National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for regulatory impact analysis

  1. Regulatory Impact Analysis and Regulatory Flexibility Act screening for operating permits regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, R.M.

    1992-06-01

    The report presents the economic impact analysis performed to comply with the requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12291 for the Title V Operating permits Rule.

  2. Regulatory impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    A regulatory impact analysis (RIA) of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this regulation. This (RIA) was required because the proposal is economically significant according to Executive Order 12866. The industry for which these impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Several different impact analyses were included in total or summarized in different chapters in the document. Those analyses were: the compliance cost analysis, the economic impact analysis, and the benefits analysis. Benefits and costs were then compared and discussed in the document`s last chapter.

  3. Regulatory impact analysis for the petroleum refineries neshap. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The report analyzes the regulatory impacts of the Petroleum Refinery National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), which is being promulgated under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CCA). This emission standard would regulate the emissions of certain hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from petroleum refineries. The petroleum refineries industry group includes any facility engaged in the production of motor gasoline, naphthas, kerosene, jet fuels, distillate fuel oils, residual fuel oils, lubricants, or other products made from crude oil or unfinished petroleum derivatives. The report analyzes the impact that regulatory action is likely to have on the petroleum refining industry.

  4. Simulation of compliance choices for the disinfection by-products regulatory impact analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gelderloos, A.B.; Harrington, G.W.; Owen, D.M.; Regli, S.; Schaefer, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. EPA is in the process of developing regulations designed to limit the concentrations of disinfectants and their by-products in drinking water systems. The objective of regulatory analysis is to determine the potential impacts of implementing different regulatory options. This paper describes one aspect of this analysis.

  5. Economic impact analysis and regulatory flexibility analysis of air pollution regulations: Architectural and industrial maintenance coatings. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, L.; Madariaga, B.

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the results of cost, economic impact, and regulatory flexibility analysis of a proposed federal rule for volatile organic compounds (VOC) for the architectural and industrial maintenance (AIM) coatings industry.

  6. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed great lakes water quality guidance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Raucher, R.; Dixon, A.; Trabka, E.

    1993-04-15

    The Regulatory Impact Analysis provides direction to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on minimum water quality standards and contains numerical water quality criteria for 32 pollutants as well as methodologies for the development of water quality criteria for additional pollutants discharged to these waters. It also provides guidance to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on antidegradation policies and standards and implementation procedures.

  7. Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) for the proposed Great Lakes water quality guidance (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Regulatory Impact Analysis provides direction to the Great Lakes states and Tribes on minimum water quality standards and contains numerical water quality criteria for 32 pollutants as well as methodologies for the development of water quality criteria for additional pollutants discharged to these waters. It also provides guidance to the Great Lakes States and Tribes on antidegradation policies and standards and implementation procedures.

  8. Regulatory Impact Analysis Clean Fuel Fleet Program. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAA) require the establishment of a Clean Fuel Fleet Program in certain areas of the country which have significant air pollution problems. The purpose of the program is to introduce and encourage the use of lower-emitting motor vehicles and clean alternative fuels in the covered areas. To accomplish these objectives in an efficient and effective manner, centrally-controlled vehicle fleets were chosen by Congress as the focus of the program. The document presents the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) estimates of the likely costs, benefits, and impacts of the Clean Fuel Fleet Program.

  9. Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's antitrust review process: an analysis of the impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) antitrust process is reviewed and its impacts to small systems and applicant systems are studied. This process takes the form of a description of the NRC's antitrust review process as implemented, a generic categorization of potential impacts and individual case-by-case studies of four different utilities.

  11. Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, Alex; Kopp, Robert E.; Shouse, Kate C.; Griffiths, Charles; Hodson, Elke L.; Kopits, Elizabeth; Mignone, Bryan K.; Moore, Chris; Newbold, Steve; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wolverton, Ann

    2013-04-01

    to updating the estimates regularly as modeling capabilities and scientific and economic knowledge improves. To help foster further improvements in estimating the SCC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a pair of workshops on “Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis.” The first focused on conceptual and methodological issues related to integrated assessment modeling and the second brought together natural and social scientists to explore methods for improving damage assessment for multiple sectors. These two workshops provide the basis for the 13 papers in this special issue.

  12. Regulatory impact analysis: Control of sulfur and aromatics contents of on-highway diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The regulatory analysis focuses on the cost effectiveness of regulating diesel fuel sulfur content. The report discusses the implications of fuel controls on the refinery industry, the control options considered, the cost effectiveness of fuel control, leadtime, enforcement issues and certification fuel.

  13. Final regulatory impact analysis and summary and analysis of comments: Control of vehicular evaporative emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The document summarizes the results of all analyses conducted in support of the final rule for evaporative emission regulations for gasoline and methanol fueled light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and heavy duty vehicles. The document also includes the test procedures, the technological feasibility, economic impact, environmental effects, cost-effectiveness of the standards and appendixes describing evaporative modeling with in-use driving patterns including MOBILE5 input and output computer files.

  14. Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

  15. Regulatory impact analysis of final effluent limitations guidelines and standards for the offshore oil and gas industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-14

    For all major rulemaking actions, Executive Order 12291 requires a Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA), in which benefits of the regulation are compared to costs imposed by the regulation. The report presents the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA, or the Agency) RIA of the final rule on the effluent limitations guidelines for the Offshore Subcategory of the Oil and Gas Extraction Industry. The principal requirement of the Executive Order is that the Agency perform an analysis comparing the benefits of the regulation to the costs that the regulation imposes. Three types of benefits are analyzed in this RIA: quantified and monetized benefits; quantified and non-monetized benefits; and non-quantified and non-monetized benefits.

  16. Regulatory impact analysis of national emissions standards for hazardous air pollutants for by-product coke oven charging, door leaks, and topside leaks. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Under the authority of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, a Natioal Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants is proposed to control emissions from By-product Coke Oven Charging, door leaks, and topside leaks. Because the EPA considers the regulation for By-product Coke Oven batteries to be a major rule, the attached Regulatory Impact Analysis was prepared to fulfill the requirements of E012291. The document reviews the need for regulation, control techniques, regulatory options, costs of control, economic impacts, benefits of the regulation, and compares benefits and costs associated with the regulation.

  17. Regulatory impact analysis of the part 503 sewage sludge regulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, S.

    1992-11-25

    The report evaluates the costs, benefits, and economic impacts of the final 40 CFR Part 503 regulation governing the use of disposal of sewage sludge generated during the treatment of domestic sewage in a treatment works and domestic septage. The report begins by describing some relevant characteristics of treatment works and domestic septage haulers. The report focuses on the costs, risks, and benefits of the Part 503 regulation.

  18. Historical perspective, economic analysis, and regulatory analysis of the impacts of waste partitioning-transmutation on the disposal of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Croff, A.G.; Kocher, D.C.

    1990-10-01

    Partitioning-transmutation, sometimes called actinide burning, is an alternative approach to high-level radioactive waste management. It consists of removing long-lived radionuclides from wastes and destroying those radionuclides, thus reducing the long-term hazards of radioactive waste. It was studied in detail in the 1970's. New developments in technology and other factors are resulting in a reexamination of this waste management option. This report consists of three papers which summarize the historical work, update the analysis of the costs of waste disposal, and describe current regulatory requirements which might be impacted by P-T. The papers provide a starting point for future research on P-T. 152 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Simulation of raw water and treatment parameters in support of the disinfection by-products regulatory impact analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Regli, S.; Cromwell, J.; Mosher, J.; Zhang, X.

    1992-06-10

    The U.S. EPA has undertaken an effort to model how the water supply industry may respond to possible rules and how those responses may affect human health risk. The model is referred to as the Disinfection By-Product Regulatory Analysis Model (DBPRAM), The paper is concerned primarily with presenting and discussing the methods, underlying data, assumptions, limitations and results for the first part of the model. This part of the model shows the creation of sets of simulated water supplies that are representative of the conditions currently encountered by public water supplies with respect to certain raw water quality and water treatment characteristics.

  20. Regulatory impact analysis and regulatory support document: Control of air pollution; determination of significance for nonroad sources and emission standards for new nonroad compression-ignition engines at or above 37 kilowatts (50 horsepower). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, T.; North, D.R.; Green, K.A.H.; Sabourin, M.A.; Guerrieri, D.A.

    1994-05-27

    The regulatory impact analysis and support document provides additional information in support of the Final Rulemaking (FRM). This FRM will regulate all new nonroad compression-ignition engines greater than or equal to 37 kilowatts (50 hp), except engines which propel or are used on marine vessels, aircraft engines, engines which propel locomotives, and engines regulated by the Mining, Safety, and Health Administration. The regulated engines are hereafter referred to as nonroad large CI engines. The goal of this regulation is to substantially reduce NOx emission and smoke from nonroad large CI engines beginning in the 1996 model year.

  1. Hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF) regulatory impact analysis for promulgated air emission standards for tanks, surface impoundments, and containers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The document constitutes the Final Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) for the Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities; Organic Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers under Section 3004(n) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The document is composed of two parts: (1) an addendum consisting of revised chapters to the 1989 RIA (PB--90-252503); and (2) an appendix containing the 1989 RIA. The addendum consists of rewritten chapters that discuss revised analyses of control options considered for the final standards. The highlight of this addendum is a completely revamped Benefit-Cost assessment (Chapter VII).

  2. Regulatory Analysis of Reactivity Transients

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, Carl E.; Clifford, Paul M.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Voglewede, John C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper will describe modifications made to the FRAPCON-3 and FRAPTRAN fuel performance codes and models that impact reactivity initiated accident (RIA) analyses. The modified models include an upper bound empirical and best estimate release models for fast transients, and a revised fuel failure model that accounts for ductile and brittle failure. Because experimental data exists for discrete test conditions, the codes and models are used to interpolate and to some extent, to extrapolate these test conditions. An upper bound empirical model for release is used to establish new recommended release fractions for long-lived and short lived (radioactive) isotopes for RIA events in Regulatory Guide 1.183. A best estimate release model is used in FRAPTRAN 1.4 based on grain boundary gas concentrations from FRAPCON-3.4 to predict release for RIA events. Code and model predictions will be compared to failure and release data from RIA tests to demonstrate accuracy.

  3. NPS Handbook for Environmental Impact Analysis | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: NPS Handbook for Environmental Impact AnalysisPermittingRegulatory...

  4. Draft regulatory impact analysis: Control of air pollution emission standards for new nonroad spark-ignition marine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Charmley, B.; North, D.R.; Samulski, M.; Srivastava, S.; Zerafa, K.

    1994-10-01

    The document summarizes the results of the analyses performed in support for the Notice for Proposed Rulemaking for the establishment of emission standards for new nonroad spark-ignition marine engines (59 Federal Register 55930) November 9, 1994. The environmental impact, costs, and cost effectiveness of the proposal are assessed, as well as other associated benefits.

  5. Final regulatory impact analysis: Refueling emission regulations for light duty vehicles and trucks and heavy duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Culminating a rulemaking process which has spanned more than a decade, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is now promulating final regulations requiring all highway light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks, and heavy-duty vehicles to meet onboard refueling vapor recovery (ORVR or onboard control) standards. The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the costs, benefits, and overall cost effectiveness of onboard control for the reduction of refueling emissions from highway motor vehicles.

  6. Regulatory analysis technical evaluation handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance to the regulatory analyst to promote preparation of quality regulatory analysis documents and to implement the policies of the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NUREG/BR-0058 Rev. 2). This Handbook expands upon policy concepts included in the NRC Guidelines and translates the six steps in preparing regulatory analyses into implementable methodologies for the analyst. It provides standardized methods of preparation and presentation of regulatory analyses, with the inclusion of input that will satisfy all backfit requirements and requirements of NRC`s Committee to Review Generic Requirements. Information on the objectives of the safety goal evaluation process and potential data sources for preparing a safety goal evaluation is also included. Consistent application of the methods provided here will result in more directly comparable analyses, thus aiding decision-makers in evaluating and comparing various regulatory actions. The handbook is being issued in loose-leaf format to facilitate revisions. NRC intends to periodically revise the handbook as new and improved guidance, data, and methods become available.

  7. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers including draft environmental assessment, regulatory impact analysis

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-12) and by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Amendments of 1988 (P.L. 100-357), and by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486), provides energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products` covered by the Act, and authorizes the Secretary of Energy to prescribe amended or new energy standards for each type (or class) of covered product. The assessment of the proposed standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers presented in this document is designed to evaluate their economic impacts according to the criteria in the Act. It includes an engineering analysis of the cost and performance of design options to improve the efficiency of the products; forecasts of the number and average efficiency of products sold, the amount of energy the products will consume, and their prices and operating expenses; a determination of change in investment, revenues, and costs to manufacturers of the products; a calculation of the costs and benefits to consumers, electric utilities, and the nation as a whole; and an assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed standards.

  8. Analysis of existing and potential environmental regulatory initiatives and their impact on the domestic natural gas industry. Topical report, July 1992-February 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, M.L.; Smith, G.E.; Kosowski, B.; Lang, M.C.

    1994-02-01

    The report identifies and evaluates the costs of compliance associated with current and potential environmental requirements facing the domestic natural gas industry. It also investigates the market for environmental technologies and current technology transfer. The primary findings of this report include: Future environmental compliance requirements on the domestic natural gas industry must be assessed within the overall context of the domestic gas market; The outcome of future regulatory initiatives is highly uncertain; The future costs of environmental compliance incurred by the domestic gas industry could be significant; Air pollution control requirements are likely to impose the greatest incremental cost burden on the domestic gas industry; The methodology developed can be easily adapted to estimate the benefits of the Gas Research Institute (GRI) environmental R D; GRI can be proactive to improve the development and transfer of environmental compliance technologies; GRI can make regulators a target of technology transfer efforts on technical capabilities an environmental risks.

  9. Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Proposal for Standard Market Design | Department of Energy Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design A report on an independent study to assess various potential impacts of the proposed rulemaking by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), "Remedying Undue Discrimination through Open Access Transmission

  10. Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Proposal for Standard Market Design Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design A report on an independent ...

  11. Regulatory impact analysis for the national emissions standards for hazardous air pollutants for source categories: Organic hazardous air pollutants from the synthetic organic chemical manufacturing industry and seven other processes. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Under authority of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, a regulation has been proposed to reduce hazardous air pollutant emissions from synthetic organic chemical manufacturing industry (SOCMI) facilities and facilities in seven non-SOCMI processes. This report summarizes the impacts of the regulation, as well as providing summaries of the proposed regulatory options and the rationale for choosing them. The benefits from this regulation are also summarized, and a chapter comparing the benefits and costs concludes the report.

  12. Comparison and regulatory impact of NQA-1 and NQA-2 with N45. 2 QA standards

    SciTech Connect

    Scanga, B.; Stokley, J.

    1989-07-01

    This report compares the 1983 edition of ANSI/ASME NQA-1 and the 1986 edition of NQA-2 standards with the ANSI N45.2 series of QA standards. NQA-1 (1983) has been endorsed for design and construction by NRC by Revision 3 of Regulatory Guide 1.28. NQA-2 has not yet been formally endorsed by the NRC. Where differences between the two sets of standards exist, the authors have assessed the impact of these differences on the regulatory process. The analysis considers both NRC Regulatory Guide endorsements and current NRC emphasis on the performance-based inspection process. The reviewers find that the NQA standards are more focused on the technical aspects of products and processes to achieve quality as compared to N45.2 standards emphasis on program verification activities. In contrast to NQA-1, NQA-2 has incorporated many lessons learned during plant construction experience and the operations phase of nuclear facilities. The summary of the impact on regulations that is presented in this report provides a comparison for utilities, vendors, and NRC inspectors of existing standards. 38 refs.

  13. Computerized fire risk assessment models: A regulatory effectiveness analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brannigan, V.; Meeks, C.

    1994-10-01

    Computerized fire risk assessment models have been proposed for regulatory use. Regulatory Effectiveness Analysis is a tool which can be used to determine whether the model satisfies the regulator`s legal requirements, and whether it is properly responsive to public judgments of fire safety. Model builders should expect detailed examination of the specifications and data used in the model, and be prepared to show competent verification and validation of the model results.

  14. NGNP Project Regulatory Gap Analysis for Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Moe

    2011-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project Regulatory Gap Analysis (RGA) for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) was conducted to evaluate existing regulatory requirements and guidance against the design characteristics specific to a generic modular HTGR. This final report presents results and identifies regulatory gaps concerning current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing requirements that apply to the modular HTGR design concept. This report contains appendices that highlight important HTGR licensing issues that were found during the RGA study. The information contained in this report will be used to further efforts in reconciling HTGR-related gaps in the NRC licensing structure, which has to date largely focused on light water reactor technology.

  15. Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

  16. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of ...

  17. NREL: Innovation Impact - Analysis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Menu Home Home Solar Solar Wind Wind Analysis Analysis Bioenergy Bioenergy Buildings Buildings Transportation Transportation Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Systems Integration Energy Systems Integration Analysis at NREL Close NREL complements its scientific research with high-quality, credible, and technology-neutral analysis that spans the entire energy portfolio to inform policy and investment decisions. These studies help to illuminate what is possible and provide critical

  18. Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this economic impact analysis (EIA) is to evaluate the effect of the control costs associated with the Petroleum Refining National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) on the behavior of the regulated petroleum refiners. The EIA was conducted based on the cost estimates for one hybrid regulatory option above the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) 'floor' (or minimum standard). This analysis compares the quantitative economic impacts of regulation to baseline industry conditions which would occur in the absence of regulation. The economic impacts of regulation are estimated for the industry, using costs which were supplied on both a national and a refinery level.

  19. Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical incident economic impact analysis methodology. You are accessing a ...

  20. Regulatory analysis of Regulatory Guide 1. 35 (Revision 3, Draft 2): In-service inspection of ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containments

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to review all the changes in the latest version (Rev. 3, Draft 2) of Regulatory Guide 1.35 and to provide a regulatory analysis for all positions in the guide to determine if it is cost-effective to backfit the guide to the containments of existing plants. To meet these objectives, three tasks were undertaken. The first task outlined containment design criteria, traced the evolution of prestressed concrete containment configurations and prestressing systems, reviewed the history of the development of the guide, and summarized the applicability of the particular versions of the regulatory guide to the 43 nuclear plants that utilize a prestressed concrete containment. Under the second task a comparative regulatory analysis of Rev. 3 (Draft 2) of the guide was developed in which major decision factors affected by the proposed change were identified, and differential risk and cost factors were addressed in relation to the current version of the guide which is in effect (Rev. 2). Finally, under the third task a backfit analysis was conducted in accordance with the requirements of the ''Backfitting'' Rule, Section 50.109 for each of the revised or added positions contained in Rev. 3 (Draft 2). Application of the revision to operating plants will provide consistency in review and a uniform standard for assessing the in-service condition of the ungrouted tendons in prestressed concrete containments. It is concluded that the revisions will have a positive impact on safety and thus lower public risk. Backfitting of the revised guide is possible for most plants licensed since 1974.

  1. Analysis of Environmental Impacts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Selected documents on the Analysis of Environmental Impacts under NEPA. October 3, 1984 Policy and Procedures for the Review of Federal Actions Impacting the Environment This...

  2. PACKAGE IMPACT MODELS AS A PRECURSOR TO CLADDING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Bajwa, Christopher S.; Piotter, Jason

    2013-02-01

    The evaluation of spent nuclear fuel storage casks and transportation packages under impact loading is an important safety topic that is reviewed as part of cask and package certification by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Explicit dynamic finite element models of full systems are increasingly common in industry for determining structural integrity during hypothetical drop accidents. Full cask and package model results are also used as the loading basis for single fuel pin impact models, which evaluate the response of fuel cladding under drop conditions. In this paper, a simplified package system is evaluated to illustrate several important structural dynamic phenomena, including the effect of gaps between components, the difference in local response at various points on a package during impact, and the effect of modeling various simplified representations of the basket and fuel assemblies. This paper focuses on the package impact analysis, and how loading conditions for a subsequent fuel assembly or fuel cladding analysis can be extracted.

  3. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    7891 April 2010 Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative S. Busche and E. Doris National ...

  4. How Much Do Local Regulations Matter? Exploring the Impact of Permitting and Local Regulatory Processes on PV Prices in the United States

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The costs of PV modules and other hardware have declined rapidly over the last decade, primarily due to technology improvements and manufacturing scale. On the other hand, non-hardware "soft" costs have not dropped as rapidly, and now comprise the majority of total costs for residential PV systems. This paper examines the impacts of city-level permitting and other local regulatory processes in the U.S. by combining data from two local regulatory process efficiency scores with the largest dataset of installed U.S. PV prices. Based on analysis, the findings indicate that variations in local permitting procedures can lead to differences in average residential PV prices of approximately $0.18/W between the jurisdictions with the most-onerous and most-favorable permitting procedures. For a typical 5-kW residential PV installation, this equates to a $700 (2.2%) difference in system costs between jurisdictions with scores in the middle 90 percent of the range. Moreover, when considering variations not only in permitting practices, but also in other local regulatory procedures, price differences grow to $0.64-0.93/W. For a typical 5-kW residential PV installation, these results correspond to a price impact of at least $2500 (8%) between jurisdictions with scores in the middle 90 percent of the range.

  5. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: To conduct an economic impact study for EGS and to develop a Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) tool to quantify (in economic terms) the potential job, energy and environmental impacts associated with electric power production from geothermal resources.

  6. EAC Recommendations Regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory Models and Modeling Tools to Assist in Analysis (September 2014)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    EAC recommendations from the September 2014 meeting regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory Models and Modeling Tools to Assist in Analysis (September 2014)

  7. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative | Department of Energy Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative This report provides detailed analyses of the following policies to determine the impact they may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy

  8. Supplemental Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Supplemental Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplemental Analysis for the Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplemental Analysis for the Final ...

  9. Results of regulatory impact survey of industrial and medical materials licensees of the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, D.; Melber, B.; Brichoux, J.; Hattrup, M.; Conger, R.; Hughes, K.

    1995-06-01

    This report presents the findings of a regulatory impact survey of nuclear materials licensees of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Commissioners of the NRC directed staff to provide the Commission with first hand information from licensees that could be used to improve the overall regulatory program. A self-administered, mail-out survey questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of licensees who had interaction with the NRC during the previous 12 months. A total of 371 respondents of the 589 who were sent questionnaires returned completed surveys, for a response rate of 63%. The body of the report presents the findings of the survey including a brief introduction to the approach used, followed by survey findings regarding regulations, policies and regulatory guidance; experience with licensing applications, renewals and amendments; inspections; reporting requirements; and enforcement actions. The appendices of the report include a copy of the survey as administered to licensees, a fuller description of the survey design and data collection methods, and detailed graphic material describing survey responses.

  10. Cross-impacts analysis development and energy policy analysis applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, J.M.; Scheer, R.M.; Stacey, G.S.

    1986-12-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe the cross-impact analysis process and microcomputer software developed for the Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PPA) of DOE. First introduced in 1968, cross-impact analysis is a technique that produces scenarios of future conditions and possibilities. Cross-impact analysis has several unique attributes that make it a tool worth examining, especially in the current climate when the outlook for the economy and several of the key energy markets is uncertain. Cross-impact analysis complements the econometric, engineering, systems dynamics, or trend approaches already in use at DOE. Cross-impact analysis produces self-consistent scenarios in the broadest sense and can include interaction between the economy, technology, society and the environment. Energy policy analyses that couple broad scenarios of the future with detailed forecasting can produce more powerful results than scenario analysis or forecasts can produce alone.

  11. Managing the analysis of air quality impacts under NEPA

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Y.B.; Leslie, A.C.D.

    1995-12-31

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) mandates the analysis and evaluation of potential impacts of major Federal actions having the potential to affect the environment. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 identify an array of new air quality issues appropriate for analysis in compliance with NEPA. An example is emissions of the 189 hazardous air pollutants identified in Title III. The utility industry estimates that more than 2.4 billion pounds of toxic pollutants were emitted to the atmosphere in 1988, with the potential for resultant adverse health impacts such as cancer, reproductive effects, birth defects, and respiratory illness. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provides Federal funds for projects that utilize coal as the primary fuel, including the approximately 45 projects funded over the past ten years under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Provision of Federal funds brings these projects under NEPA review. While electric steam generating units greater than 25 MW are currently excluded from regulatory review for the 189 air toxics listed in Title III, they are not, due to their potential impacts, excluded from NEPA review when Federally funded, in whole or in part. The authors will discuss their experiences drawn from NEPA evaluations of coal-fired power projects, the differences between regulatory requirements and NEPA requirements, source categories, major and area sources, conformity, maximum achievable control technology, mandatory licensing, radionuclides, visibility, toxics found to be emitted from coal combustion, public involvement, citizen suits, the bounty system, and how NEPA review can result in beneficial changes to proposed projects through mitigation measures to avoid or minimize potentially adverse environmental impacts.

  12. Renewable Fuels Legislation Impact Analysis

    Reports and Publications

    2005-01-01

    An analysis based on an extension of the ethanol supply curve in our model to allow for enough ethanol production to meet the requirements of S. 650. This analysis provides an update of the May 23, 2005 analysis, with revised ethanol production and cost assumptions.

  13. On the Path to SunShot: Utility Regulatory and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 NREL/TP-6A20-65670 LBNL-1004371 Utility Regulatory and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Cover photos (clockwise from top left): Solar Design Associates, Inc., NREL 08563; SolarReserve; Dennis Schroeder, NREL 30551; and iStock 000075760625 On the Path to SunShot: Utility Regulatory and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Galen Barbose 1 , John Miller 2 , Ben Sigrin 2 ,

  14. Development of the Emission Measurement and Information Tracking System (EMITS) for regulatory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, C.E.; Dorenkamp, L.D.

    1994-10-01

    With the constant implementation of complex and restrictive state and federal clean air laws, a facility must have a comprehensive understanding of the types and amount of emissions associated with the facility`s operations. Knowledge of the facility`s emissions is essential to assess the operational impacts of current and upcoming legislation. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), located in California, is regulated by federal, state, and local air quality agencies. Of most concern to the facility is California`s Assembly Bill 2588 (also known as the {open_quotes}Air Toxics Hot Spots{close_quotes} program) and the federal Title III, Title V, and Title VI provisions of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990. Because of the complex regulatory requirements, LLNL needed a system to calculate and classify air emissions by each applicable regulatory program. This paper outlines the development of LLNL`s comprehensive emissions inventory known as the Emissions Measurement and Information Tracking System (EMITS).

  15. Comparison and Analysis of Regulatory and Derived Requirements for Certain DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments; Lessons Learned for Future Spent Fuel Transportation Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, George L., Ph.D.; Fawcett, Rick L.; Rieke, Philip C.

    2003-02-27

    Radioactive materials transportation is stringently regulated by the Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to protect the public and the environment. As a Federal agency, however, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must seek State, Tribal and local input on safety issues for certain transportation activities. This interaction has invariably resulted in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements, greatly increasing transportation costs and delaying schedules while not significantly enhancing the level of safety. This paper discusses the results an analysis of the regulatory and negotiated requirements established for a July 1998 shipment of spent nuclear fuel from foreign countries through the west coast to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Staff from the INEEL Nuclear Materials Engineering and Disposition Department undertook the analysis in partnership with HMTC, to discover if there were instances where requirements derived from stakeholder interactions duplicate, contradict, or otherwise overlap with regulatory requirements. The study exhaustively lists and classifies applicable Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. These are then compared with a similarly classified list of requirements from the Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) and those developed during stakeholder negotiations. Comparison and analysis reveals numerous attempts to reduce transportation risk by imposing more stringent safety measures than those required by DOT and NRC. These usually took the form of additional inspection, notification and planning requirements. There are also many instances of overlap with, and duplication of regulations. Participants will gain a greater appreciation for the need to understand the risk-oriented basis of the radioactive materials regulations and their effectiveness in ensuring safety when negotiating extra-regulatory requirements.

  16. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Project objective: To conduct an economic impact study for EGS and to develop a Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) tool to quantify (in economic terms) the potential job, energy and environmental impacts associated with electric power production from geothermal resources. analysis_levey_economic_impact_analysis.pdf (456.77 KB) More Documents & Publications Economic Impact Analysis for EGS U.S. DOE Geothermal Electricity

  17. Code System for Analysis of Potential Radiological Impacts.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1999-02-02

    Version: 00 IMPACTS-BRC2.1 is a generic radiological assessment code that allows calculation of potential impacts to maximum individuals, waste disposal workers, and the general population resulting from exemption of very low-level radioactive wastes from regulatory control. The code allows calculations to be made of human exposure to the waste by many pathways and exposure scenarios.

  18. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Hazardous and Radioactive Air Emissions Sampling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the results of the data quality objective (DQO) process undertaken to define data needs for state and federal requirements associated with toxic, hazardous, and/or radiological air emissions under the jurisdiction of the River Protection Project (RPP). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the Air DQO. The primary drivers for characterization under this DQO are the regulatory requirements pursuant to Washington State regulations, that may require sampling and analysis. The federal regulations concerning air emissions are incorporated into the Washington State regulations. Data needs exist for nonradioactive and radioactive waste constituents and characteristics as identified through the DQO process described in this document. The purpose is to identify current data needs for complying with regulatory drivers for the measurement of air emissions from RPP facilities in support of air permitting. These drivers include best management practices; similar analyses may have more than one regulatory driver. This document should not be used for determining overall compliance with regulations because the regulations are in constant change, and this document may not reflect the latest regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements are also expected to change as various permits are issued. Data needs require samples for both radionuclides and nonradionuclide analytes of air emissions from tanks and stored waste containers. The collection of data is to support environmental permitting and compliance, not for health and safety issues. This document does not address health or safety regulations or requirements (those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) or continuous emission monitoring systems. This DQO is applicable to all equipment, facilities, and operations under the jurisdiction of RPP that emit or have the potential to emit regulated air pollutants.

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - Market and Policy Impact Analysis Staff

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Market and Policy Impact Analysis The following includes summary bios of staff expertise and interests in analysis related to electric regulation and policy; transportation market, fuels, and policies; economic impact; advanced financial analytic methods; international markets; R&D program benefits assessment; portfolio and risk assessment and green power and renewable energy certificate (REC) markets. Team Lead: Jeffery Logan Administrative Support: Karla LeComte Philipp Beiter Lori Bird

  20. Scout Impact Analysis Tool Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Scout Impact Analysis Tool Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Scout Impact Analysis Tool Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Presenters: Jared Langevin and Chioke Harris This presentation from the 2016 Peer Review provides an overview of Scout - BTO's portfolio impact analysis tool for building energy efficiency technologies. Scout Impact Analysis Tool Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review (4.73 MB) More Documents & Publications Scout: An Impact Analysis Tool for Building Energy Efficiency

  1. Regulatory/backfit analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.M.

    1988-06-01

    Station blackout is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory/backfit analysis for USI A-44. It includes (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the recommended technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements, and (7) a backfit analysis demonstrating that the resolution of USI A-44 complies with the backfit rule (10 CFR 50.109).

  2. Impact analysis on a massively parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Aramayo, G.A.

    1994-06-01

    Advanced mathematical techniques and computer simulation play a major role in evaluating and enhancing the design of beverage cans, industrial, and transportation containers for improved performance. Numerical models are used to evaluate the impact requirements of containers used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for transporting radioactive materials. Many of these models are highly compute-intensive. An analysis may require several hours of computational time on current supercomputers despite the simplicity of the models being studied. As computer simulations and materials databases grow in complexity, massively parallel computers have become important tools. Massively parallel computational research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and its application to the impact analysis of shipping containers is briefly described in this paper.

  3. Department of Energy Analysis of Economic Impact

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Department of Energy Analysis of Economic Impact Final Rule, 10 CFR 810 February 3, 2015 1 Executive Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for part 810 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) on Sept 7, 2011 and a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNOPR) on August 2, 2013. This regulation governs the process of export control review and approval for nuclear technology exports from the United States. After careful consideration of all

  4. Recycling in the major metal industries: Trends, developments, and regulatory impacts. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Public awareness of, and involvement in, recycling has increased significantly in recent years. The actual magnitude and scope of metals recycling in the United States have gone virtually unnoticed. Over time, both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of secondary metals recovery and reuse have changed substantially, while the attendant regulations have become increasingly stringent. This U.S. Bureau of Mines report examines trends and developments in major metal demand and recycling, and analyzes the possible impacts of regulations with regard to recycling activities.

  5. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    1987-05-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during calendar year 1986. Comments and observations are provided on operating experience at nuclear power plants and other NRC licensees, including results from selected AEOD studies; summaries of abnormal occurrences involving US nuclear plants; reviews of licensee event reports and their quality, reactor scram experience from 1984 to 1986, engineered safety features actuations, and the trends and patterns analysis program; and assessments of nonreactor and medical misadministration events. In addition, the report provides the year-end status of all recommendations included in AEOD studies, and listings of all AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1986.

  6. Regulatory analysis for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Anderson, N.R.

    1987-02-01

    The margin of safety provided in existing nuclear power plant equipment to resist seismically induced loads and perform required safety functions may vary considerably, because of significant changes in design criteria and methods for the seismic qualification of equipment over the years. Therefore, the seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants must be reassessed to determine whether requalification is necessary. The objective of technical studies performed under Task Action Plan A-46 was to establish an explicit set of guidelines and acceptance criteria to judge the adequacy of equipment under seismic loading at all operating plants, in lieu of requiring these plants to meet the criteria that are applied to new plants. This report presents the regulatory analysis for Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46. It includes: Statement of the Problem; the Objective of USI A-46; a Summary of A-46 Tasks; a Proposed Implementation Procedure; a Value-Impact Analysis; Application of the Backfit Rule; 10 CFR 50.109; Implementation; and Operating Plants To Be Reviewed to USI A-46 Requirements.

  7. Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Storage: Regulatory and Capacity Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Zhou, Q.

    2009-04-02

    Industrial-scale injection of CO{sub 2} into saline sedimentary basins will cause large-scale fluid pressurization and migration of native brines, which may affect valuable groundwater resources overlying the deep sequestration reservoirs. In this paper, we discuss how such basin-scale hydrologic impacts can (1) affect regulation of CO{sub 2} storage projects and (2) may reduce current storage capacity estimates. Our assessment arises from a hypothetical future carbon sequestration scenario in the Illinois Basin, which involves twenty individual CO{sub 2} storage projects in a core injection area suitable for long-term storage. Each project is assumed to inject five million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for 50 years. A regional-scale three-dimensional simulation model was developed for the Illinois Basin that captures both the local-scale CO{sub 2}-brine flow processes and the large-scale groundwater flow patterns in response to CO{sub 2} storage. The far-field pressure buildup predicted for this selected sequestration scenario suggests that (1) the area that needs to be characterized in a permitting process may comprise a very large region within the basin if reservoir pressurization is considered, and (2) permits cannot be granted on a single-site basis alone because the near- and far-field hydrologic response may be affected by interference between individual sites. Our results also support recent studies in that environmental concerns related to near-field and far-field pressure buildup may be a limiting factor on CO{sub 2} storage capacity. In other words, estimates of storage capacity, if solely based on the effective pore volume available for safe trapping of CO{sub 2}, may have to be revised based on assessments of pressure perturbations and their potential impact on caprock integrity and groundwater resources, respectively. We finally discuss some of the challenges in making reliable predictions of large-scale hydrologic impacts related to CO{sub 2

  8. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-44, Station Blackout. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    ''Station Blackout'' is the complete loss of alternating current (ac) electric power to the essential and nonessential buses in a nuclear power plant; it results when both offsite power and the onsite emergency ac power systems are unavailable. Because many safety systems required for reactor core decay heat removal and containment heat removal depend on ac power, the consequences of a station blackout could be severe. Because of the concern about the frequency of loss of offsite power, the number of failures of emergency diesel generators, and the potentially severe consequences of a loss of all ac power, ''Station Blackout'' was designated as Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-44. This report presents the regulatory analysis for USI A-44. It includes: (1) a summary of the issue, (2) the proposed technical resolution, (3) alternative resolutions considered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff, (4) an assessment of the benefits and costs of the recommended resolution, (5) the decision rationale, and (6) the relationship between USI A-44 and other NRC programs and requirements.

  9. Scout: An Impact Analysis Tool for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Scout: An Impact Analysis Tool for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Scout: An Impact Analysis Tool for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies ACEEE Summer Study 2016 presentation-Scout: An Impact Analysis Tool for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies, by Chioke Harris, AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow, Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy. Scout presentation (3.26 MB) More Documents & Publications Scout Impact Analysis Tool

  10. Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Strategic Programs » Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Team Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning Cities Leading through Energy Analysis and Planning This project delivers standardized, localized energy data and analysis that enables cities to lead clean energy innovation and integrate strategic energy analysis into their decision making. Read more Impacts of Federal Tax Credit Extensions on Renewable Deployment and Power Sector

  11. Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Regulatory laws and policies. [State by state

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    This report is a legal study prepared to provide a review of the substantive and procedural laws of each regulatory jurisdiction that may affect implementation of the PURPA standards, and to summarize the current state of consideration and implementation of policies and rate designs similar or identical to the PURPA standards by state regulatory agencies and nonregulated utilities. This report is divided into three sections. The first section, the Introduction, summarizes the standards promulgated by PURPA and the results of the legal study. The second section, State Regulatory Law and Procedure, summarizes for each state or other ratemaking jurisdiction: (1) general constitutional and statutory provisions affecting utility rates and conditions of service; (2) specific laws or decisions affecting policy or rate design issues covered by PURPA standards; and (3) statutes and decisions governing administrative procedures, including judicial review. A chart showing actions taken on the policy and rate design issues addressed by PURPA is also included for each jurisdiction, and citations to relevant authorities are presented for each standard. State statutes or decisions that specifically define a state standard similar or identical to a PURPA standard, or that refer to one of the three PURPA objectives, are noted. The third section, Nonregulated Electric Utilities, summarizes information available on nonregulated utilities, i.e., publicly or cooperatively owned utilities which are specifically exempted from state regulation by state law.

  12. Sandia Energy - Sandia Report Presents Analysis of Glare Impacts...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Presents Analysis of Glare Impacts of Ivanpah Solar Power Site Home Renewable Energy Energy News News & Events Concentrating Solar Power Solar Systems Analysis Sandia Report...

  13. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 Atomic Energy Act 1954 Energy Reorganization Act 1974 DOE Act 1977 Authority and responsibility to regulate nuclear safety at DOE facilities 10 CFR 830 10 CFR 835 10 CFR 820 Regulatory Implementation Nuclear Safety Radiological Safety Procedural Rules ISMS-QA; Operating Experience; Metrics and Analysis Cross Cutting

  14. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D.

    1994-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

  15. Techniques of analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    This bibliography provides documentation for use by state public utility commissions and major nonregulated utilities in evaluating the applicability of a wide range of electric utility rate design and regulatory concepts in light of certain regulatory objectives. Part I, Utility Regulatory Objectives, contains 2084 citations on conservation of energy and capital; efficient use of facilities and resources; and equitable rates to electricity consumers. Part II, Rate Design Concepts, contains 1238 citations on time-of-day rates; seasonally-varying rates; cost-of-service rates; interruptible rates (including the accompanying use of load management techniques); declining block rates; and lifeline rates. Part III, Regulatory Concepts, contains 1282 references on restrictions on master metering; procedures for review of automatic adjustment clauses; prohibitions of rate or regulatory discrimination against solar, wind, or other small energy systems; treatment of advertising expenses; and procedures to protect ratepayers from abrupt termination of service.

  16. Analysis of the impact of safeguards criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, M.F.; Reardon, P.T.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked to assist in developing and demonstrating a model for assessing the impact of setting criteria for the application of IAEA safeguards. This report presents the results of PNL's work on the task. The report is in three parts. The first explains the technical approach and methodology. The second contains an example application of the methodology. The third presents the conclusions of the study. PNL used the model and computer programs developed as part of Task C.5 (Estimation of Inspection Efforts) of the Program of Technical Assistance. The example application of the methodology involves low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facilities. The effects of variations in seven parameters are considered: false alarm probability, goal probability of detection, detection goal quantity, the plant operator's measurement capability, the inspector's variables measurement capability, the inspector's attributes measurement capability, and annual plant throughput. Among the key results and conclusions of the analysis are the following: the variables with the greatest impact on the probability of detection are the inspector's measurement capability, the goal quantity, and the throughput; the variables with the greatest impact on inspection costs are the throughput, the goal quantity, and the goal probability of detection; there are important interactions between variables. That is, the effects of a given variable often depends on the level or value of some other variable. With the methodology used in this study, these interactions can be quantitatively analyzed; reasonably good approximate prediction equations can be developed using the methodology described here.

  17. Update of Part 61 Impacts Analysis Methodology. Methodology report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Oztunali, O.I.; Roles, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Envirosphere Company has expanded and updated the impacts analysis methodology used during the development of the 10 CFR Part 61 rule to allow improved consideration of the costs and impacts of treatment and disposal of low-level waste that is close to or exceeds Class C concentrations. The modifications described in this report principally include: (1) an update of the low-level radioactive waste source term, (2) consideration of additional alternative disposal technologies, (3) expansion of the methodology used to calculate disposal costs, (4) consideration of an additional exposure pathway involving direct human contact with disposed waste due to a hypothetical drilling scenario, and (5) use of updated health physics analysis procedures (ICRP-30). Volume 1 of this report describes the calculational algorithms of the updated analysis methodology.

  18. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    JEDI Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models Energy Analysis Printable Version JEDI Fact Sheet The cover of JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model factsheet. PDF 563 KB The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's WINDExchange program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to

  19. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  20. Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Publications | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Publications Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Publications Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis conducts cross-cutting and portfolio-based analyses of EERE technologies and the interrelationships among technologies, markets and policies; and provides quantified impacts of EERE investments in clean energy technology innovation and deployment. For more energy data and analysis resources, visit OpenEI and the EERE Publication and Product Library. Home | Program Evaluation |

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Impact Analysis: VTO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities | Department of Energy Impact Analysis: VTO Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Impact Analysis: VTO Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about impact analysis: VTO baseline and scenario (BaSce) activities.

  2. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. ...

  3. Title 32 CFR 989 Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Impact Analysis Process (EIAP) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal Regulation: Title 32 CFR 989...

  4. Analysis of Energy Efficiency Program Impacts Based on Program...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Analysis of Energy Efficiency Program Impacts Based on Program Spending May 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. ...

  5. LEDSGP/analysis/impacts | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    impacts of LEDS measures on country development goals. These goals include reducing poverty, improving health and local environmental quality, improving energy and water access,...

  6. Design of an independent spent fuel storage installation (dry storage). Draft regulatory guide and value/impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    Subpart F, ''General Design Criteria,'' of 10 CFR Part 72, ''Licensing Requirements for the Storage of Spent Fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI),'' presents the general design criteria that are applicable to an ISFSI. This regulatory guide provides guidance acceptable to the NRC staff for use in the design of a dry storage ISFSI that will comply with these general design criteria. Any information collection activities mentioned in this draft regulatory guide are contained in requirements in 10 CFR Part 72 that provides the regulatory basis for this guide. Part 72 has been submitted to the Office of Management and Budget for clearance appropriate under the Paperwork Reduction Act. Such clearance, if obtained, would also apply to any information collection activities mentioned in this guide.

  7. Analysis of 12 electric power system outages/disturbances impacting the Florida Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    Between January 3 and August 3, 1979, there were 12 occasions on which electric power was curtailed or public appeals were made to customers to reduce their load in Peninsular Florida due to bulk electric power supply problems. The Economic Regulatory Administration (ERA) of the US DOE, pursuant to its electric power supply adequacy and reliability responsibilities, initiated a twofold analysis of the bulk power supply situation in Florida. The first phase of the analysis evaluated the technical and engineering aspects of the overall Florida bulk power supply system with special attention given to the City of Jacksonville's electric system. The second phase evaluated the socioeconomic impacts of the bulk power supply outages on residential customers in Jacksonville. The 12 disturbances are described and a comparative analysis of the causes is presented. (LCL)

  8. Impact analysis of spent fuel jacket assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Aramayo, G.A.

    1994-06-01

    As part of the analyses performed in support of the reracking of the High Flux Isotope Reactor pool, it became necessary to prove the structural integrity of the spent fuel jacket assemblies subjected to gravity drop that result from postulated accidents associated with the handling of these assemblies while submerged in the pool. The spent fuel jacket assemblies are an integral part of the reracking project, and serve to house fuel assemblies. The structure integrity of the jacket assemblies from loads that result from impact from a height of 10 feet onto specified targets has been performed analytically using the computer program LS-DYNA3D. Nine attitudes of the assembly at the time of impact have been considered. Results of the analyses show that there is no failure of the assemblies as a result of the impact scenarios considered.

  9. Analysis of the Impacts of the Clean Power Plan

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    for AEO2015 Reference case and Clean Power Plan cases, selected years 2005 2013 2020 2030 ... Analysis of the Impacts of the Clean Power Plan 24 Table 3. Summary results for AEO2015 ...

  10. Analysis of the Impacts of the Clean Power Plan

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... ELECTRICITY PRICES (2013 cents per kWh) May 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Analysis of the Impacts of the Clean Power Plan 26 Table 4. Summary results for AEO2015 ...

  11. Transport Energy Impact Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.

    2015-05-13

    Presented at the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Spring 2015 Symposium on May 13, 2015, this presentation by Jeff Gonder of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides information about NREL's transportation energy impact analysis of connected and automated vehicles.

  12. Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

    2010-02-27

    We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are

  13. New Online Tool Expands Analysis of Biofuels' Water Impact | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Online Tool Expands Analysis of Biofuels' Water Impact New Online Tool Expands Analysis of Biofuels' Water Impact January 23, 2015 - 2:25pm Addthis Last week, Argonne National Laboratory released a new version of the Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) online tool. As with the previous two versions, WATER 3.0 quantifies the water footprint of various biofuel pathways, providing details of the water consumption required for the production of biofuels.

  14. NREL analysis finds tax credit extensions can impact renewable energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    deployment and electric sector CO2 emissions - News Releases | NREL analysis finds tax credit extensions can impact renewable energy deployment and electric sector CO2 emissions February 22, 2016 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today released new analysis exploring the potential impact of recently extended federal tax credits on the deployment of renewable generation technologies and related U.S. electric sector carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. The report,

  15. Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Data and Tools | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Data and Tools Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis Data and Tools Strategic Priorities and Impact Analysis provides foundational datasets and web-accessible tools for EERE decision-makers and the public covering cost and performance characterizations of EERE technologies, US energy trends, and market and policy conditions for energy technologies. For a comprehensive list of EERE Data and Tools, visit the DOE Open Data Catalog on OpenEI. Resources Policies Database of State

  16. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a summary of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United states and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). A brief summary of public utility regulatory programs, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority is presented in this report to identify how such programs and authority may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  17. Poverty Social Impact Analysis | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Website: web.worldbank.orgWBSITEEXTERNALTOPICSEXTPSIA0,,contentMDK:2046627 Cost: Free Related Tools MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model E3MG Ventana's...

  18. Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

    1999-01-04

    Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity.

  19. Prior knowledge driven Granger causality analysis on gene regulatory network discovery

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yao, Shun; Yoo, Shinjae; Yu, Dantong

    2015-08-28

    Our study focuses on discovering gene regulatory networks from time series gene expression data using the Granger causality (GC) model. However, the number of available time points (T) usually is much smaller than the number of target genes (n) in biological datasets. The widely applied pairwise GC model (PGC) and other regularization strategies can lead to a significant number of false identifications when n>>T. In this study, we proposed a new method, viz., CGC-2SPR (CGC using two-step prior Ridge regularization) to resolve the problem by incorporating prior biological knowledge about a target gene data set. In our simulation experiments, themore » propose new methodology CGC-2SPR showed significant performance improvement in terms of accuracy over other widely used GC modeling (PGC, Ridge and Lasso) and MI-based (MRNET and ARACNE) methods. In addition, we applied CGC-2SPR to a real biological dataset, i.e., the yeast metabolic cycle, and discovered more true positive edges with CGC-2SPR than with the other existing methods. In our research, we noticed a “ 1+1>2” effect when we combined prior knowledge and gene expression data to discover regulatory networks. Based on causality networks, we made a functional prediction that the Abm1 gene (its functions previously were unknown) might be related to the yeast’s responses to different levels of glucose. In conclusion, our research improves causality modeling by combining heterogeneous knowledge, which is well aligned with the future direction in system biology. Furthermore, we proposed a method of Monte Carlo significance estimation (MCSE) to calculate the edge significances which provide statistical meanings to the discovered causality networks. All of our data and source codes will be available under the link https://bitbucket.org/dtyu/granger-causality/wiki/Home.« less

  20. Prior knowledge driven Granger causality analysis on gene regulatory network discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shun; Yoo, Shinjae; Yu, Dantong

    2015-08-28

    Our study focuses on discovering gene regulatory networks from time series gene expression data using the Granger causality (GC) model. However, the number of available time points (T) usually is much smaller than the number of target genes (n) in biological datasets. The widely applied pairwise GC model (PGC) and other regularization strategies can lead to a significant number of false identifications when n>>T. In this study, we proposed a new method, viz., CGC-2SPR (CGC using two-step prior Ridge regularization) to resolve the problem by incorporating prior biological knowledge about a target gene data set. In our simulation experiments, the propose new methodology CGC-2SPR showed significant performance improvement in terms of accuracy over other widely used GC modeling (PGC, Ridge and Lasso) and MI-based (MRNET and ARACNE) methods. In addition, we applied CGC-2SPR to a real biological dataset, i.e., the yeast metabolic cycle, and discovered more true positive edges with CGC-2SPR than with the other existing methods. In our research, we noticed a “ 1+1>2” effect when we combined prior knowledge and gene expression data to discover regulatory networks. Based on causality networks, we made a functional prediction that the Abm1 gene (its functions previously were unknown) might be related to the yeast’s responses to different levels of glucose. In conclusion, our research improves causality modeling by combining heterogeneous knowledge, which is well aligned with the future direction in system biology. Furthermore, we proposed a method of Monte Carlo significance estimation (MCSE) to calculate the edge significances which provide statistical meanings to the discovered causality networks. All of our data and source codes will be available under the link https://bitbucket.org/dtyu/granger-causality/wiki/Home.

  1. Report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on analysis and evaluation of operational data - 1987: Power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    1988-10-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1987. The report is published in two volumes. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 1, covers Power Reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry, with comments regarding the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from Licensee Event Reports, the NRC's Operations Center, and Diagnostic Evaluations. NUREG-1272, Vol. 2, No. 2, covers Nonreactors and presents a review of the nonreactors events and misadministration reports that were reported in 1987 and a brief synopsis of AEOD studies published in 1987. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD Reports issued for 1980-1987.

  2. Socio-economic impact analysis in the NEPA process

    SciTech Connect

    Karnovitz, A.; McQueen, S.

    1997-08-01

    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations require environmental impact statements to assess direct and indirect effects on a number of different environmental resource categories, including economic and social effects. However, NEPA regulations do not dictate the scope of the socio-economic analyses or specify which analytical procedures must be employed. As a result, socio-economic impact analyses vary considerably across NEPA documents in both the methodology of analysis and in the models used to quantify impacts. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of socio-economic analyses in NEPA documents and present strategies for ensuring that the socio-economic analyses are focused on the most relevant socio-economic indicators, while still conforming to the full intent of NEPA. This paper will provide guidance on what factors should be considered when identifying the economic indicators to be assessed. The paper will also describe and discuss various types of models currently used to quantify economic impacts in NEPA documents, and the comparative advantages and disadvantages of these models. In addition, the definition of the appropriate Return On Investment in relation to the model used and the analysis performed will be discussed. The offices of the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the Food and Drug Administration present real world examples of innovative approaches to socio-economic impact analysis.

  3. Global Analysis of Biofuel Policies, Feedstock and Impacts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy *Presentation_name Global Analysis of Biofuel Policies, Feedstock and Impacts Date: May 21 st 2013 Technology Area Review: Analysis Principal Investigator: 'Debo Oladosu Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information *2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy *Presentation_name Goal Statement * Contribute to DOE's goal to:

  4. Regulatory Tools

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulatory Tools Home CRA - 2004 Final Recertification Decision CRA Comments & Responses CCA - 1996 CRA CARDs & TSDs CCA CARDs & TSDs Regulatory Tools Title 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. Title 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the Certification and Re-Certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Compliance With the 40 CFR Part 191 Disposal Regulations.

  5. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 29: Bolting degradation or failure in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.

    1991-09-01

    Generic Safety Issue (GSI)-29 deals with staff concerns about public risk due to degradation or failure of safety-related bolting in nuclear power plants. The issue was initiated in November 1982. Value-impact studies of a mandatory program on safety-related bolting for operating plants were inconclusive: therefore, additional regulatory requirements for operating plants could not be justified in accordance with provisions of 10 CFR 50.109. In addition, based on operating experience with bolting in both nuclear and conventional power plants, the actions already taken through bulletins, generic letters, and information notices, and the industry-proposed actions, the staff concluded that a sufficient technical basis exists for the resolution of GSI-29. The staff further concluded that leakage of bolted pressure joints is possible but catastrophic failure of a reactor coolant pressure boundary joint that will lead to significant accident sequences is highly unlikely. For future plants, it was concluded that a new Standard Review Plant section should be developed to codify existing bolting requirements and industry-developed initiatives. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    1980-08-01

    This document, Glossary, is the first in a series of reports to identify, describe, and apply techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric utility concepts. This report was developed with a focus on the currently evolving issues of ratemaking, especially as they might be expected to arise under Sections 101, 111, 113, 114, 131, 132, and 210 of the P.U.R.P.A. of 1978. Because the evolutionary process of ratemaking has led to multiple proceedings and changes of inference in some terms, the glossary attempts to delineate these changes where appropriate. Definitions not uniquely related to ratemaking are included if they are likely to be used in ratemaking proceedings. To avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and expense, the compilers relied heavily on previously developed, publicly available glossaries and definitions developed by organizations such as Edison Electric Institute, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Existing definitions were revised and new ones were developed as appropriate.

  7. Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sector in Japan AgencyCompany Organization: Tohoku University Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen Topics: Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts, Policy Impacts Website:...

  8. FERC's acceptance of market-based pricing: An antitrust analysis. [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B.C.; Frankena, M.W. )

    1992-06-01

    In large part, FERC's determination of market power is based on an analysis that focuses on the ability of power suppliers to foreclose' other potential power suppliers by withholding transmission access to the buyer. The authors believe that this analysis is flawed because the conditions it considers are neither necessary nor sufficient for the existence of market power. That is, it is possible that market-based rates can be subject to market power even if no transmission supplier has the ability to foreclose some power suppliers; conversely, it is possible that no market power exists despite the ability to foreclose other suppliers. This paper provides a critical analysis of FERC's market-power determinations. The concept of market power is defined and its relationship to competition is discussed in Section 1, while a framework for evaluating the existence of market power is presented in Section 2. In Section 3, FERC's recent order in Terra Comfort is examined using this framework. A brief preview of FERC's order in TECO Power Services comprises Section 4. Overall conclusions are presented in Section 5.

  9. Proposed revision 2 to regulatory guide 3. 44: Standard format and content for the safety analysis report for an independent spent fuel storage installation (water-basin type)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has published a proposed Part 72, ''Licensing Requirements for the Independent Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste.'' All references to Part 72 in this draft regulatory guide refer to this proposed version that was published for comment in the Federal Register on May 27, 1986 (51 FR 19106). The proposed Part 72 specifies the information to be supplied in applications for licenses to store spent fuel in an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI). However, Part 72 does not specify the format for the safety analysis report (SAR). This regulatory guide provides guidance on preparing an SAR, and the NRC staff suggests its use for presenting the required information. Chapters are devoted to site characteristics, principal design criteria installation design, operation systems, site-generated waste confinement and managment, radiation protection, accident analyses, conduct of operations, and operating controls and limits.

  10. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Issue 143: Availability of chilled water system and room cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, V.T.

    1993-12-01

    This report presents the regulatory analysis for Generic Issue (GI-143), {open_quotes}Availability of Chilled Water System and Room Cooling.{close_quotes} The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and related auxiliaries are required to provide control of environmental conditions in areas in light water reactor (LWR) plants that contain safety-related equipment. In some plants, the HVAC and chilled water systems serve to maintain a suitable environment for both safety and non-safety-related areas. Although some plants have an independent chilled water system for the safety-related areas, the heat removal capability often depends on the operability of other supporting systems such as the service water system or the component cooling water system. The operability of safety-related components depends upon operation of the HVAC and chilled water systems to remove heat from areas containing the equipment. If cooling to dissipate the heat generated is unavailable, the ability of the safety-related equipment to operate as intended cannot be assured. Typical components or areas in the nuclear power plant that could be affected by the failure of cooling from HVAC or chilled water systems include the (1) emergency switchgear and battery rooms, (2) emergency diesel generator room, (3) pump rooms for residual heat removal, reactor core isolation cooling, high-pressure core spray, and low-pressure core spray, and (4) control room. The unavailability of such safety-related equipment or areas could cause the core damage frequency (CDF) to increase significantly.

  11. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Texas. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Texas is generally vested in the Public Utilities Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor, with the advice of at least two-thirds of the senate, for a six-year term. Prior to the passage of the Texas Public Utility Regulatory Act (PURA) in 1975, the power to regulate public utilities was vested almost exclusively in municipalities. Under PURA, municipalities retain exclusive original jurisdiction over all electric, water, and sewer utilities within the municipality. PURA provides that all regulations pertaining to public utilities promulgated by local regulatory agencies remain in effect unless they are superceded by Commission rules. The municipality's governing body is required to exercise its regulatory authority under rules and standards consistent with those promulgated by the Commission. The Commission has exclusive appellate jurisdiction to review orders and ordinances of regulatory municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  12. A Decision Analysis Tool for Climate Impacts, Adaptations, and Vulnerabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Parish, Esther S; Nugent, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    Climate change related extreme events (such as flooding, storms, and drought) are already impacting millions of people globally at a cost of billions of dollars annually. Hence, there are urgent needs for urban areas to develop adaptation strategies that will alleviate the impacts of these extreme events. However, lack of appropriate decision support tools that match local applications is limiting local planning efforts. In this paper, we present a quantitative analysis and optimization system with customized decision support modules built on geographic information system (GIS) platform to bridge this gap. This platform is called Urban Climate Adaptation Tool (Urban-CAT). For all Urban-CAT models, we divide a city into a grid with tens of thousands of cells; then compute a list of metrics for each cell from the GIS data. These metrics are used as independent variables to predict climate impacts, compute vulnerability score, and evaluate adaptation options. Overall, the Urban-CAT system has three layers: data layer (that contains spatial data, socio-economic and environmental data, and analytic data), middle layer (that handles data processing, model management, and GIS operation), and application layer (that provides climate impacts forecast, adaptation optimization, and site evaluation). The Urban-CAT platform can guide city and county governments in identifying and planning for effective climate change adaptation strategies.

  13. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework DOE's Nuclear Safety Enabling Legislation Regulatory Enforcement & Oversight Regulatory Governance Atomic Energy Act 1946 ...

  14. Regulatory Impacts to Geothermal Development

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the Technology Planning Workshop for Low-Temperature, Coproduced, and Geopressured Geothermal Energy, July 13-14, 2010, Golden, Colorado

  15. Regulatory Analysis on Criteria

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... For other implants involving NUREG-1492 the lungs, brain, pancreas, etc., tissue shielding values of similar magnitude can be assumed for an adult male and female. However, for ...

  16. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved in the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, Jessica R.; Crable, Bryan R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2015-02-11

    We report that microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomics approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF) value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detected were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product) delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. In conclusion, the proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis on macromolecular stability and energy metabolism by S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.

  17. Proteomic analysis reveals metabolic and regulatory systems involved in the syntrophic and axenic lifestyle of Syntrophomonas wolfei

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sieber, Jessica R.; Crable, Bryan R.; Sheik, Cody S.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Rohlin, Lars; Gunsalus, Robert P.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2015-02-11

    We report that microbial syntrophy is a vital metabolic interaction necessary for the complete oxidation of organic biomass to methane in all-anaerobic ecosystems. However, this process is thermodynamically constrained and represents an ecosystem-level metabolic bottleneck. To gain insight into the physiology of this process, a shotgun proteomics approach was used to quantify the protein landscape of the model syntrophic metabolizer, Syntrophomonas wolfei, grown axenically and syntrophically with Methanospirillum hungatei. Remarkably, the abundance of most proteins as represented by normalized spectral abundance factor (NSAF) value changed very little between the pure and coculture growth conditions. Among the most abundant proteins detectedmore » were GroEL and GroES chaperonins, a small heat shock protein, and proteins involved in electron transfer, beta-oxidation, and ATP synthesis. Several putative energy conservation enzyme systems that utilize NADH and ferredoxin were present. The abundance of an EtfAB2 and the membrane-bound iron-sulfur oxidoreductase (Swol_0698 gene product) delineated a potential conduit for electron transfer between acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and membrane redox carriers. Proteins detected only when S. wolfei was grown with M. hungatei included a zinc-dependent dehydrogenase with a GroES domain, whose gene is present in genomes in many organisms capable of syntrophy, and transcriptional regulators responsive to environmental stimuli or the physiological status of the cell. In conclusion, the proteomic analysis revealed an emphasis on macromolecular stability and energy metabolism by S. wolfei and presence of regulatory mechanisms responsive to external stimuli and cellular physiological status.« less

  18. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Kentucky. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Until April 1, 1979, the Public Service Commission had been vested with exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of rates and service of utilities. As of that date two new agencies, the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) and the Utility Regulatory Commission (URC), have replaced the Public Service Commission. The ERC consists of three full-time members appointed by the governor for four year terms and is responsible for enforcing the provisions of the Kentucky statutes relating to electric and gas utilities. The three-member URC is responsible for enforcing the provisions relating to non-energy utilities such as telephone, sewer, and water utilities. The statutes vest all regulatory authority over public utilities in either the ERC or the URC. Local governments retain only the power to grant local franchises. However, it should be noted, that any utility owned or operated by a political subdivision of the state is exempt from regulation. Thus, local government has complete authority over utilities which are self-owned. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  19. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Idaho. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Idaho state legislature has created the Idaho Public Utilities Commission and has given the Commission the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate every public utility in the state. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. Commissioners serve full time and are appointed for six year terms. No more than two of the members may be from the same political party. Title 61 of the Idaho Code, which establishes the Commission and delineates its powers, vests all regulatory responsibility in the Commission to the exclusion of local government. However, as an incident to their franchising power, municipalities may impose reasonable regulations on the use of their streets. The Idaho Supreme Court holds that the transfer of regulatory power over public utilities to the Commission did not diminish the powers and duties of municipalities to control and maintain their streets and alleys. Limited statutory authority also exists giving municipalities the power to regulate the fares, rates, rentals, or charges made for the service rendered under any franchise granted in such city, except such as are subject to regulation by the Public Utilities Commission. With the exception of this limited power, the Commission is the sole agency having regulatory power over Idaho public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Louisiana. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Louisiana Public Service Commission, composed of five members elected by the general electorate and elected for six-year terms. The Commission is charged with regulating all public utilities and has such other regulatory authority as provided by law. The Commission, however, has no power to regulate a public utility owned, operated, or regulated on the effective data of this constitution (1921) by the governing authority of one or more political subdivisions unless the Commission is authorized to regulate these utilities by the electorate of the political subdivision involved. An additional statutory provision excludes all municipally-owned public utilities from Commission regulation. New Orleans has retained the regulatory authority which it held as of the effective date of the Louisiana Constitution. Therefore, the Commission exercises no regulatory powers over investor or municipally-owned utilities in New Orleans. A municipality is empowered to own and operate a revenue-producing public utility within or without its boundaries and it may sell and distribute the commodity or service of the public utility within or without its corporate limits and may establish rates, rules, and regulations with respect to the sale and distribution. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Illinois. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Illinois Commerce Commission, comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate and appointed for five year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any business subject to regulation by the Commission. Local governments may exercise a large degree of regulatory authority over public utilities providing services within a municipality. The question of whether a municipality will exercise regulatory control over local public utilities must be put to the voters of the city. If the proposition is approved by a majority of the voters, the municipality may regulate services and rates and exercise most of the regulatory functions otherwise assigned to the Commission. If any public utility is dissatisfied with any action of a municipality, the utility is entitled to apply to the Commission for review of the action. On review, the Commission may take any determination which it deems just and reasonable. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are excluded specifically from the definition of public utility. These utilities are not within the jurisdiction of the Commission and are regulated locally. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Summary and analysis of public comments on NUREG-1317: Regulatory options for nuclear plant license renewal: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ligon, D.M.; Seth, S.S.

    1989-03-01

    On August 29, 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on nuclear plant license renewal and solicited public comments on NUREG-1317, ''Regulatory Options for Nuclear Plant License Renewal.'' NUREG-1317 presents a discussion of fifteen topics involving technical, environmental, and procedural issues and poses a set of related questions. As part of its ongoing task for the NRC, The MITRE Corporation has summarized and analyzed the public comments received. Fifty-three written comments were received. Of these, 83 percent were from nuclear industry representatives; the remaining comments represented federal and state agencies, public interest groups, and a private citizen.

  3. Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. grr_peer2013.pdf (1.04 MB) More Documents & Publications track 1: systems analysis | geothermal 2015 peer review Geothermal Technologies Program Annual Peer Review Presentation By Doug Hollett Validation of Innovation Exploration Technologies for Newberry Volcano

  4. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Indiana. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Public Service Commission of Indiana. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor. Commissioners are appointed for four-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interest in any public utility. Indiana courts have stated that the Commission was created and vested with regulatory authority over public utilities in order to relieve these utilities from local regulation. Local governments do, however, have specific statutory authority to determine, by contract or ordinance, the quality and character of service to be provided by public utilities within the municipality. Local governments may also regulate the use of streets and other public property by public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  5. The DT-19 container design, impact testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aramayo, G.A.; Goins, M.L.

    1995-12-01

    Containers used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for the transport of radioactive material components, including components and special assemblies, are required to meet certain impact and thermal requirements that are demonstrated by performance or compliance testing, analytical procedures or a combination of both. The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 49, Section 173.7(d) stipulates that, {prime}Packages (containers) made by or under direction of the US DOE may be used for the transportation of radioactive materials when evaluated, approved, and certified by the DOE against packaging standards equivalent to those specified in 10 CFR Part 71. This paper describes the details of the design, analysis and testing efforts undertaken to improve the overall structural and thermal integrity of the DC-19 shipping container.

  6. Guidance Related to Analysis of Impacts to Workers in National Policy Act (NEPA) Documentation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide general guidance regarding the analysis of impacts to workers in DOE environmental impact statements (EISs) and environmental assessments (EAs) in order...

  7. Reducing Regulatory Burden - EO 13563 Retrospective Review |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities

  8. Comparative analysis of electric and gas industries regulatory initiatives on Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). Topical report, July 1992-November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stapor, M.C.; Hederman, W.F.

    1993-11-01

    The report focuses on the parallels and contrasts between gas and electric utilities that have implications for applying analogies from electric utility integrated resource planning (IRP)/demand-side management (DSM) to gas utilities. In addition, the report provides an overview of IRP and DSM trends as applied to gas utilities. Understanding the similarities and differences between the gas and electric utilities is an important step toward adopting appropriate regulatory policies for gas IRP/DSM.

  9. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, Wayne Leland

    2015-05-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  10. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Alabama. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Alabama legislature has created the Public Service Commission which has general supervisory powers over utilities. The PSC consists of a president and two associates, who are elected to four-year terms. The PSC has no jurisdiction over municipal utilities and, as a result, local governments retain the power to regulate the operation of their municipally-owned utilities. Municipalities also retain their police power over streets and highways within their territory. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  11. Webinar: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model, originally presented on May 22, 2012.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Impact Analysis: VTO Baseline and Scenario (BaSce) Activities

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about impact analysis...

  13. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in New York. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the New York Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for six-year terms. Commissioners may not have any pecuniary or financial interest in any public utility. Local governing bodies are authorized to exercise such power, jurisdiction and authority in enforcing the laws of the state and the orders, rules, and regulations of the commission as may be prescribed by statute or by the commission with respect to public utilities. A Commission spokesman confirmed that no statutes have been passed pursuant to this provision and the Commission has not ceded any of its regulatory powers to local governments. With the exception of the granting of franchises and permits to use public ways, local governments exercise no regulatory powers over public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in California. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Constitution of the State of California grants to the Legislature control over persons and private corporations that own or operate a line, plant, or system for the production, generation, or transmission of heat, light, water, or power to be furnished either directly or indirectly to or for the public. The Constitution establishes the Public Utilities Commission and grants certain specific powers to the PUC, including the power to fix rates, establish rules and prescribe a uniform system of accounts. The Constitution also recognizes that the Legislature has plenary power to confer additional authority and jurisdiction upon the PUC. The Constitution prohibits regulation by a city, county, or other municipal body of matters over which the Legislature has granted regulatory power to the PUC. This provision does not, however, impair the right of any city to grant franchises for public utilities. The California legislature has enacted the California Public Utilities Code and has designated the PUC as the agency to implement the regulatory provisions of the Code. The Public Utilities Commission consists of five members appointed by the governor and approved by the senate, a majority of the membership concurring, for staggered 6-year terms. Certain limited powers over the conduct of public utilities may still be exercised by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  15. NREL: Energy Analysis - Philipp Beiter

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Philipp Beiter Photo of Philipp Beiter Philipp Beiter is a member of the Market and Policy Impact Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Energy Markets and Policy Analyst On staff since October 2014 Phone number: 303-275-4383 E-mail: Philipp.Beiter@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Energy policy analysis Regulatory policy Data analysis and statistical modeling Primary research interests Electricity markets Utility business models for distributed generation Regulatory analysis Grid integration

  16. Guide for the preparation of applications for licenses for the use of radioactive materials in leak-testing services. Draft regulatory guide and value/impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this regulatory guide is to provide assistance to applicants and licensees in preparing applications for new licenses, license amendments, and license renewals. This guide describes the information the NRC staff needs to evaluate an application for a license for the use of radioactive material in performing certain commercial services for NRC or Agreement State licensees. The services covered by this guide are leak-testing sealed sources, analyzing leak-test samples, and supplying preregistered leak-test kits. This regulatory guide is intended to provide the applicant or licensee with information that will enable him to understand specific regulatory requirements and licensing policies as they apply to his services. The information in this guide is not a substitute for training in radiation safety. After the applicant is issued a license, he must conduct his program in accordance with (1) the statements, representations, and procedures contained in his application, (2) the terms and conditions of the license, and (3) the NRC's regulations. The information provided in the application should be clear, specific, and accurate.

  17. Regulatory Burden Request for Information | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information Regulatory Burden Request for Information Response to Regulatory Burden RFI Regulatory Burden Request for Information (46.48 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules DOE_05_18_2011.pdf Regulatory Burden RFI - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001

  18. General guidance for designing, testing, operating, and maintaining emission control devices at uranium mills. Draft regulatory guide and value/impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Emissions from milling operations must be controlled so that all airborne effluent releases are reduced to levels as low as is reasonably achievable. An important means of accomplishing this is by means of emission control devices in mill ventilation systems. The design and the testing, operating, and maintenance procedures for these emission control devices should ensure that these devices are operating consistently near peak operational efficiency. The purpose of this report is to provide information to applicants and licensees regarding the NRC staff's plans for using this regulatory guide. 8 refs.

  19. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January/February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Bock, R.E.; Mayer, S.J.; Salk, M.S.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives impacting environmental, health, and safety management responsibilities. the table is updated bi-monthly with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. Comments on reducing regulatory burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    reducing regulatory burden Comments on reducing regulatory burden Comments on reducing regulatory burden from Ingersoll Rand, Residential Solutions, manufacturer of Trane and American Standard residential air conditioners, heat pumps, furnaces, and accessories Comments on reducing regulatory burden (115.32 KB) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI [76 FR 75798] Notice of Availability of Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules 2014-09-18 Issuance: Energy

  1. Regulatory impact analysis of the effluent guidelines regulation for the offshore subcategory of the oil and gas extraction industry

    SciTech Connect

    1991-02-28

    The document compares the costs and benefits of implementation of effluent guidelines for the offshore oil and gas extraction industry.

  2. Impact

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Modeling Approach on Flutter Predictions for Very Large Wind Turbine Blade ... very large wind turbine blades have indicated that flutter may be a significant concern. ...

  3. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  4. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Missouri. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Missouri is vested in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members who are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for a term of six years. Commissioners must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the general supervision of public utilities. The Public Service Commission Law passed in 1913, makes no provision for the regulation of public utilities by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  5. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Virginia. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilties is vested generally in the State Corporation Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members elected by a joint vote of the two houses of the general assembly. Commissioners serve six-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any company subject to the supervision and regulation of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the primary responsibility of supervising and regulating public utilities. However, local governments retain the power to grant franchises and otherwise regulate the use of streets and other public property. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are not within the jurisdiction of the Commission to the extent that they operate within corporate limits. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  6. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Tennessee. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Tennessee Public Service Commission has been designated by the legislature as the agency primarily responsible for the regulation of public utilities and carriers. The Commission is comprised of three members elected by the voters of the state. Each member of the Commission serves a six-year term. The Commission is given broad supervisory control over public utilities in the public utilities statute. Included under its authority is the power to determine whether a privilege or franchise granted to a public utility by a municipality is necessary and proper for the public convenience. No privilege or franchise is valid until it has been approved by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  7. Analysis of the Impacts of an Early Start for Compliance with the Kyoto Protocol

    Reports and Publications

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Energy Information Administration's analysis of the impacts of an early start, using the same methodology as in Impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on U.S. Energy Markets and Economic Activity, with only those changes in assumptions caused by the early start date.

  8. EIS-0491: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0491: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana Federal Energy Regulatory ...

  9. FY 2014 Economic Impact Analysis for DOE's Oak Ridge Office of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Environmental Management | Department of Energy FY 2014 Economic Impact Analysis for DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management FY 2014 Economic Impact Analysis for DOE's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management The primary mission of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) is to protect the region's health and environment, enable the Department's vital missions locally, and make clean land available for future use. To accomplish this, we

  10. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation that outlines the rules, policies and orders that comprise the Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

  11. Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ‘‘Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,’’

  12. Other Regulatory Efforts

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to regulating international electricity trade, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability participates in other regulatory activities.

  13. Future trends and issues in regulatory takings

    SciTech Connect

    Allbright, M.P.

    1995-12-01

    This paper will complement that delivered by Thomas root by following his historical analysis of the Fifth Amendment through recent case law with an analysis of regulatory taking through environmental statutes. The discussion will center on takings of water rights through application of the Clean Water Act and the Threatened and Endangered Species Act. Although the examples used will be hypothetical, they will be based upon factual situations. Some of the issues presented for consideration will be an examination of standing of municipalities and corporations under the Fifth Amendment, federal and state legislation impacting the judicial trend toward reviving the Fifth Amendment, budgetary considerations, and convergence from focus on real property to other types of property. The author will also discuss the judicial trend in the Fifth Amendment cases from reliance on federal power to regulate to financial impact on real property resulting from regulation, and the potential for a return to the analysis of the power to regulate through a resurrection of the Tenth Amendment limitation of powers.

  14. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    previous memorandum on this subject of August 1976. PDF icon AnalysisAgriculturalLands.pdf More Documents & Publications Mini-Guidance Articles from Lessons Learned Quarterly...

  15. Automating Natural Disaster Impact Analysis: An Open Resource to Visually Estimate a Hurricane s Impact on the Electric Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Freer, Eva B; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Fernandez, Steven J; Chinthavali, Supriya; Kodysh, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-01

    An ORNL team working on the Energy Awareness and Resiliency Standardized Services (EARSS) project developed a fully automated procedure to take wind speed and location estimates provided by hurricane forecasters and provide a geospatial estimate on the impact to the electric grid in terms of outage areas and projected duration of outages. Hurricane Sandy was one of the worst US storms ever, with reported injuries and deaths, millions of people without power for several days, and billions of dollars in economic impact. Hurricane advisories were released for Sandy from October 22 through 31, 2012. The fact that the geoprocessing was automated was significant there were 64 advisories for Sandy. Manual analysis typically takes about one hour for each advisory. During a storm event, advisories are released every two to three hours around the clock, and an analyst capable of performing the manual analysis has other tasks they would like to focus on. Initial predictions of a big impact and landfall usually occur three days in advance, so time is of the essence to prepare for utility repair. Automated processing developed at ORNL allowed this analysis to be completed and made publicly available within minutes of each new advisory being released.

  16. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of ``noxious facilities`` be identified and measured? To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  17. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of noxious facilities'' be identified and measured To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  18. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2009-12-01

    This report uses statistical analysis to evaluate the impact of wind power projects on property values, and fails to uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts.

  19. Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. FPCC Regulatory Barriers Submittal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Performance Contracting Coalition (FPCC) appreciates the opportunity to comment on reducing regulatory burdens on the Federal government, specifically as they pertain to federal energy...

  1. Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 Request for information on reducing regulatory burden, E.O. 13563 Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 (140.78 KB) More Documents & Publications Notice of Availability of Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules Reducing Regulatory Burden

  2. Three-dimensional finite element impact analysis of a nuclear waste truck cask

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    A three-dimensional finite element impact analysis of a hypothetical accident event for the preliminary design of a shipping cask to be used to transport radioactive waste by standard tractor-semitrailer truck is presented. The dynamic structural analysis code DYNA3D, run on Sandia's Cray-1 computer, was used to calculate the effects of the closure-end of the cask impacting a rigid, frictionless surface on an edge of its external impact limiter after a 30-foot fall. The center of gravity of the 304 stainless steel and depleted uranium cask was assumed to be directly above the impact point. An elastic-plastic material constitutive model was used to calculate the nonlinear response of the cask components to the transient loading. Results from the calculations show the cask sustained large localized deformations. However, these were almost entirely confined to the impact limiters built into the cask. The closure sections were determined to remain intact and leakage would not be expected after the event. Interactive color computer graphics were used throughout the analysis, proving to be extremely helpful for generation and verification of the geometry and boundary conditions of the finite element model and for interpretation of the analysis results. 12 refs., 29 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Economic impacts of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic : a cross-sectional analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Braeton J.; Shaneyfelt, Calvin R.

    2010-06-01

    A NISAC study on the economic effects of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic was done in order to assess the differential impacts at the state and industry levels given changes in absenteeism, mortality, and consumer spending rates. Part of the analysis was to determine if there were any direct relationships between pandemic impacts and gross domestic product (GDP) losses. Multiple regression analysis was used because it shows very clearly which predictors are significant in their impact on GDP. GDP impact data taken from the REMI PI+ (Regional Economic Models, Inc., Policy Insight +) model was used to serve as the response variable. NISAC economists selected the average absenteeism rate, mortality rate, and consumer spending categories as the predictor variables. Two outliers were found in the data: Nevada and Washington, DC. The analysis was done twice, with the outliers removed for the second analysis. The second set of regressions yielded a cleaner model, but for the purposes of this study, the analysts deemed it not as useful because particular interest was placed on determining the differential impacts to states. Hospitals and accommodation were found to be the most important predictors of percentage change in GDP among the consumer spending variables.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  6. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Massachusetts. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Department of Public Utilities. The Department is under the supervision and control of a commission consisting of three members appointed by the governor for terms of four years. No more than two of the commissioners may be members of the same political party. Commissioners must be freee from any employment or financial interests which are incompatible with the duties of the Department. The Department is responsible for regulating public utilities. The Department is specifically granted general supervisory authority over all gas and electric companies. Specific provisions for the appeal of local decisions exist only in the case of a municipality's approval or disapproval of new operaions by an electric or gas company in a municipality already being served by another such utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  7. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Washington. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Washinton State Constitution grants authority to the legislature to regulate railroads and other common carriers as well as telegraph and telephone companies in the state. No section of the constitution expressly provides for the regulation of electric, gas, water, or heating utilities. The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Utilities and Transportation Commission, formerly designated at the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the governor, with the consent of the senate. The term of office for commissioners is six years. Recently enacted legislation provides for the implementation of tax incentives to encourage the development of cogeneration facilities in the state. This plan is to be administered by the Department of Revenue in conjunction with the Energy Office. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  8. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Nevada. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate the operatons of public utilities in Nevada is vested generally in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor to four year terms. One of the members is designated by the governor to act as chairman and serves in that capacity at the pleasure of the governor. Commissioners must be free from employment or pecuniary interests which are incompatible with the duties of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supercedes that of local governments. Local governments play a role in regulating public utilities only through the exercise of their zoning and franchising powers. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are totally exempt from Commission control. No specific procedure is provided by which the decisions of local governments regarding utilities may be reviewed by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  9. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Mississippi. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Mississippi is vested generally in the Public Service Commission, composed of three members elected for four year terms from separate districts of the state. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. It is empowered to amend municipal franchises that contain provisions conflicting with its exclusive jurisdiction over the rates and standards of service of public utilities. Local governments play a role in regulating public utilities only through the exercise of their zoning and franchising powers. They may also operate their own utilities which are totally exempt from Commission control, unless they provide services more than one mile beyond their corporate boundaries. Other than a procedure in which certain provisions in municipal franchises may be subject to modification by the Commission, there is no process by which the decisions of local government respecting utilities are reviewed by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  10. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in North Carolina. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Under the Public Utilities Act of 1965, utilities in North Carolina are regulated by the State's Utility Commission. The Commission consists of seven members who are appointed by the governor, subject to confirmation by the General Assembly sitting in joint session. The Commissioners serve eight year terms and the governor designates one of the commissioners as chairman. The Commission has an office of the executive director, who is appointed to a six year term by the governor subject to confirmaion by the General Assembly. The executive director heads the Commission's public staff. The public staff's duties include reviewing, investigating, and making recommendations on utility rates and services and intervention on behalf of the public in proceedings affecting consumer rates and generating plant certification. The Commission has the same power to regulate the operation of privately-owned public utilities within municipalities as it has to control those ouside. The only power over privately-owned utilities reserved to the municipalities is the power to grant franchises. A municipality may maintain its own utility systems, and such systems are not subject to the control and jurisdiction of the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  11. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in New Jersey. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate the operations of public utilities in New Jersey is generally vested in the Board of Public Utilities. The Board is subsumed within the Department of Energy for administrative purposes, but functions largely independently of supervision or control by that agency. The Board is composed of three members who serve for six-year terms. They are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Board supersedes that of local governments. The Board, for example, may grant exemptions from local zoning provisions, and has approving authority over privileges or franchises granted by municipalities to public utilities. The Board, however, cannot override the refusal of a municipality to grant consent to the initiation of operations by a public utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Dakota. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission is authorized by statute to regulate gas and electric utilities. The Commission consists of three elected commissioners each of whom serves for a six year term. The Commissioners are elected by district and each must, at the time of election, be a resident of the district from which he has been elected. Each Commissioner must reside in the state capital and devote his entire time to the duties of his office. The Commission is part of the Department of Commerce and Consumer Protection. Municipal power to regulate privately owned electric and gas public utilities was terminated in 1975. A municipally-owned electric utility has the authority to regulate the sale, use, and rates of electric power and energy which it provides. The Commission has no authority to regulate steam, heat, and refrigeration systems; that power resides in cities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. The impact of response measurement error on the analysis of designed experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson-Cook, Christine Michaela; Hamada, Michael Scott; Burr, Thomas Lee

    2015-12-21

    This study considers the analysis of designed experiments when there is measurement error in the true response or so-called response measurement error. We consider both additive and multiplicative response measurement errors. Through a simulation study, we investigate the impact of ignoring the response measurement error in the analysis, that is, by using a standard analysis based on t-tests. In addition, we examine the role of repeat measurements in improving the quality of estimation and prediction in the presence of response measurement error. We also study a Bayesian approach that accounts for the response measurement error directly through the specification of the model, and allows including additional information about variability in the analysis. We consider the impact on power, prediction, and optimization. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The impact of response measurement error on the analysis of designed experiments

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Anderson-Cook, Christine Michaela; Hamada, Michael Scott; Burr, Thomas Lee

    2015-12-21

    This study considers the analysis of designed experiments when there is measurement error in the true response or so-called response measurement error. We consider both additive and multiplicative response measurement errors. Through a simulation study, we investigate the impact of ignoring the response measurement error in the analysis, that is, by using a standard analysis based on t-tests. In addition, we examine the role of repeat measurements in improving the quality of estimation and prediction in the presence of response measurement error. We also study a Bayesian approach that accounts for the response measurement error directly through the specification ofmore » the model, and allows including additional information about variability in the analysis. We consider the impact on power, prediction, and optimization. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.« less

  15. Strategic Sequencing for State Distributed PV Policies: A Quantitative Analysis of Policy Impacts and Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Krasko, V.A.

    2012-10-01

    State and local policymakers show increasing interest in spurring the development of customer-sited distributed generation (DG), in particular solar photovoltaic (PV) markets. Prompted by that interest, this analysis examines the use of state policy as a tool to support the development of a robust private investment market. This analysis builds on previous studies that focus on government subsidies to reduce installation costs of individual projects and provides an evaluation of the impacts of policies on stimulating private market development.

  16. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Project Regulatory Considerations

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn about the many permitting and project regulatory issues that need to be addressed when developing energy projects. Considerations include the Helping Expedite and Advance Responsible Tribal Home Ownership (HEARTH) Act, land use, noise, birds, and other biological resources; visual impact; soil erosion and water quality; public health and safety; cultural and paleontological resources; solid and hazardous wastes; air quality; and climate.

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory and Licensing Matters GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory and licensing matters of interest to DOE, either as an NRC license applicant or in connection with related authorities and responsibilities of DOE and NRC on nuclear material, nuclear waste, and nuclear nonproliferation matters. GC-52 attorneys provide advice and support on a

  18. Analysis of Impacts of a Clean Energy Standard as requested by Chairman Hall

    Reports and Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Chairman Ralph M. Hall for an analysis of the impacts of a Clean Energy Standard (CES). The request, as outlined in the letter included in Appendix A, sets out specific assumptions and scenarios for the study.

  19. Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing NEPA

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) memorandum on Analysis of Impacts on Prime or Unique Agricultural Lands in Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act was developed in cooperation with the Department of Agriculture. It updates and supersedes CEQ's previous memorandum on this subject of August 1976.

  20. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 106: Piping and the use of highly combustible gases in vital areas

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.C.

    1993-06-01

    Highly combustible gases such as hydrogen, propane, and acetylene are used at all nuclear power plants. Hydrogen is of particular importance because it is stored in large quantities and is distributed and used continuously in buildings containing safety-related equipment. Large hydrogen releases at the hydrogen storage facilities or in these buildings could lead to fires or explosions that might result in loss of safety-related equipment. This report gives the regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 106, [open quotes]Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas.[close quotes] Scoping analyses showed that the risk associated with the storage and distribution of hydrogen for cooling electric generators at boiling-water reactors (BWRs), the off-gas system at BWRs, the waste gas system at pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and station battery rooms and portable bottles of combustible gas used for maintenance at PWRs and BWRs is small. On the basis of generic evaluations, the NRC staff has concluded that several possible methods to reduce risk could provide cost-effective safety benefits at some plants. However, in view of the observed large differences in plant-specific characteristics affecting the risk associated with the use of hydrogen, and the marginal generic safety benefit that can be achieved in a cost-effective manner, it is recommended that this generic issue be resolved simply by making these results available in a generic letter. This information may help licensees in their plant evaluations recommended by Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, [open quotes]Individual Plant Examination of External Events for Severe Accident Vulnerabilities,[close quotes] June 28, 1991.

  1. Regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 106: Piping and the use of highly combustible gases in vital areas

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.C.

    1993-06-01

    Highly combustible gases such as hydrogen, propane, and acetylene are used at all nuclear power plants. Hydrogen is of particular importance because it is stored in large quantities and is distributed and used continuously in buildings containing safety-related equipment. Large hydrogen releases at the hydrogen storage facilities or in these buildings could lead to fires or explosions that might result in loss of safety-related equipment. This report gives the regulatory analysis for the resolution of Generic Safety Issue 106, {open_quotes}Piping and the Use of Highly Combustible Gases in Vital Areas.{close_quotes} Scoping analyses showed that the risk associated with the storage and distribution of hydrogen for cooling electric generators at boiling-water reactors (BWRs), the off-gas system at BWRs, the waste gas system at pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and station battery rooms and portable bottles of combustible gas used for maintenance at PWRs and BWRs is small. On the basis of generic evaluations, the NRC staff has concluded that several possible methods to reduce risk could provide cost-effective safety benefits at some plants. However, in view of the observed large differences in plant-specific characteristics affecting the risk associated with the use of hydrogen, and the marginal generic safety benefit that can be achieved in a cost-effective manner, it is recommended that this generic issue be resolved simply by making these results available in a generic letter. This information may help licensees in their plant evaluations recommended by Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, {open_quotes}Individual Plant Examination of External Events for Severe Accident Vulnerabilities,{close_quotes} June 28, 1991.

  2. Phenylpropanoid related regulatory protein-regulatory region associations

    DOEpatents

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Park, Joon-Hyun; Doukhanina, Elena

    2012-01-03

    Materials and methods for identifying lignin regulatory region-regulatory protein associations are disclosed. Materials and methods for modulating lignin accumulation are also disclosed.

  3. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (177.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden

  4. Regulatory impacts on code validation and use

    SciTech Connect

    McKamy, J.

    1994-09-01

    The Criticality Engineering Programs branch of Nuclear Safety Engineering at EG&G Rocky Flats is in the process of developing procedures for KENO code validation which demonstrate compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6B (NQA-1). Detailed and documented processes must be implemented to acquire, install, and validate the codes. Many of the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6B simply require documenting {open_quotes}good practices,{close_quotes} while others are not possible due to the nature of verifying and validating 20-year-old codes against 30-year-old benchmarks.

  5. .Energy Project Regulatory Considerations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Project Regulatory Considerations John Clancy Godfrey & Kahn, S.C. jclancy@gklaw.com Telephone: (414) 287-9256 August 31, 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development Webinar 1 Regulatory Issues and Opportunities * A number of federal laws and regulations apply to energy development activities on tribal lands * Federal laws, regulations, and Executive Orders apply to energy development activities * State laws and regulations largely do not apply to energy development on tribal lands *

  6. On the Path to SunShot. Utility Regulatory and Business Model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Utility Regulatory and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Net-energy metering (NEM) has helped drive the rapid growth of ...

  7. Analysis of the environmental impact of China based on STIRPAT model

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shoufu; Zhao Dingtao; Marinova, Dora

    2009-11-15

    Assuming that energy consumption is the main source of GHG emissions in China, this paper analyses the effect of population, urbanisation level, GDP per capita, industrialisation level and energy intensity on the country's environmental impact using the STIRPAT model with data for 1978-2006. The analysis shows that population has the largest potential effect on environmental impact, followed by urbanisation level, industrialisation level, GDP per capita and energy intensity. Hence, China's One Child Policy, which restrains rapid population growth, has been an effective way of reducing the country's environmental impact. However, due to the difference in growth rates, GDP per capita had a higher effect on the environmental impact, contributing to 38% of its increase (while population's contribution was at 32%). The rapid decrease in energy intensity was the main factor restraining the increase in China's environmental impact but recently it has also been rising. Against this background, the future of the country looks bleak unless a change in human behaviour towards more ecologically sensitive economic choices occurs.

  8. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of 1603 Treasury Grant Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE-EERE) to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the §1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of solar photovoltaic (PV) and large wind (greater than 1 MW) projects funded by the §1603 grant program. Through November 10, 2011, the §1603 grant program has provided approximately $9.0 billion in funds to over 23,000 PV and large wind projects, comprising 13.5 GW of electric generating capacity.

  9. Analysis of the Impacts of the Clean Power Plan - Energy Information

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Administration Baseline and scenario data Reference & Base Policy Reference & Selected Policy Cases (AEO Reference, Base Policy, Policy Extension, Policy with New Nuclear) High Economic Growth High Oil and Gas Resource Note: links bring up all output tables; electric sector-specific material can be found using the browser menu under Publications & Tables. Analysis of the Impacts of the Clean Power Plan Release date: May 22, 2015 revision Background, Methodology, and Scenarios

  10. A Retrospective Analysis of the Benefits and Impacts of U.S. Renewable Portfolio Standards

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Retrospective Analysis of the Benefits and Impacts of U.S. Renewable Portfolio Standards Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a Department of Energy Office of Science lab managed by University of California. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications.

  11. Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of a volatile uranyl derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, D.J.; Hardy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quadrupole mass spectral analysis of the volatile uranium ligand complex bis (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato) dioxouranium-di-n-butyl sulfoxide is described utilizing electron impact (EI) and methane chemical ionization (CI) ion sources. All major ions are tentatively identified and the potential usefulness of this complex for determining uranium isotope /sup 235/U//sup 238/U abundance is demonstrated.

  12. Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2004 for New York

    SciTech Connect

    Gowri, Krishnan; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.

    2007-08-03

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and New York State Department of State (DOS) requested the help of DOE’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) in estimating the annual building energy savings and cost impacts of adopting ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 (ASHRAE 2004) requirements. This report summarizes the analysis methodology and results of energy simulation in response to that request.

  13. Low-level waste management alternatives and analysis in DOE`s programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstein, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The PEIS has been divided into an Environmental Restoration section and a Waste Management section. Each section has a unique set of alternatives. This paper will focus on the waste management alternatives and analysis. The set of alternatives for waste management has been divided into waste categories. These categories are: high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, greater-than-class C and low-level waste from commercial sources, hazardous waste, and spent nuclear fuel. This paper will discuss the alternatives and analytical approach that will be used to evaluate these alternatives for the low-level waste section. Although the same alternatives will be considered for all waste types, the analysis will be performed separately for each waste type. In the sections that follow, information will be provided on waste management configurations, the analysis of waste management alternatives, waste types and locations, facility and transportation activities, the facility and transportation impacts assessment, and the compilation of impacts.

  14. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (289.74 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 SEVENTH RFI COMMENTS ON REDUCING REGULATORY BURDEN

  15. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  16. Hypervelocity impact flash for missile-defense kill assessment and engagement analysis : experiments on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Reinhart, William Dodd; Lawrence, Raymond Jeffery Jr.; Chhabildas, Lalit Chandra; Kelly, Daniel P.

    2005-07-01

    Kill assessment continues to be a major problem for the nation's missile defense program. A potential approach for addressing this issue involves spectral and temporal analysis of the short-time impact flash that occurs when a kill vehicle intercepts and engages a target missile. This can provide identification of the materials involved in the impact event, which will, in turn, yield the data necessary for target identification, engagement analysis, and kill assessment. This report describes the first phases of a project under which we are providing laboratory demonstrations of the feasibility and effectiveness of this approach. We are using two major Sandia facilities, the Z-Pinch accelerator, and the two- and three-stage gas guns at the Shock Thermodynamics and Applied Research (STAR) facility. We have looked at the spectral content of impact flash at velocities up to 25 km/s on the Z-Pinch machine to establish the capability for spectroscopy for these types of events, and are looking at similar experiments at velocities from 6 to 11 km/s on the gas guns to demonstrate a similar capability for a variety of research-oriented and applied materials. The present report describes only the work performed on the Z machine.

  17. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ([minus]60[degrees]F) temperatures.

  18. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ({minus}60{degrees}F) temperatures.

  19. New analysis techniques for estimating impacts of federal appliance efficiency standards

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, James E.

    2003-06-24

    Impacts of U.S. appliance and equipment standards have been described previously. Since 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has updated standards for clothes washers, water heaters, and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. A revised estimate of the aggregate impacts of all the residential appliance standards in the United States shows that existing standards will reduce residential primary energy consumption and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by 89 percent in 2020 compared to the levels expected without any standards. Studies of possible new standards are underway for residential furnaces and boilers, as well as a number of products in the commercial (tertiary) sector, such as distribution transformers and unitary air conditioners. The analysis of standards has evolved in response to critiques and in an attempt to develop more precise estimates of costs and benefits of these regulations. The newer analysis elements include: (1) valuing energy savings by using marginal (rather than average) energy prices specific to an end-use; (2) simulating the impacts of energy efficiency increases over a sample population of consumers to quantify the proportion of households having net benefits or net costs over the life of the appliance; and (3) calculating marginal markups in distribution channels to derive the incremental change in retail prices associated with increased manufacturing costs for improving energy efficiency.

  20. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  1. Review of light water reactor regulatory requirements: Assessment of selected regulatory requirements that may have marginal importance to risk: Postaccident sampling system, Turbine missiles, Combustible gas control, Charcoal filters

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.; Jamison, J.D.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Tabatabai, A.S.; Vo, T.V.

    1987-05-01

    In a study commissioned by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the costs and benefits of modifying regulatory requirements in the areas of the postaccident sampling system, turbine rotor design reviews and inspections, combustible gas control for inerted Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) containments, and impregnated charcoal filters in certain plant ventilation systems. The basic framework for the analyses was that presented in the Regulatory Analysis Guidelines (NUREG/BR-0058) and in the Handbook for Value-Impact Assessment (NUREG/CR-3568). The effects of selected modifications to regulations were evaluated in terms of such factors as public risk and costs to industry and NRC. The results indicate that potential modifications of the regulatory requirements in three of the four areas would have little impact on public risk. In the fourth area, impregnated charcoal filters in building ventilation systems do appear to limit risks to the public and plant staff. Revisions in the severe accident source term assumptions, however, may reduce the theoretical value of charcoal filters. The cost analysis indicated that substantial savings in operating costs may be realized by changing the interval of turbine rotor inspections. Small to moderate operating cost savings may be realized through postulated modifications to the postaccident sampling system requirements and to the requirements for combustible gas control in inerted BWR containments. Finally, the use of impregnated charcoal filters in ventilation systems appears to be the most cost-effective method of reducing radioiodine concentrations.

  2. Environmental impact assessment in Colombia: Critical analysis and proposals for improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Toro, Javier; Requena, Ignacio; Zamorano, Montserrat

    2010-07-15

    The evaluation of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) systems is a highly recommended strategy for enhancing their effectiveness and quality. This paper describes an evaluation of EIA in Colombia, using the model and the control mechanisms proposed and applied in other countries by Christopher Wood and Ortolano. The evaluation criteria used are based on Principles of Environmental Impact Assessment Best Practice, such as effectiveness and control features, and they were contrasted with the opinions of a panel of Colombian EIA experts as a means of validating the results of the study. The results found that EIA regulations in Colombia were ineffective because of limited scope, inadequate administrative support and the inexistence of effective control mechanisms and public participation. This analysis resulted in a series of recommendations regarding the further development of the EIA system in Colombia with a view to improving its quality and effectiveness.

  3. Regulatory Burden RFI - Hussmann Corporation Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regulatory Burden RFI - Hussmann Corporation Response January 3, 2012 Below are the list of questions with answers from the December 5 RFI: (1) How can the Department best promote meaningful periodic reviews of its existing rules and how can it best identify those rules that might be modified, streamlined, expanded, or repealed? DOE should maintain a list of all manufacturers impacted by legislation/rules and make sure these manufacturers are notified of all rule changes. A full review cycle

  4. HTGR technology economic/ business analysis and trade studies impacts. Impacts of HTGR commericialization on the U.S. economy

    SciTech Connect

    Silady, Fred

    2013-12-07

    The approach to this task was to initially review the 2012 Business Plan and supporting analyses for the above impacts. With that understanding as a base, the Business Plan impacts are updated in terms of the GDP and job creation as a result of additional studies and inputs such as the revised market assessment from Task 1.1. For the impacts on U.S. competitiveness, the NGNP Industry Alliance team members have been utilized to provide inputs on supplier infrastructure development and on vendor capability.

  5. Re: Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regulatory Burden RFI Re: Regulatory Burden RFI Hearth Patio & Barbecue Association comments on Regulatory Burden RFI Re: Regulatory Burden RFI (74.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI Regulatory Reduction RFI, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123, February 3, 2011

  6. Impact of Direct Financial Incentives in the Emerging Battery Electric Vehicle Market: A Preliminary Analysis

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study addresses the question “What is the impact of state-level electric vehicle incentives on electric vehicle adoption?”. It focus on rebates, tax credits, and HOV-lane access for battery electric vehicles (BEVs) but also examines the influence of public BEV charging infrastructure on BEV adoption so far. The analysis uses state-level, temporal variation in BEV incentives to identify variation in BEV registrations through econometric methods. This presentation will review initial findings of the project and gather your feedback on future research needs.

  7. regulatory | OpenEI Community

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    regulatory Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 5 August, 2013 - 13:18 Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap featured on NREL Now geothermal NREL...

  8. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Johnson, Rudd; Nguyen, Nhu T.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; et al

    2015-02-10

    The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor ?E is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by ?E in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition ?E regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved inmoreSalmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by ?E in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that ?E up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, ?E is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between ?E and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of ?E, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.less

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  10. Regulatory Requirements | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulatory Requirements Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environment, Energy, and Transportation Management (January 26, 2007) and Executive Order 13514, Federal...

  11. Washington Coastal Zone Management Regulatory Handbook | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Washington Coastal Zone Management Regulatory HandbookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Author Washington...

  12. Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    and in making its regulatory program more effective and less burdensome. Regulatory Burden RFI More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI from AHRI Air-Conditioning,...

  13. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Accardi, Alberto; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism in transcriptional regulatory regions and expression of environmentally responsive genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuting; Tomso, Daniel J.; Liu Xuemei; Bell, Douglas A. . E-mail: BELL1@niehs.nih.gov

    2005-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome are DNA sequence variations that can alter an individual's response to environmental exposure. SNPs in gene coding regions can lead to changes in the biological properties of the encoded protein. In contrast, SNPs in non-coding gene regulatory regions may affect gene expression levels in an allele-specific manner, and these functional polymorphisms represent an important but relatively unexplored class of genetic variation. The main challenge in analyzing these SNPs is a lack of robust computational and experimental methods. Here, we first outline mechanisms by which genetic variation can impact gene regulation, and review recent findings in this area; then, we describe a methodology for bioinformatic discovery and functional analysis of regulatory SNPs in cis-regulatory regions using the assembled human genome sequence and databases on sequence polymorphism and gene expression. Our method integrates SNP and gene databases and uses a set of computer programs that allow us to: (1) select SNPs, from among the >9 million human SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP database, that are similar to cis-regulatory element (RE) consensus sequences; (2) map the selected dbSNP entries to the human genome assembly in order to identify polymorphic REs near gene start sites; (3) prioritize the candidate polymorphic RE containing genes by searching the existing genotype and gene expression data sets. The applicability of this system has been demonstrated through studies on p53 responsive elements and is being extended to additional pathways and environmentally responsive genes.

  15. Regulatory and Commercial Barriers to Introduction of Renewable Super

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Premium | Department of Energy Regulatory and Commercial Barriers to Introduction of Renewable Super Premium Regulatory and Commercial Barriers to Introduction of Renewable Super Premium Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-B: End Use and Fuel Certification Robert McCormick, Principal Engineer in Fuels Performance, National Renewable Energy Laboratory b13_mccormick_2-b.pdf (974.85 KB) More Documents & Publications The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on

  16. Cavitation erosion prediction based on analysis of flow dynamics and impact load spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mihatsch, Michael S. Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-10-15

    Cavitation erosion is the consequence of repeated collapse-induced high pressure-loads on a material surface. The present paper assesses the prediction of impact load spectra of cavitating flows, i.e., the rate and intensity distribution of collapse events based on a detailed analysis of flow dynamics. Data are obtained from a numerical simulation which employs a density-based finite volume method, taking into account the compressibility of both phases, and resolves collapse-induced pressure waves. To determine the spectrum of collapse events in the fluid domain, we detect and quantify the collapse of isolated vapor structures. As reference configuration we consider the expansion of a liquid into a radially divergent gap which exhibits unsteady sheet and cloud cavitation. Analysis of simulation data shows that global cavitation dynamics and dominant flow events are well resolved, even though the spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve individual vapor bubbles. The inviscid flow model recovers increasingly fine-scale vapor structures and collapses with increasing resolution. We demonstrate that frequency and intensity of these collapse events scale with grid resolution. Scaling laws based on two reference lengths are introduced for this purpose. We show that upon applying these laws impact load spectra recorded on experimental and numerical pressure sensors agree with each other. Furthermore, correlation between experimental pitting rates and collapse-event rates is found. Locations of high maximum wall pressures and high densities of collapse events near walls obtained numerically agree well with areas of erosion damage in the experiment. The investigation shows that impact load spectra of cavitating flows can be inferred from flow data that captures the main vapor structures and wave dynamics without the need for resolving all flow scales.

  17. Multi-Year Analysis of Renewable Energy Impacts in California: Results from the Renewable Portfolio Standards Integration Cost Analysis; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Shiu, H.; Kirby, B.; Jackson, K.

    2006-08-01

    California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS, Senate Bill 1078) requires the state's investor-owned utilities to obtain 20% of their energy mix from renewable generation sources. To facilitate the imminent increase in the penetration of renewables, the California Energy Commission (CEC), in support of the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), initiated a study of integration costs in the context of RPS implementation. This effort estimated the impact of renewable generation in the regulation and load-following time scales and calculated the capacity value of renewable energy sources using a reliability model. The analysis team, consisting of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the California Wind Energy Collaborative (CWEC), performed the study in cooperation with the California Independent System Operator (CaISO), the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE). The study was conducted over three phases and was followed by an analysis of a multi-year period. This paper presents results from the multi-year analysis and the Phase III recommendations.

  18. Improved cost-benefit techniques in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, F.J.; Nesse, R.J.; Vaeth, M.; Wusterbarth, A.R.; Currie, J.W.

    1983-06-01

    The major objective of this report is to help the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory mission, particularly with respect to improving the use of cost-benefit analysis and the economic evaluation of resources within the NRC. The objectives of this effort are: (1) to identify current and future NRC requirements (e.g., licensing) for valuing nonmarket goods; (2) to identify, highlight, and present the relevant efforts of selected federal agencies, some with over two decades of experience in valuing nonmarket goods, in this area; and (3) to review methods for valuing nonmarket impacts and to provide estimats of their magnitudes. Recently proposed legislation may result in a requirement for not only more sophisticated valuation analyses, but more extensive applications of these techniques to issues of concern to the NRC. This paper is intended to provide the NRC with information to more efficiently meet such requirements.

  19. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Johnson, Rudd; Nguyen, Nhu T.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; et al

    2015-02-10

    The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved inmore » Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σE and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.« less

  20. Analysis of the Salmonella regulatory network suggests involvement of SsrB and H-NS in σE-regulated SPI-2 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Overall, Christopher C.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Kidwai, Afshan S.; Jones, Marcus B.; Johnson, Rudd; Nguyen, Nhu T.; McDermott, Jason E.; Ansong, Charles; Heffron, Fred; Cambronne, Eric; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2015-02-10

    The extracytoplasmic functioning sigma factor σE is known to play an essential role for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive and proliferate in macrophages and mice. However, its regulatory network is not well characterized, especially during infection. Here we used microarray to identify genes regulated by σE in Salmonella grown in three conditions: a nutrient-rich condition and two others that mimic early and late intracellular infection. We found that in each condition σE regulated different sets of genes, and notably, several global regulators. When comparing nutrient-rich and infection-like conditions, large changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in Salmonella pathogenesis island (SPI)-1 type-three secretion system (TTSS), SPI-2 TTSS, protein synthesis, and stress responses. In total, the expression of 58% of Salmonella genes was affected by σE in at least one of the three conditions. An important finding is that σE up-regulates SPI-2 genes, which are essential for Salmonella intracellular survival, by up-regulating SPI-2 activator ssrB expression at the early stage of infection and down-regulating SPI-2 repressor hns expression at a later stage. Moreover, σE is capable of countering the silencing of H-NS, releasing the expression of SPI-2 genes. This connection between σE and SPI-2 genes, combined with the global regulatory effect of σE, may account for the lethality of rpoE-deficient Salmonella in murine infection.

  1. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  2. Implementation of subsidence control regulatory requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, D.

    1999-07-01

    Underground coal mining in Illinois has shown an increasing percentage of total coal mined relative to surface mining. In the past 20 years, the percentage of underground to surface mine production has steadily increased. Underground mining is expected to continue to dominate Illinois coal production into the 21st century. The drive for higher production and lower operating costs should increase the number of longwall and high extraction retreat mines. This will be achieved through conversion of existing room and pillar mines or initiation of new underground mining operations. The environmental regulations that govern the mitigation of surface impacts have evolved at both the state and federal level. Federal regulations passed in 1995 modifying the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act mandated additional restrictions and regulatory requirements beyond those adopted in 1977. State regulatory bodies that implement the regulations are now working to bring their regulations and procedures into compliance with the oversight federal counterpart. many states have raised concerns over the practical application of certain aspects of the new permitting requirements. This paper describes past and present subsidence regulations in Illinois, their impact on the coal industry and on the landowners above underground coal mining. Potential problems in implementation of the new regulatory requirements as well as additional burdens placed on coal companies to comply with the regulations are explored.

  3. REGULATORY PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT REGULATORY PARTNERSHIP STATEMENT PDF icon RPS PDF.PDF More Documents & Publications REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT

  4. Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation Management of Complex Sites: Case Studies and Guidance Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) Remediation ...

  5. Paducah Regulatory Approach | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Remediation Paducah Regulatory Approach Paducah Regulatory Approach Past uranium enrichment operations and support activities generated hazardous, radioactive, ...

  6. Project Regulatory Considerations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regulatory Considerations August 31, 2016 11:00 am - 12:30 PM MDT 2 Todays Presenters * Randy Manion, Manion@wapa.gov * Doug Maccourt, douglas.Maccourt@hq.doe.gov * John Clancy, JClancy@gklaw.com * Tamera Dawes, Tamera.dawes@bia.gov * Stan Webb, Stan.webb@bia.gov 3 Link to the Webinar Slides and Audio Everyone will receive a post-webinar e-mail with the link to the page where the slides and recording will be located http://www.energy.gov/indianenergy/webinars#past 4 Questions * To submit

  7. Overview of crash and impact analysis at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, R.W.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1993-08-05

    This work provides a brief overview of past and ongoing efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of finite-element modeling of crash and impact problems. The process has been one of evolution in several respects. One aspect of the evolution has been the continual upgrading and refinement of the DYNA, NIKE, and TOPAZ family of finite-element codes. The major missions of these codes involve problems where the dominant factors are high-rate dynamics, quasi-statics, and heat transfer, respectively. However, analysis of a total event, whether it be a shipping container drop or an automobile/barrier collision, may require use or coupling or two or more of these codes. Along with refinements in speed, contact capability, and element technology, material model complexity continues to evolve as more detail is demanded from the analyses. A more recent evolution has involved the mix of problems addressed at LLNL and the direction of the technology thrusts. A pronounced increase in collaborative efforts with the civilian and private sector has resulted in a mix of complex problems involving synergism between weapons applications (shipping container, earth penetrator, missile carrier, ship hull damage) and a more broad base of problems such as vehicle impacts as discussed herein.

  8. New source performance standards for industrial boilers. Volume 5. Analysis of solid waste impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, K.; Davis, H.; Delaney, B.; Grundahl, N.; Hyde, R.; Malloch, R.; Tusa, W.

    1980-09-01

    This study provides an analysis of the impacts of emission controls on disposal of solid wastes from coal-fired industrial boilers. Examination is made of boiler systems, coal types, emission control alternatives, waste streams, waste disposal and utilization alternatives, and pertinent Federal regulations. Twenty-four representative model case scenarios are studied in detail. Expected disposal/utilization alternatives and disposal costs are developed. Comparison of the systems studied indicates that the most cost-effective SO/sub 2/ control technologies from the perspective of waste disposal cost per unit SO/sub 2/ control are, in decreasing order: physically cleaned coal/double alkali combination; double alkali; lime/limestone; spray drying; fluidized-bed combustion; and sodium throwaway.

  9. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.

  10. Regulatory Processes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Processes Beginning with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, ... they comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. (42 U.S.C. 6293; 6314) DOE ...

  11. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  12. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the §1603Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Daniel; Porro, Gian; Goldberg, Marshall

    2012-04-01

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the §1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the §1603 grant program.

  13. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-04-01

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

  14. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the §1603 Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Daniel; Porro, Gian; Goldberg, Marshall

    2012-04-09

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the §1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the §1603 grant program.

  15. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domainmore » of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.« less

  16. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area

  17. Developing consensus in response to regulatory change: a survival strategy

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    For several years now, the nuclear industry has implemented basic regulatory guides and pursued evolving incremental changes by de facto execution of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission codes or in anticipation of them. The purpose of this paper is to describe a consensus-building process recently employed by industry representatives to respond to changes to 10CFR55, Operator's Licenses and Conforming Amendment. This process resulted from the necessity for industry stakeholders to evaluate the impact of pending regulatory change. It also highlighted the need for more dialogue in the industry and the potential of expanding links with academic representatives. In addition, the paper reports participants; documentation of unnecessary regulatory constraint and vagueness of new terminology and requirements.

  18. Alternative future environmental regulatory approaches for petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Moses, D. O.; Emerson, D.; Arguerro, R.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Analytical Services, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, many industrial, regulatory, and community leaders have expressed concern that the current environmental regulatory structure disregards multimedia environmental impacts, provides few incentives to develop and use new technologies, and fails to consider site-specific conditions. For the US petroleum refining industry, faced with the need to produce higher-quality fuels from poorer-quality feedstocks, such criticisms are expected to increase. This article offers two alternative environmental regulatory approaches for existing petroleum refineries to use in the future. These alternative approaches are multimedia in scope, provide for new technology development and use, and allow flexibility in the means for meeting environmental goals. They have been reviewed and critiqued by various stakeholders, including industry representatives, regulators, and local and national community and environmental organizations. The integration of stakeholder comments and findings of ongoing national and international regulatory reinvention efforts in the development of these approaches positions them for potential use by other industries in addition to petroleum refineries.

  19. NREL: Energy Analysis - Aaron Levine

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Levine Photo of Aaron Levine Aaron Levine is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Legal and Regulatory Analyst On staff since 2012 Phone number: 303-275-3855 E-mail: aaron.levine@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Environmental laws and regulations Energy facility siting and transmission laws and regulations Natural resource leasing and acquisition Legal impacts on renewable energy development Legal and policy research Primary

  20. NREL: Energy Analysis - Laura Vimmerstedt

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laura Vimmerstedt Photo of Laura Vimmerstedt Laura Vimmerstedt is a member of the Energy Forecasting and Modeling Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Senior Environmental Analyst - Transportation, Fuels, and Environmental Impacts Section Supervisor On staff since 1994 Phone number: 303-384-7346 E-mail: laura.vimmerstedt@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Climate change policy analysis Renewable energy modeling Air-quality regulatory implications for energy technologies Primary research

  1. Economic Impacts Associated With Commercializing Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles in California: An Analysis of the California Road Map Using the JOBS H2 Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Report by Argonne National Laboratory summarizing an analysis of the economic impacts associated with commercializing fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) in California.

  2. Results for the Independent Sampling and Analysis of Used Oil Drums at the Impact Services Facility in Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), via the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, perform independent sampling and analysis of used oils contained within eight 55 gallon drums stored at the former IMPACT Services facility, located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These drums were originally delivered by LATA Sharp Remediation Services (LSRS) to IMPACT Services on January 11, 2011 as part of the Bldg. K-33 demolition project, and the drums plus contents should have been processed as non-hazardous non-radiological waste by IMPACT Services. LSRS received a certificate of destruction on August 29, 2012 (LSRS 2012a). However, IMPACT Services declared bankruptcy and abandoned the site later in 2012, and eight of the original eleven K-33 drums are currently stored at the facility. The content of these drums is the subject of this investigation. The original drum contents were sampled by LSRS in 2010 and analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using both compositing and grab sampling techniques. The objective of this 2013 sample and analysis effort was to duplicate, to the extent possible, the 2010 sampling and analysis event to support final disposition decisions. Part of that decision process includes either verifying or refuting the assertion that oils that are currently stored in drums at the IMPACT Services facility originated from Bldg. K-33 equipment.

  3. Development of the simulation system {open_quotes}IMPACT{close_quotes} for analysis of nuclear power plant severe accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Naitoh, Masanori; Ujita, Hiroshi; Nagumo, Hiroichi

    1997-07-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has initiated a long-term program to develop the simulation system {open_quotes}IMPACT{close_quotes} for analysis of hypothetical severe accidents in nuclear power plants. IMPACT employs advanced methods of physical modeling and numerical computation, and can simulate a wide spectrum of senarios ranging from normal operation to hypothetical, beyond-design-basis-accident events. Designed as a large-scale system of interconnected, hierarchical modules, IMPACT`s distinguishing features include mechanistic models based on first principles and high speed simulation on parallel processing computers. The present plan is a ten-year program starting from 1993, consisting of the initial one-year of preparatory work followed by three technical phases: Phase-1 for development of a prototype system; Phase-2 for completion of the simulation system, incorporating new achievements from basic studies; and Phase-3 for refinement through extensive verification and validation against test results and available real plant data.

  4. Standard format and content for the health and safety sections of License Renewal Applications for uranium processing and fuel fabrication. Draft regulatory guide and value/impact statement. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    This regulatory guide, ''Standard Format and Content for the Health and Safety Sections of License Renewal Applications for Uranium Processing and Fuel Fabrication'' (herein referred to as the Standard Format), has been prepared to provide more specific guidance for the preparation of the health and safety sections of license renewal applications. The Environmental Report is submitted as a separate document. The renewal application for the health and safety sections of the license consists of two major parts. The first part contains the proposed license conditions stating the performance requirements to which the applicant proposes to commit. The second part contains detailed safety information and descriptive information demonstrating the applicant's adherence to the conditions of the first part. This Standard Format is designed to separate the requirements in Part I (license conditions) from the descriptive information in Part II (demonstration and performance record).

  5. Natural Gas: Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2008)

    Reports and Publications

    2009-01-01

    This special report Web-based product presents a chronology of some of the key federal legislative and regulatory actions that have helped shape the natural gas market, with particular emphasis on policy directives from 1978 to October 2008. Separate reports provide brief descriptions of specific legislation, regulations, or policies, and their impacts on the natural gas market.

  6. Analysis of impact melt and vapor production in CTH for planetary applications

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Quintana, S. N.; Crawford, D. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    2015-05-19

    This study explores impact melt and vapor generation for a variety of impact speeds and materials using the shock physics code CTH. The study first compares the results of two common methods of impact melt and vapor generation to demonstrate that both the peak pressure method and final temperature method are appropriate for high-speed impact models (speeds greater than 10 km/s). However, for low-speed impact models (speeds less than 10 km/s), only the final temperature method is consistent with laboratory analyses to yield melting and vaporization. Finally, a constitutive model for material strength is important for low-speed impacts because strengthmore » can cause an increase in melting and vaporization.« less

  7. Papers on the nuclear regulatory dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Freeman, S.D.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    The four papers contained in this report are titled: (1) From Prescriptive to Performance-Based Regulation of Nuclear Power; (2) Nuclear Regulatory Reform: A Technology-Forcing Approach; (3) Improving the Regulation of Nuclear Power; and (4) Science and Its Limits: The Regulators' Dilemma. These four papers investigate issues relating to the long-term regulation of nuclear energy. They were prepared as part of the Institute for Energy Analysis' project on Nuclear Regulation funded by a grant from the Mellon Foundation and a smaller grant by the MacArthur Foundation. Originally this work was to be supplemented by contributions from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and from the Department of Energy. These contributions were not forthcoming, and as a result the scope of our investigations was more restricted than we had originally planned.

  8. Analysis of the impacts of the President's tax proposal on major sectors of the energy industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the President's tax proposal on the energy sector. The study consists of two parts. The first part reported in this document, specifically addresses the impacts of the President's tax proposal on the oil and gas, coal, and electric utility sectors of the energy industry. Impacts were examined at both the project and corporate levels. The study focuses on proposed changes in corporate income taxation.

  9. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-08-01

    Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

  10. Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-02-01

    The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

  11. Pursuing Energy Efficiency as a Hedge against Carbon Regulatory Risks: Current Resource Planning Practices in the West

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-07-11

    Uncertainty surrounding the nature and timing of future carbon regulations poses a fundamental and far-reaching financial risk for electric utilities and their ratepayers. Long-term resource planning provides a potential framework within which utilities can assess carbon regulatory risk and evaluate options for mitigating exposure to this risk through investments in energy efficiency and other low-carbon resources. In this paper, we examine current resource planning practices related to managing carbon regulatory risk, based on a comparative analysis of the most-recent long-term resource plans filed by fifteen major utilities in the Western U.S. First, we compare the assumptions and methods used by utilities to assess carbon regulatory risk and to evaluate energy efficiency as a risk mitigation option. Although most utilities have made important strides in beginning to address carbon regulatory risk within their resource plan, we also identify a number of opportunities for improvement and offer recommendations for resource planners and state regulators to consider. We also summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by the fifteen Western utilities, highlighting the contribution of energy efficiency and its impact on the carbon intensity of utilities' proposed resource strategies. Energy efficiency and renewables are the dominant low-carbon resources included in utilities' preferred portfolios. Across the fifteen utilities, energy efficiency constitutes anywhere from 6percent to almost 50percent of the preferred portfolio energy resources, and represents 22percent of all incremental resources in aggregate.

  12. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT PDF icon RCC Workplan PDF EN ...

  13. Regulatory Review Comment Section | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment Regulatory Review Comment Section Regulatory Review Comment Section DOE Comments on Radiation Protection (Atomic Energy ...

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regulatory Authorities

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Regulatory Authorities About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Regulatory Authorities ...

  15. Paducah Site Regulatory Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Documents Paducah Site Regulatory Documents Paducah Site Federal Facility Agreement (35.48 MB) Paducah 2015 Site Management Plan (6 MB) Paducah Community Relations Plan ...

  16. Policy and Regulatory Environment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Soft Costs Policy and Regulatory Environment Policy and Regulatory Environment Photo of a man speaking while seated at a table with men and women surrounding him. A favorable ...

  17. General Construction and Environmental Regulatory Support at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    General Construction and Environmental Regulatory Support at the Los Alamos National Laboratory General Construction and Environmental Regulatory Support at the Los Alamos National ...

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Commission Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Regulatory Commission (25.98 KB) More Documents & Publications What to Expect When Readying to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel from ...

  19. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, ...

  20. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Document covers the Regulatory ...

  1. Regulatory Burden RFI - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001 Regulatory Burden RFI - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001 Response to Request for Information on "Reducing Regulatory Burden," 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (Feb. 3, 2011) Regulatory Burden RFI - Docket No. DOE-HQ-2011-0014-0001 (453.78 KB) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI: Revitalization of DOE's Role as a Regulatory Watchdog DOE Preliminary Plan for Retrospective Analysis of Existing Rules DOE_05_18_2011.pdf

  2. H.A.R. 11-200 - Environmental Impact Statement Rules | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    - Environmental Impact Statement RulesLegal Abstract This regulatory chapter sets forth the rules for environmental impact statements. Published NA Year Signed or Took...

  3. OpenEI Community - regulatory

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Now http:en.openei.orgcommunitybloggeothermal-regulatory-roadmap-featured-nrel-now

    Navigating the complex system of federal and...

  4. Validation of seismic soil-structure interaction analysis methods: EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute)/NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) cooperation in Lotung, Taiwan, experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Tang, Y.K.; Kassawara, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    The cooperative program between NRC/ANL and EPRI on the validation of soil-structure interaction analysis methods with actual seismic response data is described. A large scale-model of a containment building has been built by EPRI/Taipower in a highly seismic region of Taiwan. Vibration tests were performed, first on the basemat before the superstructure was built and then on the completed structure. Since its completion, the structure has experienced many earthquakes. The site and structural response to these earthquakes have been recorded with field (surface and downhole) and structural instrumentation. The validation program involves blind predictions of site and structural response during vibration tests and a selected seismic event, and subsequent comparison between the predictions and measurements. The predictive calculations are in progress. The results of the correlation are expected to lead to the evaluation of the methods as to their conservatisms and sensitivities.

  5. Impact Analysis of a Dipper-Type and Multi Spring-Type Fuel Rod Support Grid Assemblies in PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Song, K.N.; Yoon, K.H.; Park, K.J.; Park, G.J.; Kang, B.S.

    2002-07-01

    A spacer grid is one of the main structural components in a fuel assembly of a Pressurized light Water Reactor (PWR). It supports fuel rods, guides cooling water, and maintains geometry from external impact loads. A simulation is performed for the strength of a spacer grid under impact load. The critical impact load that leads to plastic deformation is identified by a free-fall test. A finite element model is established for the nonlinear simulation of the test. The simulation model is tuned based on the free-fall test. The model considers the aspects of welding and the contacts between components. Nonlinear finite element analysis is carried out by a software system called LS/DYNA3D. The results are discussed from a design viewpoint. (authors)

  6. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-09-20

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the ''Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory'' (SWEIS) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a proposal for modifying current methods utilized to receive and manage certain offsite unwanted radioactive sealed sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory or if additional documentation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is needed. The need for a SA to an existing environmental impact statement (EIS) is initiated by subsequent changes in the basis upon which the original EIS was prepared and the need to evaluate whether or not the EIS is adequate in light of those changes. It is submitted according to the requirements for determining the need for supplemental environmental impact statements (10 CFR 1021.314) in the Department of Energy's regulation for implementing NEPA. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of a program evaluated in the SWEIS with those of a proposal that would change the approach of this management. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in earlier NEPA analysis.

  8. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-03-26

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoidsmore » that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. We find diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process.« less

  9. Reducing the environmental impact of road and rail vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, R.M.; Poulikakos, L.D.; Lees, A.R.; Heutschi, K.; Kalivoda, M.T.

    2012-01-15

    Methods have been developed to measure in situ the dynamic impact of both road and rail vehicles on the infrastructure and the environment. The resulting data sets have been analysed to quantify the environmental impacts in a transparent manner across both modes. A primary concern is that a small number of vehicles are being operated outside safe or regulatory limits which can have a disproportionate large impact. The analysis enables the various impacts to be ranked across both modes so enabling one to discern the benefits of intermodal transport. The impact of various policy options is considered and how to identify vehicles which can be classified as environmentally friendly. This would require European agreement as many heavy goods vehicle operate across country borders.

  10. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI)

    SciTech Connect

    Busche, S.; Doris, E.; Braccio, R.; Lippert, D.; Finch, P.; O'Toole, D.; Fetter, J.

    2010-04-01

    This report provides detailed analyses of 21 clean energy policy options considered by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative working groups for recommendation to the 2010 Hawaii State Legislature. The report considers the impact each policy may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits. The analyses provide insight into the possible impacts, both qualitative and quantitative, that these policies may have in Hawaii based on the experience with these policies elsewhere. As much as possible, the analyses incorporate Hawaii-specific context to reflect the many unique aspects of energy use in the State of Hawaii.

  11. Analysis Reveals Impact of Road Grade on Vehicle Energy Use (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-04-01

    Findings of study indicate that, on average, road grade could be responsible for 1%-3% of fuel use in light-duty automobiles, with many individual trips impacted by as much as 40%.

  12. A Retrospective Analysis of the Benefits and Impacts of U.S. Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is the second in a series of reports exploring the costs, benefits, and other impacts of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS), both retrospectively and prospectively. This report focuses on the benefits and impacts of all state RPS programs, in aggregate, for the year 2013 (the most-recent year for which the requisite data were available). Relying on a well-vetted set of methods, the study evaluates a number of important benefits and impacts in both physical and monetary terms, where possible, and characterizes key uncertainties. The prior study in this series focused on historical RPS compliance costs, and future work will evaluate costs, benefits, and other impacts of RPS policies prospectively.

  13. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Environmental Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01

    This is volume 1 of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration Information is included on the following: Purpose of and need for action; alternatives including the proposed action; affected environment; and environmental consequences.

  14. BIGHORN SHEEP: SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSIS TO THE FOREST PLAN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT„INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM MEETING

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4/10/13 Page 1 of 2 TANK WASTE COMMITTEE - 3 MONTH WORK PLAN (SUBJECT TO REVISION) May Committee meeting placeholder: Wednesday, May 8 Committee call placeholder: Tuesday, May 14 @ 3:00 p.m. * Advice responses - Advice #263 Double-Shell Tank Integrity * Advice development regarding DST AY-102 * Budget outcomes - impacts to work due to budget (including impacts to integrity programs) * Committee Business HSEP's agenda topics, joint with TWC: * Follow up on safety culture progress (DOE-ORP - Steve

  15. Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hearth & Home Technologies comments on Regulatory Burden RFI Regulatory Burden RFI (116.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Re: Regulatory Burden RFI RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF

  16. Shipping Cask Design Review Analysis.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1998-01-04

    Version 01 SCANS (Shipping Cask ANalysis System) is a microcomputer based system of computer programs and databases for evaluating safety analysis reports on spent fuel shipping casks. SCANS calculates the global response to impact loads, pressure loads, and thermal conditions, providing reviewers with an independent check on analyses submitted by licensees. Analysis options are based on regulatory cases described in the Code of Federal Regulations (1983) and Regulatory Guides published by the NRC in 1977more » and 1978. The system is composed of a series of menus and input entry cask analysis, and output display programs. An analysis is performed by preparing the necessary input data and then selecting the appropriate analysis: impact, thermal (heat transfer), thermally-induced stress, or pressure-induced stress. All data are entered through input screens with descriptive data requests, and, where possible, default values are provided. Output (i.e., impact force, moment and sheer time histories; impact animation; thermal/stress geometry and thermal/stress element outlines; temperature distributions as isocontours or profiles; and temperature time histories) is displayed graphically and can also be printed.« less

  17. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

    2009-12-02

    With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering wind power development nearby, there is an urgent need to empirically investigate common community concerns about wind project development. The concern that property values will be adversely affected by wind energy facilities is commonly put forth by stakeholders. Although this concern is not unreasonable, given property value impacts that have been found near high voltage transmission lines and other electric generation facilities, the impacts of wind energy facilities on residential property values had not previously been investigated thoroughly. The present research collected data on almost 7,500 sales of singlefamily homes situated within 10 miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from eight different hedonic pricing models, as well as both repeat sales and sales volume models. The various analyses are strongly consistent in that none of the models uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts that might be present in communities surrounding wind energy facilities. Specifically, neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have any consistent, measurable, and statistically significant effect on home sales prices. Although the analysis cannot dismiss the possibility that individual homes or small numbers of homes have been or could be negatively impacted, it finds that if these impacts do exist, they are either too small and/or too infrequent to result in any widespread, statistically observable impact.

  18. Casks (computer analysis of storage casks): A microcomputer based analysis system for storage cask review

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.F.; Mok, G.C.; Carlson, R.W.

    1995-08-01

    CASKS is a microcomputer based computer system developed by LLNL to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in performing confirmatory analyses for licensing review of radioactive-material storage cask designs. The analysis programs of the CASKS computer system consist of four modules: the impact analysis module, the thermal analysis module, the thermally-induced stress analysis module, and the pressure-induced stress analysis module. CASKS uses a series of menus to coordinate input programs, cask analysis programs, output programs, data archive programs and databases, so the user is able to run the system in an interactive environment. This paper outlines the theoretical background on the impact analysis module and the yielding surface formulation. The close agreement between the CASKS analytical predictions and the results obtained form the two storage casks drop tests performed by SNL and by BNFL at Winfrith serves as the validation of the CASKS impact analysis module.

  19. Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regulatory Burden RFI Regulatory Burden RFI These comments are submitted by the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) notice appearing in the Federal Register on February 3, 2011 requesting information to assist DOE in reviewing existing regulations and in making its regulatory program more effective and less burdensome. Regulatory Burden RFI (50.14 KB) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI from AHRI

  20. Impacts of different data averaging times on statistical analysis of distributed domestic photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Widen, Joakim; Waeckelgaard, Ewa; Paatero, Jukka; Lund, Peter

    2010-03-15

    The trend of increasing application of distributed generation with solar photovoltaics (PV-DG) suggests that a widespread integration in existing low-voltage (LV) grids is possible in the future. With massive integration in LV grids, a major concern is the possible negative impacts of excess power injection from on-site generation. For power-flow simulations of such grid impacts, an important consideration is the time resolution of demand and generation data. This paper investigates the impact of time averaging on high-resolution data series of domestic electricity demand and PV-DG output and on voltages in a simulated LV grid. Effects of 10-minutely and hourly averaging on descriptive statistics and duration curves were determined. Although time averaging has a considerable impact on statistical properties of the demand in individual households, the impact is smaller on aggregate demand, already smoothed from random coincidence, and on PV-DG output. Consequently, the statistical distribution of simulated grid voltages was also robust against time averaging. The overall judgement is that statistical investigation of voltage variations in the presence of PV-DG does not require higher resolution than hourly. (author)

  1. Environment and energy in Iceland: A comparative analysis of values and impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thorhallsdottir, Thora Ellen . E-mail: theth@hi.is

    2007-08-15

    Within an Icelandic framework plan for energy, environmental values and impacts were estimated in multicriteria analyses for 19 hydroelectric and 22 geothermal developments. Four natural environment classes were defined (geology + hydrology, species, ecosystems + soils, landscape + wilderness) with cultural heritage as the fifth class. Values and impacts were assessed through 6 agglomerated attributes: richness/diversity, rarity, size/continuity/pristineness, information/symbolic value, international responsibility and visual value. The project offers a unique opportunity for comparing environmental values and impacts within a large sample of sites and energy alternatives treated within a common methodological framework. Total values were higher in hydroelectric than in geothermal areas. Hydroelectric areas scored high for cultural heritage (particularly in rarity and information value), landscape and wilderness. Geothermal areas had high bedrock and hydrological diversity and information values, and a high landscape visual value but little cultural heritage. High values were correlated among some classes of the natural environment, all of which are likely to reflect functional relationships. In contrast, cultural heritage values were not related to natural environment values. Overall, landscape and wilderness had the highest mean value and were also most affected by energy development. Over 40% of the hydroelectric development had a predicted mean impact value of > 4 (out of a maximum of 10), compared with 10% of the geothermal projects. Excluding two outsized hydropower options, there was a significant correlation between plant capacity and impact on geology and hydrology but not with other environmental variables.

  2. EIS-0103: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Energy Saver

    EIS-0103: Draft Environmental Impact Statement New EnglandHydro-Quebec 450-kV Direct Current Transmission Line Interconnection The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this ...

  3. EIS-0493: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EIS-0493: Final Environmental Impact Statement Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and Pipeline Project, Nueces and San Patricio Counties, Texas The Federal Energy Regulatory...

  4. EIS-0491: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Lake Charles Liquefaction Project, Calcasieu Parish, LA The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is...

  5. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards:A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-16

    State renewables portfolio standards (RPS) have emerged as one of the most important policy drivers of renewable energy capacity expansion in the U.S. Collectively, these policies now apply to roughly 40% of U.S. electricity load, and may have substantial impacts on electricity markets, ratepayers, and local economies. As RPS policies have been proposed or adopted in an increasing number of states, a growing number of studies have attempted to quantify the potential impacts of these policies, focusing primarily on projecting cost impacts, but sometimes also estimating macroeconomic and environmental effects. This report synthesizes and analyzes the results and methodologies of 28 distinct state or utility-level RPS cost impact analyses completed since 1998. Together, these studies model proposed or adopted RPS policies in 18 different states. We highlight the key findings of these studies on the costs and benefits of RPS policies, examine the sensitivity of projected costs to model assumptions, assess the attributes of different modeling approaches, and suggest possible areas of improvement for future RPS analysis.

  6. Multi-Year Analysis Examines Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of Renewable Portfolio Standards

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-01

    As states consider revising renewable portfolio standard (RPS) programs or developing new ones, careful assessments of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of existing policies will be critical. RPS programs currently exist in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Many of these policies, which were enacted largely during the late 1990s and 2000s, will reach their terminal targets by the end of this decade. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) are engaged in a multi-year project to examine the costs, benefits, and other impacts of state RPS polices both retrospectively and prospectively. This fact sheet overviews this work.

  7. Social Impact Management Plans: Innovation in corporate and public policy

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, Daniel M.; Vanclay, Frank

    2013-11-15

    Social Impact Assessment (SIA) has traditionally been practiced as a predictive study for the regulatory approval of major projects, however, in recent years the drivers and domain of focus for SIA have shifted. This paper details the emergence of Social Impact Management Plans (SIMPs) and undertakes an analysis of innovations in corporate and public policy that have put in place ongoing processes – assessment, management and monitoring – to better identify the nature and scope of the social impacts that might occur during implementation and to proactively respond to change across the lifecycle of developments. Four leading practice examples are analyzed. The International Finance Corporation (IFC) Performance Standards require the preparation of Environmental and Social Management Plans for all projects financed by the IFC identified as having significant environmental and social risks. Anglo American, a major resources company, has introduced a Socio-Economic Assessment Toolbox, which requires mine sites to undertake regular assessments and link these assessments with their internal management systems, monitoring activities and a Social Management Plan. In South Africa, Social and Labour Plans are submitted with an application for a mining or production right. In Queensland, Australia, Social Impact Management Plans were developed as part of an Environmental Impact Statement, which included assessment of social impacts. Collectively these initiatives, and others, are a practical realization of theoretical conceptions of SIA that include management and monitoring as core components of SIA. The paper concludes with an analysis of the implications for the practice of impact assessment including a summary of key criteria for the design and implementation of effective SIMPs. -- Highlights: • Social impact management plans are effective strategies to manage social issues. • They are developed in partnership with regulatory agencies, investors and community.

  8. Regulatory analyses for severe accident issues: an example

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    A study has been performed as part of a program to establish methods for incorporation of information from a broad range of research programs, particularly those which generate probabilistic risk information, and to develop suitable presentation formats for providing guidance to decisionmakers on issues related to severe accidents. The study addresses issues related to information availability, content, and presentation formats for use in the regulatory decisionmaking process. The approach employed to address these issues was to perform an example regulatory analysis on representative topics of interest using available technical information. The issue examined in the example analysis is the implementation of either a vented containment system or an alternative decay heat removal system at the Peach Bottom No. 2 plant. The example demonstrates many of the problems which will be encountered as probabilistic information from ongoing programs is incorporated into the regulatory decisionmaking process.

  9. Analysis of the Impact of Balancing Area Cooperation on the Operation of the Western Interconnection with Wind and Solar Generation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Jordan, G.; Piwko, R.; Kirby, B.; King, J.; Beuning, S.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation describes the analysis of the impact of balancing area cooperation on the operation of the Western Interconnection with wind and solar generation, including a discussion of operating reserves, ramping, production simulation, and conclusions.

  10. Regulatory/policy-panel A

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, M.R.; Grano, D.; Ruyter, J.C. de; Jernigan, R.; Carney, M.V.; Schulze, R.A.

    1995-08-01

    The status of various bills in Congress is outlined. The bills include those included in the {open_quotes}Contract with America,{close_quotes} limits on federal regulations, the Regulatory Transition Act of 1995, and the Job Creation and Wage Enhancement Act of 1995.

  11. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    SUPPLEMENTAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC SCOPING MEETINGS FOR THE PLANNED ALASKA LNG PROJECT (October 20, 2015) The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) will conduct additional public scoping meetings as part of their preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Alaska LNG Project involving construction and operation of facilities by Alaska Gasline Development Corporation; BP Alaska LNG, LLC; Conoco Phillips Alaska LNG Company; ExxonMobil Alaska LNG, LLC;

  12. Scout: A Portfolio Impact Analysis Tool for Building Energy-Efficiency Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Building Energy-Efficiency Technologies Jared Langevin and Chioke Harris EERE/AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellows Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy What we'll cover 1. New software for estimating national energy/CO 2 impacts of building energy efficiency measures 2. The data and modeling approach of this software 3. A vision for this software's use and development We all want low energy, low cost, healthy buildings The problem: many efficient technologies, multiple

  13. Analysis of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Directive and the EIA decision in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Bilgin, Ayla

    2015-07-15

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Directive first entered into force in the United States in 1969, and began to be implemented in many other countries by 1990. The first Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Directive in Turkey was published on February 7, 1993, under the Environmental Law No. 2872. The EIA Directive was revised seven times on June 23, 1997, June 6, 2002, December 16, 2003, July 17, 2008, October 3, 2013, and November 25, 2014. Several amendments were made during this process. The first EIA Directive dated 1993 was narrow in scope and its procedure was long, while the amendments in 2003, 2008, 2013, and 2014 widened the scope of the EIA, and shortened the EIA assessment procedures. In this study, the amendments to the Turkish EIA Directive were analysed, and their effect on the number of EIA decisions made was addressed. It was concluded that the uncertainties in EIA procedures were removed, procedures were shortened, and as a result, the number of EIA decisions increased thanks to the revisions made in line with harmonisation with European Union (EU) acquis. - Highlights: • Demonstrates the Environmental Impact Assessment practices in Turkey. • Demonstrates the application of the EIA in Turkey by sector. • Demonstrates the amendments of the EIA by-laws in Turkey. • Demonstrates the changes in EIA practices and EIA decisions.

  14. Analysis of the energy impacts of the DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Small Grants Program: methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Lucarelli, B.; Kessel, J.; Kay, J.; Linse, J.; Tompson, S.; Homer, M.

    1981-02-01

    In 1977, Congress directed DOE to create an energy grants program with the object of funding individuals, small businesses, and nonprofit organizations to develop technologies that use renewable energy resources. The Small Grants Program was created and this report assesses the energy savings potential of the program. The first step in the analysis was to assess the energy-savings potential of 57 projects. Program energy savings were then estimated from project savings using statistical inference. Chapter 2 presents estimates of direct energy savings for the 57 projects and discusses direct energy savings. Chapter 3 discusses the methods and results of the economic analysis. Chapter 4 examines the indirect savings. Because of the large size of the sample, neither project descriptions nor specific details of each project analysis are included. Instead, two examples from the analysis are presented in Chapters 2, 3, and 4 to illustrate the methods. The results of the analysis and key project data are summarized. Chapter 5 presents estimates of program energy savings and the methods used to obtain them. The report concludes with a discussion of how improved project selection can increase program energy savings and present two approaches for conducting future energy-impact studies.

  15. Density functional theory analysis of the impact of steric interaction on the function of switchable polarity solvents

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Joshua S.; Noll, Bruce; Orme, Christopher J.; Wilson, Aaron D.

    2015-05-04

    Here, a density functional theory (DFT) analysis has been performed to explore the impact of steric interactions on the function of switchable polarity solvents (SPS) and their implications on a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model previously proposed for SPS. An x-ray crystal structure of the N,N-dimethylcyclohexylammonium bicarbonate (Hdmcha) salt has been solved as an asymmetric unit containing two cation/anion pairs, with a hydrogen bonding interaction observed between the bicarbonate anions, as well as between the cation and anion in each pair. DFT calculations provide an optimized structure of Hdmcha that closely resembles experimental data and reproduces the cation/anion interaction with the inclusion of a dielectric field. Relaxed potential energy surface (PES) scans have been performed on Hdmcha-based computational model compounds, differing in the size of functional group bonded to the nitrogen center, to assess the steric impact of the group on the relative energy and structural properties of the compound. Results suggest that both the length and amount of branching associated with the substituent impact the energetic limitations on rotation of the group along the N-R bond and NC-R bond, and disrupt the energy minimized position of the hydrogen bonded bicarbonate group. The largest interaction resulted from functional groups that featured five bonds between the ammonium proton and a proton on a functional group with the freedom of rotation to form a pseudo-six membered ring which included both protons.

  16. Density functional theory analysis of the impact of steric interaction on the function of switchable polarity solvents

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    McNally, Joshua S.; Noll, Bruce; Orme, Christopher J.; Wilson, Aaron D.

    2015-05-04

    Here, a density functional theory (DFT) analysis has been performed to explore the impact of steric interactions on the function of switchable polarity solvents (SPS) and their implications on a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model previously proposed for SPS. An x-ray crystal structure of the N,N-dimethylcyclohexylammonium bicarbonate (Hdmcha) salt has been solved as an asymmetric unit containing two cation/anion pairs, with a hydrogen bonding interaction observed between the bicarbonate anions, as well as between the cation and anion in each pair. DFT calculations provide an optimized structure of Hdmcha that closely resembles experimental data and reproduces the cation/anion interaction withmore » the inclusion of a dielectric field. Relaxed potential energy surface (PES) scans have been performed on Hdmcha-based computational model compounds, differing in the size of functional group bonded to the nitrogen center, to assess the steric impact of the group on the relative energy and structural properties of the compound. Results suggest that both the length and amount of branching associated with the substituent impact the energetic limitations on rotation of the group along the N-R bond and NC-R bond, and disrupt the energy minimized position of the hydrogen bonded bicarbonate group. The largest interaction resulted from functional groups that featured five bonds between the ammonium proton and a proton on a functional group with the freedom of rotation to form a pseudo-six membered ring which included both protons.« less

  17. Steam generators regulatory practices and issues in Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, C.; Castelao, C.; Ruiz-Colino, J.; Figueras, J.M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents the actual status of Spanish Steam Generator tubes, actions developed by PWR plant owners and submitted to CSN, and regulatory activities related to tube degradation mechanisms analysis; NDT tube inspection techniques; tube, tubesheet and TSPs integrity studies; tube plugging/repair criteria; preventive and corrective measures including whole SGs replacement; tube leak measurement methods and other operational aspects.

  18. Regulatory applications of sediment criteria. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-23

    The report briefly describes the development of sediment criteria, discusses their utility and appropriate regulatory applications, and recommends steps to enhance the acceptance of sediment criteria by the regulatory and regulated communities.

  19. 5.0 INTERFACE OF REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5-1 5.0 INTERFACE OF REGULATORY AUTHORITIES 5.1 REGULATORY PROGRAMS The RCRA, CERCLA, and State Dangerous Waste Program overlap in many areas. In general, CERCLA was created by...

  20. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Project Regulatory Considerations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Considerations Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Project Regulatory Considerations August 31, 2016 11:00AM to 12:30PM MDT Learn about the many permitting and project ...

  1. Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis

    SciTech Connect

    Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard; Bringezu, Stefan

    2010-07-15

    This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

  2. Analysis of long-term impacts of TRU waste remaining at generator/storage sites for No Action Alternative 2

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Bergeron, M.P.; Streile, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal-Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II). Described herein are the underlying information, data, and assumptions used to estimate the long-term human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control under No Action Alternative 2. Under No Action Alternative 2, TRU wastes would not be emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) but would remain at generator/storage sites in surface or near-surface storage. Waste generated at smaller sites would be consolidated at the major generator/storage sites. Current TRU waste management practices would continue, but newly generated waste would be treated to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. For this alternative, institutional control was assumed to be lost 100 years after the end of the waste generation period, with exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the TRU waste possible from direct intrusion and release to the surrounding environment. The potential human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in TRU waste were analyzed for two different types of scenarios. Both analyses estimated site-specific, human-health impacts at seven major generator/storage sites: the Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The analysis focused on these seven sites because 99 % of the estimated TRU waste volume and inventory would remain there under the assumptions of No Action Alternative 2.

  3. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.H.; Levine, D.L.; Eversole, R.E.; Mouring, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    The ORNL gas-cylinder fire and impact shield was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant for the transport of cylinders filled with radioactive gases. The shield was evaluated analytically and experimentally to determine its compliance with the applicable regulations governing containers in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported, and the results are reported herein. Computational and test procedures were used to determine the structural integrity and thermal behavior of the cask relative to the general standards for normal conditions of transport and the standards for hypothetical accident conditions. Results of the evaluation demonstrate that the container is in compliance with the applicable regulations.

  4. Analysis of Sub-Hourly Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy and Balancing Area Size: Preprint

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sub-Hourly Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy and Balancing Area Size Preprint M. Milligan National Renewable Energy Laboratory B. Kirby Oak Ridge National Laboratory To be presented at WindPower 2008 Houston, Texas June 1-4, 2008 Conference Paper NREL/CP-500-43434 June 2008 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US

  5. BIGHORN SHEEP: SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSIS TO THE FOREST PLAN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT„INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM MEETING

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4/9/13 Page 1 of 2 RIVER AND PLATEAU COMMITTEE - 3 MONTH WORK PLAN (SUBJECT TO REVISION) May Committee meeting placeholder: Tuesday, May 7 Committee call placeholder: Tuesday, May 14 @ 1:30 p.m. * Advice development for the 300 Area RI/FS and Proposed Plan Rev 0 * Advice development for 100-F Area RI/FS and Proposed Plan Draft A * Impacts from the TC&WM EIS groundwater modeling on future cleanup proposals * Advice responses? * Committee Business June Committee meeting placeholder: Tuesday,

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  7. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-15

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  8. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  9. Introducing a New Fuel: A Regulatory Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Introducing a New Fuel: A Regulatory Perspective Sustainable Transportation Summit July 12, 2016 Overview * Background * Market Driven - New fuel for existing vehicles and engines - New fuel for new vehicles and engines * Regulation Driven * Past Regulatory Experience * Conclusions 2 EPA Fuels Regulatory Authority * Congress has given EPA regulatory authority for motor vehicle and nonroad fuels - Contained in Title 2 (Mobile Sources) of the CAA, Section 211 * Major revisions in 1990 * Several

  10. Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation Outline: Current Regulatory Framework Future Regulatory Needs Technical Basis (with some examples) Path ...

  11. Impact and structural analysis of the INEL 55 gallon recycled shielded storage container

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.

    1996-07-01

    The INEL Recycled Shielded Storage Containers (RSSC) are designed primarily for the transportation and storage of mixed RH-TRU solid waste using recycled, potentially contaminated lead and stainless steel construction materials. Two versions of the RSSC have been developed accommodating either 30 or 55 gallon drums. This report addresses the structural qualification of the 55 gallon version of the RSSC to DOT 7A Type A requirements. The controlling qualification test is a 4 ft drop onto a rigid surface. During and after this test, the container contents must remain within the container and shielding must not be reduced. The container is also designed to withstand stacking, internal pressure, lifting loads, tiedown failure, penetration, and a range of temperatures. Nonlinear dynamic finite element analyses were performed using a range of material properties. Loads in the major connections and strains in the stainless steel and lead were monitored as a function of time during impact analyses for three simulated drop orientations. Initial results were used to develop the final design. For the final design, the stainless steel and lead have maximum strains well below ultimate levels except at an impact corner where additional deformation is acceptable. The predicted loads in the connections indicate that some yielding will occur but the containment and shielding will remain intact. The results presented here provide assurance that the container will pass the DOT 7A Type A drop tests as well as the other structural requirements.

  12. Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Alton Strategic Environmental Group New Port Richey, FL charles.alton@earthlink.net April 4, 2011 Daniel Cohen, Assistant General Counsel Legislation, Regulation, and Energy Efficiency Office of the General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Mr. Cohen: I have reviewed the Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued February 3, 2011 (Federal Register /Vol. 76, No. 23 /Thursday, February 3, 2011 /Notices). In the

  13. Regulatory cross-cutting topics for fuel cycle facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Brown, Jason; Goldmann, Andrew Scott; Louie, David

    2013-10-01

    This report overviews crosscutting regulatory topics for nuclear fuel cycle facilities for use in the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation and Screening study. In particular, the regulatory infrastructure and analysis capability is assessed for the following topical areas: Fire Regulations (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fire regulations to advance fuel cycle facilities) Consequence Assessment (i.e., how applicable are current radionuclide transportation tools to support risk-informed regulations and Level 2 and/or 3 PRA) While not addressed in detail, the following regulatory topic is also discussed: Integrated Security, Safeguard and Safety Requirement (i.e., how applicable are current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations to future fuel cycle facilities which will likely be required to balance the sometimes conflicting Material Accountability, Security, and Safety requirements.)

  14. Low-rank coal study. Volume 4. Regulatory, environmental, and market analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The regulatory, environmental, and market constraints to development of US low-rank coal resources are analyzed. Government-imposed environmental and regulatory requirements are among the most important factors that determine the markets for low-rank coal and the technology used in the extraction, delivery, and utilization systems. Both state and federal controls are examined, in light of available data on impacts and effluents associated with major low-rank coal development efforts. The market analysis examines both the penetration of existing markets by low-rank coal and the evolution of potential markets in the future. The electric utility industry consumes about 99 percent of the total low-rank coal production. This use in utility boilers rose dramatically in the 1970's and is expected to continue to grow rapidly. In the late 1980's and 1990's, industrial direct use of low-rank coal and the production of synthetic fuels are expected to start growing as major new markets.

  15. An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.

    2000-08-01

    It may be labeled sport utility vehicle, SUV, sport-ute, suburban assault vehicle, or a friend of OPEC (Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries). It has been the subject of comics, the object of high-finance marketing ploys, and the theme of Dateline. Whatever the label or the occasion, this vehicle is in great demand. The popularity of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) has increased dramatically since the late 1970s, and SUVs are currently the fastest growing segment of the motor vehicle industry. Hoping to gain market share due to the popularity of the expanding SUV market, more and more manufacturers are adding SUVs to their vehicle lineup. One purpose of this study is to analyze the world of the SUV to determine why this vehicle has seen such a rapid increase in popularity. Another purpose is to examine the impact of SUVs on energy consumption, emissions, and highway safety.

  16. Ramping and Uncertainty Prediction Tool - Analysis and Visualization of Wind Generation Impact on Electrical Grid

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2014-03-03

    RUT software is designed for use by the Balancing Authorities to predict and display additional requirements caused by the variability and uncertainty in load and generation. The prediction is made for the next operating hours as well as for the next day. The tool predicts possible deficiencies in generation capability and ramping capability. This deficiency of balancing resources can cause serious risks to power system stability and also impact real-time market energy prices. The toolmore » dynamically and adaptively correlates changing system conditions with the additional balancing needs triggered by the interplay between forecasted and actual load and output of variable resources. The assessment is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm incorporating multiple sources of uncertainty including wind, solar and load forecast errors. The tool evaluates required generation for a worst case scenario, with a user-specified confidence level.« less

  17. Environmental regulatory update table, April 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-05-01

    This report contains a monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and projection of further action.

  18. Environmental regulatory update table, May 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-06-01

    This report contains a monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-04-01

    This report contains a monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. Incorporating Biodiversity Considerations Into Environmental Impact Analysis Under NEPA (CEQ, 1993)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) report is intended to provide background on the emerging, complex subject of biodiversity, outline some general concepts that underlie biological diversity analysis and management, describe how the issue is currently addressed in NEPA analyses, and provide options for agencies undertaking NEPA analyses that consider biodiversity.

  1. Optimization of the engineering design for the Lansing District Cooling System by comparative analysis of the impact of advanced technologies on a conventional design approach. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Lansing Board of Water and Light (LBWL) began investigating development of a cooling district in the Lansing Downtown in 1989 in order to retain and build summer load for its steam utility. A feasibility study was conducted in conjunction with SFT, Inc. and ZBA, Inc. which addressed many factors such as marketability of the product, impact on the summer steam load, distribution system development, system design, probable capital and operating costs, reliability and environmental and other regulatory impacts on a preliminary feasibility basis. The Phase I study completed in September of 1989 provided highly promising results for establishing a District Cooling System (DCS). An existing chilled water production facility owned by the State of Michigan was identified as a potential location for a DCS plant. With these changes a review of the feasibility with a new set of alternatives and sensitivities was evaluated. This enhancement to the Phase I Study was nearing completion when the LBWL in conjunction with Energy, Mines and Resources Canada proposed to conduct the Phase II project in conjunction with DOE. The project was structured to proceed along a dual track to demonstrate the impact of the application of various innovative technologies.

  2. Scout: A Portfolio Impact Analysis Tool for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Chioke Harris AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow Building Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy The problem: many efficient technologies, multiple perspectives 2 Scout provides a common framework for evaluation of energy efficient measures 3 Scout is intended to be adaptable to the analysis needs of BTO and others Academics, national labs, and industry partners can use Scout to communicate the larger-scale benefits of R&D breakthroughs

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Reimund, Kevin K.; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R.; Wilson, Aaron D.

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  4. Energy Department Issues Request For Proposal for Nuclear Regulatory...

    Energy Saver

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensed Facilities Procurement Energy Department Issues Request For Proposal for Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensed Facilities Procurement March ...

  5. Numerical and probabilistic analysis of asteroid and comet impact hazard mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Plesko, Catherine S; Weaver, Robert P; Huebner, Walter F

    2010-09-09

    The possibility of asteroid and comet impacts on Earth has received significant recent media and scientific attention. Still, there are many outstanding questions about the correct response once a potentially hazardous object (PHO) is found. Nuclear munitions are often suggested as a deflection mechanism because they have a high internal energy per unit launch mass. However, major uncertainties remain about the use of nuclear munitions for hazard mitigation. There are large uncertainties in a PHO's physical response to a strong deflection or dispersion impulse like that delivered by nuclear munitions. Objects smaller than 100 m may be solid, and objects at all sizes may be 'rubble piles' with large porosities and little strength. Objects with these different properties would respond very differently, so the effects of object properties must be accounted for. Recent ground-based observations and missions to asteroids and comets have improved the planetary science community's understanding of these objects. Computational power and simulation capabilities have improved such that it is possible to numerically model the hazard mitigation problem from first principles. Before we know that explosive yield Y at height h or depth -h from the target surface will produce a momentum change in or dispersion of a PHO, we must quantify energy deposition into the system of particles that make up the PHO. Here we present the initial results of a parameter study in which we model the efficiency of energy deposition from a stand-off nuclear burst onto targets made of PHO constituent materials.

  6. Failure Impact Analysis of Key Management in AMI Using Cybernomic Situational Assessment (CSA)

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Hauser, Katie R; Lantz, Margaret W; Mili, Ali

    2013-01-01

    In earlier work, we presented a computational framework for quantifying the security of a system in terms of the average loss a stakeholder stands to sustain as a result of threats to the system. We named this system, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES). In this paper, we refine the framework and apply it to cryptographic key management within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as an example. The stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats are determined. We then populate the matrices with justified values by addressing the AMI at a higher level, rather than trying to consider every piece of hardware and software involved. We accomplish this task by leveraging the recently established NISTR 7628 guideline for smart grid security. This allowed us to choose the stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats realistically. We reviewed the literature and selected an industry technical working group to select three representative threats from a collection of 29 threats. From this subset, we populate the stakes, dependency, and impact matrices, and the threat vector with realistic numbers. Each Stakeholder s Mean Failure Cost is then computed.

  7. Impact analysis of OSM regulations on highwall mining systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The establishment of the federal surface mining performance standards has placed additional restraints on auger mining. The federal regulations impose barrier pillar and hole sealing requirements on augering, stipulate time frames for hole sealing and discharge treatment, and prohibit auger mining under certain conditions. Barrier pillar requirements between groups of auger holes and between auger holes and underground workings decrease the augerable reserve base on a site by a minimum of ten percent. Barrier requirements may also reduce productivity levels due to increased delay and scheduling problems. Federal auger hole sealing requirements are more stringent than most state regulations, and consequently have increased the cost of augering in almost all auger mining areas. The availability of impervious materials on the site and the extent of backfilling required to form a water-tight seal may have the greatest effect on auger hole reclamation costs. The federal regulations require auger mining to be prohibited: if adverse water quality impacts cannot be prevented; if stability of sealings cannot be achieved; if subsidence resulting from augering may damage powerlines, pipelines, buildings, or other facilities; or if coal reserve recovery is not maximized by augering. As a result, all up dip augering may be restricted on the grounds that seal stability cannot be maintained for long time periods if water pressure builds behind the plug. Also, since tradiational augering techniques have a lower recovery rate than surface or underground methods, augering may be prohibited in many situations by the stipulation that maximum resource recovery will not be achieved.

  8. Financing, performance analysis and impact assessment of bio-methanation projects in India

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, B.S.K.

    1997-06-01

    The conversion of wastes into energy and the protection of the environment are major concerns today. With mounting environmental pressures, it has become mandatory for almost all industrial sectors to comply with environmental regulations and treat the effluents, if any. There are about 285 distilleries in India generating effluents, of which nearly 177 have either implemented or are on the verge of completing effluent treatment plants. The effluents from distillery units are treated with a dual purpose of pollution abatement and recovery of energy. Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Ltd. (IREDA) has so far funded 59 process industries, mostly distillery units, for the generation of biogas from effluents. IREDA`s contribution towards the generation of biogas by financing these units amounts to about 0.86 million cubic meters of biogas per day which is equivalent to saving 965 tonnes of coal per day, in turn leading to carbon dioxide avoidance of about 1,330 tonnes per day. IREDA conducted a sample study on performance of these biogas plants and their impact on environment.

  9. Value impact analysis of Generic Issue 143, Availability of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Chilled Water Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, P.M.; Marler, J.E.; Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.; Friley, J.R.

    1993-11-01

    This study evaluates the values (benefits) and impacts (costs) associated with potential resolutions to Generic Issue 143, ``Availability of HVAC and Chilled Water Systems.`` The study identifies vulnerabilities related to failures of HVAC, chilled water, and room cooling systems; develops estimates of room heatup rates and safety-related equipment vulnerabilities following losses of HVAC/room cooler systems; develops estimates of the core damage frequencies and public risks associated with failures of these systems; develops three proposed resolution strategies to this generic issue; and performs a value/impact analysis of the proposed resolutions. Existing probabilistic risk assessments for four representative plants, including one plant from each vendor, form the basis for the core damage frequency and public risk calculations. Both internal and external events were considered. It was concluded that all three proposed resolution strategies exceed the $1,000/person-rem cost-effectiveness ratio. Additional evaluations were performed to develop ``generic`` insights on potential design-related and configuration-related vulnerabilities and potential high-frequency ({approximately}1E-04/RY) accident sequences that involve failures of HVAC/room cooling functions. It was concluded that, although high-frequency accident sequences may exist at some plants, these high-frequency sequences are plant-specific in nature or have been resolved through hardware and/or operational changes. The plant-specific Individual Plant Examinations are an effective vehicle for identification and resolution of these plant-specific anomalies and hardware configurations.

  10. Draft regulatory guide and value/impact statement: station blackout

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, A.M.

    1986-03-01

    This guide describes a method acceptable to the NRC staff for complying with the proposed Commission regulation that would require nuclear power plants to be capable of coping with a station blackout for a specified duration. This guide applies to all commercial light-water-cooled nuclear power plants.

  11. Impact of Regulatory Change to Coordinate Gas Pipelines and Power...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Energy Sciences Word Cloud More Like ...

  12. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will describe the latest developments surrounding the HEARTH Act and discuss how it can help tribal communities create a bright future. This webinar is held from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mountain Standard Time on June 24, 2015.

  13. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-07-11

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

  14. Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

    2008-05-16

    Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

  15. Regulatory Policy and Markets for Energy Storage in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2014-05-14

    The last 5 years have been one of the most exciting times for the energy storage industry. We have seen significant advancements in the regulatory process to make accommodations for valuing and monetizing energy storage for what it provides to the grid. The most impactful regulatory decision for the energy storage industry has come from California, where the California Public Utilities Commission issued a decision that mandates procurement requirements of 1.325 GW for energy storage to 3 investor-own utilities in 4 stages: in 2014, 2016, 2018, and 2020. Furthermore, at the Federal level, FERCs Order 755, requires the transmission operators to develop pay for performance tariffs for ancillary services. This has had direct impact on the market design of US competitive wholesale markets and the monetization of fast responding grid assets. While this order is technology neutral, it clearly plays into the fast-responding capability of energy storage technologies. Today PJM, CAISO, MISO, NYISO, and NE-ISO have implemented Order 755 and offer new tariff for regulation services based on pay-for-performance principles. Furthermore, FERC Order 784, issued in July 2013 requires transmission providers to consider speed and accuracy in determining the requirements for ancillary services. In November 2013, FERC issued Order 972, which revises the small generator interconnection agreement which declares energy storage as a power source. This order puts energy storage on par with existing generators. This paper will discuss the implementation of FERCs Pay for Performance Regulation order at all ISOs in the U.S. under FERC regulatory authority (this excludes ERCOT). Also discussed will be the market impacts and overall impacts on the NERC regulation performance indexes. The paper will end with a discussion on the California and Ontario, Canada procurement mandates and the opportunity that it may present to the energy storage industry.

  16. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has

  17. BIGHORN SHEEP: SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSIS TO THE FOREST PLAN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT„INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM MEETING

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    8/6/13 Page 1 of 2 RIVER AND PLATEAU COMMITTEE - 3 MONTH WORK PLAN (SUBJECT TO REVISION) September Committee meeting placeholder: Tuesday, September 10 Committee call placeholder: Tuesday, September 17 @ 1:30 p.m. * Draft Work Plan for the BC Cribs WA-1 RI/FS * Update on 618-10 Documented Safety Analysis; update on VPU remediation * Update on drums from ERDF (TRU?) * Update on K-Reactor boreholes * Advice responses? * Committee Business --HSEP agenda, joint with RAP: Emergency Preparedness Drill

  18. AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF SPORTS UTILITY VEHICLES IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.

    2000-08-16

    During the 1990s, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) became the fastest growing segment of the auto industry, especially those in the medium-size category. In 1999, SUV sales reached almost 19% of the total light vehicle market and the mix of SUVs on the road, as measured by registration data, was about 8.7%. This immense popularity has been called by some a passing fad--vehicle purchases based on the SUV ''image''. But the continued yearly increases in SUV sales seem to indicate a more permanent trend. Additional explanations for SUV popularity include the general economic well being in the United States, a perception of safety, and ''utility''. Generally larger and heavier than the typical automobile, SUVs require more fuel per mile to operate and produce greater amounts of pollutants. They are also driven further annually than are automobiles of the same vintage, a fact that exacerbates the fuel-use and emission problems. Although buyers believe that SUVs are safer than automobiles which they are in some cases, SUVs are more prone to roll-overs than are automobiles. In addition, SUVs, with their higher bumpers and greater weight, may be a threat to other vehicles on the highway, especially in side-impact crashes. With sales projected to grow to over 3 million units per year beginning in 2001, SUVs show no sign of decreasing in popularity. These vehicles are used primarily for general mobility, rather than off-road activities. An emphasis on better fuel economy and improved emissions control could address environmental and oil dependency concerns. In fact, recently, two vehicle manufacturers announced intentions of improving the fuel economy of their SUVs in the next few years. Also, tests simulating crashes involving automobiles and SUVs could provide valuable data for identifying potential safety design issues. It is clear that automobiles and SUVs will be sharing the highways for years to come.

  19. Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland Hilty, Lorenz M.

    2011-04-15

    With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

  20. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume III. An analysis of the validity of the utilities' stock-recruitment curve-fitting exercise and prior estimation of beta technique. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1792

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, S. W.; Goodyear, C. P.; Kirk, B. L.

    1982-03-01

    This report addresses the validity of the utilities' use of the Ricker stock-recruitment model to extrapolate the combined entrainment-impingement losses of young fish to reductions in the equilibrium population size of adult fish. In our testimony, a methodology was developed and applied to address a single fundamental question: if the Ricker model really did apply to the Hudson River striped bass population, could the utilities' estimates, based on curve-fitting, of the parameter alpha (which controls the impact) be considered reliable. In addition, an analysis is included of the efficacy of an alternative means of estimating alpha, termed the technique of prior estimation of beta (used by the utilities in a report prepared for regulatory hearings on the Cornwall Pumped Storage Project). This validation methodology should also be useful in evaluating inferences drawn in the literature from fits of stock-recruitment models to data obtained from other fish stocks.

  1. Accident Conditions versus Regulatory Test for NRC-Approved UF6 Packages

    SciTech Connect

    MILLS, G. SCOTT; AMMERMAN, DOUGLAS J.; LOPEZ, CARLOS

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approves new package designs for shipping fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}. Currently there are three packages approved by the NRC for domestic shipments of fissile quantities of UF{sub 6}: NCI-21PF-1; UX-30; and ESP30X. For approval by the NRC, packages must be subjected to a sequence of physical tests to simulate transportation accident conditions as described in 10 CFR Part 71. The primary objective of this project was to relate the conditions experienced by these packages in the tests described in 10 CFR Part 71 to conditions potentially encountered in actual accidents and to estimate the probabilities of such accidents. Comparison of the effects of actual accident conditions to 10 CFR Part 71 tests was achieved by means of computer modeling of structural effects on the packages due to impacts with actual surfaces, and thermal effects resulting from test and other fire scenarios. In addition, the likelihood of encountering bodies of water or sufficient rainfall to cause complete or partial immersion during transport over representative truck routes was assessed. Modeled effects, and their associated probabilities, were combined with existing event-tree data, plus accident rates and other characteristics gathered from representative routes, to derive generalized probabilities of encountering accident conditions comparable to the 10 CFR Part 71 conditions. This analysis suggests that the regulatory conditions are unlikely to be exceeded in real accidents, i.e. the likelihood of UF{sub 6} being dispersed as a result of accident impact or fire is small. Moreover, given that an accident has occurred, exposure to water by fire-fighting, heavy rain or submersion in a body of water is even less probable by factors ranging from 0.5 to 8E-6.

  2. Economic impact

    SciTech Connect

    Technology Transfer Department

    2001-06-01

    In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.

  3. Final report : impacts analysis for cyber attack on electric power systems (national SCADA test bed FY09).

    SciTech Connect

    Stamp, Jason Edwin; LaViolette, Randall A.; Gardiner, Judith D.

    2009-09-01

    The development continues for Finite State Abstraction (FSA) methods to enable Impacts Analysis (IA) for cyber attack against power grid control systems. Building upon previous work, we successfully demonstrated the addition of Bounded Model Checking (BMC) to the FSA method, which constrains grid conditions to reasonable behavior. The new FSA feature was successfully implemented and tested. FSA is an important part of IA for the power grid, complementing steady-state approaches. It enables the simultaneous evaluation of myriad dynamic trajectories for the system, which in turn facilitates IA for whole ranges of system conditions simultaneously. Given the potentially wide range and subtle nature of potential control system attacks, this is a promising research approach. In this report, we will explain the addition of BMC to the previous FSA work and some testing/simulation upon the implemented code using a two-bus test system. The current FSA approach and code allow the calculation of the acceptability of power grid conditions post-cyber attack (over a given time horizon and for a specific grid topology). Future work will enable analysis spanning various topologies (to account for switching events), as well as an understanding of the cyber attack stimuli that can lead to undesirable grid conditions.

  4. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-08-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Environmental regulatory update table, January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-02-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  8. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-02-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental regulatory update table, July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-08-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (July 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental Sciences Division environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiative so interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, October 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-11-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Environmental regulatory update table, February 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-02-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for taht initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. Environmental regulatory update table, February 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to Department of Energy (DOE) operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-06-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Noghrei-Nikbakht, P.A.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  19. Environmental regulatory update table, June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  20. Environmental regulatory update table, January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-02-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  1. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Environmental regulatory update table, December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, February 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, G.T.; Houlberg, L.M.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  6. Environmental regulatory update table, September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the /ital Federal Register/ and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  7. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-12-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  8. Environmental regulatory update table, June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-07-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  9. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-10-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  11. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1990-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  12. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.M., Hawkins, G.T.; Salk, M.S.

    1991-09-01

    This Environmental Regulatory Update Table (August 1991) provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  13. Environmental Sciences Division: Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  14. Environmental regulatory update table, May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-06-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  15. Environmental regulatory update table, March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  16. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, L.; Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1989-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  17. Environmental Regulatory Update Table, December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Houlbert, L.M.; Langston, M.E. ); Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  18. Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cheniere Energy, Inc. ("Cheniere") submits the following comments in response to the Department of Energy's ("DOE" or "Department") request for information and comments concerning "Reducing Regulatory Burden" published in the Federal Register on February 3, 2011. Regulatory Burden RFI (206.63 KB) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI [76 FR 75798] SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR CHENIERE MARKETING, LLC and CORPUS CHRISTIC LIQUEFACTION, LLC -FE

  19. History of Regulatory Oversight at LANL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    History of Regulatory Oversight History of Regulatory Oversight at LANL History of Regulatory Oversight at LANL 1943-1950: Manhattan Project Era Few environmental regulations Best available protection technologies employed, though rudimentary 1950s-1970s: Cold War Era Laboratory moved from townsite to current location Advent of national environmental protection laws Clean Air Act Clean Water Act Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 1980s-1990s: Non-proliferation/Stockpile Reduction LANL

  20. Understanding the Energy Policy and Regulatory Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Understanding the Energy Policy and Regulatory Environment Douglas MacCourt Senior Policy Advisor Department of Energy, Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs 2 Presentation Agenda * Regulatory and Policy Considerations o Legal Issues, Interconnection, permitting considerations, Clean Power Plan * Federal, State, & Utility Incentives o Net metering, Renewable Portfolio Standards, ITC * Tools 3 REGULATORY AND POLICY CONSIDERATIONS 4 Legal Issues Legal issues to consider in exploring your

  1. Approach of Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect

    Tendera, P.

    1997-04-01

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany, NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWBFL model 213) and Tomelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW - WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufacturers. The objective of the Czech LBB program is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of there NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety Facilities too. For both Dukovany and Tomelin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASMF CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quote} and consist of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  2. Approach for Czech regulatory body to LBB

    SciTech Connect

    Tendera, P.

    1997-04-01

    At present there are two NPPs equipped with PWR units in Czech Republic. The Dukovany NPP is about ten years in operation (four units 440 MW - WWER model 213) and Temelin NPP is under construction (two units 1000 MW-WWER model 320). Both NPPs were built to Soviet design and according to Soviet regulations and standards but most of equipment for primary circuits was supplied by home manufactures. The objective for the Czech LBB programme is to prove the LBB status of the primary piping systems of these NPPs and the LBB concept is a part of strategy to meet western style safety standards. The reason for the Czech LBB project is a lack of some standard safety facilities, too. For both Dukovany and Temolin NPPs a full LBB analysis should be carried out. The application of LBB to the piping system should be also a cost effective means to avoid installations of pipe whip restraints and jet shields. The Czech regulatory body issued non-mandatory requirement {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} which is in compliance with national legal documents and which is based on the US NRC Regulatory Procedures and US standards (ASME, CODE, ANSI). The requirement has been published in the document {open_quotes}Safety of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes} No. 1/1991 as {open_quotes}Requirements on the Content and Format of Safety Reports and their Supplements{close_quotes} and consists of two parts (1) procedure for obtaining proof of evidence {open_quotes}Leak Before Break{close_quotes} (2) leak detection systems for the pressurized reactor primary circuit. At present some changes concerning both parts of the above document will be introduced. The reasons for this modifications will be presented.

  3. Regulatory Policy Guide/Game Concept Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Driving Ratepayer-Funded Efficiency through Regulatory Policies Working Group

    2011-09-01

    Proposes a new resource for utility regulators to plot a course through regulatory options available to surmount barriers to aggressive and sustained utility investment in energy efficiency programs.

  4. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation PDF icon RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents & Publications REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING ...

  5. EAC Recommendations Regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    tools, and the use of DOE's convening authority and financial sponsorship. EAC Recommendations Regarding Emerging and Alternative Regulatory Models and Modeling Tools to ...

  6. Restrospective Regulatory Review | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    On January 18, 2011, President Obama issued Executive Order 13563, Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review, which directs federal agencies, among other things, to review ...

  7. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of E15 (2.81 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol ...

  8. WE-D-BRE-07: Variance-Based Sensitivity Analysis to Quantify the Impact of Biological Uncertainties in Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamp, F.; Brueningk, S.C.; Wilkens, J.J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In particle therapy, treatment planning and evaluation are frequently based on biological models to estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) or the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2). In the context of the linear-quadratic model, these quantities depend on biological parameters (α, β) for ions as well as for the reference radiation and on the dose per fraction. The needed biological parameters as well as their dependency on ion species and ion energy typically are subject to large (relative) uncertainties of up to 20–40% or even more. Therefore it is necessary to estimate the resulting uncertainties in e.g. RBE or EQD2 caused by the uncertainties of the relevant input parameters. Methods: We use a variance-based sensitivity analysis (SA) approach, in which uncertainties in input parameters are modeled by random number distributions. The evaluated function is executed 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} times, each run with a different set of input parameters, randomly varied according to their assigned distribution. The sensitivity S is a variance-based ranking (from S = 0, no impact, to S = 1, only influential part) of the impact of input uncertainties. The SA approach is implemented for carbon ion treatment plans on 3D patient data, providing information about variations (and their origin) in RBE and EQD2. Results: The quantification enables 3D sensitivity maps, showing dependencies of RBE and EQD2 on different input uncertainties. The high number of runs allows displaying the interplay between different input uncertainties. The SA identifies input parameter combinations which result in extreme deviations of the result and the input parameter for which an uncertainty reduction is the most rewarding. Conclusion: The presented variance-based SA provides advantageous properties in terms of visualization and quantification of (biological) uncertainties and their impact. The method is very flexible, model independent, and enables a broad assessment

  9. Regulatory Burden RFI: Revitalization of DOE's Role as a Regulatory Watchdog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Memorandum serves as an Executive Summary of Center for Regulatory Effectiveness’ (CRE’s) attached comments highlighting four issues:

  10. Impact of Direct Financial Incentives in the Emerging Battery Electric Vehicle Market: A Preliminary Analysis (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Direct Financial Incentives in the Emerging Battery Electric Vehicle Market: A Preliminary Analysis Bentley Clinton 1,2 , Austin Brown 1 , Carolyn Davidson 1 , Daniel Steinberg 1 1 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2 Department of Economics, University of Colorado - Boulder February 2015 NREL/PR-6A20-63263 2 Overview Question * How have incentives changed purchasing for battery electric vehicles in the United States? Method * Regression analysis at the state level to isolate

  11. Assessing National Employment Impacts of Investment in Residential and Commercial Sector Energy Efficiency: Review and Example Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, David M.; Belzer, David B.; Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.

    2014-06-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) modeled the employment impacts of a major national initiative to accelerate energy efficiency trends at one of two levels: • 15 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, efficiency activities save about 15 percent of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) Reference Case electricity consumption by 2030. It is assumed that additional energy savings in both the residential and commercial sectors begin in 2015 at zero, and then increase in an S-shaped market penetration curve, with the level of savings equal to about 7.0 percent of the AEO 2014 U.S. national residential and commercial electricity consumption saved by 2020, 14.8 percent by 2025, and 15 percent by 2030. • 10 percent savings by 2030. In this scenario, additional savings begin at zero in 2015, increase to 3.8 percent in 2020, 9.8 percent by 2025, and 10 percent of the AEO reference case value by 2030. The analysis of the 15 percent case indicates that by 2030 more than 300,000 new jobs would likely result from such policies, including an annual average of more than 60,000 jobs directly supporting the installation and maintenance of energy efficiency measures and practices. These are new jobs resulting initially from the investment associated with the construction of more energy-efficient new buildings or the retrofit of existing buildings and would be sustained for as long as the investment continues. Based on what is known about the current level of building-sector energy efficiency jobs, this would represent an increase of more than 10 percent from the current estimated level of over 450,000 such jobs. The more significant and longer-lasting effect comes from the redirection of energy bill savings toward the purchase of other goods and services in the general economy, with its attendant influence on increasing the total number of jobs. This example analysis utilized PNNL’s ImSET model, a modeling framework that PNNL has used over the past two decades to assess

  12. Quantifying the Impact of Immediate Reconstruction in Postmastectomy Radiation: A Large, Dose-Volume Histogram-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nisha; Cordeiro, Peter G.; Keam, Jennifer; Ballangrud, Ase; Shi Weiji; Zhang Zhigang; Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Stein, Nicholas F.; Zhou Ying; McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N.; Ho, Alice Y.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of immediate breast reconstruction on postmastectomy radiation (PMRT) using dose-volume histogram (DVH) data. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-seven women underwent PMRT at our center, 196 with implant reconstruction and 51 without reconstruction. Patients with reconstruction were treated with tangential photons, and patients without reconstruction were treated with en-face electron fields and customized bolus. Twenty percent of patients received internal mammary node (IMN) treatment. The DVH data were compared between groups. Ipsilateral lung parameters included V20 (% volume receiving 20 Gy), V40 (% volume receiving 40 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. Heart parameters included V25 (% volume receiving 25 Gy), mean dose, and maximum dose. IMN coverage was assessed when applicable. Chest wall coverage was assessed in patients with reconstruction. Propensity-matched analysis adjusted for potential confounders of laterality and IMN treatment. Results: Reconstruction was associated with lower lung V20, mean dose, and maximum dose compared with no reconstruction (all P<.0001). These associations persisted on propensity-matched analysis (all P<.0001). Heart doses were similar between groups (P=NS). Ninety percent of patients with reconstruction had excellent chest wall coverage (D95 >98%). IMN coverage was superior in patients with reconstruction (D95 >92.0 vs 75.7%, P<.001). IMN treatment significantly increased lung and heart parameters in patients with reconstruction (all P<.05) but minimally affected those without reconstruction (all P>.05). Among IMN-treated patients, only lower lung V20 in those without reconstruction persisted (P=.022), and mean and maximum heart doses were higher than in patients without reconstruction (P=.006, P=.015, respectively). Conclusions: Implant reconstruction does not compromise the technical quality of PMRT when the IMNs are untreated. Treatment technique, not reconstruction, is the primary

  13. Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.

    SciTech Connect

    Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2012-02-09

    Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power

  14. Environmental Sciences Division environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This report contains a monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance.

  15. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; et al

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protonsmore » with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Lastly, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.« less

  16. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G. Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  17. Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

  18. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Lastly, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  19. Regulatory approaches for addressing dissolved oxygen concerns at hydropower facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J.; Cada, Glenn F.; Sale, Michael J.; Eddlemon, Gerald K.

    2003-03-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are a common water quality problem downstream of hydropower facilities. At some facilities, structural improvements (e.g. installation of weir dams or aerating turbines) or operational changes (e.g., spilling water over the dam) can be made to improve DO levels. In other cases, structural and operational approaches are too costly for the project to implement or are likely to be of limited effectiveness. Despite improvements in overall water quality below dams in recent years, many hydropower projects are unable to meet state water quality standards for DO. Regulatory agencies in the U.S. are considering or implementing dramatic changes in their approach to protecting the quality of the Nations waters. New policies and initiatives have emphasized flexibility, increased collaboration and shared responsibility among all parties, and market-based, economic incentives. The use of new regulatory approaches may now be a viable option for addressing the DO problem at some hydropower facilities. This report summarizes some of the regulatory-related options available to hydropower projects, including negotiation of site-specific water quality criteria, use of biological monitoring, watershed-based strategies for the management of water quality, and watershed-based trading. Key decision points center on the health of the local biological communities and whether there are contributing impacts (i.e., other sources of low DO effluents) in the watershed. If the biological communities downstream of the hydropower project are healthy, negotiation for site-specific water quality standards or biocriteria (discharge performance criteria based on characteristics of the aquatic biota) might be pursued. If there are other effluent dischargers in the watershed that contribute to low DO problems, watershed-scale strategies and effluent trading may be effective. This report examines the value of regulatory approaches by reviewing their use in other

  20. System Analysis Projects

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Technologies Office Systems Analysis projects include environmental, regulatory, financial initiatives and efforts that solve non-technical barriers to geothermal deployment.

  1. Final report : impacts analysis for cyber attack on electric power systems (National SCADA Test Bed FY08).

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stamp, Jason Edwin; LaViolette, Randall A.

    2009-02-01

    To analyze the risks due to cyber attack against control systems used in the United States electrical infrastructure, new algorithms are needed to determine the possible impacts. This research is studying the Reliability Impact of Cyber ttack (RICA) in a two-pronged approach. First, malevolent cyber actions are analyzed in terms of reduced grid reliability. Second, power system impacts are investigated using an abstraction of the grid's dynamic model. This second year of esearch extends the work done during the first year.

  2. Regulatory Project Manager for Salina and Permian Basins for the NWTS (National Waste Terminal Storage) Program: Final techical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The identification of candidate sites for nuclear waste repositories involves geological and environmental studies to characterize potential sites. These investigations include the collection and analysis of detailed geological and environmental data and comparison of the data against predetermined site performance criteria, i.e., geologic characteristics, environmental protection, and socioeconomic impacts. The work summarized in this final technical report encompasses mainly ''environmental characterization'' studies in the Permian Basin in the Texas Panhandle during the period of 1977-86; in the earlier phase of the contract, regional environmental work was also done in the Salina Basin (1977-79) and certain licensing support activities and safety analyses were conducted (1977-82). Considerable regulatory support work was also performed during 1986. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Category:Regulatory Roadmap State Sections | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Regulatory Roadmap State Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Regulatory Roadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list of Regulatory Roadmap pages. This...

  4. Review of inputs provided to Jason Associates Corporation in support of RWEV-REP-001, the Analysis of Postclosure Groundwater Impacts report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Charles R.; Weck, Philippe F.; Vaughn, Palmer; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2014-04-01

    Report RWEV-REP-001, Analysis of Postclosure Groundwater Impacts for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada was issued by the DOE in 2009 and is currently being updated. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) provided support for the original document, performing calculations and extracting data from the Yucca Mountain Performance Assessment Model that were used as inputs to the contaminant transport and dose calculations by Jason Associates Corporation, the primary developers of the DOE report. The inputs from SNL were documented in LSA-AR-037, Inputs to Jason Associates Corporation in Support of the Postclosure Repository Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement. To support the updating of the original Groundwater Impacts document, SNL has reviewed the inputs provided in LSA-AR-037 to verify that they are current and appropriate for use. The results of that assessment are documented here.

  5. Sandia Energy - Policy and Regulatory, Codes and Standards

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy and Regulatory, Codes and Standards Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Policy and Regulatory, Codes...

  6. NEMA Comments on DOE Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI NEMA Comments on DOE Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) thanks you for the opportunity to ...

  7. NEMA Comments on Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Reducing Regulatory Burden NEMA Comments on Reducing Regulatory Burden The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) thanks you for the opportunity to provide comments ...

  8. Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory ...

  9. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) -List of Covered Electric Utilities - 2006 Public Utility Regulatory ...

  10. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) as Applicable to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005) - List of Covered Electric Utilities. Public Utility Regulatory ...

  11. Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) on the Smart Grid RFI Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) ...

  12. 7/24/2014 DOE Natural Gas Regulatory...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    42014 DOE Natural Gas Regulatory E-filing Application https:app.fossil.energy.govappfergasApplicationAction.go 12 Basic Information Natural Gas Regulatory E-filing...

  13. General Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    and Regulatory Studies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: General Renewable Energy-Policy and Regulatory Studies AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank...

  14. Washington Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit Regulatory...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Air Quality Notice of Construction Permit Regulatory Handbook Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook:...

  15. April Tribal Webinar on Energy Policy and Regulatory Environment...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April Tribal Webinar on Energy Policy and Regulatory Environment Rescheduled for May 4 April Tribal Webinar on Energy Policy and Regulatory Environment Rescheduled for May 4 April ...

  16. Category:Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list of Geothermal...

  17. Category:Regulatory Roadmap Federal Sections | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Category:Regulatory Roadmap Federal Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Regulatory...

  18. Effective Regulatory Institutions: The Regulator's Role in the...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Regulatory Institutions: The Regulator's Role in the Policy Process, Including Issues of Regulatory Independence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name:...

  19. Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of a Second Early Site Permit in Just One Month Department of Energy Commends the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Approval of ...

  20. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to Advance Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Increase Cooperation to ...

  1. Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the First United States Nuclear Plant Site in Over 30 Years Energy Praises the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Approval of the ...

  2. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information...

    Energy Saver

    US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart Grid Implementation Input US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Input to DOE Request for Information Smart ...

  3. Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar: Proposed Approach for Energy Efficiency Standards Canada-United States Regulatory Cooperation Council Webinar: Proposed ...

  4. CANADA-UNITED STATES REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL Webinar:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CANADA-UNITED STATES REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL Webinar: Work Plan Development - 201617; April 12, 2016 CANADA-UNITED STATES REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL Webinar: Work Plan ...

  5. Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Comments on RFI on ...

  6. .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI Comments from Hearth, Patio & Barbecue ...

  7. Microsoft Word - AGA Comments on 2011 Regulatory Burden RFI ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    AGA Comments on 2011 Regulatory Burden RFI Microsoft Word - AGA Comments on 2011 ... 76, No. 23, February 3, 2011 PDF icon Microsoft Word - AGA Comments on 2011 Regulatory ...

  8. Re: Request for Information on Regulatory Burden of DOE Regulations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PDF icon Re: Request for Information on Regulatory Burden of DOE Regulations More Documents & Publications Edison Electric Institute (EEI) Reducing Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. ...

  9. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory...

  10. Category:Regulatory Roadmap Flowcharts | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    flowcharts Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Flowcharts S Solar Regulatory Roadmap...

  11. Energy Department Develops Regulatory Roadmap to Spur Geothermal Energy Development

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department today issued a Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap that will help developers navigate regulatory requirements at every level of government to deploy geothermal energy projects.

  12. SEVENTH RFI COMMENTS ON REDUCING REGULATORY BURDEN

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ‘‘Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,’’ issued by the President on January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy (Department or DOE) is...

  13. Sixth RFI Comment On Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ‘‘Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,’’ issued by the President on January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy(Department or DOE) is...

  14. Fourth RFI Comment on Regulatory Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ‘‘Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,’’ issued by the President on January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy (Department or DOE) is...

  15. Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act Information

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (SBREFA) OSDBU is a resource for small businesses seeking information concerning the rules and regulations regarding all federal agencies and their relationships with the small business community.

  16. AHAM Comments_Regulatory Burden RFI

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) respectfully submits the following comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on its Regulatory Burden RFI, 81 Fed. Reg. 28736 (May 10, 2016).

  17. Reducing Regulatory Burden EO 13563 Third RFI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ‘‘Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,’’ issued by the President on January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy (Department or DOE) is...

  18. Reducing Regulatory Burden EO 13563 Fifth RFI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    As part of its implementation of Executive Order 13563, ‘‘Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,’’ issued by the President on January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy(Department or DOE) is...

  19. NUCLEAR REGULATORY,.COMMISSION REGION I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... & Lab Branch Division of Nuclear Materials Safety Docket No. 040-07964 License No. ... U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMblISSION REGION I INSPECTION REPORT Report No. 040-0796496-001 ...

  20. Portsmouth Site Regulatory Agreements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Site Regulatory Agreements Portsmouth Site Regulatory Agreements Portsmouth Administrative Consent Order - 1997 (2.92 MB) Portsmouth Ohio Consent Decree - 1989 (2.69 MB) Portsmouth Removal Action and Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study and Remedial Design and Remedial Action (D&D Orders) Project Director's Final Findings and Order, Mods. 2011, 2012 (13.24 MB) Portsmouth Integration Director's Final Findings and Order - 2011 (20.16 MB) Portsmouth DUF6 Director's Final Findings and

  1. Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) respectfully submits the following comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on its Request for Information on reducing regulatory burden, 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (Feb. 3, 2011). Regulatory Burden RFI (340.84 KB) More Documents & Publications WPN 00-5: Approval of Replacement Refrigerators and Electric Water Heaters as Allowable Weatherization Measures TEE-0012 - In the Matter of Electrolux Home Products, Inc. TEE-0022 - In the Matter of

  2. EVALUATION REPORT The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cybersecurity Program - 2014 OAS-L-15-03 November 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 3, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Federal

  3. Regulatory assessment of supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking on structural measures for existing single-hull tankers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Regulatory Assessment (RA) examines certain alternative pollution prevention measures on a selected range of existing single-hull tank vessel categories. First, a screening analysis was conducted to evaluate the impacts of certain structural measures on a selected number of baseline analytical tank vessel models. The screening analysis included an estimation of onetime expenses associated with refitting the vessel at a shipyard, the cost of losing cargo carrying capacity due to the implementation of a measure that would not allow cargo carriage in certain tanks or above certain levels, and other costs such as loss of revenue during the shipyard period. Second, a detailed analysis was conducted to estimate the costs and benifits of those measures which were deemed the most effective at reducing oil outflow on the affected existing single-hull tank vessel fleet. The detailed analysis included a breakdown of costs and benefits, and included a cost-benefit analysis over the potential 19-year period that this regulation would be in effect.

  4. Technical Challenges of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Impacts to the US Power System: Distribution System Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; DeSteese, John G.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) to address three basic questions concerning how typical existing electrical distribution systems would be impacted by the addition of PHEVs to residential loads.

  5. KWOC (Key-Word-Out-of-Context) Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, S.D.

    1990-04-01

    To meet the objectives of the program funded by the Department of Energy (DOE)-Nuclear Energy (NE) Technology Support Programs, the Performance Assurance Project Office (PAPO) administers a Performance Assurance Information Program that collects, compiles, and distributes program-related information, reports, and publications for the benefit of the DOE-NE program participants. THE KWOC Index of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide Series'' is prepared as an aid in searching for specific topics in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Regulatory Guide Series.

  6. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  7. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  8. Socioeconomic effects of DRAFT power marketing options of the Central Valley and Washoe Projects: 2005 regional economic impact analysis using IMPLAN

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.M.; Godoy-Kain, P.; Gu, A.Y.; Ulibarri, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This report summarizes the methods and conclusions of an economic analysis of the distributional effects of alternative actions that Sierra Nevada could take with its new marketing plan. These alternatives are summarized in the agency`s Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and this study directly supports the findings in the EIS. The study evaluates the potential economic impacts projected to occur across the northern and central California area currently serviced by Sierra Nevada`s customers. A standard input-output estimation approach was used to calculate impacts on regional output, labor income, and employment. The IMPLAN regional economic modeling system was used to develop regional models for the analysis. Individual regional models were developed for the overall area, the San Francisco Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area, the Sacramento Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area, the Redding Metropolitan Statistical Area, and the Bakersfield Metropolitan Statistical Area. The analysis relies on information about the effect of Sierra Nevada`s alternative actions on overall system power costs for the year 2005 developed by RW Beck and Associates (Beck-1996). This information is used as input to the 2005 benchmarked IMPLAN regional economic models. The resulting economic impact estimates are inextricably linked to this input information about changes in system power costs, and the estimates reported here are of similar relative magnitude to those estimates. The potential economic effects of Sierra Nevada`s actions are extremely small in relation to the size of the economies potentially affected, and, although they are calculable, they are not significant and often difficult to separate from random error present in the models.

  9. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lands | Department of Energy Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands Regulatory Considerations for Developing Generation Projects on Federal Lands Presentation covers regulatory considerations for developing generation projects on federal lands. Download the presentation on regulatory considerations for developing generation projects on federal lands. (309.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Coordinating Interstate ElectricTransmission Siting: An

  10. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, March 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented.

  11. U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions and branches are presented.

  12. Unconventional gas systems analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zammerilli, A.M.; Duda, J.R.; Layne, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    Gas systems analysis at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) crosscuts all sectors of the natural gas industry from resource to utilization. The board-based analysis identifies market needs that are required to maintain and expand the competitive position of natural gas in the overall energy supply by providing market pull'' options. METC systems analyses continually explore the impact of cost-lowering alternatives, which lead to the development of production and economic strategies to improve and promote the utilization of natural gas. Results of systems analyses identify socioeconomic, environmental, and regulatory barrier issues, providing a strategic base for guiding and improving future gas research, development, and demonstration initiative. Some recent analyses have focused on METC's directional well projects, targeting unconventional formations throughout the United States. Specifically, cost supply relationships and risk assessments are being developed for low-permeability gas formations underlying the Maverick, Greater Green River, Piceance, and Appalachian Basins.

  13. Evaluation of regulatory guides potentially useful to geologic repository development

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, W.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The US Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide series provides a set of regulatory and technical guidelines for achieving and demonstrating regulatory compliance for various segments of the nuclear fuel cycle. Of these regulatory guides only few specifically pertain to high-level waste repository activities. The overwhelming majority pertain to other, more mature aspects of the nuclear cycle. It is believed that conscientious, reasoned application of the fundamental regulatory bases underlying the positions in these other regulatory guides could provide a solid regulatory starting point for repository development activities. This information report provides a summary screening of regulatory guides published as of September 1983 and provides an initial assessment of the potential usefulness of these regulatory guides to repository design and operation activities.

  14. Proceedings of the 1991 Socioeconomic Energy Research and Analysis Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    These proceedings analyze US energy policy as it pertains to minority groups. Example topics include: Economic impacts of the National Energy Strategy on minority and majority households, Utility measures to assist payment-troubled customers, Equity impacts of controlling energy usage through market-based versus regulatory approaches, Technical and planning support for the DOE-HUD initiative for energy efficiency in housing, an analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage, and methodical issues in evaluating integrated least cost planning programs.

  15. Legal, regulatory & institutional issues facing distributed resources development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report describes legal, regulatory, and institutional considerations likely to shape the development and deployment of distributed resources. It is based on research co-sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and four investor-owned utilities (Central & South West Services, Cinergy Corp., Florida Power Corporation, and San Diego Gas & Electric Company). The research was performed between August 1995 and March 1996 by a team of four consulting firms experienced in energy and utility law, regulation, and economics. It is the survey phase of a project known as the Distributed Resources Institutional Analysis Project.

  16. The Impact of Wind Development on County-Level Income and Employment: A Review of Methods and an Empirical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Lantz

    2012-09-21

    To gain an understanding of the long-term county-level impacts from a large sample of wind power projects and to understand the potential significance of methodological criticisms, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recently joined efforts to complete a first-of-its-kind study that quantifies the annual impact on county-level personal income resulting from wind power installations in nearly 130 counties across 12 states. The results of this study as well as a comparison with the prior county-level estimates generated from input-output models, are summarized in the fact sheet.

  17. Large Scale Comparative Visualisation of Regulatory Networks with TRNDiff

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, Xin-Yi; Buckingham, Lawrence; Hogan, James M.; Novichkov, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    The advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has seen explosive growth in genomic datasets, and dense coverage of related organisms, supporting study of subtle, strain-specific variations as a determinant of function. Such data collections present fresh and complex challenges for bioinformatics, those of comparing models of complex relationships across hundreds and even thousands of sequences. Transcriptional Regulatory Network (TRN) structures document the influence of regulatory proteins called Transcription Factors (TFs) on associated Target Genes (TGs). TRNs are routinely inferred from model systems or iterative search, and analysis at these scales requires simultaneous displays of multiple networks well beyond those of existing network visualisation tools [1]. In this paper we describe TRNDiff, an open source system supporting the comparative analysis and visualization of TRNs (and similarly structured data) from many genomes, allowing rapid identification of functional variations within species. The approach is demonstrated through a small scale multiple TRN analysis of the Fur iron-uptake system of Yersinia, suggesting a number of candidate virulence factors; and through a larger study exploiting integration with the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov; [2]) - a collection of hundreds of manually curated and predicted transcription factor regulons drawn from across the entire spectrum of prokaryotic organisms.

  18. Large Scale Comparative Visualisation of Regulatory Networks with TRNDiff

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chua, Xin-Yi; Buckingham, Lawrence; Hogan, James M.; Novichkov, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    The advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has seen explosive growth in genomic datasets, and dense coverage of related organisms, supporting study of subtle, strain-specific variations as a determinant of function. Such data collections present fresh and complex challenges for bioinformatics, those of comparing models of complex relationships across hundreds and even thousands of sequences. Transcriptional Regulatory Network (TRN) structures document the influence of regulatory proteins called Transcription Factors (TFs) on associated Target Genes (TGs). TRNs are routinely inferred from model systems or iterative search, and analysis at these scales requires simultaneous displays of multiple networks well beyond thosemore » of existing network visualisation tools [1]. In this paper we describe TRNDiff, an open source system supporting the comparative analysis and visualization of TRNs (and similarly structured data) from many genomes, allowing rapid identification of functional variations within species. The approach is demonstrated through a small scale multiple TRN analysis of the Fur iron-uptake system of Yersinia, suggesting a number of candidate virulence factors; and through a larger study exploiting integration with the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov; [2]) - a collection of hundreds of manually curated and predicted transcription factor regulons drawn from across the entire spectrum of prokaryotic organisms.« less

  19. A performance-based regulatory approach to increase the efficiency of the regulatory process

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has adopted as a fundamental principle that all regulatory burdens must be justified and that its regulatory process must be efficient. The reasons for seeking to remove marginal-to-safety regulations are to eliminate or modify regulations where burdens are not commensurate with their safety significance and thus free up resources and improve the focus and effectiveness of the body of regulations. As a result, the NRC has for some time been pursuing programs consistent with this philosophy. It now plans to institutionalize a continuing effort of regulatory burden reduction to ensure such efforts are permanently integrated into its regulatory process. The NRC believes such efforts are important to its mission and the industry it regulates.

  20. NREL: Innovation Impact Home Page

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Innovation Impact Menu Home Home Solar Solar Wind Wind Analysis Analysis Bioenergy Bioenergy Buildings Buildings Transportation Transportation Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Systems Integration Energy Systems Integration Innovation Impact NREL has a rich history of scientific innovation and partnering with industry. Explore examples of our accomplishments across renewable energy and energy efficiency research. Solar Solar Wind Wind Analysis Analysis Bioenergy Bioenergy Buildings

  1. CRE_Response-DOE_Regulatory_Review_Request_for_Comments.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Center for Regulatory Effectiveness 1601 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC, 20009 Tel: (202) 265-2383 Fax: (202) 939-6969 secretary1@mbsdc.com www.TheCRE.com 1 REGULATORY REVIEW MEMORANDUM To: Department of Energy From: Jim Tozzi Subject: Regulatory Burden Request for Information Date: September 4, 2012 CC: Boris Bershteyn/Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs This Memorandum serves as an Executive Summary of Center for Regulatory Effectiveness' (CRE's) attached comments

  2. Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (Reply Comments) | Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) Comments on RFI on reducing regulatory burden Department of Energy Request for Information: Reducing Regulatory Burden (Reply Comments) (89.49 KB) More Documents & Publications Re: Regulatory Burden RFI RegReview_ReplyComments_Lennox_Hearth_Products.PDF .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue

  3. DOE Ex Parte Memorandum - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Memorandum - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness DOE Ex Parte Memorandum - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness The Center for Regulatory Effectiveness (CRE) is submitting this memorandum pursuant to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Guidance on Ex Parte Communications. Center_for_Reg_Effectiveness.pdf (169.94 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments Regulatory Burden RFI: Revitalization of DOE's Role as a

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K L

    1991-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Solar Project Regulatory Considerations and NEPA Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs Solar Project Regulatory Considerations and NEPA Compliance DOE Tribal Webinar Project Regulatory Considerations August 31, 2016 NEPA Compliance  Statute, Executive Orders, DOI Memos, Policy, DOI Handbooks  Process  Coordination National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)  NEPA-Public Law 91- 190 42 U.S.C. 4321-4347 January 1, 1970  CEQ Regulations 40 CFR 1500-1508 November 29, 1978  DOI Implementing Procedures 516 DM 1-6 (April 23, 1980)  DOI Final

  6. Supplement Analysis to the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Proposed Disposition of Certain Large Containment Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-02-12

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) (DOE 1999a) adequately addresses the environmental effects of introducing a proposed project for the clean-out and decontamination (DECON) of certain large containment vessels into the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 3, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. After undergoing the clean-out and DECON steps, the subject containment vessels would be disposed of at LANL's TA-54 low-level waste (LLW) disposal site or, as appropriate, at a DOE or commercial offsite permitted LLW-regulated landfill; after actinides were recovered from the DECON solution within the CMR Building, they would be moved to LANL's TA-55 Plutonium Facility and undergo subsequent processing at that facility for reuse. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an environmental impact statement (EIS) when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns, or there are changed circumstances or new or changed information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 10211.314(c) of the DOE's regulations for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation that states: ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis''. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the proposed project action with the LANL operations capabilities evaluated in the 1999 SWEIS in support DOE's long-term hydrodynamic testing program at LANL, as well as the waste disposal capabilities evaluated in

  7. Multi-Year Analysis Examines Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of Renewable Portfolio Standards (Fact Sheet), NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    states consider revising renewable portfolio standard (RPS) programs or developing new ones, careful assessments of the costs, benefits, and other impacts of existing policies will be critical. RPS programs currently exist in 29 states and Washington, D.C. Many of these policies, which were enacted largely during the late 1990s and 2000s, will reach their terminal targets by the end of this decade. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

  8. A Scoping Analysis Of The Impact Of SiC Cladding On Late-Phase Accident Progression Involving Core–Concrete Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The overall objective of the current work is to carry out a scoping analysis to determine the impact of ATF on late phase accident progression; in particular, the molten core-concrete interaction portion of the sequence that occurs after the core debris fails the reactor vessel and relocates into containment. This additional study augments previous work by including kinetic effects that govern chemical reaction rates during core-concrete interaction. The specific ATF considered as part of this study is SiC-clad UO2.

  9. Impact of preoperative radiation for rectal cancer on subsequent lymph node evaluation: A population-based analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Nancy N. . E-mail: baxte025@umn.edu; Morris, Arden M.; Rothenberger, David A.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) on the accuracy of lymph node staging (LNS). Preoperative RT is a well-established component of rectal cancer treatment but its impact on LNS is unknown. Methods and materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry, representing 14% of the U.S. population, was used to assess the impact of preoperative RT on LNS. Our study population consisted of adults with rectal cancer between 1998 and 2000 who underwent radical resection. Results: In our 3-year study period, 5647 patients met the selection criteria and 1034 (19.5%) underwent preoperative RT. The preoperative RT group was younger (average age, 61 years) than those who did not undergo preoperative RT (average age, 69 years) and more likely to be male (22% of men vs. 16% of women). On average, fewer nodes were examined in patients who underwent preoperative RT (7 nodes) vs. those who did not (10 nodes); this difference was statistically significant, controlling for potential confounders (p {<=} 0.0001). In 16% of the preoperative RT patients (vs. 7.5% without), no nodes were identified (p {<=} 0.0001). If one used a minimum of 12 nodes as the standard, only 20% of patients who underwent preoperative RT underwent adequate LNS. Conclusion: Lymph node staging in patients who undergo preoperative RT must be interpreted with caution. Studies are needed to evaluate the clinical relevance of node number and pathologic staging after preoperative RT for rectal cancer.

  10. Regulatory Promotion of Emergent CCS Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Lincoln; Uchitel, Kirsten; Johnson, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing inevitability of climate change and the attendant need for mitigation strategies, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has yet to gain much traction in the United States. Recent regulatory proposals by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), limited in scope to new-build power plants, represent the only significant policy initiative intended to mandate diffusion of CCS technology. Phase I of this Project assessed barriers to CCS deployment as prioritized by the CCS community. That research concluded that there were four primary barriers: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. Phase II of this Project, as presented in this Report, assesses potential regulatory models for CCS and examines where those models address the hurdles to diffusing CCS technology identified in Phase I. It concludes (1) that a CCS-specific but flexible standard, such as a technology performance standard or a very particular type of market-based regulation, likely will promote CCS diffusion, and (2) that these policies cannot work alone, but rather, should be combined with other measures, such as liability limits and a comprehensive CCS regulatory regime.

  11. The regulatory battleground: A briefing for commanders

    SciTech Connect

    Wirick, D.

    1995-12-31

    This imperfect analogy likens the history and current status of public utility regulation to a military campaign. Clearly, the relationship between regulators and utilities has not always been combative, but intermittent conflict has necessarily characterized the relationship. Nonetheless, this military analogy describes some of the elements of the history of regulation and may have implications for regulatory policy in the near term. The scene is a battlefield headquarters not far from the heat of the conflict. The commanders of regulatory units are gathered. In the distance, the low rumble of troop movements can be heard. Ladies and gentlemen, please take your seats. As you are aware, recent developments have placed regulatory forces in extreme jeopardy. Our forces are under stress, and though they continue to fight, the confusion of the current situation is beginning to take its toll. In most cases, reinforcements have been denied and our lines of logistical support have been weakened. Without effective and rapid action on our part, the regulatory battle will be lost and we will be driven from the field. Until consumers are well-enough armed to protect themselves, a process that is certainly suspect and potentially time-consuming, they will be powerless and undoubtedly victimized.

  12. Obtain regulatory support services and technical expertise

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this task order (TO) is to obtain regulatory support services and technical expertise required to comply with the March 2005 Compliance Order on Consent (Consent Order), the Individual Permit for Stormwater (IP), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (RCRA Permit, and other applicable compliance areas for Fiscal Year 2016.

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission NNSA Receives Excellence Award for Radiological Security Enhancements in Hawaii HONOLULU - At an official event this week, the City and County of Honolulu presented the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with the Homeland Security Excellence Award for DOE/NNSA's Office of Radiological Security's (ORS) efforts

  14. Detection of Weakly Conserved Ancestral Mammalian RegulatorySequences by Primate Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian-fei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Chanan, Sumita; Cheng,Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.; Boffelli, Dario

    2006-06-01

    Genomic comparisons between human and distant, non-primatemammals are commonly used to identify cis-regulatory elements based onconstrained sequence evolution. However, these methods fail to detectcryptic functional elements, which are too weakly conserved among mammalsto distinguish from nonfunctional DNA. To address this problem, weexplored the potential of deep intra-primate sequence comparisons. Wesequenced the orthologs of 558 kb of human genomic sequence, coveringmultiple loci involved in cholesterol homeostasis, in 6 nonhumanprimates. Our analysis identified 6 noncoding DNA elements displayingsignificant conservation among primates, but undetectable in more distantcomparisons. In vitro and in vivo tests revealed that at least three ofthese 6 elements have regulatory function. Notably, the mouse orthologsof these three functional human sequences had regulatory activity despitetheir lack of significant sequence conservation, indicating that they arecryptic ancestral cis-regulatory elements. These regulatory elementscould still be detected in a smaller set of three primate speciesincluding human, rhesus and marmoset. Since the human and rhesus genomesequences are already available, and the marmoset genome is activelybeing sequenced, the primate-specific conservation analysis describedhere can be applied in the near future on a whole-genome scale, tocomplement the annotation provided by more distant speciescomparisons.

  15. Alternative multimedia regulatory programs for next-generation refineries

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Gasper, J.; Arguerro, R.; Emerson, D.

    2000-06-22

    The 25-year-old command-and-control environmental regulatory structure in the US has resulted in significant environmental improvements. Recently, however, its limitations (e.g., rigid application regardless of site-specific conditions, disregard of cross-media and multimedia impacts, limited incentives for new technology development and use) have become increasingly apparent. New regulatory approaches that recognize current and anticipated economic constraints, new knowledge of environmental processes and impacts, and the benefits of new technologies are needed. Such approaches could be especially important for the US petroleum refining industry. This industry operates under thin profit margins, releases chemicals that can produce adverse health and environmental impacts, and must meet the technological challenges of producing more highly refined fuels from poorer quality feedstocks. Under a grant from the Environmental Technology Initiative (ETI), Argonne National Laboratory and its subcontractor, Analytical Services, Inc. developed two alternative environmental regulatory programs for next-generation petroleum refineries. (In this report, next-generation refineries refers to the refineries of today as they operate in the next 20 or more years rather than to fully reengineered future refineries.) The objective of the ETI refinery project was to develop future-oriented regulatory programs for next-generation refineries that will expand the use of innovative technologies, encourage pollution prevention, demonstrate environmental responsibility, and maintain refinery economic performance. Rather than suggesting targeted, short-term modifications to existing media-specific command-and-control regulations, the ETI project suggests the use of new approaches that are broader and more flexible. It recognizes that giving refineries flexibility in meeting environmental protection goals can stimulate new technology development and use. Unlike most US Environmental

  16. EIS-0511: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Statement | Department of Energy EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0511: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement Aguirre Offshore GasPort Project, Puerto Rico EPA announced the availability of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate: 1) an offshore marine liquid natural gas receiving facility

  17. Environmental impacts of thermochemical biomass conversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; McKinney, M.D.; Norton, M.V.; Abrams, C.W.

    1995-06-01

    Thermochemical conversion in this study is limited to fast pyrolysis, upgrading of fast pyrolysis oils, and gasification. Environmental impacts of all types were considered within the project, but primary emphasis was on discharges to the land, air, and water during and after the conversion processes. The project discussed here is divided into five task areas: (1) pyrolysis oil analysis; (2) hydrotreating of pyrolysis oil; (3) gas treatment systems for effluent minimization; (4) strategic analysis of regulatory requirements; and (5) support of the IEA Environmental Systems Activity. The pyrolysis oil task was aimed at understanding the oil contaminants and potential means for their removal. The hydrotreating task was undertaken to better define one potential means for both improving the quality of the oil but also removing contaminants from the oil. Within Task 3, analyses were done to evaluate the results of gasification product treatment systems. Task 4 was a review and collection of regulatory requirements which would be applicable to the subject processes. The IEA support task included input to and participation in the IEA Bioenergy activity which directly relates to the project subject. Each of these tasks is described along with the results. Conclusions and recommendations from the overall project are given.

  18. Innovation Impact Publications | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Impact Publications NREL has a rich history of scientific innovation and partnering with industry in research and development across our primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: analysis, bioenergy, buildings, manufacturing, solar, transportation, and wind technologies. Learn more about NREL's Innovation Impact by viewing the fact sheets below on our key breakthrough results. Analysis NREL Case Study Leads to International Partnership In 2012, NREL analysts

  19. The development and application of the chemical mixture methodology in analysis of potential health impacts from airborne release in emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Douglas K.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ciolek, John T.; Lu, Po-Yung; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Tuccinardi, Thomas E.; Bouslaugh, Philip R.

    2010-07-15

    The Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is used for emergency response and safety planning by the U.S. Department of Energy, its contractors, and other private and public sector organizations. The CMM estimates potential health impacts on individuals and their ability to take protective actions as a result of exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. They are based on the concentration of each chemical in the mixture at a designated receptor location, the protective action criteria (PAC) providing chemical-specific exposure limit values, and the health code numbers (HCNs) that identify the target organ groupings that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The CMM has been significantly improved since its introduction more than 10 years ago. Major enhancements involve the expansion of the number of HCNs from 44 to 60 and inclusion of updated PAC values based on an improved development methodology and updates in the data used to derive the PAC values. Comparisons between the 1999 and 2009 versions of the CMM show potentially substantial changes in the assessment results for selected sets of chemical mixtures. In particular, the toxic mode hazard indices (HIs) and target organ HIs are based on more refined acute HCNs, thereby improving the quality of chemical consequence assessment, emergency planning, and emergency response decision making. Seven hypothetical chemical storage and processing scenarios are used to demonstrate how the CMM is applied in emergency planning and hazard assessment.

  20. DOE Seeks Comments on its Preliminary Plan to Reduce Regulatory...

    Energy Saver

    Comments on its Preliminary Plan to Reduce Regulatory Burden DOE Seeks Comments on its Preliminary Plan to Reduce Regulatory Burden July 13, 2011 - 2:02pm Addthis The Department of ...

  1. Category:Regulatory Roadmap Overview Sections | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Category Edit History Category:Regulatory Roadmap Overview Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the Regulatory Roadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list...

  2. DOE Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments DOE Review of Regulations - Center for Regulatory Effectiveness Comments The Center for Regulatory Effectiveness (CRE) is pleased to submit these comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on how DOE can best review its existing regulations and to identify whether any of its existing regulations should be modified, streamlined, expanded or repealed. Center_for_Regulatory_Effectiveness_Comments.pdf

  3. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission functional organization charts, January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Functional organization charts for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission offices, divisions, and branches are presented in this document.

  4. AHAM Comments Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Comments Regulatory Burden RFI AHAM Comments Regulatory Burden RFI The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) respectfully submits the following comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on its Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 47328 (Aug. 8, 2012). AHAM Comments_DOE Reg Review Sept 2012_FINAL.pdf (64.14 KB) More Documents & Publications Regulatory Burden RFI, 77 Fed. Reg. 28518 (May 15, 2012) Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comment AHAM Retrospective Preliminary

  5. Fact Sheet: DOE/National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissione...

    Energy Saver

    National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to encourage investments in infrastructure modernization to enhance pipeline safety, efficiency and deliverability. ...

  6. .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    RFI | Department of Energy .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI Comments from Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI .Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association's Comments on DOE's Regulatory Burden RFI (604.37 KB) More Documents & Publications HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

  7. DOE Comments Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Comments Regulatory Burden RFI DOE Comments Regulatory Burden RFI These comments are submitted by Rheem Manufacturing Company in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) notice appearing in the December 5, 2011 Federal Register requesting information on existing regulations that should be modified, streamlined, expanded, or repealed. Reg_Review_DOE_comts_RFI.pdf (55.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Rheem Comments Fourth RFI Comment on Regulatory Review Reducing Regulatory Burden

  8. Probabilistic cost-benefit analysis of enhanced safety features for strategic nuclear weapons at a representative location

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, D.R.; Hall, C.H.; Holman, G.S.; Graham, K.F.; Harvey, T.F.; Serduke, F.J.D.

    1993-10-01

    We carried out a demonstration analysis of the value of developing and implementing enhanced safety features for nuclear weapons in the US stockpile. We modified an approach that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed in response to a congressional directive that NRC assess the ``value-impact`` of regulatory actions for commercial nuclear power plants. Because improving weapon safety shares some basic objectives with NRC regulations, i.e., protecting public health and safety from the effects of accidents involving radioactive materials, we believe the NRC approach to be appropriate for evaluating weapons-safety cost-benefit issues. Impact analysis includes not only direct costs associated with retrofitting the weapon system, but also the expected costs (or economic risks) that are avoided by the action, i.e., the benefits.

  9. Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cover Letter Regulatory Burden RFI 4-15-11 Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden ... on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2011. PDF icon Microsoft Word - Cover Letter Regulatory Burden ...

  10. Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2011-09-01

    In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  11. Integrated Approach to Reconstruction of Microbial Regulatory Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodionov, Dmitry A; Novichkov, Pavel S

    2013-11-04

    This project had the goal(s) of development of integrated bioinformatics platform for genome-scale inference and visualization of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacterial genomes. The work was done in Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (SBMRI, P.I. D.A. Rodionov) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, co-P.I. P.S. Novichkov). The developed computational resources include: (1) RegPredict web-platform for TRN inference and regulon reconstruction in microbial genomes, and (2) RegPrecise database for collection, visualization and comparative analysis of transcriptional regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics. These analytical resources were selected as key components in the DOE Systems Biology KnowledgeBase (SBKB). The high-quality data accumulated in RegPrecise will provide essential datasets of reference regulons in diverse microbes to enable automatic reconstruction of draft TRNs in newly sequenced genomes. We outline our progress toward the three aims of this grant proposal, which were: Develop integrated platform for genome-scale regulon reconstruction; Infer regulatory annotations in several groups of bacteria and building of reference collections of microbial regulons; and Develop KnowledgeBase on microbial transcriptional regulation.

  12. Regulatory Approaches for Solid Radioactive Waste Storage in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, A.; Testov, S.; Diaschev, A.; Nazarian, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.

    2003-02-26

    The Russian Navy under the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program has designated the Polyarninsky Shipyard as the regional recipient for solid radioactive waste (SRW) pretreatment and storage facilities. Waste storage technologies include containers and lightweight modular storage buildings. The prime focus of this paper is solid radioactive waste storage options based on the AMEC mission and Russian regulatory standards. The storage capability at the Polyarninsky Shipyard in support of Mobile Pretreatment Facility (MPF) operations under the AMEC Program will allow the Russian Navy to accumulate/stage the SRW after treatment at the MPF. It is anticipated that the MPF will operate for 20 years. This paper presents the results of a regulatory analysis performed to support an AMEC program decision on the type of facility to be used for storage of SRW. The objectives the study were to: analyze whether a modular storage building (MSB), referred in the standards as a lightweight building, would comply with the Russian SRW storage building standard, OST 95 10517-95; analyze the Russian SRW storage pad standard OST 95 10516-95; and compare the two standards, OST 95 10517-95 for storage buildings and OST 95 10516-95 for storage pads.

  13. CANADA-UNITED STATES REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CANADA-UNITED STATES REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL Webinar: Proposed Approach for Energy Efficiency Standards January 12, 2015 Natural Resources Ressources naturelles Canada Canada Key Contacts in U.S. and Canada NRCan * Debbie Scharf, Director of Equipment Division * Katherine Delves, Chief of Standards Development * Jamie Hulan, Team leader for Standards Development * Andrés Drew, RCC lead DOE * John Cymbalsky, Program Manager for Appliance Standards * Ashley Armstrong, Supervisory

  14. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII genes

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2001-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the

  15. Responding to the changing regulatory scene

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, P.

    1995-12-31

    The regulatory approach of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is discussed in this paper. Three areas receive emphasis: (1) the changing relations between the US EPA and the states, (2) the new emphasis on pollution prevention techniques, and (3) a new environmental amnesty project. Budgetary considerations, performance partnerships, and nonregulatory compliance assistance are briefly outlined in relation to these topics. Results of the environmental amnesty program for small business, called Clean Break, are briefly reported.

  16. Plant nitrogen regulatory P-PII polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Lam, Hon-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2004-11-23

    The present invention generally relates to plant nitrogen regulatory PII gene (hereinafter P-PII gene), a gene involved in regulating plant nitrogen metabolism. The invention provides P-PII nucleotide sequences, expression constructs comprising said nucleotide sequences, and host cells and plants having said constructs and, optionally expressing the P-PII gene from said constructs. The invention also provides substantially pure P-PII proteins. The P-PII nucleotide sequences and constructs of the invention may be used to engineer organisms to overexpress wild-type or mutant P-PII regulatory protein. Engineered plants that overexpress or underexpress P-PII regulatory protein may have increased nitrogen assimilation capacity. Engineered organisms may be used to produce P-PII proteins which, in turn, can be used for a variety of purposes including in vitro screening of herbicides. P-PII nucleotide sequences have additional uses as probes for isolating additional genomic clones having the promoters of P-PII gene. P-PII promoters are light- and/or sucrose-inducible and may be advantageously used in genetic engineering of plants.

  17. Regulatory issues for deep borehole plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W.G.

    1995-03-01

    As a result of recent changes throughout the world, a substantial inventory of excess separated plutonium is expected to result from dismantlement of US nuclear weapons. The safe and secure management and eventual disposition of this plutonium, and of a similar inventory in Russia, is a high priority. A variety of options (both interim and permanent) are under consideration to manage this material. The permanent solutions can be categorized into two broad groups: direct disposal and utilization. The deep borehole disposition concept involves placing excess plutonium deep into old stable rock formations with little free water present. Issues of concern include the regulatory, statutory and policy status of such a facility, the availability of sites with desirable characteristics and the technologies required for drilling deep holes, characterizing them, emplacing excess plutonium and sealing the holes. This white paper discusses the regulatory issues. Regulatory issues concerning construction, operation and decommissioning of the surface facility do not appear to be controversial, with existing regulations providing adequate coverage. It is in the areas of siting, licensing and long term environmental protection that current regulations may be inappropriate. This is because many current regulations are by intent or by default specific to waste forms, facilities or missions significantly different from deep borehole disposition of excess weapons usable fissile material. It is expected that custom regulations can be evolved in the context of this mission.

  18. Economic impacts study

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsen, W.; Worley, W.; Frost, E.

    1988-09-30

    This is a progress report on the first phase of a project to measure the economic impacts of a rapidly changing U.S. target base. The purpose of the first phase is to designate and test the macroeconomic impact analysis model. Criteria were established for a decision-support model. Additional criteria were defined for an interactive macroeconomic impact analysis model. After a review of several models, the Economic Impact Forecast System model of the U.S. Army Construction Research Laboratory was selected as the appropriate input-output tool that can address local and regional economic analysis. The model was applied to five test cases to demonstrate its utility and define possible revisions to meet project criteria. A plan for EIFS access was defined at three levels. Objectives and tasks for scenario refinement are proposed.

  19. Comparison of Stack Measurement Data from R&D Facilities to Regulatory Criteria. A Case Study from PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2013-10-30

    Chemical emissions from research and development (R&D) activities are difficult to estimate because of the large number of chemicals used and the potential for continual changes in processes. In this case study, stack measurements taken from R&D facilities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were examined, including extreme worst-case emissions estimates and alternate analyses using a Monte Carlo method that takes into account the full distribution of sampling results. The results from these analyses were then compared to emissions estimated from chemical inventories. Results showed that downwind ambient air concentrations calculated from the stack measurement data were below acceptable source impact levels (ASILs) for almost all compounds, even under extreme worst-case analyses. However, for compounds with averaging periods of a year, the unrealistic but simplifying extreme worst-case analysis often resulted in exceedances of lower level regulatory criteria used to determine modeling requirements or to define trivial releases. Compounds with 24-hour averaging periods were nearly all several orders of magnitude below all, including the trivial release, criteria. The alternate analysis supplied a more realistic basis of comparison and an ability to explore effects under different operational modes.

  20. Development of Regulatory Documents for Creation (Upgrade) of Physical Protection Systems under the Russian/American MPC&A Program

    SciTech Connect

    Izmaylov, Alexandr V.; Babkin, Vladimir; Kurov, Valeriy; Piskarev, Alexander; O'Brien, Patricia E.; Wright, Troy L.; Schlegel, Stephen C.; Hazel, Michael J.; Miller, Daniel R.; Tuttle, John D.; Kovchegin, Dmitry

    2009-10-07

    The development of new or the upgrade of existing physical protection systems (PPS) for nuclear facilities involves a multi-step and multidimensional process. The process consists of conceptual design, design, and commissioning stages. The activities associated with each of these stages are governed by Russian government and agency regulations. To ensure a uniform approach to development or upgrading of PPS at Russian nuclear facilities, the development of a range of regulatory and methodological documents is necessary. Some issues of PPS development are covered by the regulatory documents developed by Rosatom, as well as other Russian agencies with nuclear facilities under their control. This regulatory development has been accomplished as part of the U.S.-Russian MPC&A cooperation or independently by the Russian Federation. While regulatory coverage is extensive, there are a number of issues such as vulnerability analysis, effectiveness assessment, upgrading PPS, and protection of information systems for PPS that require additional regulations be developed. This paper reports on the status of regulatory coverage for PPS development or upgrade, and outlines a new approach to regulatory document development. It describes the evolutionary process of regulatory development through experience gained in the design, development and implementation of PPS as well as experience gained through the cooperative efforts of Russian and U.S. experts involved the development of MPC&A regulations.