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.68 a gallon, down 1.7

  7. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to $3.93 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Prices increased in all regions across the U.S. The highest prices were found in the New England region, at 4.18 a gallon, up 2.3 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.74 a gallon,

  8. Commercial Building Partnership Retail Food Sales Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  9. Property Representatives Lists - HQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Property Representatives Lists - HQ Property Representatives Lists - HQ These are the current lists of Headquarters Property Representatives. If you have any questions please contact: Ellen Hall, Office of Logistics Operations, (301) 903-2613. Authorized Property Pass Signers List and Accountable Property Representatives List, Effective April 1, 2016 (106.12 KB) More Documents & Publications Directory Listings AU Functional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors Headquarters Facilities

  10. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Description

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home improvement market includes a range of private-sector entities that currently provide or could offer home energy upgrade services. Most of these entities are remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers; other actors are present in the sector (such as window installers and insulators), but this analysis focuses on these four main categories.

  11. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In the second half of 2014, the national average retail price per gallon of gasoline (all grades) fell from a high of $3.77 in June to a low of $2.63 in December – a difference of $1.14 per gallon....

  12. ACMP Handbook Contracting Officer's Representative (COR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ACMP Handbook Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) December 22, 2011 1 Acquisition Career Management Handbook Certification and Appointment of Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) 1. PURPOSE a. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE has established this Contracting Officer's Representative (COR) Program to outline a comprehensive curriculum to systematically develop skill at performing delegated contract management duties; define competency based training standards to ensure that CORs

  13. DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives Office of River Protection About ORP ORP Projects & Facilities Newsroom Contracts & Procurements ORP Contracts & Procurements Home DOE-ORP Contract Management Plans DOE-ORP Prime Contracts DOE-ORP Contracting Officers DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives DOE ORP Purchase Card Buyers Contact ORP DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size DESIGNATED COR

  14. DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Officer Representatives DOE-RL Contracts/Procurements RL Contracts & Procurements Home Prime Contracts Current Solicitations Other Sources DOE RL Contracting Officers DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size CO/COR Contract Number Company Acronym Limitations CHAPIN, DOUGLAS DE-DT0002699 CNG DE-DT0002699, CASCADE NATURAL GAS PIPELINE EIS (DOE/EIS-0476) PHASE 1, WITH

  15. Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    DOE-STD-1151-2010 October 2010 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of ...

  16. FAQS Reference Guide – Facility Representative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  17. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Representative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This document, concerning the Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Representative Average Unit Costs of Energy, is a notice issued by the Department of Energy. Though ...

  18. Facility Representative of the Year Award

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program.

  19. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  20. A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

    2006-11-15

    Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

  1. Efficient Driving Tips to Help Ease the Pain at the Pump | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL No doubt you've heard-or noticed yourself-that gas prices are rising again. It's always painful to fill up when you know the total will be ...

  2. EECBG Success Story: CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Oklahoma has been known for its close association with petroleum. Oklahoma City is changing that view and working to convert a portion of its vehicle fleet from gasoline and diesel fuel to compressed natural gas.Learn more.

  3. Top 3 Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    -- fuel costs can still add up quickly. If you're one of the millions traveling by car over the holiday weekend, check out three tools that will help you save money on your...

  4. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  5. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  6. PWR representative behavior during a LOCA

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    To date, there has been substantial analytical and experimental effort to define the margins between design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior and regulatory limits on maximum fuel rod cladding temperature and deformation. As a result, there is extensive documentation on the modeling of fuel rod behavior in test reactors and design basis LOCA's. However, modeling of that behavior using representative, non-conservative, operating histories is not nearly as well documented in the public literature. Therefore, the objective of this paper is (a) to present calculations of LOCA induced behavior for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core representative fuel rods, and (b) to discuss the variability in those calculations given the variability in fuel rod condition at the initiation of the LOCA. This analysis was limited to the study of changes in fuel rod behavior due to different power operating histories. The other two important parameters which affect that behavior, initial fuel rod design and LOCA coolant conditions were held invarient for all of the representative rods analyzed.

  7. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, “Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative,” was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  8. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors, 2014" "Alaska" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc","Cooperative",1219363,276627,129773,812963,0 2,"Chugach Electric Assn Inc","Cooperative",1134527,513748,563581,57198,0 3,"Anchorage Municipal

  9. Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  10. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers' Decisions to Use Alternative Financing Models

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, David; Margolis, Robert

    2014-12-01

    This report examines the tradeoffs among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have deployed substantial U.S. PV capacity: IKEA, which owns its PV, and Staples, which purchases power generated from onsite PV systems through power purchase agreements (PPAs). We also analyze the financial considerations that influence any company's choice of PV financing strategy. Our goal in this report is to clarify the financial and institutional costs and benefits of financing strategies and to inform other companies that are considering launching or expanding similar PV programs.

  11. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85 C. Johnson and M. Melendez Technical Report NREL/TP-540-41590 December 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 *

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

  13. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  14. S. 3047: A Bill to amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill would amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. The bill defines limits on the purchases required of a retailer from the producer or refiner and defines the exceptions under which any large integrated refiner can operate any motor fuel service station in the US. The Federal Trade Commission is charged with the enforcement.

  15. Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P.; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2013-03-15

    Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

  16. The New Hampshire retail competition pilot program and the role of green marketing

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, E.A.; Fang, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    Most states in the US are involved in electric industry restructuring, from considering the pros and cons in regulatory dockets to implementing legislative mandates for full restructuring and retail access for all consumers. Several states and utilities have initiated pilot programs in which multiple suppliers or service providers may compete for business and some utility customers can choose among competing suppliers. The State of New Hampshire has been experimenting with a pilot program, mandated by the State Legislature in 1995 and implemented by the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (NHPUC), before it implements full retail access. Green marketing, an attempt to characterize the supplier or service provider as environmentally friendly without referring to the energy resource used to generate electricity, was used by several suppliers or service providers to attract customers. This appeal to environmental consumerism was moderately successful, but it raised a number of consumer protection and public policy issues. This issue brief examines the marketing methods used in New Hampshire and explores what green marketing might mean for the development of renewable energy generation. It also addresses the issues raised and their implications.

  17. 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy 998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees (82.87 KB) More Documents & Publications 1999 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees FTCP Members DOE Integrated Safety Management Champions List

  18. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one

  19. 2015 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Retail Price (cents/kWh) (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total New England 19.43 15.46 12.34 10.07 16.52 Connecticut 20.94 15.97 12.95 13.18 17.77 Maine 15.61 12.47 9.05 12.78 Massachusetts 19.83 15.79 13.54 7.76 16.90 New Hampshire 18.50 14.96 12.74 16.02 Rhode Island 19.29 15.78 13.76 18.54 17.01 Vermont 17.09 14.54 10.27 14.41 Middle Atlantic 15.97 13.13 7.32 11.72 13.00 New Jersey 15.81 12.79

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    4 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass 0.4 Window (U-Factor 0.38-0.69 SHGC 0.40-0.44 Wall R-Value (2) 7.6-15.2 c.i. Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-25 c.i. Lighting Average Power Density (W/ft.^2) 1.3 System and Plant Heating Plant Gas Furnace(>225 kBtuh) 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant Air conditioner (>135-240 kBtuh) 10.8 EER/11.2 IPLV - 11.0 EER/11.5 IPLV Service Hot Water Gas Storage Water Heater (>75kBtuh) 90%

  1. Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect to four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.

  2. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray ...

  3. DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Joseph Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager Office of the Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DOE S-3.1), DOE Headquarters, ...

  4. Office of Departmental Representative to DNFSB | Department of...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Departmental Representative to DNFSB Mission The Department Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) provides effective cross-organizational ...

  5. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  6. Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

  7. Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network...

  8. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report ...

  9. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-07-03

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV

  10. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Darghouth, Naïm R.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Mills, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer

  11. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnema, Eric; Leach, Matt; Pless, Shanti

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Should utility incumbents be able to extend their brand name to competitive retail markets? An economic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, J.R.; Clements, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    As retail competition begins, at least for the short run, there should be policy restrictions on an incumbent utility`s ability to extend its brand to an affiliated marketer. However, a utility-affiliated marketer should be permitted to compete in a newly deregulated market using a generic or self-developed brand name. If extending a brand name from an incumbent utility to an affiliated marketer does in fact create real barriers to entry in the retail market, competition will be crippled in this market and consumers will suffer. More important, deregulation will appear to have failed in the electric power market--a consequence with effects reaching past the electricity industry to other industries considering deregulation as a viable policy choice. However, if real barriers to entry are not erected by this type of brand name extension, the industry may suffer from lower quality products, less service, and reduced innovation if policymakers prohibit brand name extension.

  14. 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 – 25, 1999

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and...

  15. Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in California Represented...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    California Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in California Represented by the Price (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep ...

  16. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department’s corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical...

  17. Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Mexico Represented...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mexico Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in New Mexico Represented by the Price (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct ...

  18. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Quarterly Report | Department of Energy 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported

  19. 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Quarterly Report | Department of Energy Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 2010 Top Retail Companies, by Sales # Stores % Change over Chain ($billion) 2009 Revenues 2010 2009 Stores Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. 419.0 3.4% 8,970 6.0% The Kroger Co. 82.2 7.1% 3,605 -0.4% Costco 76.3 9.1% 572 1.1% The Home Depot 68.0 2.8% 2,248 0.2% Walgreen Co. 67.4 6.4% 8,046 7.3% Target Corp. 67.4 3.1% 1,750 0.6% CVS Caremark 57.3 3.6% 7,182 2.2% Best Buy 50.3 1.2% 4,172 3.7% Lowes Cos. 48.8 3.4% 1,749 2.3% Sears Holdings 43.3 -1.6% 4,038 2.2% Source(s): 2010 Revenues % Change over Chain

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    5 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.5 0.7 23.0 25.2 14.3 16.1 Houston 2A 11.6 12.4 16.2 18.9 14.6 16.9 Phoenix 2B 8.3 10.2 17.2 21.3 14.2 17.5 Atlanta 3A 24.9 26.2 9.2 11.2 15.1 17.4 Los Angeles 3B 6.9 7.7 3.3 3.9 13.4 14.1 Las Vegas 3B 15.4 17.9 11.6 14.8 12.7 16.9 San Francisco 3C 22.4 22.5 0.7 1.0 10.6 12.1 Baltimore 4A 43.0 46.9 6.2 7.9 13.3 16.2 Albuquerque 4B 30.2 33.8 5.3

  2. Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bing; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Winiarski, David W.; Jiang, Wei; McBride, Merle F.; Crall, C.

    2006-09-30

    The Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (AEDG-SR) was developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the Department of Energy (DOE). The guide is intended to offer recommendations to achieve 30% energy savings and thus to encourage steady progress towards net-zero energy buildings. The baseline level energy use was set at buildings built at the turn of the millennium, which are assumed to be based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (refer to as the ?Standard? in this report). ASHRAE and its partners are engaged in the development of a series of guides for small commercial buildings, with the AEDG-SR being the second in the series. Previously the partnership developed the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings: Achieving 30% Energy Savings Over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, which was published in late 2004. The technical support document prepared by PNNL details how the energy analysis performed in support of the Guide and documents development of recommendation criteria.

  3. Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (DNFSB) | Department of Energy Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) The Office of the Departmental Representative ensures effective cross-organizational leadership and coordination to resolve DNFSB-identified technical and management issues as we work to ensure the health, safety, and security of the workers, public, and environment. This web site is an important

  4. CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium | Y-12 National Security

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex represented at ... CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium Posted: February 16, 2016 - 6:53pm CNS was well represented at the first National Energetic Materials Consortium. About 70 university researchers and government and industry experts from across the country, including Consolidated Nuclear Security employees, joined forces at the first ever National Energetic Materials Consortium hosted by Texas Tech University. Pantex's Christopher Young said, "There are a

  5. Facility Representative, Technical Area (TA-55) Plutonium Facility, Los

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Alamos Site Office | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Facility Representative, Technical Area (TA-55) Plutonium Facility, Los Alamos Site Office John Krepps John Krepps June 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Facility Representative of the Year John Krepps, a facility representative for the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Los Alamos Site Office, received the Department of Energy's top award for oversight of nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. Krepps, a Los

  6. Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on ...

  7. Dr. Kelli Joseph, NYISO Representing the ISO-RTO Council

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Kelli Joseph, NYISO Representing the ISO-RTO Council July 28, 2014 DOE Quadrennial Energy Review Gas Electric Interdependencies: Coordination Efforts, Regional Issues, and...

  8. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Supersedes DOE O 541.1A.

  9. Chapter 1: Energy Challenges | Representative DOE Energy and...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Energy and Science Program Workshops ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Representative DOE Energy and Science Program ...

  10. In Charlotte, Senior DOE Official to Amplify State of the Union, Call to Give Drivers More Options at the Pump

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Dr. David Danielson will join officials from NASCAR and Sprint Corp. in Charlotte, N.C., to highlight the President’s State of the Union address

  11. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7, 2005 (Next Release on August 24, 2005) Pain At The Pump With retail gasoline prices increasing between August 8 and August 15 by the largest amount ever since EIA instituted its...

  12. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898

  13. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  14. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  15. Ames Laboratory represented in ISU Homecoming Parade | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    represented in ISU Homecoming Parade On Sunday, Oct. 23, a group of about two dozen Ames Laboratory staff marched in the 2016 ISU Homecoming parade through downtown Ames. Marchers distributed candy and 70th anniversary bookmarks to the crowd.

  16. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  17. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  18. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  19. Utility Energy Service Contracts Training for Utility Representatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar targets Federal staff, as well as utility representatives, and provides an understanding of the legal parameters, contracting requirements, financing options, and other aspects of utility energy service contracts (UESC).

  20. U.S. Representative Frank Lucas and Oklahoma State Senator

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 U.S. Representative Frank Lucas and Oklahoma State Senator David Myers recently voiced ... Though the SGP central facility and activity hub near Lamont, Oklahoma, has 31 employees ...

  1. Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the

  2. DOE Representative to World Institute of Nuclear Safety (WINS) | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) DOE Representative to World Institute of Nuclear Safety (WINS) Lisa G. Hilliard Lisa Hilliard August 2009 NNSA Administrator's Silver Award Lisa G. Hilliard has received the NNSA Administrator's Silver Award for her sustained distinguished accomplishments as the Office Director of the DOE office to the U.S. Mission to International Organizations in Vienna from May 1993 to April 2009, serving four Ambassadors, two interim Representatives, and six

  3. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCustomer-Sited PV: A Study of Commercial Installations inCalifornia

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-06-01

    We analyze the impact of retail rate design on the economics of grid-connected commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems in California. The analysis is based on 15-minute interval building load and PV production data for 24 commercial PV installations in California, spanning a diverse set of building load shapes and geographic locations. We derive the annual bill savings per kWh generated for each PV system, under each of 21 distinct retail rates currently offered by the five largest utilities in California. We identify and explain variation in the value of bill savings attributable to differences in the structure of demand and energy charges across rates, as well as variation attributable to other factors, such as the size of the PV system relative to building load, the specific shape of the PV production profile, and the customer load profile. We also identify the optimal rate for each customer, among those rates offered as alternatives to one another, and show how the decision is driven in large measure by the size of the PV system relative to building load. The findings reported here may be of value to regulators and utilities responsible for designing retail rates, as well as to customers and PV retailers who have a need to estimate the prospective bill savings of PV systems.

  4. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  5. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  6. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  7. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  8. WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state agencies, local governments, tribes, communities, business, academia and other groups will gather in Washington, D.C. for the 2012 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program.

  9. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this Memorandum is to provide guidance, Attachment 1, to Qualifying Officials (QO) on how to use the cross-walk, Attachment 2, in granting equivalencies to Facility Representative (FR) candidates using the most current FR Functional Area Qualification Standards, DOE-STD-1151-2010.

  10. Learning Based Bidding Strategy for HVAC Systems in Double Auction Retail Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yannan; Somani, Abhishek; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bidding strategy is proposed using reinforcement learning for HVAC systems in a double auction market. The bidding strategy does not require a specific model-based representation of behavior, i.e., a functional form to translate indoor house temperatures into bid prices. The results from reinforcement learning based approach are compared with the HVAC bidding approach used in the AEP gridSMART® smart grid demonstration project and it is shown that the model-free (learning based) approach tracks well the results from the model-based behavior. Successful use of model-free approaches to represent device-level economic behavior may help develop similar approaches to represent behavior of more complex devices or groups of diverse devices, such as in a building. Distributed control requires an understanding of decision making processes of intelligent agents so that appropriate mechanisms may be developed to control and coordinate their responses, and model-free approaches to represent behavior will be extremely useful in that quest.

  11. Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, Ryan E.; Thomson, Judi R.; Harvey, William J.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Whiting, Mark A.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Chappell, Alan R.; Butner, R. Scott

    2011-09-20

    Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  12. Single-point representative sampling with shrouded probes

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1993-08-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed methodologies for sampling radionuclides in air effluents from stacks and ducts at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Requirements include use of EPA Method 1 for the location of sampling sites and use of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N13.1 for guidance in design of sampling probes and the number of probes at a given site. Application of ANSI N13.1 results in sampling being performed with multiprobe rakes that have as many as 20 probes. There can be substantial losses of aerosol particles in such sampling that will degrade the quality of emission estimates from a nuclear facility. Three alternate methods, technically justified herein, are proposed for effluent sampling. First, a shrouded aerosol sampling probe should replace the sharp-edged elbowed-nozzle recommended by ANSI. This would reduce the losses of aerosol particles in probes and result in the acquisition of more representative aerosol samples. Second, the rakes of multiple probes that are intended to acquire representative samples through spatial coverage should be replaced by a single probe located where contaminant mass and fluid momentum are both well mixed. A representative sample can be obtained from a well-mixed flow. Some effluent flows will need to be engineered to achieve acceptable mixing. Third, sample extraction should be performed at a constant flow rate through a suitable designed shrouded probe rather than at a variable flow rate through isokinetic probes. A shrouded probe is shown to have constant sampling characteristics over a broad range of stack velocities when operated at a fixed flow rate.

  13. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  14. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  15. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed

  16. Wave propagation in equivalent continuums representing truss lattice materials

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Matthew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2015-07-29

    Stiffness scales linearly with density in stretch-dominated lattice meta-materials offering the possibility of very light yet very stiff structures. Current additive manufacturing techniques can assemble structures consisting of these lattice materials, but the design of such structures will require accurate, efficient simulation techniques. Equivalent continuum models have several advantages over discrete truss models of stretch dominated lattices, including computational efficiency and ease of model construction. However, the development an equivalent model suitable for representing the dynamic response of a periodic truss is complicated by microinertial effects. This paper derives a dynamic equivalent continuum model for periodic truss structures and verifiesmore » it against detailed finite element simulations. The model must incorporate microinertial effects to accurately reproduce long-wavelength characteristics of the response such as anisotropic elastic soundspeeds. The formulation presented here also improves upon previous work by preserving equilibrium at truss joints for affine lattice deformation and by improving numerical stability by eliminating vertices in the effective yield surface.« less

  17. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  18. Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201) Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201) Better Buildings ...

  19. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions

    Energy Saver

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions December 2014 Prepared for: Solid-State Lighting Program Building Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PNNL-SA-23984 1 Preface The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CALiPER program has been purchasing and testing general illumination solid-state lighting (SSL) products since 2006.

  20. jcpenney retail renovation

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Zhang, Jian; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Wilburn, Matthew S.

    2011-06-30

    JC Penney is a partner with the DOE's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) program, working with PNNL to explore energy design measures (EDMs) that may be applied to their building portfolio. A site in Colonial Heights, VA was chosen for a retrofit project; computer modeling predicts 45% improved energy performance compared to baseline operations. This case study reviews EDMs that were selected and their performance as of June 2011.

  1. Retail Power Marketer

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 0 6 All other costs 0 7 Approval Expires: 05312017 SCHEDULE 6. PART B. DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Schedule 6. Part B. Energy and Demand Savings -- Demand Response ANNUAL ...

  2. Facility Representatives

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... Guidance for Hazard Analysis-Emergency Planning for Extremely Hazardous Substances; or ... DOE-STD-1063-2011 13 f. Minor events or problems are frequently clues that indicate ...

  3. Josh Allen of Richland Operations Office Named 2014 Facility Representative of the Year

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Congratulations to Josh Allen, Richland Operations Office, the winner of the 2014 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award!

  4. Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-08-01

    This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

  5. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 μm. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were

  6. What every designated representative should know about Title IV and Title V enforcement provisions

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, C.A.; Dayal, P.

    1995-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act not only created a regulatory program unlike any other under the Clean Air Act, but also established a unique position--the designated representative--as an integral part of the program. The designated representative is required to meet certain basic obligations under Title IV, and a panoply of enforcement mechanisms are available to EPA in the event of noncompliance with these obligations. Also, because a designated representative may take on responsibilities under the permit provisions of Title V of the Clean Air Act, the designated representative can also be subject to an enforcement action for failure to comply with certain Title V permit requirements. This paper considers the basic definition of the designated representative under EPA`s Title IV and Title V regulations, identifies the responsibilities assigned to the designated representative, and then analyzes the enforcement mechanisms that may be applied to the designated representative if a regulatory responsibility has not been satisfied.

  7. Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National Accelerator Laboratory | Department of Energy Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford

  8. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization | Department of Energy The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the

  9. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman,

  10. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman,

  11. Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and

  12. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2002 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H.

  13. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  14. 3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

  15. DOE-STD-1151-2002; Facility Representative Functional Area Qualificati...

    Energy Saver

    DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. ...

  16. 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

  17. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government ... Organization Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of ...

  18. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on ...

  19. 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  20. 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  1. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  3. DOE Orders Self-Study Program- DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Orders Self-Study Program DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives Familiar Level - August 2011

  4. Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Tailored Marketing for Low-Income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201), call slides and discussion summary.

  5. 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  6. 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  7. 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

  9. 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

  10. 1Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  11. 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

  12. 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

  13. 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  14. 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  15. 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  16. 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  17. 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  18. 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  19. 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

  20. 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  1. Acquisition Career Management Program Handbook, Partial Revision of Chapter 11, Contracting Officer's Representative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this flash is to provide interim guidance for certifying and appointing Contracting Officer's Representatives. This guidance complies with the Office of Federal Procurement Policy memorandum, Revisions to the Federal Acquisition Certification for Contracting Officer's Representatives (FAC-COR), dated September 6, 2011 with an effective date of January 1, 2012.

  2. Effectiveness of the food recovery at the retailing stage under shelf life uncertainty: An application to Italian food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Muriana, Cinzia

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The food recovery is seen as suitable way to manage food near to its expiry date. • The variability of the products shelf life must be taken into account. • The paper addresses the mathematic modeling of the profit related to food recovery. • The optimal time to withdraw the products is determinant for food recovery. - Abstract: Food losses represent a significant issue affecting food supply chains. The possibility of recovering such products can be seen as an effective way to reduce such a phenomenon, improve supply chain performances and ameliorate the conditions of undernourished people. The topic has been already investigated by a previous paper enforcing the hypothesis of deterministic and constant Shelf Life (SL) of products. However, such a model cannot be properly extended to products affected by uncertainties of the SL as it does not take into account the deterioration costs and loss of profits due to the overcoming of the SL within the cycle time. Thus the present paper presents an extension of the previous one under stochastic conditions of the food quality. Differently from the previous publication, this work represents a general model applicable to all supply chains, especially to those managing fresh products characterized by uncertain SL such as fruits and vegetables. The deterioration costs and loss of profits are included in the model and the optimal time at which to withdraw the products from the shelves as well as the quantities to be shipped at each alternative destination have been determined. A comparison of the proposed model with that reported in the previous publication has been carried out in order to underline the impact of the SL variability on the optimality conditions. The results show that the food recovery strategy in the presence of uncertainty of the food quality is rewarding, even if the optimal profit is lower than that of the deterministic case.

  3. Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Moment" for America | Department of Energy Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - In a speech at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for the

  4. Sensitivity and representativity analysis of past experiments with respect to ABTR system.

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.

    2007-08-29

    A comprehensive validation analysis has been performed that incorporates representativity of multiple parameters, experiments, reference designs, and adjustment of the nuclear data. The work involves a new representativity study among selected reactor designs and several experiments. Application, using existing experiments, to reference design like the ABTR and the SFR has demonstrated that it is possible to achieve a significant reduction of uncertainty on the main integral parameters of interest for their neutronic design. This is possible when the set of available experiments are relevant (i.e. representative of the reference designs), of good quality (i.e. of reduced uncertainty on experimental results), and consistent (i.e. not providing conflictive information).

  5. 3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  6. 4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  7. 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  8. 2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  9. 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  10. 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  11. John C. Barnes of Savannah River Operations named 2012 Facility Representative of the Year

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    About 200 Department of Energy (DOE) federal employees are Facility Representatives (FR) who provide day-to-day oversight of contractor operations at DOE facilities. Each year the Department...

  12. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General, U.S. Department of Energy Request to ...

  13. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on ...

  14. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to ...

  15. 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  16. 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  17. 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  18. 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  19. 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  20. 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  1. 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  3. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Energy Saver

    U.S. Representative Joe Courtney WHAT: Tour of United Technologies Research Center WHEN: 9:45 AM EST **Media availability to follow Media are requested to park in the lot ...

  4. Stan Watkins Named Department of Energy Facility Representative of the Year

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Stan Watkins Named Department of Energy Facility Representative of the Year May 15, 2009 Microsoft Office document icon R-09-02

  5. 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  6. 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December   2008. Data for these indicators are  gathered by Field...

  7. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Forum | Jefferson Lab W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray Valerie Gray, a graduate student at The College of William and Mary and a researcher at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was chosen this year by American Physical Society members as chair-elect for the APS Forum on Graduate Student Affairs.

  8. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of

  9. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Government Reform | Department of Energy Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General, U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Department of Energy's (Department) contract administration activities. The Department is one of the most contractor dependent agencies in the Federal

  10. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a

  11. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to Visit Research Center in East Hartford | Department of Energy Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received

  12. Edlund Named DOE Facility Representative of the Year | Y-12 National

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex Edlund Named DOE Facility ... Edlund Named DOE Facility Representative of the Year Posted: May 10, 2016 - 10:24am Jeff Edlund of the National Nuclear Security Administration Production Office was recently named Facility Representative of the Year by the U.S. Department of Energy. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. -- Jeff Edlund, who conducts day-to-day federal oversight of enriched uranium facility operations at the Y-12 National Security Complex, has been named the U.S. Department of Energy

  13. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy’s Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles.

  14. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  15. Understanding the representativeness of FLUXNET for upscaling carbon flux from eddy covariance measurements

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Hargrove, William W.; Collier, Nathan

    2016-08-23

    Eddy covariance data from regional flux networks are direct in situ measurement of carbon, water, and energy fluxes and are of vital importance for understanding the spatio-temporal dynamics of the the global carbon cycle. FLUXNET links regional networks of eddy covariance sites across the globe to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of fluxes at regional to global scales and to detect emergent ecosystem properties. This study presents an assessment of the representativeness of FLUXNET based on the recently released FLUXNET2015 data set. We present a detailed high resolution analysis of the evolving representativeness of FLUXNET through time. Results providemore » quantitative insights into the extent that various biomes are sampled by the network of networks, the role of the spatial distribution of the sites on the network scale representativeness at any given time, and how that representativeness has changed through time due to changing operational status and data availability at sites in the network. To realize the full potential of FLUXNET observations for understanding emergent ecosystem properties at regional and global scales, we present an approach for upscaling eddy covariance measurements. Informed by the representativeness of observations at the flux sites in the network, the upscaled data reflects the spatio-temporal dynamics of the carbon cycle captured by the in situ measurements. In conclusion, this study presents a method for optimal use of the rich point measurements from FLUXNET to derive an understanding of upscaled carbon fluxes, which can be routinely updated as new data become available, and direct network expansion by identifying regions poorly sampled by the current network.« less

  16. On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organiz

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency advocacy organizations met with staff and members of the Compressed Air and Gas Institute (CAGI) along with some compressed air experts at the offices of the Alliance to Save Energy to explore and discuss a consensus approach to advancing energy efficiency of compressed air systems within the context of the DOE's potential rulemaking on compressors. The group discussed the need to assemble the relevant data and technical content that

  17. Chapter 1: Energy Challenges | Representative DOE Energy and Science Program Worshops

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy and Science Program Workshops ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Representative DOE Energy and Science Program Workshops Chapter 1: Supplemental Information The Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR) found very extensive outreach by the DOE Energy and Science Programs to the broad energy research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) community- including industry, academia, civil society, national laboratories,

  18. Identifying representative crop rotation patterns and grassland loss in the US Western Corn Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gelfand, Ilya; Hurtt, George C.

    2014-10-01

    Crop rotations (the practice of growing crops on the same land in sequential seasons) reside at the core of agronomic management as they can influence key ecosystem services such as crop yields, carbon and nutrient cycling, soil erosion, water quality, pest and disease control. Despite the availability of the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) which provides remotely sensed data on crop type in the US on an annual basis, crop rotation patterns remain poorly mapped due to the lack of tools that allow for consistent and efficient analysis of multi-year CDLs. This study presents the Representative Crop Rotations Using Edit Distance (RECRUIT) algorithm, implemented as a Python software package, to select representative crop rotations by combining and analyzing multi-year CDLs. Using CDLs from 2010 to 2012 for 5 states in the US Midwest, we demonstrate the performance and parameter sensitivity of RECRUIT in selecting representative crop rotations that preserve crop area and capture land-use changes. Selecting only 82 representative crop rotations accounted for over 90% of the spatio-temporal variability of the more than 13,000 rotations obtained from combining the multi-year CDLs. Furthermore, the accuracy of the crop rotation product compared favorably with total state-wide planted crop area available from agricultural census data. The RECRUIT derived crop rotation product was used to detect land-use conversion from grassland to crop cultivation in a wetland dominated part of the US Midwest. Monoculture corn and monoculture soybean cropping were found to comprise the dominant land-use on the newly cultivated lands.

  19. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

  20. 100% MOX BWR experimental program design using multi-parameter representative

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S.

    2012-07-01

    A new multiparameter representative approach for the design of Advanced full MOX BWR core physics experimental programs is developed. The approach is based on sensitivity analysis of integral parameters to nuclear data, and correlations among different integral parameters. The representativeness method is here used to extract a quantitative relationship between a particular integral response of an experimental mock-up and the same response in a reference project to be designed. The study is applied to the design of the 100% MOX BASALA ABWR experimental program in the EOLE facility. The adopted scheme proposes an original approach to the problem, going from the initial 'microscopic' pin-cells integral parameters to the whole 'macroscopic' assembly integral parameters. This approach enables to collect complementary information necessary to optimize the initial design and to meet target accuracy on the integral parameters to be measured. The study has demonstrated the necessity of new fuel pins fabrication, fulfilling minimal costs requirements, to meet acceptable representativeness on local power distribution. (authors)

  1. Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Laverty

    2005-10-01

    UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

  2. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOEpatents

    Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  3. Accountable Property Representatives List and Property Pass Signer List by Organization, April 1, 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Accountable Property Representatives/Property Pass Authorization 4/1/2016 Employee Authorized Organization Phone APR Primary Property Pass Signer PETEET, LISA J. ALL ORGS (202) 287-5496 √ AGEE, PATTIE M. EM-40 (202) 586-9417 √ AMES, RUSSELL SC-32 (202) 586-1082 √ √ ANDERSON, SHELLEY EI-11 (202) 586-6196 √ ANDERSON, SUE EM-73 (301) 903-8368 √ √ ATKINSON-HYMAN, DEBRA PA-1 (202) 586-2461 √ √ AUGUSTYN, ANN HG-6 (202) 287-1528 √ BARLETT, DENNIS EE-3C (202) 586-0874 √ BARNES,

  4. A general encoding framework for representing network measurement and topology data

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE AND EXPERIENCE Concurrency Computat.: Pract. Exper. 2009; 21:1069-1086 Published online 11 February 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/cpe.1412 A general encoding framework for representing network measurement and topology data A. Brown 1, ∗, † , M. Swany 1 and J. Zurawski 2 1 Department of Computer and Information Sciences, 103 Smith Hall, Newark, DE 19716, U.S.A. 2 Internet2, 1150 18th Street NW, Suite 1020,

  5. Retail Sales Allocation Tool (RSAT)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  6. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    272 2.257 2.243 2.230 2.233 2.184 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.229 2.237 2.232 2.219 2.240 2.217 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.249 2.247 2.248 2.248 2.255 2.225 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.256 2.263 2.274 2.271 2.335 2.321 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.204 2.216 2.196 2.172 2.165 2.138 1993-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.221 2.155 2.107 2.075 2.082 1.994 1992-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 2.038 2.043 2.056 2.042 2.015 1.975 1992-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 2.244 2.269 2.286 2.293

  7. Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2011-04-18

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

  8. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  9. Strain rate, temperature and representative length scale influence on plasticity and yield stress in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C

    2011-01-18

    Shock compression of materials constitutes a complex process involving high strain rates, elevated temperatures and compression of the lattice. Materials properties are greatly affected by temperature, the representative length scale and the strain rate of the deformation. Experimentally, it is difficult to study the dynamic microscopic mechanisms that affect materials properties following high intensity shock loading, but they can be investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Moreover, MD allows a better control over some parameters. We are using MD simulations to study the effect of the strain rate, representative length scale and temperature on the properties of metals during compression. A half-million-atom Cu sample is subjected to strain rates ranging from 10{sup 7} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 12} s{sup -1} at different temperatures ranging from 50K to 1500K. Single crystals as well as polycrystals are investigated. Plasticity mechanisms as well as the evolution of the micro- and macro-yield stress are observed. Our results show that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. We also show that the strain rate at which the transition between constant and increasing yield stress as a function of the temperature occurs increases with increasing temperature. Calculations at different grain sizes will give an insight into the grain size effect on the plasticity mechanisms and the yield stress.

  10. An analysis of representative heating load lines for residential HSPF ratings

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C. Keith; Shen, Bo; Shrestha, Som S.

    2015-07-01

    This report describes an analysis to investigate representative heating loads for single-family detached homes using current EnergyPlus simulations (DOE 2014a). Hourly delivered load results are used to determine binned load lines using US Department of Energy (DOE) residential prototype building models (DOE 2014b) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The selected residential single-family prototype buildings are based on the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC 2006) in the DOE climate regions. The resulting load lines are compared with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Standard 210/240 (AHRI 2008) minimum and maximum design heating requirement (DHR) load lines of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) ratings procedure for each region. The results indicate that a heating load line closer to the maximum DHR load line, and with a lower zero load ambient temperature, is more representative of heating loads predicted for EnergyPlus prototype residential buildings than the minimum DHR load line presently used to determine HSPF ratings. An alternative heating load line equation was developed and compared to binned load lines obtained from the EnergyPlus simulation results. The effect on HSPF of the alternative heating load line was evaluated for single-speed and two-capacity heat pumps, and an average HSPF reduction of 16% was found. The alternative heating load line relationship is tied to the rated cooling capacity of the heat pump based on EnergyPlus autosizing, which is more representative of the house load characteristics than the rated heating capacity. The alternative heating load line equation was found to be independent of climate for the six DOE climate regions investigated, provided an adjustable zero load ambient temperature is used. For Region IV, the default DOE climate region used for HSPF ratings, the higher load line results in an ~28

  11. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wavefunctions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. We work to address this puzzle by (A) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (B) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble.

  12. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff

  13. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state bymore » a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic

  14. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic expectations

  15. Generalization of the Kohn-Sham system that can represent arbitrary one-electron density matrices

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hubertus J. J. van Dam

    2016-05-23

    Density functional theory is currently the most widely applied method in electronic structure theory. The Kohn-Sham method, based on a fictitious system of noninteracting particles, is the workhorse of the theory. The particular form of the Kohn-Sham wave function admits only idempotent one-electron density matrices whereas wave functions of correlated electrons in post-Hartree-Fock methods invariably have fractional occupation numbers. Here we show that by generalizing the orbital concept and introducing a suitable dot product as well as a probability density, a noninteracting system can be chosen that can represent the one-electron density matrix of any system, even one with fractionalmore » occupation numbers. This fictitious system ensures that the exact electron density is accessible within density functional theory. It can also serve as the basis for reduced density matrix functional theory. Moreover, to aid the analysis of the results the orbitals may be assigned energies from a mean-field Hamiltonian. This produces energy levels that are akin to Hartree-Fock orbital energies such that conventional analyses based on Koopmans' theorem are available. Lastly, this system is convenient in formalisms that depend on creation and annihilation operators as they are trivially applied to single-determinant wave functions.« less

  16. Clustering method and representative feeder selection for the California solar initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Williams, Joseph R.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina

    2014-02-01

    The screening process for DG interconnection procedures needs to be improved in order to increase the PV deployment level on the distribution grid. A significant improvement in the current screening process could be achieved by finding a method to classify the feeders in a utility service territory and determine the sensitivity of particular groups of distribution feeders to the impacts of high PV deployment levels. This report describes the utility distribution feeder characteristics in California for a large dataset of 8,163 feeders and summarizes the California feeder population including the range of characteristics identified and most important to hosting capacity. The report describes the set of feeders that are identified for modeling and analysis as well as feeders identified for the control group. The report presents a method for separating a utilitys distribution feeders into unique clusters using the k-means clustering algorithm. An approach for determining the feeder variables of interest for use in a clustering algorithm is also described. The report presents an approach for choosing the feeder variables to be utilized in the clustering process and a method is identified for determining the optimal number of representative clusters.

  17. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2014-01-01

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  18. A transferable coarse-grained model for diphenylalanine: How to represent an environment driven conformational transition

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgicdir, Cahit; Sensoy, Ozge; Sayar, Mehmet; Peter, Christine

    2013-12-21

    One of the major challenges in the development of coarse grained (CG) simulation models that aim at biomolecular structure formation processes is the correct representation of an environment-driven conformational change, for example, a folding/unfolding event upon interaction with an interface or upon aggregation. In the present study, we investigate this transferability challenge for a CG model using the example of diphenylalanine. This dipeptide displays a transition from a trans-like to a cis-like conformation upon aggregation as well as upon transfer from bulk water to the cyclohexane/water interface. Here, we show that one can construct a single CG model that can reproduce both the bulk and interface conformational behavior and the segregation between hydrophobic/hydrophilic medium. While the general strategy to obtain nonbonded interactions in the present CG model is to reproduce solvation free energies of small molecules representing the CG beads in the respective solvents, the success of the model strongly depends on nontrivial decisions one has to make to capture the delicate balance between the bonded and nonbonded interactions. In particular, we found that the peptide's conformational behavior is qualitatively affected by the cyclohexane/water interaction potential, an interaction that does not directly involve the peptide at all but merely influences the properties of the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface. Furthermore, we show that a small modification to improve the structural/conformational properties of the CG model could dramatically alter the thermodynamic properties.

  19. Sustainable development: Background an represent policy views for governmental agencies, industry, and other specialty groups

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerman, J.A.; Silverman, G.S.

    1995-12-01

    Sustainable development is a phrase that has come into common usage without benefit of clear definition or meaning. Usage very much reflects individual and group perspectives: foresters might consider sustainability in terms of maintaining ecological integrity as part of managing forests for wood harvesting, industry might emphasize pollution control, while government agencies may be looking for new ways to exploit resources on a more continuous basis. Perhaps the greatest commonality among groups considering these issues is that {open_quotes}sustainability{close_quotes} has not been attained but that it needs to occur. The National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP) agrees that it is critical to the health of the planet that sustainable development be actively pursued and implemented in international, national, regional, and local policies and practices. To contribute to this effort a {open_quotes}white paper{close_quotes} is being prepared. Its purpose is twofold: (1) to review the existing information from the NAEP Sustainable Development Working Group and the literature and through examination of these policies, to clarify the thinking, what is being done, and what is still needed; and (2) to develop a position and action plan. This action plan should direct NAEP`s actions in making a significant contribution to the national dialog. This paper presents the background and results of the review phase of this white paper development. Representative views on sustainable development policy and practice are presented from three perspectives: governmental agencies, industry, and other specialty groups.

  20. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics

  1. Extraction of organic compounds from representative shales and the effect on porosity

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    DiStefano, Victoria H.; McFarlane, Joanna; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Stack, Andrew G.; Gordon, Alexander D.; Littrell, Ken C.; Chipera, Steve J.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Lewis, Samuel A.; Hale, Richard E.; et al

    2016-09-01

    This study is an attempt to understand how native organics are distributed with respect to pore size to determine the relationship between hydrocarbon chemistry and pore structure in shales, as the location and accessibility of hydrocarbons is key to understanding and improving the extractability of hydrocarbons in hydraulic fracturing. Selected shale cores from the Eagle Ford and Marcellus formations were subjected to pyrolysis gas chromatography (GC), thermogravimetric analysis, and organic solvent extraction with the resulting effluent analyzed by GC-mass spectrometry (MS). Organics representing the oil and gas fraction (0.1 to 1 wt. %) were observed by GC-MS. For most ofmore » the samples, the amount of native organic extracted directly related to the percentage of clay in the shale. The porosity and pore size distribution (0.95 nm to 1.35 m) in the Eagle Ford and Marcellus shales was measured before and after solvent extraction using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). An unconventional method was used to quantify the background from incoherent scattering as the Porod transformation obscures the Bragg peak from the clay minerals. Furthermore, the change in porosity from SANS is indicative of the extraction or breakdown of higher molecular weight bitumen with high C/H ratios (asphaltenes and resins). This is mostly likely attributed to complete dissolution or migration of asphaltenes and resins. These longer carbon chain lengths, C30-C40, were observed by pyrolysis GC, but either were too heavy to be analyzed in the extracts by GC-MS or were not effectively leached into the organic solvents. Thus, experimental limitations meant that the amount of extractable material could not be directly correlated to the changes in porosity measured by SANS. But, the observable porosity generally increased with solvent extraction. A decrease in porosity after extraction as observed in a shale with high clay content and low maturity was attributed to swelling of pores

  2. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter E.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Hanson, Paul J.; Mao, Jiafu; Sebestyen, Stephen D.; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Bisht, Gautam

    2015-11-12

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. Furthermore, the new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics

  3. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2010-12-29

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  4. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of

  5. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  6. Construction Control Representative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Engineering and Construction Field Engineering, (J5600) 5555...

  7. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A.

    2013-07-01

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of the Use of Existing RELAP5-3D Models to Represent the Actinide Burner Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. B. Davis

    2007-02-01

    The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid that are not currently represented with internal code models, including axial and radial heat conduction in the fluid and subchannel mixing. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor. An evaluation was also performed to determine if the existing centrifugal pump model could be used to simulate the performance of electromagnetic pumps.

  9. On time-optimal NMR control of states of qutrits represented by quadrupole nuclei with the spin I = 1

    SciTech Connect

    Zobov, V. E. Shauro, V. P.

    2011-08-15

    Elementary logical operators (selective rotation, Fourier transform, controllable phase shift, and SUM gate) are considered for a quantum computer based on three-level systems (qutrits) represented by nuclear spins I = 1 under nuclear magnetic resonance conditions. The computer simulation of the realization of these operators by means of simple and composite selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses and optimized RF pulses is performed. The time dependence of the amplitude of last pulses is found by numerical optimization at different durations. Two variants are proposed for realization of a two-qutrit SUM gate by using one-qutrit or two-qutrit optimized RF pulses. The calculated time dependences of realization errors were used to study the time optimality of different methods for obtaining gates, proposed earlier and in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the methods are evaluated for different values of physical parameters.

  10. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Stroud, Mary Ann; Smith, Paul Herrick; Wayne, David M.; Mason, Richard E.; Worl, Laura A.

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  12. Characterization of representative materials in support of safe, long term storage of surplus plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 containers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Paul H; Narlesky, Joshua E; Worl, Laura A; Gillispie, Obie W

    2010-01-01

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) is a joint LANL/SRS effort funded by DOE/EM to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. The chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) range from less than half of the impurities present to nearly all the impurities. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on over 60 samples of plutonium chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper will summarize the characterization data, including the origin and process history, particle size, surface area, density, calorimetry, chemical analysis, moisture analysis, prompt gamma, gas generation and corrosion behavior.

  13. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Laurie, M.; Fourrez, S.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  14. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Herlemann, D. P. R.; Geissinger, O.; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W.; Kunin, V.; Sun, H.; Lapidus, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Brune, A.

    2009-02-01

    The candidate phylum Termite group 1 (TG1), is regularly 1 encountered in termite hindguts but is present also in many other habitats. Here we report the complete genome sequence (1.64 Mbp) of Elusimicrobium minutum strain Pei191{sup T}, the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. We reconstructed the metabolism of this strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a beetle larva gut and discuss the findings in light of physiological data. E. minutum has all genes required for uptake and fermentation of sugars via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including several hydrogenases, and an unusual peptide degradation pathway comprising transamination reactions and leading to the formation of alanine, which is excreted in substantial amounts. The presence of genes encoding lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the presence of a pathway for peptidoglycan formation are consistent with ultrastructural evidence of a Gram-negative cell envelope. Even though electron micrographs showed no cell appendages, the genome encodes many genes putatively involved in pilus assembly. We assigned some to a type II secretion system, but the function of 60 pilE-like genes remains unknown. Numerous genes with hypothetical functions, e.g., polyketide synthesis, non-ribosomal peptide synthesis, antibiotic transport, and oxygen stress protection, indicate the presence of hitherto undiscovered physiological traits. Comparative analysis of 22 concatenated single-copy marker genes corroborated the status of Elusimicrobia (formerly TG1) as a separate phylum in the bacterial domain, which was so far based only on 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

  15. THE SPITZER EXTRAGALACTIC REPRESENTATIVE VOLUME SURVEY: THE ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-z SDSS QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Falder, J. T.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S.; Surace, J.; Mauduit, J.-C.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Afonso, J.; Cava, A.; Seymour, N.

    2011-07-10

    This paper presents a study of the environments of SDSS quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We concentrate on the high-redshift QSOs as these have not been studied in large numbers with data of this depth before. We use the IRAC 3.6-4.5 {mu}m color of objects and ancillary r-band data to filter out as much foreground contamination as possible. This technique allows us to find a significant (>4{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 2.0 and an (>2{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 3.3. We compare our findings to the predictions of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, based on the {Lambda}CDM MILLENNIUM simulation, and find for both redshift bins that the model predictions match well the source density we have measured from the SERVS data.

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Full Service Providers sell bundled electricity services (e.g., both energy and delivery) ... Other Providers sell either the energy or the delivery services, but not both. Sales ...

  17. Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    310 2.312 2.313 2.312 2.310 2.288 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.310 2.312 2.313 2.312 2.310 2.288 2003-2016 Regular 2.210 2.208 2.205 2.203 2.198 2.171 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.210 2.208 2.205 2.203 2.198 2.171 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.424 2.434 2.452 2.450 2.451 2.440 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.424 2.434 2.452 2.450 2.451 2.440 2003-2016 Premium 2.639 2.654 2.660 2.665 2.668 2.659 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.639 2.654 2.660 2.665 2.668 2.659

  18. California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    855 2.860 2.853 2.880 2.866 2.812 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.855 2.860 2.853 2.880 2.866 2.812 1995-2016 Regular 2.799 2.805 2.798 2.824 2.809 2.755 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.799 2.805 2.798 2.824 2.809 2.755 1995-2016 Midgrade 2.928 2.934 2.926 2.955 2.941 2.892 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.928 2.934 2.926 2.955 2.941 2.892 1995-2016 Premium 3.044 3.050 3.041 3.072 3.059 3.005 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.044 3.050 3.041 3.072 3.059 3.005 1995-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  19. Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    43 2.416 2.399 2.298 2.372 2.267 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.543 2.416 2.399 2.298 2.372 2.267 2000-2016 Regular 2.420 2.291 2.274 2.172 2.246 2.140 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.420 2.291 2.274 2.172 2.246 2.140 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.745 2.623 2.605 2.507 2.580 2.482 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.745 2.623 2.605 2.507 2.580 2.482 2000-2016 Premium 3.074 2.958 2.946 2.848 2.924 2.820 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.074 2.958 2.946 2.848 2.924 2.820 2000

  20. Cleveland Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    396 2.273 2.156 2.155 2.211 2.147 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.396 2.273 2.156 2.155 2.211 2.147 2003-2016 Regular 2.265 2.144 2.023 2.019 2.074 2.015 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.265 2.144 2.023 2.019 2.074 2.015 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.564 2.427 2.329 2.336 2.391 2.323 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.564 2.427 2.329 2.336 2.391 2.323 2003-2016 Premium 2.875 2.754 2.641 2.647 2.711 2.623 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.875 2.754 2.641 2.647 2.711 2.623 2003

  1. Colorado Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    266 2.269 2.265 2.261 2.226 2.186 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.266 2.269 2.265 2.261 2.226 2.186 2000-2016 Regular 2.160 2.164 2.160 2.155 2.119 2.079 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.160 2.164 2.160 2.155 2.119 2.079 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.427 2.429 2.425 2.422 2.387 2.348 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.427 2.429 2.425 2.422 2.387 2.348 2000-2016 Premium 2.688 2.686 2.683 2.684 2.652 2.611 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.688 2.686 2.683 2.684 2.652 2.611 2000

  2. Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    247 2.254 2.254 2.249 2.220 2.182 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.247 2.254 2.254 2.249 2.220 2.182 2000-2016 Regular 2.133 2.141 2.141 2.136 2.107 2.070 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.133 2.141 2.141 2.136 2.107 2.070 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.423 2.431 2.428 2.422 2.392 2.354 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.423 2.431 2.428 2.422 2.392 2.354 2000-2016 Premium 2.686 2.695 2.691 2.689 2.661 2.621 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.686 2.695 2.691 2.689 2.661 2.621 2000

  3. Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    112 2.125 2.135 2.107 2.083 2.065 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.112 2.125 2.135 2.107 2.083 2.065 2000-2016 Regular 1.981 1.996 2.003 1.969 1.952 1.933 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.981 1.996 2.003 1.969 1.952 1.933 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.276 2.285 2.298 2.301 2.242 2.224 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.276 2.285 2.298 2.301 2.242 2.224 2000-2016 Premium 2.547 2.550 2.569 2.552 2.517 2.503 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.547 2.550 2.569 2.552 2.517 2.503

  4. Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    901 2.916 2.898 2.968 2.949 2.894 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.901 2.916 2.898 2.968 2.949 2.894 2000-2016 Regular 2.847 2.862 2.845 2.914 2.895 2.839 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.847 2.862 2.845 2.914 2.895 2.839 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.960 2.975 2.958 3.028 3.009 2.958 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.960 2.975 2.958 3.028 3.009 2.958 2000-2016 Premium 3.071 3.086 3.067 3.137 3.119 3.067 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.071 3.086 3.067 3.137 3.119 3.067

  5. Massachusetts Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 2.310 2.312 2.314 2.313 2.293 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.313 2.310 2.312 2.314 2.313 2.293 2003-2016 Regular 2.213 2.204 2.202 2.202 2.201 2.176 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.213 2.204 2.202 2.202 2.201 2.176 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.420 2.429 2.447 2.444 2.446 2.437 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.420 2.429 2.447 2.444 2.446 2.437 2003-2016 Premium 2.624 2.635 2.644 2.653 2.656 2.644 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.624 2.635 2.644 2.653 2.656 2.644

  6. Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    85 2.597 2.588 2.575 2.559 2.542 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.585 2.597 2.588 2.575 2.559 2.542 2003-2016 Regular 2.423 2.439 2.429 2.414 2.397 2.382 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.423 2.439 2.429 2.414 2.397 2.382 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.710 2.717 2.712 2.705 2.691 2.677 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.710 2.717 2.712 2.705 2.691 2.677 2003-2016 Premium 3.020 3.020 3.015 3.004 2.987 2.967 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 3.020 3.020 3.015 3.004 2.987 2.967 2003

  7. Minnesota Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    238 2.218 2.187 2.151 2.112 2.053 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.238 2.218 2.187 2.151 2.112 2.053 2000-2016 Regular 2.173 2.155 2.124 2.088 2.048 1.987 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.173 2.155 2.124 2.088 2.048 1.987 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.318 2.298 2.266 2.231 2.193 2.136 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.318 2.298 2.266 2.231 2.193 2.136 2000-2016 Premium 2.563 2.532 2.504 2.470 2.431 2.388 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.563 2.532 2.504 2.470 2.431 2.388

  8. New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    430 2.435 2.464 2.466 2.496 2.473 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.386 2.391 2.415 2.422 2.455 2.420 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.467 2.474 2.506 2.503 2.531 2.518 2000-2016 Regular 2.297 2.302 2.332 2.334 2.365 2.338 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.276 2.279 2.303 2.310 2.347 2.304 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.317 2.324 2.359 2.356 2.382 2.369 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.572 2.581 2.607 2.606 2.633 2.621 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.499 2.507 2.536 2.543 2.559 2.546

  9. Ohio Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    392 2.258 2.147 2.157 2.214 2.107 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.392 2.258 2.147 2.157 2.214 2.107 2003-2016 Regular 2.275 2.140 2.029 2.037 2.095 1.986 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.275 2.140 2.029 2.037 2.095 1.986 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.543 2.404 2.297 2.307 2.365 2.265 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.543 2.404 2.297 2.307 2.365 2.265 2003-2016 Premium 2.822 2.690 2.581 2.595 2.651 2.547 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.822 2.690 2.581 2.595 2.651 2.547 2003

  10. PADD 4 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    328 2.356 2.374 2.383 2.358 2.324 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.328 2.356 2.374 2.383 2.358 2.324 1994-2016 Regular 2.244 2.269 2.286 2.293 2.268 2.235 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.244 2.269 2.286 2.293 2.268 2.235 1992-2016 Midgrade 2.426 2.462 2.485 2.498 2.472 2.437 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.426 2.462 2.485 2.498 2.472 2.437 1994-2016 Premium 2.650 2.681 2.702 2.716 2.692 2.657 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.650 2.681 2.702 2.716 2.692 2.657 1994-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  11. PADD 5 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    740 2.744 2.745 2.763 2.753 2.712 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.594 2.599 2.618 2.623 2.619 2.598 1995-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.799 2.804 2.797 2.820 2.808 2.758 1995-2016 Regular 2.675 2.679 2.680 2.697 2.686 2.645 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.529 2.534 2.552 2.557 2.553 2.531 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.738 2.742 2.735 2.758 2.745 2.695 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.853 2.857 2.857 2.878 2.867 2.827 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.737 2.740 2.762 2.765 2.761 2.742

  12. San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    885 2.877 2.877 2.861 2.845 2.780 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.885 2.877 2.877 2.861 2.845 2.780 2000-2016 Regular 2.823 2.815 2.815 2.798 2.782 2.719 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.823 2.815 2.815 2.798 2.782 2.719 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.984 2.975 2.976 2.962 2.941 2.871 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.984 2.975 2.976 2.962 2.941 2.871 2000-2016 Premium 3.085 3.077 3.078 3.065 3.049 2.981 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 3.085 3.077 3.078 3.065 3.049 2.981

  13. Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    743 2.753 2.758 2.754 2.764 2.716 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.743 2.753 2.758 2.754 2.764 2.716 2003-2016 Regular 2.686 2.698 2.704 2.699 2.708 2.661 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.686 2.698 2.704 2.699 2.708 2.661 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.859 2.867 2.870 2.870 2.880 2.836 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.859 2.867 2.870 2.870 2.880 2.836 2003-2016 Premium 2.975 2.978 2.983 2.984 2.995 2.942 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.975 2.978 2.983 2.984 2.995 2.942

  14. Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    117 2.119 2.153 2.146 2.110 2.072 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.136 2.140 2.148 2.131 2.099 2.062 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.090 2.088 2.161 2.170 2.125 2.088 2000-2016 Regular 2.010 2.015 2.050 2.043 2.006 1.969 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.034 2.040 2.050 2.032 2.000 1.964 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.974 1.977 2.052 2.059 2.015 1.976 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.277 2.277 2.307 2.311 2.269 2.227 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.300 2.299 2.304 2.292 2.262 2.216

  15. Washington Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    735 2.733 2.762 2.760 2.749 2.711 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.735 2.733 2.762 2.760 2.749 2.711 2003-2016 Regular 2.673 2.670 2.698 2.696 2.685 2.646 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.673 2.670 2.698 2.696 2.685 2.646 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.857 2.855 2.884 2.883 2.870 2.837 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.857 2.855 2.884 2.883 2.870 2.837 2003-2016 Premium 2.996 2.992 3.028 3.027 3.016 2.980 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.996 2.992 3.028 3.027 3.016 2.980 2003

  16. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Reformulated Areas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2.017 1.961 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 1.997 1.975 1.906 1.880 1.850 1.806 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.025 1.988 1.934 1.904 1.875 1.827 1994-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD...

  17. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Conventional Areas

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1.933 1.922 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.075 2.060 2.033 2.029 2.013 2.000 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.205 2.197 2.156 2.130 2.106 2.097 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD...

  18. Florida Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    340 2.308 2.281 2.268 2.271 2.315 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.340 2.308 2.281 2.268 2.271 2.315 2003-2016 Regular 2.189 2.156 2.124 2.111 2.115 2.160 2003-2016 ...

  19. 2015 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Commercial (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 308 334,721 20,073.0 6.00 Calpine Power America LLC CA Power Marketer 1 1,069,832 57,737.7 5.40 City of Cerritos - (CA) CA Municipal 295 68,400 5,009.8 7.32 City of Corona - (CA) CA Municipal 968 25,568 2,175.9 8.51 Commerce Energy, Inc. CA Power Marketer 2,200 260,750 17,070.2 6.55

  20. 2015 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Industrial (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 35 74,586 4,809.0 6.45 City of Cerritos - (CA) CA Municipal 8 12,066 873.1 7.24 City of Corona - (CA) CA Municipal 7 43,030 3,583.8 8.33 Constellation NewEnergy, Inc CA Power Marketer 46 1,839,431 93,070.0 5.06 Direct Energy Business CA Power Marketer 30 265,519 15,365.0 5.79 EDF Industrial

  1. 2015 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Residential (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 104 841 79.2 9.42 Commerce Energy, Inc. CA Power Marketer 8,777 76,513 6,928.6 9.06 Lancaster Choice Energy CA Power Marketer 11,853 49,044 4,086.2 8.33 Marin Clean Energy CA Power Marketer 140,505 1,043,258 86,591.3 8.30 Sonoma Clean Power Authority CA Power Marketer 155,985 980,668 69,970.8

  2. 2015 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 447 410,148 24,961.2 6.09 Calpine Power America LLC CA Power Marketer 1 1,069,832 57,737.7 5.40 City of Cerritos - (CA) CA Municipal 303 80,466 5,882.9 7.31 City of Corona - (CA) CA Municipal 975 68,598 5,759.7 8.40 Commerce Energy, Inc. CA Power Marketer 10,977 337,263 23,998.8 7.12 Constellation

  3. 2015 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Transportation (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Northern California Power Agny CA Political Subdivision 1 315,301 15,454.0 4.90 Constellation NewEnergy, Inc CT Power Marketer 1 6,289 458.8 7.30 Direct Energy Business CT Power Marketer 1 75,180 4,745.1 6.31 NextEra Energy Services, LLC CT Power Marketer 1 56,063 7,267.6 12.96 Direct Energy Business DC Power Marketer 1 333,972

  4. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Transportation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Transportation (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) City of North Little Rock - (AR) AR Municipal 1 324 37.0 11.42 Entergy Arkansas Inc AR Investor Owned 1 113 12.0 10.62 Salt River Project AZ Political Subdivision 1 6,216 584.0 9.40 City & County of San Francisco CA Municipal 1 104,193 6,519.0 6.26 City of Pasadena - (CA) CA Municipal 1 8,927 1,280.1

  5. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Transportation"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Clara - (CA)","CA","Municipal",1,20969,2049.9,9.7758596 "Los Angeles Department of Water & Power","CA","Municipal",2,130046,18397.7,14.147071 "Sacramento Municipal Util ...

  6. Retail Prices for Gasoline, All Grades

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    381 2.367 2.353 2.341 2.345 2.298 1993-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.372 2.380 2.374 2.361 2.384 2.362 1993-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.349 2.349 2.353 2.353 2.361 2.336 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.395 2.402 2.413 2.410 2.473 2.458 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.360 2.371 2.350 2.327 2.324 2.298 1993-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.313 2.247 2.198 2.166 2.174 2.087 1993-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 2.152 2.153 2.165 2.153 2.127 2.087 1993-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 2.328 2.356 2.374 2.383

  7. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Marketing, Ltd.","CT","Power Marketer",251,1347975,111807,8.2944417 "Constellation NewEnergy, Inc","DC","Power Marketer",1,749,56.6,7.5567423 "Direct Energy Business Marketing, ...

  8. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC","DC","Power Marketer",1,148128,930... "Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC","MD","Power Marketer",2,113058,660...

  9. ,"San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...132016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcusy05sfw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcusy05sfw.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  10. ,"Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...132016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcusy05law.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcusy05law.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  11. Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 12 13 7 2010's 13 13 16 19 42 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas Estimated Production Montana Shale Gas Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production Shale

  12. No. 2 Distillate Prices - Through Retail Outlets

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    67 - - - - - 1983-2015 East Coast (PADD 1) 2.455 - - - - - 1983-2015 New England (PADD 1A) 2.531 - - - - - 1983-2015 Connecticut 2.481 - - - - - 1983-2015 Maine 2.540 - - - - - 1983-2015 Massachusetts 2.588 - - - - - 1983-2015 New Hampshire 2.512 - - - - - 1983-2015 Rhode Island 2.507 - - - - - 1983-2015 Vermont 2.598 - - - - - 1983-2015 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.488 - - - - - 1983-2015 Delaware 2.488 - - - - - 1983-2015 District of Columbia 2.513 - - - - - 1983-2015 Maryland 2.485 - - - - -

  13. Retail Prices for Gasoline, All Grades

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 2.835 3.576 3.680 3.575 3.437 2.520 1993-2015 East Coast (PADD1) 2.824 3.587 3.695 3.599 3.470 2.483 1993-2015 New England (PADD 1A) 2.864 3.666 3.785 3.692 3.547 2.507 1993-2015 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.859 3.629 3.763 3.654 3.533 2.559 1993-2015 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.787 3.535 3.618 3.532 3.401 2.420 1993-2015 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.779 3.532 3.605 3.515 3.360 2.411 1993-2015 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 2.702 3.423 3.479 3.374 3.216 2.256 1993-2015

  14. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 559 25,106 2,071.5 8.25 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 227 452,985 19,665.2 4.34 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ... 8.93 City of Sturgeon Bay - (WI) WI Municipal 1 14,452 ...

  15. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 48,211.7 12.49 City of Bay City - (MI) MI Municipal ... 379,900 34,167.6 8.99 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 604,703 29,473.2 4.87 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ...

  16. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 35,654.1 13.57 City of Bay City - (MI) MI Municipal ... 254,348 24,210.5 9.52 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 9,251 132,861 8,545.5 6.43 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ...

  17. 2015 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 12,377.1 10.15 City of Bay City - (MI) MI Municipal ... 1,709 100,446 7,885.6 7.85 Coos-Curry Electric Coop, Inc OR ... 447 18,857 1,262.5 6.70 Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, Inc OR ...

  18. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...3,393685,35089.3,8.9130396 "Coos-Curry Electric Coop, ...,598333,28491.3,4.7617798 "Oregon Trail El Cons Coop, ... "City of Sturgeon Bay - (WI)","WI","Municipal",873...

  19. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...ative",9,20211,1603,7.9313245 "Blue Grass Energy Coop Corp","KY","Cooperative",10,337889,2...9,43861,3070.7,7.0009804 "City of Bowling Green - (KY)","KY","Municipal",6,118189,8185,6.9...

  20. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Solutions Corp.","IL","Power Marketer",477853,4492034,227638.8,5.0676108 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",24959,190336,16176.4,8.4988652 "Homefield ...

  1. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Glacial Energy Holdings","IL","Power Marketer",2426,128194,8721.1,6.8030485 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",24967,198273,16620.1,8.3824323 "Homefield ...

  2. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Glacial Energy Holdings","IL","Power Marketer",2426,128194,8721.1,6.8030485 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",8,7937,443.7,5.5902734 "Homefield ...

  3. Systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a service representative

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Scott H.; Johnson, Joel A.; Neiswanger, Jeffery R.; Twitchell, Kevin E.

    2004-03-09

    The present invention includes systems configured to distribute a telephone call, communication systems, communication methods and methods of routing a telephone call to a customer service representative. In one embodiment of the invention, a system configured to distribute a telephone call within a network includes a distributor adapted to connect with a telephone system, the distributor being configured to connect a telephone call using the telephone system and output the telephone call and associated data of the telephone call; and a plurality of customer service representative terminals connected with the distributor and a selected customer service representative terminal being configured to receive the telephone call and the associated data, the distributor and the selected customer service representative terminal being configured to synchronize, application of the telephone call and associated data from the distributor to the selected customer service representative terminal.

  4. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  5. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  6. August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum provides an overview of the meeting between representatives of the American Public Gas Association (APGA) and of the Department of Energy (DOE).  Present for APGA were Dave Schryver...

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,8374110,8204704,7597337,7442490,7146835,6865634,6698105,6176586,6300359,6075079,21,25.3,25.5 "Industrial",16565376,16847755,16993922,16774699,14710294,17038455,17839032,17990009,1...

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Hawaii" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maine" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mississippi" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nebraska" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oklahoma" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Michigan" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Missouri" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Indiana" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Georgia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Dakota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Delaware" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pennsylvania" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Florida" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Texas" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Virginia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Iowa" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Carolina" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Oregon" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Colorado" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Vermont" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    California" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    District of Columbia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    West Virginia" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Louisiana" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Montana" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Illinois" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    United States" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Utah" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Ohio" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share ...

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Massachusetts" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, ...

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maryland" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Tennessee" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Arizona" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Minnesota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent ...

  2. UESC Training for Utility Representatives

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services.

  3. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  4. Program Analyst (Contracting Officer Representative)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position reports directly to the Office Director for PBPE. The incumbent of this position analyzes, evaluates and/or advises management on the effectiveness of complex and overarching EIA...

  5. UESCs Training for Utility Representatives

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services.

  6. Higher crude oil prices contribute to higher summer gasoline prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Higher crude oil prices contribute to higher summer gasoline prices The recent rise in crude oil prices will be passed on to consumers in the form of higher gasoline prices this summer but drivers will still find lower prices at the pump compared to what they paid last year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the retail price for regular-grade gasoline will average $2.27 per gallon this summer. That's 6 cents higher than previously forecast but still

  7. Summer gasoline price forecast slightly higher, but drivers still pay less than last year

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Summer gasoline price forecast slightly higher, but drivers still pay less than last year Rising crude oil prices are likely to be passed on to consumers at the pump, but U.S. drivers are still expected to pay the lowest summer gasoline prices since 2004, and for all of 2016 the average household will spend $900 less on gasoline than it did two years ago." In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the retail price for regular grade gasoline will average

  8. U.S. drivers continue to see low gasoline prices in December

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nationwide average gasoline price to fall below $2 a gallon in January The national average price of regular gasoline is expected to drop below $2 per gallon this month and hover near the $2 level through most of this year, as lower crude oil prices translate into more savings for consumers at the pump. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the retail price for regular-grade gasoline averages $1.90 per gallon in February. That's the lowest level in seven

  9. Structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09410 (DUF2006) reveals a structural signature of the calycin superfamily that suggests a role in lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Skerra, Arne; Lomize, Andrei; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Krishna, S. Sri; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The first structural representative of the domain of unknown function DUF2006 family, also known as Pfam family PF09410, comprises a lipocalin-like fold with domain duplication. The finding of the calycin signature in the N-terminal domain, combined with remote sequence similarity to two other protein families (PF07143 and PF08622) implicated in isoprenoid metabolism and the oxidative stress response, support an involvement in lipid metabolism. Clusters of conserved residues that interact with ligand mimetics suggest that the binding and regulation sites map to the N-terminal domain and to the interdomain interface, respectively.

  10. Increases in electric rates in rural areas. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session, June 4, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Seven witnesses representing rural electric utilities and cooperatives spoke at a June 4, 1980 hearing to discuss which inflationary factors are increasing rural electric rates. The Committee recognized that the problem is not unique to rural systems. In their testimony, the witnesses noted increasing urbanization of rural areas; the cost of generating plant construction, fuel, and operating expenses; general economic factors of inflation and high interest rates; and regulations as major contributing factors to utility requests for rate increases. The hearing record includes their testimony, additional material submitted for the record, and responses to questions from the subcommittee. (DCK)

  11. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has identified nine issue areas which, in our judgment, represent the most significant challenges facing the Department of Energy (Department)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY 10:00 AM Friday, June 9, 2006 Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, I am pleased to be here at your request to testify on cyber security issues at the Department of Energy. The Department of Energy, which spends over $2 billion each year on information technology (IT), has a current inventory of approximately 800 information systems, including up to 115,000 personal computers;

  12. Findings and recommendations of the advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Report for the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    In a report to the US House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology, the Advisory Panel defines the most critical energy problem facing the US: obtaining a sufficient supply of liquid hydrocarbons for transportation fuel and for other applications where substitution would be difficult, costly, and time-consuming. Any substantial contribution from synthetic fuels must involve the use of coal, oil shale, and biomass, with the raw materials coming from as many different regions of the country as possible. The panel makes recommendations regarding (1) the emphasis of the Department of Energy's synthetic-fuel demonstration program, (2) implementation of a synthetic-fuel production program, and (3) mitigation of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of synthetic-fuel production. The panel specifically maintains that federal assistance to commercial-scale projects should be available on a competitive basis to those organizations willing to take substantial marketing risks.

  13. Requiring an Office of Investigations within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, September 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This bill amends the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 to add a new section 205A that establishes within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) a statutory Office of Investigation (OI) and establishes a director of this office who reports directly to the five NRC Commissioners. The new section also sets out the responsibility of the office for initiating and conducting investigations into violations of laws the NRC implements that relate to violations involving wrongdoing. The OI is charged with reporting violations of federal criminal law to the Department of Justice. The Committee on Energy and Commerce considered the bill, report favorably on it without amendment, and recommend its passage by the whole House of Representatives.

  14. Mobil/Marathon takeover. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, November 19, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The exercise of corporate power and money as well as the effect on energy policy were the underlying issues in a hearing on the proposed merger of Mobil and Marathon oil companies. The use of capital in this way would deny funds for economic recovery and energy development at a time when the oil companies complain that they need more financial incentives. The companies' response in the direction of mergers suggest that deregulation and tax incentives are not developing solutions to energy supply, but are creating new problems. The witnesses included representatives of Ohio, DOE's Office of Competition, and independent oil jobbers and distributors, who argued against the merger. Additional letters and statement from the witnesses follow their testimony. (DCK)

  15. H. R. 4805: Internal Revenue Code of 1990. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, May 10, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives on May 10, 1990 to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. This bill reduces emissions of carbon dioxide by imposing a tax on certain fuels based on their carbon content. Separate sections are included which impose tax on coal, tax on petroleum, and tax on natural gas. The tax rate on coal will be $3.00 per ton for 1991, $6.00 per ton for 1992, $9.00 per ton for 1993, and $12 per ton for 1994. The tax rate on petroleum will be $.65 per barrel for 1991, $1.30 per barrel for 1992, $1.95 per barrel for 1993, and $2.60 per barrel for 1994. The tax rate on natural gas will be $.08 per MCF for 1991, $.16 per MCF for 1992, $.24 per MCF for 1993, and $.32 per MCF for 1994.

  16. Written Statement of David Huizenga Senior Advisor for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States House of Representatives (May 9, 2013)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Senior Advisor David Huizenga represented the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States...

  17. Assessment of G3(MP2)//B3 theory including a pseudopotential for molecules containing first-, second-, and third-row representative elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Carlos Murilo Romero; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; Custodio, Rogrio; Pereira, Douglas Henrique; Departamento de Cincias Exatas e Biotecnolgicas, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Gurupi, 77410-530 Gurupi, Tocantins

    2013-11-14

    G3(MP2)//B3 theory was modified to incorporate compact effective potential (CEP) pseudopotentials, providing a theoretical alternative referred to as G3(MP2)//B3-CEP for calculations involving first-, second-, and third-row representative elements. The G3/05 test set was used as a standard to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated properties. G3(MP2)//B3-CEP theory was applied to the study of 247 standard enthalpies of formation, 104 ionization energies, 63 electron affinities, 10 proton affinities, and 22 atomization energies, comprising 446 experimental energies. The mean absolute deviations compared with the experimental data for all thermochemical results presented an accuracy of 1.4 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and 1.6 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3-CEP. Approximately 75% and 70% of the calculated properties are found with accuracy between 2 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and G3(MP2)//B3-CEP, respectively. Considering a confidence interval of 95%, the results may oscillate between 4.2 kcal mol{sup ?1} and 4.6 kcal mol{sup ?1}, respectively. The overall statistical behavior indicates that the calculations using pseudopotential present similar behavior with the all-electron theory. Of equal importance to the accuracy is the CPU time, which was reduced by between 10% and 40%.

  18. Crack stability in a representative piping system under combined inertial and seismic/dynamic displacement-controlled stresses. Subtask 1.3 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.; Olson, R.; Wilkowski, O.G.; Marschall, C.; Schmidt, R.

    1997-06-01

    This report presents the results from Subtask 1.3 of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The objective of Subtask 1.3 is to develop data to assess analysis methodologies for characterizing the fracture behavior of circumferentially cracked pipe in a representative piping system under combined inertial and displacement-controlled stresses. A unique experimental facility was designed and constructed. The piping system evaluated is an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter Schedule 100 pipe. The experimental facility is equipped with special hardware to ensure system boundary conditions could be appropriately modeled. The test matrix involved one uncracked and five cracked dynamic pipe-system experiments. The uncracked experiment was conducted to evaluate piping system damping and natural frequency characteristics. The cracked-pipe experiments evaluated the fracture behavior, pipe system response, and stability characteristics of five different materials. All cracked-pipe experiments were conducted at PWR conditions. Material characterization efforts provided tensile and fracture toughness properties of the different pipe materials at various strain rates and temperatures. Results from all pipe-system experiments and material characterization efforts are presented. Results of fracture mechanics analyses, dynamic finite element stress analyses, and stability analyses are presented and compared with experimental results.

  19. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

  20. Development of a Short-Duration Drive Cycle to Represent Long-Term Measured Drive Cycle Data: Evaluation of Truck Efficiency Technologies in Class 8 Tractor Trailers

    SciTech Connect

    LaClair, Tim; Gao, Zhiming; Fu, Joshua; Calcagno, Jimmy; Yun, Jeongran

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the fuel savings and emissions reductions that can be achieved from truck fuel efficiency technologies for a fleet's specific usage allows the fleet to select a combination of technologies that will yield the greatest operational efficiency and profitability. An accurate characterization of usage for the fleet is critical for such an evaluation; however, short-term measured drive cycle data do not generally reflect overall usage very effectively. This study presents a detailed analysis of vehicle usage in a commercial vehicle fleet and demonstrates the development of a short-duration synthetic drive cycle with measured drive cycle data collected over an extended period of time. The approach matched statistical measures of the vehicle speed with acceleration history and integrated measured grade data to develop a compressed drive cycle that accurately represents total usage. Drive cycle measurements obtained during a full year from six tractor trailers in normal operations in a less-than-truckload carrier were analyzed to develop a synthetic drive cycle. The vehicle mass was also estimated to account for the variation of loads that the fleet experienced. These drive cycle and mass data were analyzed with a tractive energy analysis to quantify the benefits in terms of fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions that can be achieved on Class 8 tractor trailers by using advanced efficiency technologies, either individually or in combination. Although differences exist between Class 8 tractor trailer fleets, this study provides valuable insight into the energy and emissions reduction potential that various technologies can bring in this important trucking application. Finally, the methodology employed for generating the synthetic drive cycle serves as a rigorous approach to develop an accurate usage characterization that can be used to effectively compress large quantities of drive cycle data.

  1. Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spatial pattern of the uncertainty in climate air pollution health impact has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the latest Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). OBJECTIVES: We estimated county-level ozone (O3) and PM2.5 related excess mortality (EM) and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States in the 2050s under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. METHODS: Using dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 and PM2.5 levels at 12 km resolution between the future (2057-2059) and present (2001-2004) under two RCP scenarios. Using concentration-response relationships in the literature and projected future populations, we estimated EM attributable to the changes in O3 and PM2.5. We finally analyzed the contribution of input variables to the uncertainty in the county-level EM estimation using Monte Carlo simulation. RESULTS: O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1,082 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): -288 to 2,453), and -5,229 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (-7,212 to -3,246). Simulated PM2.5 changes resulted in a significant decrease in EM under the two RCPs. The uncertainty of O3-related EM estimates was mainly caused by RCP scenarios, whereas that of PM2.5-related EMs was mainly from concentration-response functions. CONCLUSION: EM estimates attributable to climate change-induced air pollution change as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space, and so are the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective mitigation and adaptation policy.

  2. Spatially resolved estimation of ozone-related mortality in the United States under two representative concentration pathways (RCPs) and their uncertainty

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent A.; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2014-11-16

    We report that the spatial pattern of the uncertainty in air pollution-related health impacts due to climate change has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), the latest greenhouse gas emission pathways. We estimated future tropospheric ozone (O3) and related excess mortality and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States under RCPs. Based on dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 level at 12 km resolution between the future (2057 and 2059) and base years (2001–2004) under a low-to-medium emission scenario (RCP4.5) and amore » fossil fuel intensive emission scenario (RCP8.5). We then estimated the excess mortality attributable to changes in O3. Finally, we analyzed the sensitivity of the excess mortality estimates to the input variables and the uncertainty in the excess mortality estimation using Monte Carlo simulations. O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1312 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95 % confidence interval (CI): 427 to 2198) and ₋2118 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (95 % CI: ₋3021 to ₋1216), when allowing for climate change and emissions reduction. The uncertainty of O3-related excess mortality estimates was mainly caused by RCP emissions pathways. Finally, excess mortality estimates attributable to the combined effect of climate and emission changes on O3 as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space and so do the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective community level mitigation and adaptation policy.« less

  3. Development of a Short-Duration Drive Cycle to Represent Long-Term Measured Drive Cycle Data: Evaluation of Truck Efficiency Technologies in Class 8 Tractor Trailers

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    LaClair, Tim; Gao, Zhiming; Fu, Joshua; Calcagno, Jimmy; Yun, Jeongran

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the fuel savings and emissions reductions that can be achieved from truck fuel efficiency technologies for a fleet's specific usage allows the fleet to select a combination of technologies that will yield the greatest operational efficiency and profitability. An accurate characterization of usage for the fleet is critical for such an evaluation; however, short-term measured drive cycle data do not generally reflect overall usage very effectively. This study presents a detailed analysis of vehicle usage in a commercial vehicle fleet and demonstrates the development of a short-duration synthetic drive cycle with measured drive cycle data collected over an extendedmore » period of time. The approach matched statistical measures of the vehicle speed with acceleration history and integrated measured grade data to develop a compressed drive cycle that accurately represents total usage. Drive cycle measurements obtained during a full year from six tractor trailers in normal operations in a less-than-truckload carrier were analyzed to develop a synthetic drive cycle. The vehicle mass was also estimated to account for the variation of loads that the fleet experienced. These drive cycle and mass data were analyzed with a tractive energy analysis to quantify the benefits in terms of fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions that can be achieved on Class 8 tractor trailers by using advanced efficiency technologies, either individually or in combination. Although differences exist between Class 8 tractor trailer fleets, this study provides valuable insight into the energy and emissions reduction potential that various technologies can bring in this important trucking application. Finally, the methodology employed for generating the synthetic drive cycle serves as a rigorous approach to develop an accurate usage characterization that can be used to effectively compress large quantities of drive cycle data.« less

  4. Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a cellulolytic and filamentous thermophile that represents a novel lineage (Kallotenuales ord. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov.) within the class Chloroflexia

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Jesse; Gieler, Brandon; Heisler, Devon; Palisoc, Maryknoll; Williams, Amanda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ming, Hong; Yu, Tian T.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Li, Wen J.; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-08-15

    Several closely-related, thermophilic, and cellulolytic bacterial strains, designated JKG1T, JKG2, JKG3, JKG4, and JKG5, were isolated from a cellulolytic enrichment (corn stover) incubated in the water column of Great Boiling Spring, NV. Strain JKG1T had cells of a diameter of 0.7 - 0.9 ?m and length of ~2.0 ?m that formed non-branched multicellular filaments reaching >300 ?m. Spores were not formed and dense liquid cultures were red. The temperature range for growth was 45-65 C, with an optimum of 55 C. The pH range for growth was 5.6-9.0, with an optimum of 7.5. JKG1T grew as an aerobic heterotroph, utilizing glucose, sucrose, xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, carboxymethylcellulose, filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, xylan, starch, casamino acids, tryptone, peptone, yeast extract, acetate, citrate, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol as sole carbon sources, and was not observed to photosynthesize. The cells stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the new isolates in the class Chloroflexia, but distant from other cultivated members, with the highest sequence identity of 82.5% to Roseiflexus castenholzii. The major quinone was menaquinone-9; no ubiquinones were detected. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C18:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C18:0, and iso-C17:0. C16:0, iso-C16:0, and C17:0. The peptidoglycan amino acids were alanine, ornithine, glutamic acid, serine, and asparagine. Whole-cell sugars included mannose, rhamnose, glucose, galactose, ribose, arabinose, and xylose. Morphological, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic results suggest that JKG1T is representative of a new lineage within the class Chloroflexia, which we propose to designate Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov., Kallotenuales ord. nov.

  5. Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (February 11 2016)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives February 11, 2016.

  6. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (March 24, 2015)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives March 24, 2015

  7. Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Demonstration Using a Representative Savannah River Site Sludge Simulant On the Large-Size Pilot Platform at the CEA-Marcoule

    SciTech Connect

    Girold, C.; Delaunay, M.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Lacombe, J. [CEA Marcoule, CEA/DEN/DTCD/SCDV, 30 (France); Marra, S.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.; Smith, M.; Edwards, R.; Barnes, A.; Stone, M. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Washington Savannah River Company, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Iverson, D. [Liquid Waste Operations, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), Aiken, SC (United States); Do Quang, R. [AREVA NC, Tour AREVA, 92 - Paris La Defense (France); Tchemitcheff, E. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, Richland Office, Richland, WA (United States); Veyer, C. [Consultant, 59 - Saint Waast la Vallee (France)

    2008-07-01

    The cold-crucible induction melter technology (CCIM) is considered worldwide for industrial implementation to overcome the current limits of high level waste vitrification technologies and to answer future challenges such as: new or difficult sludge compositions, need for improving waste loading, need for high temperatures, and corrosive effluents. More particularly, this technology is being considered for implementation at the US DOE Savannah River site to increase the rate of waste processing while reducing the number of HLW canisters to be produced through increased waste loading and improved waste throughput. A collaborative program involving AREVA, CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), SRNL (Savannah River National Laboratory) and WSRC (Washington Savannah River Company) has thus been initiated in 2007 to demonstrate vitrification with waste loadings on the order of 50% (versus the current DWPF waste loading of about 35%) with a PUREX-type waste composition (high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition), and to perform two pilot-scale runs on the large size platform equipped with a 650 mm diameter CCIM at the CEA Marcoule. The objectives of the demonstrations were 1) to show the feasibility of processing a representative SRS sludge surrogate using continuous slurry feeding, 2) to produce a glass that would meet the acceptance specifications with an increased waste loading when compared to what is presently achieved at the DWPF, and 3) achieve improved waste throughputs. This presentation describes the platform and the very encouraging results obtained from the demonstration performed at temperatures, specific throughputs and waste loadings that overcome current DWPF limits. Results from the initial exploratory run and second demonstration run include 1) production of a glass product that achieved the targeted glass composition that was more durable than the standard Environmental Assessment (EA) glass, 2) successful slurry feeding of the CCIM, and 3) promising waste

  8. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 m

  9. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.835 3.576 3.680 3.575 3.437 2.520 1993-2015 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.793 3.528 3.610 3.511 3.376 2.423 1994-2015 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.921 3.675 3.822 3.707 3.559 2.718 1994-2015 Regular 2.782 3.521 3.618 3.505 3.358 2.429 1990-2015 Conventional Areas 2.742 3.476 3.552 3.443 3.299 2.334 1990-2015 Reformulated Areas 2.864 3.616 3.757 3.635 3.481 2.629 1994-2015 Midgrade 2.902 3.644 3.756 3.663 3.539 2.645

  10. Hedging effects of wind on retail electric supply costs

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Frank; Litvinova, Julia

    2009-12-15

    In the short term, renewables - especially wind - are not as effective as conventional hedges due to uncertain volume and timing as well as possibly poor correlation with high-value periods. In the long term, there are more potential hedging advantages to renewables because conventional financial hedges are not available very far in the future. (author)

  11. Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    95 2.402 2.413 2.410 2.473 2.458 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.453 2.457 2.482 2.489 2.506 2.488 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.359 2.368 2.371 2.361 2.453 2.439 1994-2016 Regular 2.256 2.263 2.274 2.271 2.335 2.321 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.332 2.335 2.361 2.368 2.387 2.365 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.208 2.217 2.219 2.209 2.302 2.293 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.540 2.547 2.556 2.553 2.609 2.596 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.559 2.563 2.590 2.597 2.606 2.598

  12. East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    72 2.380 2.374 2.361 2.384 2.362 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.385 2.395 2.385 2.370 2.373 2.349 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.349 2.354 2.356 2.347 2.403 2.385 1994-2016 Regular 2.229 2.237 2.232 2.219 2.240 2.217 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.241 2.251 2.243 2.227 2.228 2.201 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.211 2.215 2.215 2.207 2.261 2.243 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.509 2.516 2.506 2.495 2.517 2.497 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.510 2.518 2.500 2.488 2.494 2.473

  13. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    152 2.153 2.165 2.153 2.127 2.087 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.170 2.173 2.166 2.148 2.127 2.087 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.090 2.088 2.161 2.170 2.125 2.088 1994-2016 Regular 2.038 2.043 2.056 2.042 2.015 1.975 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.057 2.063 2.057 2.038 2.015 1.975 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.974 1.977 2.052 2.059 2.015 1.976 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.297 2.293 2.302 2.297 2.271 2.230 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.313 2.308 2.300 2.285 2.268 2.226

  14. Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    60 2.371 2.350 2.327 2.324 2.298 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.365 2.377 2.355 2.331 2.330 2.304 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.310 2.310 2.296 2.277 2.260 2.238 1994-2016 Regular 2.204 2.216 2.196 2.172 2.165 2.138 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.210 2.223 2.203 2.178 2.172 2.144 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.141 2.140 2.124 2.106 2.088 2.063 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.497 2.505 2.478 2.460 2.464 2.439 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.498 2.506 2.478 2.460 2.465 2.440

  15. Midwest (PADD 2) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    13 2.247 2.198 2.166 2.174 2.087 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.295 2.232 2.176 2.154 2.163 2.078 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.432 2.342 2.335 2.239 2.248 2.143 1994-2016 Regular 2.221 2.155 2.107 2.075 2.082 1.994 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.205 2.143 2.089 2.067 2.074 1.988 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.325 2.235 2.227 2.130 2.137 2.030 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.479 2.409 2.360 2.327 2.339 2.252 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.456 2.390 2.333 2.310 2.321 2.236

  16. New England (PADD 1A) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    49 2.349 2.353 2.353 2.361 2.336 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.372 2.377 2.374 2.384 2.400 2.379 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.343 2.342 2.347 2.345 2.352 2.325 1994-2016 Regular 2.249 2.247 2.248 2.248 2.255 2.225 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 2.276 2.280 2.277 2.290 2.303 2.279 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.242 2.238 2.241 2.237 2.243 2.211 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.479 2.485 2.495 2.495 2.503 2.490 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.510 2.527 2.517 2.521 2.531 2.523

  17. New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    330 2.331 2.349 2.348 2.461 2.451 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.330 2.331 2.349 2.348 2.461 2.451 2000-2016 Regular 2.180 2.182 2.201 2.200 2.314 2.307 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.180 2.182 2.201 2.200 2.314 2.307 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.512 2.508 2.519 2.521 2.628 2.609 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.512 2.508 2.519 2.521 2.628 2.609 2000-2016 Premium 2.709 2.708 2.726 2.724 2.837 2.819 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.709 2.708 2.726 2.724 2.837 2.819

  18. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 Sep-16 Oct-16 View History Gasoline - All Grades 2.371 2.467 2.345 2.284 2.327 2.359 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.303 2.405 2.263 2.226 2.270 2.297 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.509 2.593 2.512 2.402 2.442 2.485 1994-2016 Regular 2.268 2.366 2.239 2.178 2.219 2.249 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 2.199 2.303 2.157 2.119 2.161 2.186 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.413 2.497 2.411 2.300 2.339 2.382 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.510 2.603 2.488 2.427

  19. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    81 2.367 2.353 2.341 2.345 2.298 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.327 2.309 2.286 2.270 2.270 2.220 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.491 2.484 2.490 2.484 2.499 2.458 1994-2016 Regular 2.272 2.257 2.243 2.230 2.233 2.184 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 2.216 2.198 2.175 2.159 2.157 2.105 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.389 2.381 2.386 2.379 2.392 2.349 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.529 2.516 2.502 2.493 2.498 2.455 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.469 2.452 2.429 2.415 2.416 2.370

  20. West Coast less California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    528 2.529 2.545 2.546 2.544 2.525 1998-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.594 2.599 2.618 2.623 2.619 2.598 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.210 2.199 2.198 2.182 2.187 2.179 1998-2016 Regular 2.459 2.461 2.476 2.478 2.475 2.456 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.529 2.534 2.552 2.557 2.553 2.531 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.121 2.109 2.109 2.093 2.098 2.090 1998-2016 Midgrade 2.668 2.668 2.686 2.686 2.683 2.666 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.737 2.740 2.762 2.765 2.761 2.742

  1. Retail Prices for Diesel (On-Highway) - All Types

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2.235 2.211 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.455 2.413 2.372 2.318 2.279 2.260 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.527 2.515 2.453 2.397 2.365 2.344 1997-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD...

  2. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report ...

  3. Historic utility retail rate information | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    updates) until just recently, so you may not find too much history. Going forward, we hope to make historic rates more organized, using the "supersedes" field to connect historic...

  4. Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.

    1994-12-31

    Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

  5. Reliant Energy Retail Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Facebook: https:www.facebook.comreliantenergy Outage Hotline: 1-866-222-7100 Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.reliant.comWelcome.d...

  6. TXU Energy Retail Co LP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.txu.comenresidentia Green Button Reference Page: www.txu.comenresidentia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  7. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... accident at the Three Mile Island plant in Pennsylvania on March 28, 1979, heightened concerns over safety and led to stringent new regulatory requirements for nuclear plants. ...

  8. Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Through Retail Outlets

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 1.892 2.306 3.058 3.168 3.068 2.876 1978-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 1.871 2.291 3.054 3.172 3.058 2.716 1983-2014 New England (PADD...

  9. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets

    Reports and Publications

    1996-01-01

    Restructuring of interstate pipeline companies has created new choices and challenges for local distribution companies (LDCs), their regulators, and their customers. The process of separating interstate pipeline gas sales from transportation service has been completed and has resulted in greater gas procurement options for LDCs.

  10. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energys Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  11. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  12. Archived Reference Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  13. Archived Reference Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  14. How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

  15. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  16. Business Case for Installing E85 at Retail Stations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-01-01

    Clean Cities Now is the official publication of the Clean Cities program. It features articles on alternative fuels and vehicles, idle reduction, fuel economy, and hybrid vehicles.

  17. Dominion Retail Inc (New York) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    861 Data Utility Id 3763 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.0593kWh...

  18. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (New York) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    861 Data Utility Id 50046 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Commercial: 0.0507kWh...

  19. A Look at Retail and Service Buildings - Index Page

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), information is collected separately for service buildings, enclosed malls,...

  20. Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    at the same rate as power purchased from the utility. ... transpired solar collector, or solar wall, for space heating. ... dim or grow brighter based on sensor readings ...

  1. H. R. 5904: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide tax relief to utilities installing acid rain reduction equipment, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, October 23, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on October 23, 1990 to control acid rain. This legislation focuses on tax credit for equipment to meet acid rain reduction standards, as well as tax-exempt financing of acid rain control property. In addition, a tax credit is issued for minerals used to reduce the sulfur in coal.

  2. FAQS Job Task Analyses- Facility Representative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

  3. Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining ...

  4. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Julia spends her free time hiking and backpacking and plans to pursue a wildlife and fisheries biology degree at Clemson University. The ORSSAB meets on the second Wednesday of ...

  5. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Honor Society, and she is involved with Project U, a club that stands against bullying. She is on the girls' powderpuff football team, and in her free time, she enjoys...

  6. Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Having basic knowledge and meeting technical competencies related to Nuclear Fundamentals, ... competencies related to specific engineering principles, such as: steam system ...

  7. Arkansas Converter Station Alternative Siting Area Representative...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... LOWER HATCHIE NWR HATCHIE NWR CHICKASAW NWR Creek WMA Eagle Lake Refuge WMA Lucias E. John Tully WMA Wolf River WMA Eagle Lake Refuge WMA St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA HENNING ...

  8. 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ...resa.robbins@rfets.gov Robin Ron AL LAAO (505) 667-4548 (505) 665-9230 rrobin@doeal.gov Ross Bill AL AAO (806) 477-7239 (806) 477-6987 wross@pantex.com Schierman Kerry RL SNF (509) ...

  9. 1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (925) 423-7567 henry.rio@oak.doe.gov Rose Grady AL AAO (505) 477-3162 grose@pantex.com Ross Bill AL AAO (806) 477-7239 wross@pantex.com Seaborg Don RL PFP (509) 372-2889 ...

  10. FAQS Qualification Card – Facility Representative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A key element for the Department’s Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA).

  11. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  12. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Hardin Valley varsity tennis team the past three years. Sophia is interested in medicine and health sciences and is thinking about a career in medicine. She is currently the...

  13. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  14. The Representative Concentration Pathways: An Overview (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): PNNL-SA-79134 Journal ID: ISSN 0165-0009; CLCHDX; KP1703030; TRN: US201122%%706 DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource ...

  15. Understanding and representing natural language meaning

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, D.L.; Maran, L.R.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dinitz, R.; Farwell, D.

    1982-12-01

    During this contract period the authors have: (a) continued investigation of events and actions by means of representation schemes called 'event shape diagrams'; (b) written a parsing program which selects appropriate word and sentence meanings by a parallel process known as activation and inhibition; (c) begun investigation of the point of a story or event by modeling the motivations and emotional behaviors of story characters; (d) started work on combining and translating two machine-readable dictionaries into a lexicon and knowledge base which will form an integral part of our natural language understanding programs; (e) made substantial progress toward a general model for the representation of cognitive relations by comparing English scene and event descriptions with similar descriptions in other languages; (f) constructed a general model for the representation of tense and aspect of verbs; (g) made progress toward the design of an integrated robotics system which accepts English requests, and uses visual and tactile inputs in making decisions and learning new tasks.

  16. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Rdige,...

  17. house of representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Congressmen tour Y-12 facilities During a recent visit to the Y-12 National Security Complex, Rep. Mike Simpson (R-Idaho), chairman of the House Energy and Water Appropriations ...

  18. Hazardous-waste cleanup and enforcement problems: Indiana. Hearing before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, June 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen witnesses representing the private and public sectors testified at a Seymour, Indiana hearing on hazardous materials at the Seymour Recycling facility and efforts to clean up the site. The facility began operations in 1968, and was closed down in February of 1980; the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had discovered during 1978 that the company was not disposing of its chemical wastes properly. Local concerns focused on why the EPA efforts slowed noticeably in the spring of 1981 and whether the site qualifies for superfund financing. Spokesmen from EPA argued that the slowdown was due to inaction at the state level, but state representatives countered that the problem was a lack of state funds to match federal funding. Other witnesses pursued health and safety issues and the efforts Seymour citizens have made to gain relief. (DCK)

  19. H. R. 2670: A bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, June 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on June 18, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste. When garbage is burned, toxic materials are concentrated in the ash. If the ash is disposed of in a landfill, these toxic materials can contaminate the ground water or surface water by leaching toxic materials from the ash. In addition, disposing of contaminated ash improperly can pose a health hazard. New authority is provided for regulating incinerator ash as a hazardous waste.

  20. Issues relating to overlapping Federal and state responsibilities for the oversight of the Surface Mining Law. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 26, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The hearing was called regarding the responsibilities of the state and Federal government in administering the Federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. With mining taking place in 27 states under a variety of conditions and practices, the Act encourages the states to assume primacy responsibility for regulating coal mining. Once a state's plan is approved, the Federal role becomes one of oversight. This hearing examines Pennsylvania's programs and what happens when there is a disagreement between state and Federal authorities. Testimony is presented from 12 witnesses, representing coal companies, electric power companies, Sierra Club, National Wildlife Federation, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, and West Virginia.