National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for reduced lignin content

  1. Expression of a bacterial 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase reduces lignin content and improves biomass saccharification efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Eudes, Aymerick; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; George, Anthe; Liang, Yan; Yang, Fan; Singh, Seema; Keasling, Jay D.; Simmons, Blake A.; Loqué, Dominique

    2015-01-13

    Lignin confers recalcitrance to plant biomass used as feedstocks in agro-processing industries or as source of renewable sugars for the production of bioproducts. The metabolic steps for the synthesis of lignin building blocks belong to the shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Genetic engineering efforts to reduce lignin content typically employ gene knockout or gene silencing techniques to constitutively repress one of these metabolic pathways. Recently, new strategies have emerged offering better spatiotemporal control of lignin deposition, including the expression of enzymes that interfere with the normal process for cell wall lignification. In this study, we report that expression of a 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase (QsuB from Corynebacterium glutamicum) reduces lignin deposition in Arabidopsis cell walls. QsuB was targeted to the plastids to convert 3-dehydroshikimate – an intermediate of the shikimate pathway – into protocatechuate. Compared to wild-type plants, lines expressing QsuB contain higher amounts of protocatechuate, p-coumarate, p-coumaraldehyde and p-coumaryl alcohol, and lower amounts of coniferaldehyde, coniferyl alcohol, sinapaldehyde and sinapyl alcohol. 2D-NMR spectroscopy and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (pyro-GC/MS) reveal an increase of p-hydroxyphenyl units and a reduction of guaiacyl units in the lignin of QsuB lines. Size-exclusion chromatography indicates a lower degree of lignin polymerization in the transgenic lines. Therefore, our data show that the expression of QsuB primarily affects the lignin biosynthetic pathway. Finally, biomass from these lines exhibits more than a twofold improvement in saccharification efficiency. We conclude that the expression of QsuB in plants, in combination with specific promoters, is a promising gain-of-function strategy for spatiotemporal reduction of lignin in plant biomass.

  2. Expression of a bacterial 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase reduces lignin content and improves biomass saccharification efficiency

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Eudes, Aymerick; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; George, Anthe; Liang, Yan; Yang, Fan; Singh, Seema; Keasling, Jay D.; Simmons, Blake A.; Loqué, Dominique

    2015-01-13

    Lignin confers recalcitrance to plant biomass used as feedstocks in agro-processing industries or as source of renewable sugars for the production of bioproducts. The metabolic steps for the synthesis of lignin building blocks belong to the shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Genetic engineering efforts to reduce lignin content typically employ gene knockout or gene silencing techniques to constitutively repress one of these metabolic pathways. Recently, new strategies have emerged offering better spatiotemporal control of lignin deposition, including the expression of enzymes that interfere with the normal process for cell wall lignification. In this study, we report that expression of a 3-dehydroshikimatemore » dehydratase (QsuB from Corynebacterium glutamicum) reduces lignin deposition in Arabidopsis cell walls. QsuB was targeted to the plastids to convert 3-dehydroshikimate – an intermediate of the shikimate pathway – into protocatechuate. Compared to wild-type plants, lines expressing QsuB contain higher amounts of protocatechuate, p-coumarate, p-coumaraldehyde and p-coumaryl alcohol, and lower amounts of coniferaldehyde, coniferyl alcohol, sinapaldehyde and sinapyl alcohol. 2D-NMR spectroscopy and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (pyro-GC/MS) reveal an increase of p-hydroxyphenyl units and a reduction of guaiacyl units in the lignin of QsuB lines. Size-exclusion chromatography indicates a lower degree of lignin polymerization in the transgenic lines. Therefore, our data show that the expression of QsuB primarily affects the lignin biosynthetic pathway. Finally, biomass from these lines exhibits more than a twofold improvement in saccharification efficiency. We conclude that the expression of QsuB in plants, in combination with specific promoters, is a promising gain-of-function strategy for spatiotemporal reduction of lignin in plant biomass.« less

  3. Loss of function of folylpolyglutamate synthetase 1 reduces lignin content and improves cell wall digestibility in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Avinash C.; Chen, Fang; Ray, Tui; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Peña, Maria J.; Avci, Utku; Li, Hongjia; Huhman, David V.; Backe, Jason; Urbanowicz, Breeanna; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Bedair, Mohamed; Wyman, Charles E.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; York, William S.; Hahn, Michael G.; Dixon, Richard A.; Blancaflor, Elison B.; Tang, Yuhong

    2015-12-21

    One-carbon (C1) metabolism is important for synthesizing a range of biologically important compounds that are essential for life. In plants, the C1 pathway is crucial for the synthesis of a large number of secondary metabolites, including lignin. Tetrahydrofolate and its derivatives, collectively referred to as folates, are crucial co-factors for C1 metabolic pathway enzymes. Given the link between the C1 and phenylpropanoid pathways, we evaluated whether folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS), an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of a glutamate tail to folates to form folylpolyglutamates, can be a viable target for reducing cell wall recalcitrance in plants. Consistent with its role in lignocellulosic formation, FPGS1 was preferentially expressed in vascular tissues. Total lignin was low in fpgs1 plants leading to higher saccharification efficiency of the mutant. The decrease in total lignin in fpgs1 was mainly due to lower guaiacyl (G) lignin levels. Glycome profiling revealed subtle alterations in the cell walls of fpgs1. Further analyses of hemicellulosic polysaccharides by NMR showed that the degree of methylation of 4-O-methyl glucuronoxylan was reduced in the fpgs1 mutant. Microarray analysis and real-time qRT-PCR revealed that transcripts of a number of genes in the C1 and lignin pathways had altered expression in fpgs1 mutants. Consistent with the transcript changes of C1-related genes, a significant reduction in S-adenosyl-l-methionine content was detected in the fpgs1 mutant. The modified expression of the various methyltransferases and lignin-related genes indicate possible feedback regulation of C1 pathway-mediated lignin biosynthesis. In conclusion, our observations provide genetic and biochemical support for the importance of folylpolyglutamates in the lignocellulosic pathway and reinforces previous observations that targeting a single FPGS isoform for down-regulation leads to reduced lignin in plants. Because fpgs1 mutants had no dramatic defects in

  4. Loss of function of folylpolyglutamate synthetase 1 reduces lignin content and improves cell wall digestibility in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Avinash C.; Chen, Fang; Ray, Tui; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Peña, Maria J.; Avci, Utku; Li, Hongjia; Huhman, David V.; Backe, Jason; Urbanowicz, Breeanna; et al

    2015-12-21

    One-carbon (C1) metabolism is important for synthesizing a range of biologically important compounds that are essential for life. In plants, the C1 pathway is crucial for the synthesis of a large number of secondary metabolites, including lignin. Tetrahydrofolate and its derivatives, collectively referred to as folates, are crucial co-factors for C1 metabolic pathway enzymes. Given the link between the C1 and phenylpropanoid pathways, we evaluated whether folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS), an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of a glutamate tail to folates to form folylpolyglutamates, can be a viable target for reducing cell wall recalcitrance in plants. Consistent with its rolemore » in lignocellulosic formation, FPGS1 was preferentially expressed in vascular tissues. Total lignin was low in fpgs1 plants leading to higher saccharification efficiency of the mutant. The decrease in total lignin in fpgs1 was mainly due to lower guaiacyl (G) lignin levels. Glycome profiling revealed subtle alterations in the cell walls of fpgs1. Further analyses of hemicellulosic polysaccharides by NMR showed that the degree of methylation of 4-O-methyl glucuronoxylan was reduced in the fpgs1 mutant. Microarray analysis and real-time qRT-PCR revealed that transcripts of a number of genes in the C1 and lignin pathways had altered expression in fpgs1 mutants. Consistent with the transcript changes of C1-related genes, a significant reduction in S-adenosyl-l-methionine content was detected in the fpgs1 mutant. The modified expression of the various methyltransferases and lignin-related genes indicate possible feedback regulation of C1 pathway-mediated lignin biosynthesis. In conclusion, our observations provide genetic and biochemical support for the importance of folylpolyglutamates in the lignocellulosic pathway and reinforces previous observations that targeting a single FPGS isoform for down-regulation leads to reduced lignin in plants. Because fpgs1 mutants had no dramatic

  5. Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels Reducing Plant Lignin for Cheaper Biofuels Print Wednesday, 04 May 2016 12:11 Lignin is a polymer that permeates plant cell walls. ...

  6. Modification of lignin content and composition in plants

    DOEpatents

    Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2002-01-01

    Plants and methods of preparing plants having reduced lignin content and/or altered lignin composition are provided. The activities of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase and/or caffeic acid O-methyltransferase enzymes in the modified plants are reduced.

  7. Plants with modified lignin content and methods for production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Qiao; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2014-08-05

    The invention provides methods for decreasing lignin content and for increasing the level of fermentable carbohydrates in plants by down-regulation of the NST transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of NST are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise reduced lignin content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops. Methods for processing plant tissue and for producing ethanol by utilizing such plants are also provided.

  8. Modification of Lignin Content of Plant Cell Walls - Energy Innovation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Modification of Lignin Content of Plant Cell Walls Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About ...

  9. Transcription factors for modification of lignin content in plants

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Huanzhong; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A.

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides methods for modifying lignin, cellulose, xylan, and hemicellulose content in plants, and for achieving ectopic lignification and, for instance, secondary cell wall synthesis in pith cells, by altered regulation of a WRKY transcription factor. Nucleic acid constructs for altered WRKY-TF expression are described. Transgenic plants are provided that comprise modified pith cell walls, and lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose content. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved biofuel feedstock and as highly digestible forage crops.

  10. Genetic manipulation of lignin reduces recalcitrance and improves biomass ethanol production from switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Fu, Chunxiang; Xiao, Xirong; Ge, Yaxin; Chen, Fang; Bouton, Joseph; Foston, Marcus; Dixon, Richard A; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Switchgrass is a leading dedicated bioenergy feedstock because it is a native, high yielding, perennial prairie grass with broad cultivation range and low agronomic input requirements. Biomass conversion research has developed pilot scale processes for production of ethanol and other alcohols but they remain costly primarily due to the intrinsic recalcitrance of biomass. We show here that switchgrass genetic modification can produce normal plants that have reduced thermochemical and enzymatic recalcitrance. Downregulation of the switchgrass caffeic O-methyltransferase gene decreases lignin content modestly, reduces the syringyl to guaiacyl lignin monomer ratio and increases the ethanol yield by up to a third using conventional biomass fermentation processes. The downregulated lines have wild-type biomass yields but require reduced pretreatment severity and 300-400% lower cellulase dosages for equivalent product yields significantly lowering processing costs. Alternately, our modified transgenic switchgrass lines should yield significantly more fermentation chemicals per hectare under identical process conditions.

  11. Effect of lignin content on changes occurring in poplar cellulose ultrastructure during dilute acid pretreatment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sun, Qining; Foston, Marcus; Meng, Xianzhi; Sawada, Daisuke; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O’Neill, Hugh M.; Li, Hongjia; Wyman, Charles E.; Langan, Paul; Ragauskas, Art J.; et al

    2014-10-14

    Obtaining a better understanding of the complex mechanisms occurring during lignocellulosic deconstruction is critical to the continued growth of renewable biofuel production. A key step in bioethanol production is thermochemical pretreatment to reduce plant cell wall recalcitrance for downstream processes. Previous studies of dilute acid pretreatment (DAP) have shown significant changes in cellulose ultrastructure that occur during pretreatment, but there is still a substantial knowledge gap with respect to the influence of lignin on these cellulose ultrastructural changes. This study was designed to assess how the presence of lignin influences DAP-induced changes in cellulose ultrastructure, which might ultimately have largemore » implications with respect to enzymatic deconstruction efforts. Native, untreated hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoids) samples and a partially delignified poplar sample (facilitated by acidic sodium chlorite pulping) were separately pretreated with dilute sulfuric acid (0.10 M) at 160°C for 15 minutes and 35 minutes, respectively . Following extensive characterization, the partially delignified biomass displayed more significant changes in cellulose ultrastructure following DAP than the native untreated biomass. With respect to the native untreated poplar, delignified poplar after DAP (in which approximately 40% lignin removal occurred) experienced: increased cellulose accessibility indicated by increased Simons’ stain (orange dye) adsorption from 21.8 to 72.5 mg/g, decreased cellulose weight-average degree of polymerization (DPw) from 3087 to 294 units, and increased cellulose crystallite size from 2.9 to 4.2 nm. These changes following DAP ultimately increased enzymatic sugar yield from 10 to 80%. We conclude that, overall, the results indicate a strong influence of lignin content on cellulose ultrastructural changes occurring during DAP. With the reduction of lignin content during DAP, the enlargement of

  12. Lignin nanoparticle synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole; Wheeler, David R.; Benko, David A.

    2015-08-11

    A method including reducing a particle size of lignin particles to an average particle size less than 40 nanometers; after reducing the particle size, combining the lignin particles with a polymeric material; and forming a structure of the combination. A method including exposing lignin to a diazonium precursor including a functional group; modifying the lignin by introducing the functional group to the lignin; and combining the modified lignin with a polymeric material to form a composite. An apparatus including a composite of a polymer and lignin wherein the lignin has an average particle size less than 100 micrometers.

  13. Modulating lignin in plants

    DOEpatents

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  14. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Don L.; Pometto, III, Anthony L.

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  15. The Arabidopsis domain of unknown function 1218 (DUF1218) containing proteins, MODIFYING WALL LIGNIN-1 and 2 (At1g31720/MWL-1 and At4g19370/MWL-2) function redundantly to alter secondary cell wall lignin content

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mewalal, Ritesh; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Coetzee, Berdine; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Myburg, Alexander A.; Zabotina, Olga A.

    2016-03-01

    DUF1218 is a land plant-specific innovation and has previously been shown to be associated with cell wall biology, vasculature patterning and abiotic/biotic stress response. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 15 members, two of which (At1g31720 and At4g27435) are preferentially expressed in the secondary cell wall depositing inflorescence stems. To further our understanding of the roles of DUF1218-containing proteins in secondary cell wall biology, we functionally characterized At1g31720 (herein referred to as MODIFYING WALL LIGNIN-1 or MWL-1). Since related gene family members may contribute to functional redundancy, we also characterized At4g19370 (MWL-2), the most closely related gene to MWL-1 in the proteinmore » family. Subcellular localization revealed that both Arabidopsis proteins are targeted to the cell periphery. The single T-DNA knockout lines, mwl-1 and mwl-2, and independent overexpression lines showed no significant differences in plant growth or changes in total lignin content relative to wild-type (WT) control plants. However, the double homozygous mutant, mwl-1/mwl-2, had smaller rosettes with a significant decrease in rosette fresh weight and stem height relative to the WT control at four weeks and six weeks, respectively. Moreover, mwl-1/mwl-2 showed a significant reduction in total lignin content (by ca. 11% relative to WT) and an increase in syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) monomer ratio relative to the control plants. Lastly, our study has identified two additional members of the DUF1218 family in Arabidopsis as novel contributors to secondary cell wall biology, specifically lignin biosynthesis, and these proteins appear to function redundantly.« less

  16. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, D. )

    1992-12-01

    Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

  17. Poly(ethylene oxide)-Assisted Macromolecular Self-Assembly of Lignin in ABS Matrix for Sustainable Composite Applications

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Akato, Kokouvi M.; Tran, Chau D.; Chen, Jihua; Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-11-05

    Here we report the compatibilization of biomass-derived lignin polymer in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic matrix without loss of mechanical properties via poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-mediated macromolecular self-assembly. ABS was blended with lignin in different concentrations, and blends with 10 wt % PEO (relative to lignin) were prepared. The relative tensile strength improved slightly at low lignin content but diminished rapidly as the lignin content was increased. However, the inclusion of PEO as an interfacial adhesion promoter helped avoid deleterious effects. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that PEO plasticized the hard phase and thus lowered the activation energy (Ea) for its relaxationmore » but caused stiffening of the soft phase and increased its Ea. Microscopy revealed that incorporating lignin in ABS led to the statistical dispersion of discrete lignin domains (300–1000 nm) which, after PEO addition, were reduced to smaller interconnected particles (200–500 nm). The lignin-extended partially renewable ABS resins showed shear-thinning behavior and reduced viscosity compared to neat ABS. The preferred lignin-loaded compositions reinforced with 20 vol % chopped carbon fibers exhibited mechanical performances (77–80 MPa) equivalent to those of reinforced ABS materials reportedly used in 3D printing applications. In conclusion, this approach could lower the cost of ABS while reducing its carbon footprint.« less

  18. Poly(ethylene oxide)-Assisted Macromolecular Self-Assembly of Lignin in ABS Matrix for Sustainable Composite Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akato, Kokouvi M.; Tran, Chau D.; Chen, Jihua; Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-11-05

    Here we report the compatibilization of biomass-derived lignin polymer in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) thermoplastic matrix without loss of mechanical properties via poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-mediated macromolecular self-assembly. ABS was blended with lignin in different concentrations, and blends with 10 wt % PEO (relative to lignin) were prepared. The relative tensile strength improved slightly at low lignin content but diminished rapidly as the lignin content was increased. However, the inclusion of PEO as an interfacial adhesion promoter helped avoid deleterious effects. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that PEO plasticized the hard phase and thus lowered the activation energy (Ea) for its relaxation but caused stiffening of the soft phase and increased its Ea. Microscopy revealed that incorporating lignin in ABS led to the statistical dispersion of discrete lignin domains (300–1000 nm) which, after PEO addition, were reduced to smaller interconnected particles (200–500 nm). The lignin-extended partially renewable ABS resins showed shear-thinning behavior and reduced viscosity compared to neat ABS. The preferred lignin-loaded compositions reinforced with 20 vol % chopped carbon fibers exhibited mechanical performances (77–80 MPa) equivalent to those of reinforced ABS materials reportedly used in 3D printing applications. In conclusion, this approach could lower the cost of ABS while reducing its carbon footprint.

  19. High-throughput prediction of Acacia and eucalypt lignin syringyl/guaiacyl content using FT-Raman spectroscopy and partial least squares modeling

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Healey, Adam; Singh, Seema; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Lee, David J.; Shepherd, Merv; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-01-16

    High-throughput techniques are necessary to efficiently screen potential lignocellulosic feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels, chemicals, and bio-based materials, thereby reducing experimental time and expense while supplanting tedious, destructive methods. The ratio of lignin syringyl (S) to guaiacyl (G) monomers has been routinely quantified as a way to probe biomass recalcitrance. Mid-infrared and Raman spectroscopy have been demonstrated to produce robust partial least squares models for the prediction of lignin S/G ratios in a diverse group of Acacia and eucalypt trees. The most accurate Raman model has now been used to predict the S/G ratio from 269 unknown Acaciamore » and eucalypt feedstocks. This study demonstrates the application of a partial least squares model composed of Raman spectral data and lignin S/G ratios measured using pyrolysis/molecular beam mass spectrometry (pyMBMS) for the prediction of S/G ratios in an unknown data set. The predicted S/G ratios calculated by the model were averaged according to plant species, and the means were not found to differ from the pyMBMS ratios when evaluating the mean values of each method within the 95 % confidence interval. Pairwise comparisons within each data set were employed to assess statistical differences between each biomass species. While some pairwise appraisals failed to differentiate between species, Acacias, in both data sets, clearly display significant differences in their S/G composition which distinguish them from eucalypts. In conclusion, this research shows the power of using Raman spectroscopy to supplant tedious, destructive methods for the evaluation of the lignin S/G ratio of diverse plant biomass materials.« less

  20. High-throughput prediction of Acacia and eucalypt lignin syringyl/guaiacyl content using FT-Raman spectroscopy and partial least squares modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Healey, Adam; Singh, Seema; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Lee, David J.; Shepherd, Merv; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-01-16

    High-throughput techniques are necessary to efficiently screen potential lignocellulosic feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels, chemicals, and bio-based materials, thereby reducing experimental time and expense while supplanting tedious, destructive methods. The ratio of lignin syringyl (S) to guaiacyl (G) monomers has been routinely quantified as a way to probe biomass recalcitrance. Mid-infrared and Raman spectroscopy have been demonstrated to produce robust partial least squares models for the prediction of lignin S/G ratios in a diverse group of Acacia and eucalypt trees. The most accurate Raman model has now been used to predict the S/G ratio from 269 unknown Acacia and eucalypt feedstocks. This study demonstrates the application of a partial least squares model composed of Raman spectral data and lignin S/G ratios measured using pyrolysis/molecular beam mass spectrometry (pyMBMS) for the prediction of S/G ratios in an unknown data set. The predicted S/G ratios calculated by the model were averaged according to plant species, and the means were not found to differ from the pyMBMS ratios when evaluating the mean values of each method within the 95 % confidence interval. Pairwise comparisons within each data set were employed to assess statistical differences between each biomass species. While some pairwise appraisals failed to differentiate between species, Acacias, in both data sets, clearly display significant differences in their S/G composition which distinguish them from eucalypts. In conclusion, this research shows the power of using Raman spectroscopy to supplant tedious, destructive methods for the evaluation of the lignin S/G ratio of diverse plant biomass materials.

  1. Structural Transformation of Isolated Poplar and Switchgrass Lignins from Dilute Acid Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qining; Pu, Yunqiao; Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-27

    A key step in conversion of cellulosic biomass into sustainable fuels and chemicals is thermochemical pretreatment to reduce plant cell wall recalcitrance. Obtaining an improved understanding of the fundamental chemistry of lignin, the most recalcitrant component of biomass, during pretreatment is critical to the continued development of renewable biofuel production. To examine the intrinsic chemistry of lignin during dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), lignin was isolated from poplar and switchgrass using a cellulolytic enzyme system and then treated under DAP conditions. These results highlight that lignin is subjected to depolymerization reactions within the first 2 min of dilute acid pretreatment and these changes are accompanied by increased generation of aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin. This is followed by a competing set of depolymerization and repolymerization reactions that lead to a decrease in the content of guaiacyl lignin units and an increase in condensed lignin units as the reaction residence time is extended beyond 5 min. Finally, we showed that a detailed comparison of changes in functional groups and molecular weights of cellulolytic enzyme lignins with different structural parameters, related to the recalcitrant properties of lignin, could be successfully altered during DAP conditions.

  2. Structural Transformation of Isolated Poplar and Switchgrass Lignins from Dilute Acid Pretreatment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sun, Qining; Pu, Yunqiao; Meng, Xianzhi; Wells, Tyrone; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-27

    A key step in conversion of cellulosic biomass into sustainable fuels and chemicals is thermochemical pretreatment to reduce plant cell wall recalcitrance. Obtaining an improved understanding of the fundamental chemistry of lignin, the most recalcitrant component of biomass, during pretreatment is critical to the continued development of renewable biofuel production. To examine the intrinsic chemistry of lignin during dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), lignin was isolated from poplar and switchgrass using a cellulolytic enzyme system and then treated under DAP conditions. These results highlight that lignin is subjected to depolymerization reactions within the first 2 min of dilute acid pretreatment andmore » these changes are accompanied by increased generation of aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin. This is followed by a competing set of depolymerization and repolymerization reactions that lead to a decrease in the content of guaiacyl lignin units and an increase in condensed lignin units as the reaction residence time is extended beyond 5 min. Finally, we showed that a detailed comparison of changes in functional groups and molecular weights of cellulolytic enzyme lignins with different structural parameters, related to the recalcitrant properties of lignin, could be successfully altered during DAP conditions.« less

  3. Lignin | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Lignin Jump to: navigation, search Lignin.jpg What is Lignin? Lignin is the fiber in our food, the thing that makes vegetables crunchy and firm. It is a polymer found extensively...

  4. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion,more » and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.« less

  5. Lignin structural alterations in thermochemical pretreatments with limited delignification

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Yunqiao; Hu, Fan; Huang, Fang; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2015-08-02

    Lignocellulosic biomass has a complex and rigid cell wall structure that makes biomass recalcitrant to biological and chemical degradation. Among the three major structural biopolymers (i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) in plant cell walls, lignin is considered the most recalcitrant component and generally plays a negative role in the biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. The conversion of biomass to biofuels through a biochemical platform usually requires a pretreatment stage to reduce the recalcitrance. Pretreatment renders compositional and structural changes of biomass with these changes ultimately govern the efficiency of the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Dilute acid, hot water, steam explosion, and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatments are among the leading thermochemical pretreatments with a limited delignification that can reduce biomass recalcitrance. Practical applications of these pretreatment are rapidly developing as illustrated by recent commercial scale cellulosic ethanol plants. While these thermochemical pretreatments generally lead to only a limited delignification and no significant change of lignin content in the pretreated biomass, the lignin transformations that occur during these pretreatments and the roles they play in recalcitrance reduction is an important research aspect. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of lignin alterations during these limited delignification thermochemical pretreatments, with emphasis on lignin chemical structures, molecular weights, and redistributions in the pretreated biomass.

  6. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Moscow, ID)

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  7. Lignin Utilization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Utilization WBS 2.2.3.1 2013 DOE BioEnergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review Date: May 22 nd , 2013 Technology Area Review: Biochemical Conversion Principal Investigator: Gregg T. Beckham Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Goal Statement Goal: Develop processes to produce fuels and value-added chemicals from lignin to help meet 2017 and 2022 cost targets in

  8. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L. (Moscow, ID); Ramachandra, Muralidhara (Wilmington, DE)

    1993-01-01

    DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

  9. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, D.L.; Ramachandra, M.

    1993-08-03

    DNA constructs are provided for the production of Streptomyces lignin peroxidase. The enzyme finds use in the degradation of lignin and oxidation of organic substrates.

  10. Lignin conversion: Opportunities and challenges for the integrated biorefinery

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Xie, Shangxian; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Yuan, Joshua S.

    2016-06-21

    The utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and products represents one of the most imminent challenges in the modern biorefinery because most of the bioprocesses for lignocellulosic biofuels results in a lignin-containing waste stream. Considering lignin's abundance and relatively high energy content, this waste stream can be used as a feedstock for value-added products to improve the sustainability and economic feasibility of the biorefinery. Bioconversion of lignin with microbes recently emerged as an alternative lignin-valorization approach with significant potential. Typically, the microbial bioconversion of lignin requires three major steps: lignin depolymerization, aromatic compounds catabolism, and target product biosynthesis. In thismore » review, we summarize the most recent advances in lignin bioconversion to address the challenges in each of the three steps. In conclusion, we further discuss strategies and perspectives for future research to address the challenges in bioconversion of lignin.« less

  11. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOEpatents

    Najjar, Mitri S.; Corbeels, Roger J.; Kokturk, Uygur

    1989-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  12. Lignin Valorization-final-sm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    renewable resource for chemicals Biofuels: Increasing the Value of Lignin Lignin Valorization Current lignocellulose biomass conversion to biofuels requires the breakdown of lignin ...

  13. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  14. Systems biology-guided biodesign of consolidated lignin conversion

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lin, Lu; Cheng, Yanbing; Pu, Yunqiao; Sun, Su; Li, Xiao; Jin, Mingjie; Pierson, Elizabeth A.; Gross, Dennis C.; Dale, Bruce E.; Dai, Susie Y.; et al

    2016-07-12

    Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer on the earth, yet its utilization for fungible products is complicated by its recalcitrant nature and remains a major challenge for sustainable lignocellulosic biorefineries. In this study, we used a systems biology approach to reveal the carbon utilization pattern and lignin degradation mechanisms in a unique lignin-utilizing Pseudomonas putida strain (A514). The mechanistic study further guided the design of three functional modules to enable a consolidated lignin bioconversion route. First, P. putida A514 mobilized a dye peroxidase-based enzymatic system for lignin depolymerization. This system could be enhanced by overexpressing a secreted multifunctional dyemore » peroxidase to promote a two-fold enhancement of cell growth on insoluble kraft lignin. Second, A514 employed a variety of peripheral and central catabolism pathways to metabolize aromatic compounds, which can be optimized by overexpressing key enzymes. Third, the β-oxidation of fatty acid was up-regulated, whereas fatty acid synthesis was down-regulated when A514 was grown on lignin and vanillic acid. Therefore, the functional module for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production was designed to rechannel β-oxidation products. As a result, PHA content reached 73% per cell dry weight (CDW). Further integrating the three functional modules enhanced the production of PHA from kraft lignin and biorefinery waste. Furthermore, this study elucidated lignin conversion mechanisms in bacteria with potential industrial implications and laid out the concept for engineering a consolidated lignin conversion route.« less

  15. Economic contribution of lignins to ethanol production from biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Chum, H.L.; Parker, S.K.; Feinberg, D.A.; Wright, J.D.; Rice, P.A.; Sinclair, S.A.; Glasser, W.G.

    1985-05-01

    Lignin, one of the three major polymeric components of biomass (16% to 33% by weight in wood), has the highest specific heat content. Therefore, it can be burned for process fuel. Compared to coal, its fuel value is 2.2 cents/lb. This report investigates markets for lignin utilization of higher value. After lignin isolation from the process, purchase of replacement fuel (coal was analyzed), lignin sale for the manufacture of solid materials or higher value octane enhancers was evaluated. Polymeric applications evaluated were: surfactants, asphalt, carbon black, adhesives, and lignin plastics; agricultural applications were briefly reviewed. These lignins would generate coproduct credits of 25 cents to 150 cents/gallon of ethanol respectively for 7.5 cents to 60 cents/lb lignin value (isolation and eventual modification costs were taken into account). Overall markets for these polymeric applications were projected at 11 billion lb/year by the year 2000. These projections are intensities of demand and not actual shipments of lignins. In addition, this report investigates the possibility of converting lignins into mixtures of methyls aryl ethers and methyl substituted-aryl ethers which are high value octane enhancers, fully compatible with gasoline. The report intends to show that if fuel ethanol production in the billions of gallons scale occurs lignin markets would not be saturated. 10 refs., 14 figs., 36 tabs.

  16. p-Hydroxyphenyl (H) Units Lower the Degree of Polymerization in Lignin: Chemical Control in Lignin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, A. K.; Parks, J. M.; Davis, M. F.; Smith, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin, composed predominantly of p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) subunits, is a major component of plant cell walls that imparts resistance toward chemical and microbial deconstruction of plant biomass, rendering its conversion inefficient and costly. Previous studies have shown that alterating lignin composition, i.e., the relative abundance of H, G and S subunits, promises more efficient extraction of sugars from plant biomass. Smaller and less branched lignin chains are more easily extracted during pretreatment, making cellulose more readily degradable. Here, using density functional theory calculations, we show that the incorporation of H subunits into lignin via b-b and b-5 interunit linkages reduces the degree of polymerization in lignin. Frontier molecular orbital analyses of lignin dimers and trimers show that H as a terminal subunit on a growing lignin polymer linked via b-b and b-5 linkage cannot undergo radical formation, preventing further chain growth by endwise polymerization resulting in lignin polymers with lower degree of polymerization. These results indicate that, for endwise polymerization in lignin synthesis, there exists a chemical control that may lay a significant role in determining the structure of lignin.

  17. Lignin Valorization-final-sm

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovering effective methods of depolymerizing lignin will improve economics of biorefineries and create a renewable resource for chemicals Biofuels: Increasing the Value of Lignin Lignin Valorization Current lignocellulose biomass conversion to biofuels requires the breakdown of lignin to liberate sugars that can be converted into advanced fuels. The process results in a significant amount of lignin waste product that could be utilized for other byproducts improving the economics for

  18. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOEpatents

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  19. Catalytic Hydrolytic Cleavage and Oxy-Cleavage of Lignin Linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Guanguang; Chen, Baowei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2014-07-26

    In this work, new strategies involving organic bases were evaluated to depolymerize lignin to reduced molecular fragments in aqueous medium. NaOH as an inorganic base was also investigated as a reference. Full nature lignin samples are used for the study. As research tools to unravel the complexity of the macro lignin structure and bulky molecular size under this study, size exclusion chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometric analysis, typically used for protein characterizations, were used to follow the progress of lignin depolymerisation by measuring the molecular weight distribution of the products and determining the key molecular fingerprints, respectively. The results show that sodium phenoxide and guanidine carbonate are effective catalysts for lignin depolymerization. It is observed that there exists a synergism between H2O2 and the organic base, which is strongest with guanidine carbonate.

  20. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-01-25

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  1. Method for reducing the sulfur content of a sulfur-containing hydrocarbon stream

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2004-12-28

    The sulfur content of a liquid hydrocarbon stream is reduced under mild conditions by contracting a sulfur-containing liquid hydrocarbon stream with transition metal particles containing the transition metal in a zero oxidation state under conditions sufficient to provide a hydrocarbon product having a reduced sulfur content and metal sulfide particles. The transition metal particles can be produced in situ by adding a transition metal precursor, e.g., a transition metal carbonyl compound, to the sulfur-containing liquid feed stream and sonicating the feed steam/transition metal precursor combination under conditions sufficient to produce the transition metal particles.

  2. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein.

  3. Pinoresinol reductase 1 impacts lignin distribution during secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qiao; Zeng, Yining; Yin, Yanbin; Pu, Yunqiao; Jackson, Lisa A.; Engle, Nancy L.; Martin, Madhavi Z.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Ding, Shi-You; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; et al

    2014-08-05

    In this paper, pinoresinol reductase (PrR) catalyzes the conversion of the lignan (-)-pinoresinol to (-)-lariciresinol in Arabidopsis thaliana, where it is encoded by two genes, PrR1 and PrR2, that appear to act redundantly. PrR1 is highly expressed in lignified inflorescence stem tissue, whereas PrR2 expression is barely detectable in stems. Co-expression analysis has indicated that PrR1 is co-expressed with many characterized genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis, whereas PrR2 expression clusters with a different set of genes. The promoter of the PrR1 gene is regulated by the secondary cell wall related transcription factors SND1 and MYB46. The loss-of-function mutantmore » of PrR1 shows, in addition to elevated levels of pinoresinol, significantly decreased lignin content and a slightly altered lignin structure with lower abundance of cinnamyl alcohol end groups. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy analysis indicated that the lignin content of the prr1-1 loss-of-function mutant is similar to that of wild-type plants in xylem cells, which exhibit a normal phenotype, but is reduced in the fiber cells. Finally, together, these data suggest an association of the lignan biosynthetic enzyme encoded by PrR1 with secondary cell wall biosynthesis in fiber cells.« less

  4. Lignin Bioproducts to Enable Biofuels

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wyman, Charles E.; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2015-09-15

    Here we report that today's and tomorrow's biofuels production facilities could benefit tremendously from increasing the value from the large amount of lignin that results from biofuels operations. Certainly, the scientific community, and biofuels industry has begun to recognize the challenges and opportunities associated with lignin.

  5. Functionalized lignin, rubber containing functionalized lignin and products containing such rubber composition

    DOEpatents

    Benko, David Andrew; Hahn, Bruce Raymond; Cohen, Martin Paul; Dirk, Shawn Matthew; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole

    2014-03-04

    The invention relates to functionalized lignin, rubber compositions which contain functionalized lignin and to products which have at least one component comprised of such rubber composition.

  6. From lignin association to nano-/micro-particle preparation: Extracting higher value of lignin

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wenwen; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Cheng, Gang

    2016-09-26

    As the most abundant source of renewable aromatic compounds on the planet, lignin is gaining growing interest in replacing petroleum-based chemicals and products. Value-added applications of lignin are also essential for economic viability for future bio-refineries. It is however an under-utilized natural resource due to its structural heterogeneities. Lignin nanoparticles offer many opportunities for value-added applications of lignin. The solution structures of lignin were proposed as one of the key elements in controlling lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Fundamental understanding of solutionstructures of lignin aid in designing better fabrication of lignin nanoparticles. A deeper understanding of the observed experimental results also pointsmore » to the need for detailed studies of lignin in solution. Lastly, this review consists of two major topics, the solution structures of lignin and lignin nano-/micro-particle preparation. Suggestions for future studies regarding these two topics were also put forward.« less

  7. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templated carbon.

  8. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous research has shown that addition of lignin-derived liquids to coal stirred in tetralin under mild reaction conditions (375{degree}C and 300--500 psig) results in a marked enhancement in the rate of coal depolymerization. A mathematical model was developed to study the kinetics of coal depolymerization in the presence of liquid-derived liquids. In the present study, a reaction pathway was formulated to explain the enhancement in coal depolymerization due to lignin (solid) addition. The model postulated assumes that the products of lignin obtained during thermolysis interact with the reactive moieties present in coal while simultaneous depolymerization of coal occurs. A good fit between the experimental data and the kinetic model was found. The results show that in addition to the enhancement in the rate of coal depolymerization, lignin also reacts (and enhances the extent of depolymerization of coal) with those reaction sites in coal that are not susceptible to depolymerization when coal alone is reacted in tetralin under identical reaction conditions. Additional work is being carried out to determine a thorough materials balance on the lignin-assisted coal depolymerization process. A number of liquid samples have been obtained which are being studied for their stability in various environments. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    8.0 - HOISTING AND RIGGING IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS February 18, 2010 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 18.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS..................................................................................................................................1 PAGINATION TABLE.....................................................................................................................................1 18.0 HOISTING AND RIGGING IN HOSTILE ENVIRONMENTS

  10. Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

  11. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    DOEpatents

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  12. CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    3.0 - CRITICAL, SPECIAL, & ENGINEERED LIFTS January 4, 2016 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 3.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 CRITICAL LIFTS ....................................................................................................................................... 3 3.1 SCOPE .......................................................................................................................................................... 3 3.2 CRITICAL LIFT DETERMINATION

  13. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Shabtai, Joseph S. (Salt Lake City, UT); Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chornet, Esteban (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-09

    A high-yield process for converting lignin into reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline compositions of high quality is provided. The process is a two-stage catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated, partially oxygenated gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage of the process, a lignin feed material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction, followed by a selective hydrocracking reaction which utilizes a superacid catalyst to produce a high oxygen-content depolymerized lignin product mainly composed of alkylated phenols, alkylated alkoxyphenols, and alkylbenzenes. In the second stage of the process, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to an exhaustive etherification reaction, optionally followed by a partial ring hydrogenation reaction, to produce a reformulated, partially oxygenated/etherified gasoline product, which includes a mixture of substituted phenyl/methyl ethers, cycloalkyl methyl ethers, C.sub.7 -C.sub.10 alkylbenzenes, C.sub.6 -C.sub.10 branched and multibranched paraffins, and alkylated and polyalkylated cycloalkanes.

  14. CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume 2, Sampling Technical Requirements Effective Date: 6/1/07 Vol. 2: i CONTENTS 1.0 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROCESS .................................................................... 1-1 2.0 DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES ................................................................................... 2-1 3.0 SAMPLING SYSTEMS .................................................................................................. 3-1 3.1 Facility Management

  15. CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume 4, Laboratory Technical Requirements Effective Date: 6/1/07 Vol. 4: i CONTENTS 1.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE OBJECTIVES......................................................................... 1-1 1.1 DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES............................................................................ 1-1 1.2 CLIENT DATA QUALITY REQUIREMENTS ..................................................... 1-2 1.2.1 Precision

  16. Genetic Determinants for Enzymatic Digestion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Are Independent of Those for Lignin Abundance in a Maize Recombinant Inbred Population

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, Bryan W.; Sykes, Robert W.; Babcock, Nicholas C.; Dugard, Christopher K.; Held, Michael A.; Klimek, John F.; Shreve, Jacob T.; Fowler, Matthew; Ziebell, Angela; Davis, Mark F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Springer, Nathan M.; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Weil, Clifford F.; McCann, Maureen C.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-06-27

    Biotechnological approaches to reduce or modify lignin in biomass crops are predicated on the assumption that it is the principal determinant of the recalcitrance of biomass to enzymatic digestion for biofuels production. We defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the Intermated B73 x 3 Mo17 recombinant inbred maize (Zea mays) population using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry to establish stem lignin content and an enzymatic hydrolysis assay to measure glucose and xylose yield. Among five multiyear QTL for lignin abundance, two for 4-vinylphenol abundance, and four for glucose and/or xylose yield, not a single QTL for aromatic abundance and sugar yield was shared. A genome-wide association study for lignin abundance and sugar yield of the 282- member maize association panel provided candidate genes in the 11 QTL of the B73 and Mo17 parents but showed that many other alleles impacting these traits exist among this broader pool of maize genetic diversity. B73 and Mo17 genotypes exhibited large differences in gene expression in developing stem tissues independent of allelic variation. Combining these complementary genetic approaches provides a narrowed list of candidate genes. A cluster of SCARECROW-LIKE9 and SCARECROW-LIKE14 transcription factor genes provides exceptionally strong candidate genes emerging from the genome-wide association study. In addition to these and genes associated with cell wall metabolism, candidates include several other transcription factors associated with vascularization and fiber formation and components of cellular signaling pathways. Finally, these results provide new insights and strategies beyond the modification of lignin to enhance yields of biofuels from genetically modified biomass.

  17. Genetic Determinants for Enzymatic Digestion of Lignocellulosic Biomass Are Independent of Those for Lignin Abundance in a Maize Recombinant Inbred Population

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Penning, Bryan W.; Sykes, Robert W.; Babcock, Nicholas C.; Dugard, Christopher K.; Held, Michael A.; Klimek, John F.; Shreve, Jacob T.; Fowler, Matthew; Ziebell, Angela; Davis, Mark F.; et al

    2014-06-27

    Biotechnological approaches to reduce or modify lignin in biomass crops are predicated on the assumption that it is the principal determinant of the recalcitrance of biomass to enzymatic digestion for biofuels production. We defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the Intermated B73 x 3 Mo17 recombinant inbred maize (Zea mays) population using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry to establish stem lignin content and an enzymatic hydrolysis assay to measure glucose and xylose yield. Among five multiyear QTL for lignin abundance, two for 4-vinylphenol abundance, and four for glucose and/or xylose yield, not a single QTL for aromatic abundance and sugar yieldmore » was shared. A genome-wide association study for lignin abundance and sugar yield of the 282- member maize association panel provided candidate genes in the 11 QTL of the B73 and Mo17 parents but showed that many other alleles impacting these traits exist among this broader pool of maize genetic diversity. B73 and Mo17 genotypes exhibited large differences in gene expression in developing stem tissues independent of allelic variation. Combining these complementary genetic approaches provides a narrowed list of candidate genes. A cluster of SCARECROW-LIKE9 and SCARECROW-LIKE14 transcription factor genes provides exceptionally strong candidate genes emerging from the genome-wide association study. In addition to these and genes associated with cell wall metabolism, candidates include several other transcription factors associated with vascularization and fiber formation and components of cellular signaling pathways. Finally, these results provide new insights and strategies beyond the modification of lignin to enhance yields of biofuels from genetically modified biomass.« less

  18. Lignin-Derived Advanced Carbon Materials

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-11-16

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. By applying specific pretreatments and manufacturing methods, it has been found that lignin can be converted into a variety of value-added carbon materials. However, the physical and chemical heterogeneities of lignin complicate its use as a feedstock. Herein, we discuss the lignin manufacturing process, the effects of pretreatments and manufacturing methods on the properties of product lignin, and structure–property relationships in various applications of lignin-derived carbon materials, such as carbon fibers, carbon mats, activated carbons, carbon films, and templatedmore » carbon.« less

  19. Contents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Program and Book of Abstracts Contents Organizers i-ii Detailed Program iii-viii Oral presentations 1-38 Posters P1-P27 Program Schematic back cover The LAPD Symposium brings together scientists from laser physics, low- temperature plasma chemistry and physics, and nuclear fusion. The Symposium is an important, unique, and fruitful source for cross-fertilization between these fields. Major topics include laser-aided diagnostics for fusion plasmas, industrial process plasmas, and environmental

  20. Method of altering lignin in trees

    DOEpatents

    MacKay, J.; O`Malley, D.; Whetten, R.; Sederoff, R.

    1998-10-20

    Methods of providing and breeding trees having more easily extractable lignin due to the presence of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (Cad) null gene are presented. 16 figs.

  1. Method of altering lignin in trees

    DOEpatents

    MacKay, John; O'Malley, David; Whetten, Ross; Sederoff, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Methods of providing and breeding trees having more easily extractable lignin due to the presence of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (Cad) null gene are presented.

  2. Effect of ionic liquid treatment on the structures of lignins in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Kent, Michael S; He, Lilin; Varanasi, Patanjali; Dibble, Dean; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Seema

    2012-01-01

    The solution structures of three types of isolated lignin - organosolv (OS), Kraft (K), and low sulfonate (LS) - before and after treatment with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate were studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) over a concentration range of 0.3-2.4 wt %. The results indicate that each of these lignins is comprised of aggregates of well-defined basal subunits, the shapes and sizes of which, in D{sub 2}O and DMSO-d{sub 6}, are revealed using these techniques. LS lignin contains a substantial amount of nanometer-scale individual subunits. In aqueous solution these subunits have a well-defined elongated shape described well by ellipsoidal and cylindrical models. At low concentration the subunits are highly expanded in alkaline solution, and the effect is screened with increasing concentration. OS lignin dissolved in DMSO was found to consist of a narrow distribution of aggregates with average radius 200 {+-} 30 nm. K lignin in DMSO consists of aggregates with a very broad size distribution. After ionic liquid (IL) treatment, LS lignin subunits in alkaline solution maintained the elongated shape but were reduced in size. IL treatment of OS and K lignins led to the release of nanometer-scale subunits with well-defined size and shape.

  3. Preparation of lithium-ion battery anodes using lignin (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Preparation of lithium-ion battery anodes using lignin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preparation of lithium-ion battery anodes using lignin Authors:...

  4. Roles of Small Laccases from Streptomyces in Lignin Degradation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Roles of Small Laccases from Streptomyces in Lignin Degradation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roles of Small Laccases from Streptomyces in Lignin Degradation Authors: ...

  5. Lignin Based Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Lignin Based Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lignin Based Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Applications The ...

  6. Lignin Utilization Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... * Cost-effective separations Aim 2: Use biology & catalysis to upgrade lignin 6 ... an interdisciplinary team Aim 2: Use biology & catalysis to upgrade lignin FY13: Proof ...

  7. Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

    2014-09-01

    for the C-O bond hydrogenolysis in model compounds, which mimic the b-O-4, a-O-4, and 4-O-5 linkages of natural lignin. The versatile IRMOF-74(n) series is proposed as a platform for creating efficient hydrogenolysis catalysts as it not only displays tunable pore sizes, but also has the required thermal and chemical stability. The catalytic C-O bond cleavage occurs at 10 bar hydrogen pressure and temperatures as low as 120 degC. The conversion efficiency of the aromatic ether substrates into the corresponding hydrocarbons and phenols varies as PhCH 2 CH 2 OPh > PhCH 2 OPh > PhOPh (Ph = phenyl), while the catalytic activity generally follows the following trend Ni@IRMOF-74>Ti@IRMOF-74>IRMOF-74. Conversions as high as 80%, coupled with good selectivity for hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation, highlight the potential of MOF-based catalysts for the selective cleavage of recalcitrant aryl-ether bonds found in lignin and other biopolymers. This project supports the DOE Integrated Biorefinery Program goals, the objective of which is to convert biomass to fuels and high-value chemicals, by addressing an important technology gap: the lack of low-temperature catalysts suitable for industrial lignin degradation. Biomass, which is %7E30 wt% lignin, constitutes a potentially major source of platform chemicals that could improve overall profitability and productivity of all energy-related products, thereby benefiting consumers and reducing national dependence on imported oil. Additionally, DoD has a strong interest in low-cost drop-in fuels (Navy Biofuel Initiative) and has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with DOE and USDA to develop a sustainable biofuels industry.

  8. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is preferably dried and stored until it is used (along with an alkali, an aldehyde and an adhesive filler) in compounding an adhesive of the type generally used in the manufacture of plywood.

  9. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins by extracting demethylated lignin

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

  10. Method for regulation of plant lignin composition

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clint

    1999-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the regulation of lignin composition in plant tissue. Plants are transformed with a gene encoding an active F5H gene. The expression of the F5H gene results in increased levels of syringyl monomer providing a lignin composition more easily degraded with chemicals and enzymes.

  11. Engineering a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase with high selectivity for the condensed lignin precursor coniferyl alchohol

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yuanheng; Shanklin, John; Mohammad -Wadud Bhuiya; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2015-09-16

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create an enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. Lastly, the resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta.

  12. Engineering a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase with high selectivity for the condensed lignin precursor coniferyl alchohol

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cai, Yuanheng; Shanklin, John; Mohammad -Wadud Bhuiya; Liu, Chang -Jun

    2015-09-16

    Lignin, a rigid biopolymer in plant cell walls, is derived from the oxidative polymerization of three monolignols. The composition of monolignol monomers dictates the degree of lignin condensation, reactivity, and thus the degradability of plant cell walls. Guaiacyl lignin is regarded as the condensed structural unit. Polymerization of lignin is initiated through the deprotonation of the para-hydroxyl group of monolignols. Therefore, preferentially modifying the para-hydroxyl of a specific monolignol to deprive its dehydrogenation propensity would disturb the formation of particular lignin subunits. Here, we test the hypothesis that specific remodeling the active site of a monolignol 4-O-methyltransferase would create anmore » enzyme that specifically methylates the condensed guaiacyl lignin precursor coniferyl alcohol. Combining crystal structural information with combinatorial active site saturation mutagenesis and starting with the engineered promiscuous enzyme, MOMT5 (T133L/E165I/F175I/F166W/H169F), we incrementally remodeled its substrate binding pocket by the addition of four substitutions, i.e. M26H, S30R, V33S, and T319M, yielding a mutant enzyme capable of discriminately etherifying the para-hydroxyl of coniferyl alcohol even in the presence of excess sinapyl alcohol. The engineered enzyme variant has a substantially reduced substrate binding pocket that imposes a clear steric hindrance thereby excluding bulkier lignin precursors. Lastly, the resulting enzyme variant represents an excellent candidate for modulating lignin composition and/or structure in planta.« less

  13. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri

    2015-05-22

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5?m and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31?W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  14. Challenging/interesting lignin times

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-08-31

    Anyone who is working in the fuels industry knows that we are living in challenging times. On a personal note, I recall that ~5 years ago, some of my children's friends headed out into the petroleum industry to start their careers and several have now returned because of the retrenching work force. Despite these challenging times, the cellulosic ethanol industry continues to develop commercial operations, but with today's cost structure, biofuels production facilities have certainly slowed their pace of development and roll-out. Furthermore, the biological technology platform for biorefining plant polysaccharides to biofuels has been reported to have an intrinsicmore » advantage, if it can convert its waste lignin stream to value-added components.[1]« less

  15. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging Showing Reduced Unsaturated Lipid Content in the Hippocampus of a mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovjan, A.C.; Kretlow, A.; Miller, L.M.

    2010-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are essential to brain functions such as membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and cell survival. It is also thought that low levels of unsaturated lipid in the brain may contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk or severity. However, it is not known how accumulation of unsaturated lipids is affected in different regions of the hippocampus, which is a central target of AD plaque pathology, during aging. In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIRI) to visualize the unsaturated lipid content in specific regions of the hippocampus in the PSAPP mouse model of AD as a function of plaque formation. Specifically, the unsaturated lipid content was imaged using the olefinic {double_bond}CH stretching mode at 3012 cm{sup -1}. The axonal, dendritic, and somatic layers of the hippocampus were examined in the mice at 13, 24, 40, and 56 weeks old. Results showed that lipid unsaturation in the axonal layer was significantly increased with normal aging in control (CNT) mice (p < 0.01) but remained low and relatively constant in PSAPP mice. Thus, these findings indicate that unsaturated lipid content is reduced in hippocampal white matter during amyloid pathogenesis and that maintaining unsaturated lipid content early in the disease may be critical in avoiding progression of the disease.

  16. Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Primm, R.T., III

    2003-11-01

    Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses.

  17. Reduced

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reduced intermittency in the magnetic turbulence of reversed field pinch plasmas L. Marrelli and L. Frassinetti Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti, 4 35127 Padova, Italy a͒ P. Martin Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti, 4 35127 Padova, Italy a͒ and Dipartimento di Fisica G. Galilei, Universitàt di Padova, 35131 Padova, Italy D. Craig and J. S. Sarff Department of Physics and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in

  18. Zero added oxygen for high quality sputtered ITO. A data science investigation of reduced Sn-content and added Zr

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Peshek, Timothy J.; Burst, James M.; Coutts, Timothy J.; Gessert, Timothy A.

    2016-01-19

    Here, we demonstrate mobilities of >45 cm2/V s for sputtered tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films at zero added oxygen. All films were deposited with 5 wt. % SnO2, instead of the more conventional 8–10 wt. %, and had varying ZrO2 content from 0 to 3 wt. %, with a subsequent reduction in In2O3 content. Moreover, these films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering from nominally stoichiometric targets with varying oxygen partial pressure in the sputter ambient. Anomalous behavior was discovered for films with no Zr-added, where a bimodality of high and low mobilities was discovered for nominally similar growth conditions.more » However, all films showed the lowest resistivity and highest mobilities when the oxygen partial pressure in the sputter ambient was zero. This result is contrasted with several other reports of ITO transport performance having a maximum for small but nonzero oxygen partial pressure. Our result is attributed to the reduced concentration of SnO2. The addition of ZrO2 yielded the highest mobilities at >55 cm2/V s and the films showed a modest increase in optical transmission with increasing Zr-content.« less

  19. Manipulation Of Lignin Biosynthesis To Maximize Ethanol Production From Populus Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Clint Chapple; Dr. Rick Lindroth; Dr. Burce Dien; Dr. Glen Stanosz; Dr. Alex Wiedenhoeft; Dr. Fu Zhao; Dr. Duane Wegener; Dr. Janice Kelly; Dr. Leigh Raymond; Dr. Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-15

    Our research focuses on transgenic strategies for modifying lignification to improve biomass quality, without leading to deleterious effects on plant performance. In order to accomplish this objective, we designed molecular strategies and selected appropriate transgenes for manipulating the expression of lignification-associated genes; we generated poplar engineered for altered lignin content and/or monomer composition, and field-tested them for fitness; we analyzed the impact of these transgenic strategies on metabolism in general and lignin biosynthesis in particular; and evaluated the ease with which cell wall deconstruction can be accomplished using both chemical and enzymatic means using wild-type and high syringyl poplar.

  20. Manipulation of lignin composition in plants using a tissue-specific promoter

    DOEpatents

    Chapple, Clinton C. S.

    2003-08-26

    The present invention relates to methods and materials in the field of molecular biology, the manipulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway and the regulation of proteins synthesis through plant genetic engineering. More particularly, the invention relates to the introduction of a foreign nucleotide sequence into a plant genome, wherein the introduction of the nucleotide sequence effects an increase in the syringyl content of the plant's lignin. In one specific aspect, the invention relates to methods for modifying the plant lignin composition in a plant cell by the introduction there into of a foreign nucleotide sequence comprising at issue specific plant promoter sequence and a sequence encoding an active ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H) enzyme. Plant transformants harboring an inventive promoter-F5H construct demonstrate increased levels of syringyl monomer residues in their lignin, rendering the polymer more readily delignified and, thereby, rendering the plant more readily pulped or digested.

  1. A new class of renewable thermoplastics with extraordinary performance from nanostructured lignin-elastomers

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chen, Jihua D.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Naskar, Amit K.; Tran, Chau D.

    2016-03-22

    In this study, a new class of thermoplastic elastomers has been created by introducing nanoscale-dispersed lignin (a biomass-derived phenolic oligomer) into nitrile rubber. Temperature-induced controlled miscibility between the lignin and the rubber during high shear melt-phase synthesis allows tuning the material s morphology and performance. The sustainable product has unprecedented yield stress (15–45 MPa), strain hardens at large deformation, and has outstanding recyclability. The multiphase polymers developed from an equal-mass mixture of a melt-stable lignin fraction and nitrile rubber with optimal acrylonitrile content, using the method described here, show 5–100 nm lignin lamellae with a high-modulus rubbery interphase. Molded ormore » printed elastomeric products prepared from the lignin-nitrile material offer an additional revenue stream to pulping mills and biorefineries. Research was sponsored by the Technology Innovation Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. TEM (J.C. and C.D.T.) and SAXS (J.K.K.) experiments were conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.« less

  2. Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-04-01

    Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling

  3. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Ralph, John; Donohue, Timothy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Phillips, George N.

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, we present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.

  4. Structural basis of stereospecificity in the bacterial enzymatic cleavage of β-aryl ether bonds in lignin

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Helmich, Kate E.; Pereira, Jose Henrique; Gall, Daniel L.; Heins, Richard A.; McAndrew, Ryan P.; Bingman, Craig; Deng, Kai; Holland, Keefe C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Simmons, Blake A.; et al

    2015-12-04

    Here, lignin is a combinatorial polymer comprising monoaromatic units that are linked via covalent bonds. Although lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemicals, its recalcitrance to chemical or biological digestion presents major obstacles to both the production of second-generation biofuels and the generation of valuable coproducts from lignin's monoaromatic units. Degradation of lignin has been relatively well characterized in fungi, but it is less well understood in bacteria. A catabolic pathway for the enzymatic breakdown of aromatic oligomers linked via β-aryl ether bonds typically found in lignin has been reported in the bacterium Sphingobium sp. SYK-6. Here, wemore » present x-ray crystal structures and biochemical characterization of the glutathione-dependent β-etherases, LigE and LigF, from this pathway. The crystal structures show that both enzymes belong to the canonical two-domain fold and glutathione binding site architecture of the glutathione S-transferase family. Mutagenesis of the conserved active site serine in both LigE and LigF shows that, whereas the enzymatic activity is reduced, this amino acid side chain is not absolutely essential for catalysis. The results include descriptions of cofactor binding sites, substrate binding sites, and catalytic mechanisms. Because β-aryl ether bonds account for 50–70% of all interunit linkages in lignin, understanding the mechanism of enzymatic β-aryl ether cleavage has significant potential for informing ongoing studies on the valorization of lignin.« less

  5. Effect of Lignin Removal by Alkaline Peroxide Pretreatment on the Susceptibility of Corn Stover to Purified Cellulolytic and Xylanolytic Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, M. J.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.; Decker, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Pretreatment of corn stover with alkaline peroxide (AP) at pH 11.5 resulted in reduction of lignin content in the residual solids as a function of increasing batch temperature. Scanning electron microscopy of these materials revealed notably more textured surfaces on the plant cell walls as a result of the delignifying pretreatment. As expected, digestion of the delignified samples with commercial cellulase preparations showed an inverse relationship between the content of lignin present in the residual solids after pretreatment and the extent of both glucan and xylan conversion achievable. Digestions with purified enzymes revealed that decreased lignin content in the pretreated solids did not significantly impact the extent of glucan conversion achievable by cellulases alone. Not until purified xylanolytic activities were included with the cellulases were significant improvements in glucan conversion realized. In addition, an inverse relationship was observed between lignin content after pretreatment and the extent of xylan conversion achievable in a 24-h period with the xylanolytic enzymes in the absence of the cellulases. This observation, coupled with the direct relationship between enzymatic xylan and glucan conversion observed in a number of cases, suggests that the presence of lignins may not directly occlude cellulose present in lignocelluloses but rather impact cellulase action indirectly by its association with xylan.

  6. Deconstruction of Lignin Model Compounds and Biomass-Derived Lignin using Layered Double Hydroxide Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Chmely, S. C.; McKinney, K. A.; Lawrence, K. R.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is an underutilized value stream in current biomass conversion technologies because there exist no economic and technically feasible routes for lignin depolymerization and upgrading. Base-catalyzed deconstruction (BCD) has been applied for lignin depolymerization (e.g., the Kraft process) in the pulp and paper industry for more than a century using aqueous-phase media. However, these efforts require treatment to neutralize the resulting streams, which adds significantly to the cost of lignin deconstruction. To circumvent the need for downstream treatment, here we report recent advances in the synthesis of layered double hydroxide and metal oxide catalysts to be applied to the BCD of lignin. These catalysts may prove more cost-effective than liquid-phase, non-recyclable base, and their use obviates downstream processing steps such as neutralization. Synthetic procedures for various transition-metal containing catalysts, detailed kinetics measurements using lignin model compounds, and results of the application of these catalysts to biomass-derived lignin will be presented.

  7. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, Foster A. (Lakewood, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

  8. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, F.A.

    1998-09-15

    A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

  9. Separation of Alcohols from Solution by Lignin Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, William {Bill} L; Compere, A L

    2008-01-01

    Partition relationships of radioisotope labeled ethanol and 1-butanol between aqueous solutions and a hydrated commercial Kraft softwood lignin gel are presented. These initial evaluations indicate that lignin hydrogels preferentially concentrate 1-butanol and, to a lesser extent, ethanol. The process implications and potential use of lignin as an inexpensive extractant are discussed.

  10. Genetic engineering of syringyl-enriched lignin in plants

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Vincent Lee; Li, Laigeng

    2004-11-02

    The present invention relates to a novel DNA sequence, which encodes a previously unidentified lignin biosynthetic pathway enzyme, sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) that regulates the biosynthesis of syringyl lignin in plants. Also provided are methods for incorporating this novel SAD gene sequence or substantially similar sequences into a plant genome for genetic engineering of syringyl-enriched lignin in plants.

  11. Genetics and chemistry of lignin degradation by Streptomyces

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Our research goal was to define the involvement of lignin peroxidases and other extracellular enzymes in lignin degradation by Streptomyces. We examined the biochemistry and genetics of lignin degrading enzyme production by several strains of Streptomyces. The lignin peroxidase ALiP-P3 of S. viridosporus was characterized kinetically and its activity optimized for oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and vanillyl-acetone. Sensitive spectrophotometric assays were developed for monitoring oxidation of these substrates. ALiP-P3 reaction chemistry was examined using both spectrophotometric assays and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Results showed that the enzyme oxidizes phenolic lignin substructure models in strong preference to nonphenolic ones. The peroxidase was also shown to depolymerize native lignin. We also cloned the ALip-P3 gene S. lividans in plasmid vector pIJ702. The cloned gene was partially sequenced, We also immunologically characterized the lignin peroxidase of S. viridosporus T7A and showed it to be structurally related to peroxidases produced by other lignin-solubilizing Streptomyces, but not the the H8 lignin peroxidase of P. chrysosporium. Studies with peroxidase deficient mutants of strain T7A showed that lignin peroxidases of S. viridosporus are directly involved in the solubilization of lignin. Additional research showed that other enzymes are also probably involved in lignin solubilization, possibly including extracellular esterases.

  12. Modest hypoxia significantly reduces triglyceride content and lipid droplet size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Yokokawa, Takumi; Endo, Yuriko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Faculty of Sport Science, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 ; Taguchi, Sadayoshi

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: Long-term hypoxia decreased the size of LDs and lipid storage in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Long-term hypoxia increased basal lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hypoxia decreased lipid-associated proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hypoxia decreased basal glucose uptake and lipogenic proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hypoxia-mediated lipogenesis may be an attractive therapeutic target against obesity. -- Abstract: Background: A previous study has demonstrated that endurance training under hypoxia results in a greater reduction in body fat mass compared to exercise under normoxia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this hypoxia-mediated reduction in fat mass remain uncertain. Here, we examine the effects of modest hypoxia on adipocyte function. Methods: Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated at 5% O{sub 2} for 1 week (long-term hypoxia, HL) or one day (short-term hypoxia, HS) and compared with a normoxia control (NC). Results: HL, but not HS, resulted in a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride content (by 50%) compared to NC (p < 0.01). As estimated by glycerol release, isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly lowered by hypoxia, whereas the release of free fatty acids under the basal condition was prominently enhanced with HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Lipolysis-associated proteins, such as perilipin 1 and hormone-sensitive lipase, were unchanged, whereas adipose triglyceride lipase and its activator protein CGI-58 were decreased with HL in comparison to NC. Interestingly, such lipogenic proteins as fatty acid synthase, lipin-1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma were decreased. Furthermore, the uptake of glucose, the major precursor of 3-glycerol phosphate for triglyceride synthesis, was significantly reduced in HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Conclusion: We conclude that hypoxia has a direct impact on reducing the triglyceride content and lipid droplet size via decreased

  13. Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities RFI Responses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities RFI Responses Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities RFI Responses Responses to DE-FOA-0001615: Request for Information: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities More Information american_process_inc_de_foa_0001615_sugar.pdf (427.34 KB) american_science_and_technology_de_foa_0001615_lignin.pdf (313.64 KB) american_science_and_technology_de_foa_0001615_sugar.pdf (315.33 KB) avapco_de_foa_0001615_lignin.pdf

  14. Lignin-blocking treatment of biomass and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    2009-10-20

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion. Cellulase efficiencies are improved by the protein or polypeptide treatment. The treatment may be used in combination with steam explosion and acid prehydrolysis techniques. Hydrolysis yields from lignin containing biomass are enhanced 5-20%, and enzyme utilization is increased from 10% to 50%. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  15. Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-03-01

    Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.

  16. Computational Mechanistic Studies of Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Model Dimers for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sturgeon, M. R.; Chmely, S. C.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous alkyl-aromatic polymer that constitutes up to 30% of plant cell walls, and is used for water transport, structure, and defense. The highly irregular and heterogeneous structure of lignin presents a major obstacle in the development of strategies for its deconstruction and upgrading. Here we present mechanistic studies of the acid-catalyzed cleavage of lignin aryl-ether linkages, combining both experimental studies and quantum chemical calculations. Quantum mechanical calculations provide a detailed interpretation of reaction mechanisms including possible intermediates and transition states. Solvent effects on the hydrolysis reactions were incorporated through the use of a conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) and with cluster models including explicit water molecules in the first solvation shell. Reaction pathways were computed for four lignin model dimers including 2-phenoxy-phenylethanol (PPE), 1-(para-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenoxy-ethanol (HPPE), 2-phenoxy-phenyl-1,3-propanediol (PPPD), and 1-(para-hydroxyphenyl)-2-phenoxy-1,3-propanediol (HPPPD). Lignin model dimers with a para-hydroxyphenyl ether (HPPE and HPPPD) show substantial differences in reactivity relative to the phenyl ether compound (PPE and PPPD) which have been clarified theoretically and experimentally. The significance of these results for acid deconstruction of lignin in plant cell walls will be discussed.

  17. Method for recovering and using lignin in adhesive resins

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, Herbert A.

    1993-01-01

    Lignin, or a lignin derived material, which has been significantly demethylated (e.g., the demethylated lignin found in the raffinate produced as a by-product of dimethyl sulfide production which can be carried out using the spent liquor from wood pulping operations) can be isolated by a process wherein an organic solvent is added to a lignin-containing aqueous solution. The organic solvent is typically a polar, and at least a partially water-immiscible substance such as, for example, ethyl acetate. The resulting lignin-containing aqueous solution/organic solvent mixture is acidified to produce a water layer which is discarded and an organic solvent layer which contains the demethylated lignin. Upon its recovery, the demethylated lignin is dissolved in an alkaline solution to which an aldehyde source is added to produce a resol-type resin. The aldehyde source may be formaldehyde in solution, paraformaldehyde, hexamethylenetetramine, or other aldehydes including acetaldehyde, furfural, and their derivatives.

  18. THERMAL INSULATION FROM LIGNIN-DERIVED CARBON FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, Tracy; Chen, Chong; Eberle, Cliff; Webb, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and GrafTech International Holdings Inc. (GrafTech) have collaborated to develop and demonstrate the performance of high temperature thermal insulation prototypes made from lignin-based carbon fibers (LBCF). This was the first reported production of LBCF or resulting products at scale > 1 kg. The results will potentially lead to the first commercial application of LBCF. The goal of the commercial application is to replace expensive, foreign-sourced isotropic pitch carbon fibers with lower cost carbon fibers made from a domestically sourced, bio-derived (renewable) feedstock. LBCF can help resolve supply chain vulnerability and reduce the production cost for high temperature thermal insulation as well as create US jobs. The performance of the LBCF prototypes was measured and found to be comparable to that of the current commercial product. During production of the insulation prototypes, the project team demonstrated lignin compounding/pelletization, fiber production, heat treatment, and compositing at scales far surpassing those previously demonstrated in LBCF R&D or production.

  19. Lignin-Derived Carbon Fiber as a Co-Product of Refining Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Langholtz, Matthew H.; Downing, Mark; Graham, Robin Lambert; Baker, Fred S.; Compere, Alicia L.; William L. Griffith; Boeman, Raymond G.; Keller, Martin

    2014-01-15

    Lignin by-products from biorefineries has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to petroleum-based precursors to manufacture carbon fiber, which can be combined with a binding matrix to produce a structural material with much greater specific strength and specific stiffness than conventional materials such as steel and aluminum. The market for carbon fiber is universally projected to grow exponentially to fill the needs of clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and to improve the fuel economies in vehicles through lightweighting. In addition to cellulosic biofuel production, lignin-based carbon fiber production coupled with biorefineries may provide $2,400 to $3,600 added value dry Mg-1 of biomass for vehicle applications. Compared to producing ethanol alone, the addition of lignin-derived carbon fiber could increase biorefinery gross revenue by 30% to 300%. Using lignin-derived carbon fiber in 15 million vehicles per year in the US could reduce fossil fuel consumption by 2-5 billion liters year-1, reduce CO2 emissions by about 6.7 million Mg year-1, and realize fuel savings through vehicle lightweighting of $700 to $1,600 per Mg biomass processed. The value of fuel savings from vehicle lightweighting becomes economical at carbon fiber price of $6.60 kg-1 under current fuel prices, or $13.20 kg-1 under fuel prices of about $1.16 l-1.

  20. Redistribution of Lignin Caused by Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D. K.; Donohoe, B. S.; Katahira, R.; Tucker, M. P.; Vinzant, T. B.; Himmel, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Research conducted at NREL has shown that lignin undergoes a phase transition during thermochemical pretreatments conducted above its glass transition temperature. The lignin coalesces within the plant cell wall and appears as microscopic droplets on cell surfaces. It is clear that pretreatment causes significant changes in lignin distribution in pretreatments at all scales from small laboratory reactors to pilot scale reactors. A method for selectively extracting lignin droplets from the surfaces of pretreated cell walls has allowed us to characterize the chemical nature and molecular weight distribution of this fraction. The effect of lignin redistribution on the digestibility of pretreated solids has also been tested. It is clear that removal of the droplets increases the digestibility of pretreated corn stover. The improved digestibility could be due to decreased non-specific binding of enzymes to lignin in the droplets, or because the droplets no longer block access to cellulose.

  1. Mechanism of lignin inhibition of enzymatic biomass deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Petridis, Loukas; Qi, Xianghong; Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy. C.

    2015-12-01

    The conversion of plant biomass to ethanol via enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis offers a potentially sustainable route to biofuel production. However, the inhibition of enzymatic activity in pretreated biomass by lignin severely limits the efficiency of this process. By performing atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of a biomass model containing cellulose, lignin, and cellulases (TrCel7A), we elucidate detailed lignin inhibition mechanisms. We find that lignin binds preferentially both to the elements of cellulose to which the cellulases also preferentially bind (the hydrophobic faces) and also to the specific residues on the cellulose-binding module of the cellulase that are critical for cellulose binding of TrCel7A (Y466, Y492, and Y493). In conclusion, lignin thus binds exactly where for industrial purposes it is least desired, providing a simple explanation of why hydrolysis yields increase with lignin removal.

  2. Mechanism of lignin inhibition of enzymatic biomass deconstruction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Petridis, Loukas; Qi, Xianghong; Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy. C.

    2015-12-01

    The conversion of plant biomass to ethanol via enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis offers a potentially sustainable route to biofuel production. However, the inhibition of enzymatic activity in pretreated biomass by lignin severely limits the efficiency of this process. By performing atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of a biomass model containing cellulose, lignin, and cellulases (TrCel7A), we elucidate detailed lignin inhibition mechanisms. We find that lignin binds preferentially both to the elements of cellulose to which the cellulases also preferentially bind (the hydrophobic faces) and also to the specific residues on the cellulose-binding module of the cellulase that are critical for cellulose bindingmore » of TrCel7A (Y466, Y492, and Y493). In conclusion, lignin thus binds exactly where for industrial purposes it is least desired, providing a simple explanation of why hydrolysis yields increase with lignin removal.« less

  3. Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities RFI Responses |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities RFI Responses Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities RFI Responses Responses to DE-FOA-0001615: Request for Information: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is to develop and demonstrate transformative and revolutionary, sustainable bioenergy technologies for a prosperous nation. To facilitate this goal, BETO

  4. Modification of Lignin by Protein Cross-linking to Facilitate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production of Biofuels From Poplar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modification of Lignin by Protein Cross-linking to Facilitate Production of Biofuels From Poplar The ...

  5. Lignin pyrolysis in heated grid apparatus: Experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Avni, L.; Coughlin, R.W.; King, H.H.; Solomon, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    The study of lignin pyrolysis has a vital importance since all lignin conversion processes, namely; combustion, liquefaction and gasification, are initiated by this step. Lignin, a major component of biomass is a potential source of aromatic chemicals through the pyrolysis process. This paper considers the application of a recently developed pyrolysis model of coal pyrolysis applied to a heated grid as well as an entrained flow reactor, to the pyrolysis of lignin. Flash pyrolysis as well as slow heating rate pyrolysis was carried out in a heated grid, in which on-line, in-situ gas and tar analysis is performed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy. The model has proved to be successful in simulating the results of vacuum flash pyrolysis and slow heating rate pyrolysis for a variety of lignins. The experiments have shown that lignin pyrolysis kinetics are insensitive to lignin source or extracting process. Theory and experiment agree well for both slow and fast heating rates, using the given model parameters. The lignin parameters of the model are related to the functional group composition of the lignin.

  6. "Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bionic" Liquids from Lignin: Joint BioEnergy Institute Results Pave the Way for ... Combustion Research Facility Joint BioEnergy Institute Research Engineering and ...

  7. Selective aerobic alcohol oxidation method for conversion of lignin into simple aromatic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, Shannon S; Rahimi, Alireza

    2015-03-03

    Described is a method to oxidize lignin or lignin sub-units. The method includes oxidation of secondary benzylic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit to a corresponding ketone in the presence of unprotected primarily aliphatic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit. The optimal catalyst system consists of HNO.sub.3 in combination with another Bronsted acid, in the absence of a metal-containing catalyst, thereby yielding a selectively oxidized lignin or lignin sub-unit. The method may be carried out in the presence or absence of additional reagents including TEMPO and TEMPO derivatives.

  8. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    1999-09-28

    A process for converting lignin into high-quality reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline compositions in high yields is disclosed. The process is a two-stage, catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage, a lignin material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction in the presence of a supercritical alcohol as a reaction medium, to thereby produce a depolymerized lignin product. In the second stage, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to a sequential two-step hydroprocessing reaction to produce a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product. In the first hydroprocessing step, the depolymerized lignin is contacted with a hydrodeoxygenation catalyst to produce a hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product. In the second hydroprocessing step, the hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product is contacted with a hydrocracking/ring hydrogenation catalyst to produce the reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product which includes various desirable naphthenic and paraffinic compounds.

  9. Lignin biodegradation and the production of ethyl alcohol from cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, S.L.; Wilke, C.R.

    1981-02-01

    During the last few years our group has been engaged in developing a biochemical process for the conversion of lignocellulosic materials to ethyl alcohol. Lignin is a barrier to complete cellulose saccharification in this process, but chemical and physical delignification steps are too expensive to be used at the present time. An enzymatic delignification process might be attractive for several reasons: little energy would be expected to be needed, enzymes could be recovered and reused, and useful chemicals might be produced from dissolved lignin. A number of thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi were examined for the ability to rapidly degrade lignocellulose in order to find an organism whcih produced an active lignin-degrading enzyme system. Chryosporium pruinosum and Sporotrichum pulverulentum were found to be active lignocellulose degraders, and C. pruinosum was chosen for further study. Lignin and carbohydrate were degraded when the substrate remained moistened by, but not submerged in, the liquid medium. Attempts were made to demonstrate a cell-free lignin degrading system by both extraction and pressing of cultures grown on moist lignocellulose. Carbohydrate-degrading activity was found but not lignin-degrading activity. This led us to ask whether diffusible lignin-degrading activity could be demonstrated in this organism. The data indicate that the lignin degradation system, or one or more of its components, produced by this organism is either unstable, non-diffusible, or inactive at small distances (about 1 mm) from growing hyphae. At present, studies are being conducted using diffusion cultures to select mutants of C. pruinosum that do produce a diffusible lignin degradation system. We are also examining a number of mesophilic lignin-degrading molds for this ability.

  10. Computational inference of the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway in Panicum virgatum

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Faraji, Mojdeh; Fonseca, Luis L.; Escamilla-Treviño, Luis; Dixon, Richard A.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2015-09-17

    Switchgrass is a prime target for biofuel production from inedible plant parts and has been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. Yet, one of the main obstacles to effective biofuel production remains to be the major problem of recalcitrance. Recalcitrance emerges in part from the 3-D structure of lignin as a polymer in the secondary cell wall. Lignin limits accessibility of the sugars in the cellulose and hemicellulose polymers to enzymes and ultimately decreases ethanol yield. Monolignols, the building blocks of lignin polymers, are synthesized in the cytosol and translocated to the plant cell wall, where they undergomore » polymerization. The biosynthetic pathway leading to monolignols in switchgrass is not completely known, and difficulties associated with in vivo measurements of these intermediates pose a challenge for a true understanding of the functioning of the pathway. In this study, a systems biological modeling approach is used to address this challenge and to elucidate the structure and regulation of the lignin pathway through a computational characterization of alternate candidate topologies. The analysis is based on experimental data characterizing stem and tiller tissue of four transgenic lines (knock-downs of genes coding for key enzymes in the pathway) as well as wild-type switchgrass plants. These data consist of the observed content and composition of monolignols. The possibility of a G-lignin specific metabolic channel associated with the production and degradation of coniferaldehyde is examined, and the results support previous findings from another plant species. The computational analysis suggests regulatory mechanisms of product inhibition and enzyme competition, which are well known in biochemistry, but so far had not been reported in switchgrass. By including these mechanisms, the pathway model is able to represent all observations. In conclusion, the results show that the presence of the coniferaldehyde channel is

  11. Reducing the moisture content of clean coals. Volume 2, High-G solid-bowl centrifuge: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kehoe, D.

    1992-12-01

    Coal moisture content can profoundly effect the cost of burning coal in utility boilers. Because of the large effect of coal moisture, the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO) contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute to investigate advanced coal dewatering methods at its Coal Quality Development Center. This report contains the test result on the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge, the second of four devices to be tested. The high-G solid-bowl centrifuge removes water for coal by spinning the coal/water mixture rapidly in a rotating bowl. This causes the coal to cling to the sides of the bowl where it can be removed, leaving the water behind. Testing was performed at the CQDC to evaluate the effect of four operating variables (G-ratio, feed solids concentration, dry solids feed rate, and differential RPM) on the performance of the high-G solid-bowl centrifuge. Two centrifuges of different bowl diameter were tested to establish the effect of scale-up of centrifuge performance. Testing of the two centrifuges occurred from 1985 through 1987. CQDC engineers performed 32 tests on the smaller of the two centrifuges, and 47 tests on the larger. Equations that predict the performance of the two centrifuges for solids recovery, moisture content of the produced coal, and motor torque were obtained. The equations predict the observed data well. Traditional techniques of establishing the performance of centrifuge of different scale did not work well with the two centrifuges, probably because of the large range of G-ratios used in the testing. Cost of operating a commercial size bank of centrifuges is approximately $1.72 per ton of clean coal. This compares well with thermal drying, which costs $1.82 per ton of clean coal.

  12. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  13. Potential role of lignin in tomorrow's wood utilization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, W.G.

    1981-03-01

    Low-grade timber supplies and wood processing residues are presently converted into paper products, used for fuel, or remain totally unused. Competition for this resource will continue to mount, particularly when manufacturers of chemicals and liquid fuels enter the market with new technologies now under development. The type of technology that concentrates on depolymerization of carbohydrates will generate large quantities of lignin-rich residues. The potential of these lignins to contribute to the economic feasibility of new chemical wood process technologies may involve degradative depolymerization to phenols and benzene, or polymer conversion into a wide variety of dispersants, binders, reinforcing and antioxidizing agents, etc. Where lignin's fuel value lies around 3 to 4 cents/lb. (fall of 1979), its raw material value for phenol is reported to be almost 5 cents/lb., and the value of the polymeric materials is estimated to be between 6 and 20 cents/lb. At the lower end of this range of raw material values are ligninsulfonates, which contribute nearly 98 percent to the approximately 1.5 billion lb./yr. U.S. market for lignin products. Kraft lignins are located at the opposite end of this range. Novel bioconversion-type lignins are expected to be more similar in structure and properties to kraft than to sulfite lignins. Whereas application of the dispersant properties of ligninsulfonates in tertiary oil recovery operations is expected to constitute the most significant use of lignin in terms of volume, adhesive and resin applications hold the greatest promise in terms of value. Both utilization schemes seem to require pretreatments in the form of either polymeric fractionation or chemical modification. Potential savings from the use of polymeric lignins in material systems are great.

  14. High-Throughput Screening of Recalcitrance Variations in Lignocellulosic Biomass: Total Lignin, Lignin Monomers, and Enzymatic Sugar Release

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Stephen R.; Sykes, Robert W.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Lupoi, Jason S.; Doepkke, Crissa; Tucker, Melvin P.; Schuster, Logan A.; Mazza, Kimberly; Himmel, Michael E.; Davis, Mark F.; Gjersing, Erica

    2015-09-15

    The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, chemicals, and other commodities has been explored as one possible pathway toward reductions in the use of non-renewable energy sources. In order to identify which plants, out of a diverse pool, have the desired chemical traits for downstream applications, attributes, such as cellulose and lignin content, or monomeric sugar release following an enzymatic saccharification, must be compared. The experimental and data analysis protocols of the standard methods of analysis can be time-consuming, thereby limiting the number of samples that can be measured. High-throughput (HTP) methods alleviate the shortcomings of the standard methods, and permit the rapid screening of available samples to isolate those possessing the desired traits. This study illustrates the HTP sugar release and pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectrometry pipelines employed at the National Renewable Energy Lab. These pipelines have enabled the efficient assessment of thousands of plants while decreasing experimental time and costs through reductions in labor and consumables.

  15. Computational Study of Bond Dissociation Enthalpies for Substituted $\\beta$-O-4 Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, Jarod M; Beste, Ariana; Buchanan III, A C

    2011-01-01

    The biopolymer lignin is a potential source of valuable chemicals. Phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) is representative of the dominant $\\beta$-O-4 ether linkage. Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the Boltzmann-weighted carbon-oxygen and carbon-carbon bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of substituted PPE. These values are important in order to understand lignin decomposition. Exclusion of all conformers that have distributions of less than 5\\% at 298 K impacts the BDE by less than 1 kcal mol$^{-1}$. We find that aliphatic hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents introduce only small changes to the BDEs (0-3 kcal mol$^{-1}$). Substitution on the phenyl ring at the $ortho$ position substantially lowers the C-O BDE, except in combination with the hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents, where the effect of methoxy substitution is reduced by hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding between the aliphatic substituents and the ether oxygen in the PPE derivatives has a significant influence on the BDE. CCSD(T)-calculated BDEs and hydrogen bond strengths of $ortho$-substituted anisoles when compared with M06-2X values confirm that the latter method is sufficient to describe the molecules studied and provide an important benchmark for lignin model compounds.

  16. NREL Overcomes Obstacles in Lignin Valorization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This NREL Highlight is being produced for the 2015 February Alliance S&T Board meeting, and describes research that shows lignin can be converted into renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials.

  17. Lignin conversion to fuels, chemicals and materials - Energy Innovation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Lignin conversion to fuels, chemicals and materials National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary There has been vast research in developing cost effective processes to convert the polysaccharide components of plants, mainly cellulose and hemicellulose, into fuels and chemicals. However, the lignin component of biomass, which is an energy-dense polymer and the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth, is vastly underutilized in

  18. Methods for simultaneous control of lignin content and composition, and cellulose content in plants

    DOEpatents

    Chiang, Vincent Lee C.; Li, Laigeng

    2005-02-15

    The present invention relates to a method of concurrently introducing multiple genes into plants and trees is provided. The method includes simultaneous transformation of plants with multiple genes from the phenylpropanoid pathways including 4CL, CAld5H, AldOMT, SAD and CAD genes and combinations thereof to produce various lines of transgenic plants displaying altered agronomic traits. The agronomic traits of the plants are regulated by the orientation of the specific genes and the selected gene combinations, which are incorporated into the plant genome.

  19. Treatment of Lignin Precursors to Improve their Suitability for Carbon Fibers: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Ryan; Naskar, Amit; Gallego, Nidia; Dai, Xuliang; Hausner, Andrew

    2015-04-17

    Lignin has been investigated as a carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although there have been a number of reports of successful lignin-based carbon fiber production at the lab scale, lignin-based carbon fibers are not currently commercially available. This review will highlight some of the known challenges, and also the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Lignin can come from different sources (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction methods (e.g. organosolv, kraft), meaning that lignin can be found with a diversity of purity and structure. The implication of these conditions on lignin as carbon fiber precursor is not comprehensively known, especially as the lignin landscape is evolving. The work presented in this review will help guide the direction of a project between GrafTech and ORNL to develop lignin carbon fiber technology, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  20. Hydroprocessing lignin and lignin model compounds; Products, kinetics, and catalyst aging

    SciTech Connect

    Train, P.M. ); Klein, M.T. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the hydroprocessing reaction of kraft lignin and four of its model compounds, o-hydroxydiphenylmethane (OHD), diphenylmethane (DPM), 4-phenoxyphenol (PP), and 4-methylguaiacol (MG) studied over a sulfided CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The reactions of OHD were also studied over sulfided Ni-Mo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni-W/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Ni-Mo/zeolite catalysts. Reaction pathways, kinetics, and catalyst deactivation were resolved. Experiments with the actual kraft lignin substrate showed that catalytic hydroprocessing led to higher yields of single-ring products and lower yields of light gas compared to hydropyrolysis alone. The CoMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst increased the selectivity to non-coking monophenolics and hydrocarbon products. The model compound results permitted interpretation. The hydroxyl substituents on OHD and PP directed bond cleavage strongly. The atom linking the two aromatic rings remained almost exclusively with the unsubstituted ring after cleavage. The substituent increased reactivity by at least an order of magnitude. The catalytic reactions of OHD, DPM, and PP were 10{sup 3}-19{sup 4} times faster than their thermal reactions. Deoxygenation was appreciable in these reactions and in the catalytic hydroprocessing of MG.

  1. Lignin's potential contribution to the feasibility of biomass conversion to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, P.C.; Glasser, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    The potential contribution of lignin toward the economic improvement of processes involving the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to liquid fuels such as ethyl alcohol was examined. This improvement in process economics is achieved by the employment of a two-product process scheme whereby lignin-rich residues separated from cellulosics during bioconversion are marketed as polymeric materials. Lignin's utility as a marketable macromolecule was assessed by (a) characterization of structural features in bioconversion lignins with reference to commercial lignin products, (b) by examining lignin in terms of its value as a component in polymer systems such as urethane and phenol-formaldehyde thermosetting adhesives, and (c) by identifying potential high-volume, high-value lignin market categories which could absorb lignin fractions produced in future bioconversion scenarios. 38 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

  2. In situ micro-spectroscopic investigation of lignin in poplar cell walls pretreated by maleic acid

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Meilan, Richard; Ding, Shi -You

    2015-08-27

    In higher plant cells, lignin provides necessary physical support for plant growth and resistance to attack by microorganisms. For the same reason, lignin is considered to be a major impediment to the process of deconstructing biomass to simple sugars by hydrolytic enzymes. Furthermore, the in situ variation of lignin in plant cell walls is important for better understanding of the roles lignin play in biomass recalcitrance.

  3. Synthetic Design Microorganisms for Lignin Fuels and Chemicals Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Synthetic Design Microorganisms for Lignin Fuels and Chemicals 3/26/2015 Synthetic Biology Joshua S. Yuan Associate Professor and Director Texas A&M University This presentation does contain proprietary information 1 Project Goal: Design of Microorganisms for Lignin Fuel * The proposed research aims to address one of the most challenging issues in biofuel production: the utilization of lignin for fungible fuels. * Project Outcome: A viable biological platform for conversion of lignin into

  4. Genetics and chemistry of lignin degradation by Streptomyces. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    Our research goal was to define the involvement of lignin peroxidases and other extracellular enzymes in lignin degradation by Streptomyces. We examined the biochemistry and genetics of lignin degrading enzyme production by several strains of Streptomyces. The lignin peroxidase ALiP-P3 of S. viridosporus was characterized kinetically and its activity optimized for oxidation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and vanillyl-acetone. Sensitive spectrophotometric assays were developed for monitoring oxidation of these substrates. ALiP-P3 reaction chemistry was examined using both spectrophotometric assays and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Results showed that the enzyme oxidizes phenolic lignin substructure models in strong preference to nonphenolic ones. The peroxidase was also shown to depolymerize native lignin. We also cloned the ALip-P3 gene S. lividans in plasmid vector pIJ702. The cloned gene was partially sequenced, We also immunologically characterized the lignin peroxidase of S. viridosporus T7A and showed it to be structurally related to peroxidases produced by other lignin-solubilizing Streptomyces, but not the the H8 lignin peroxidase of P. chrysosporium. Studies with peroxidase deficient mutants of strain T7A showed that lignin peroxidases of S. viridosporus are directly involved in the solubilization of lignin. Additional research showed that other enzymes are also probably involved in lignin solubilization, possibly including extracellular esterases.

  5. Lignin-derived thermoplastic co-polymers and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Naskar, Amit K.; Saito, Tomonori; Pickel, Joseph M.; Baker, Frederick S.; Eberle, Claude Clifford; Norris, Robert E.; Mielenz, Jonathan Richard

    2014-06-10

    The present invention relates to a crosslinked lignin comprising a lignin structure having methylene or ethylene linking groups therein crosslinking between phenyl ring carbon atoms, wherein said crosslinked lignin is crosslinked to an extent that it has a number-average molecular weight of at least 10,000 g/mol, is melt-processible, and has either a glass transition temperature of at least 100.degree. C., or is substantially soluble in a polar organic solvent or aqueous alkaline solution. Thermoplastic copolymers containing the crosslinked lignin are also described. Methods for producing the crosslinked lignin and thermoplastic copolymers are also described.

  6. Graphitic biocarbon from metal-catalyzed hydrothermal carbonization of lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Demir, Muslum; Kahveci, Zafer; Aksoy, Burak; Palapati, Naveen K. R.; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Cullinan, Harry T.; El-Kaderi, Hani M.; Harris, Charles T.; Gupta, Ram B.

    2015-10-09

    Lignin is a high-volume byproduct from the pulp and paper industry and is currently burned to generate electricity and process heat. Moreover, the industry has been searching for high value-added uses of lignin to improve the process economics. In addition, battery manufacturers are seeking nonfossil sources of graphitic carbon for environmental sustainability. In our work, lignin (which is a cross-linked polymer of phenols, a component of biomass) is converted into graphitic porous carbon using a two-step conversion. Lignin is first carbonized in water at 300 °C and 1500 psi to produce biochar, which is then graphitized using a metal nitrate catalyst at 900–1100 °C in an inert gas at 15 psi. Graphitization effectiveness of three different catalysts—iron, cobalt, and manganese nitrates—is examined. The product is analyzed for morphology, thermal stability, surface properties, and electrical conductivity. Both temperature and catalyst type influenced the degree of graphitization. A good quality graphitic carbon was obtained using catalysis by Mn(NO3)2 at 900 °C and Co(NO3)2 at 1100 °C.

  7. Graphitic biocarbon from metal-catalyzed hydrothermal carbonization of lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Demir, Muslum; Kahveci, Zafer; Aksoy, Burak; Palapati, Naveen K. R.; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Cullinan, Harry T.; El-Kaderi, Hani M.; Harris, Charles T.; Gupta, Ram B.

    2015-10-09

    Lignin is a high-volume byproduct from the pulp and paper industry and is currently burned to generate electricity and process heat. Moreover, the industry has been searching for high value-added uses of lignin to improve the process economics. In addition, battery manufacturers are seeking nonfossil sources of graphitic carbon for environmental sustainability. In our work, lignin (which is a cross-linked polymer of phenols, a component of biomass) is converted into graphitic porous carbon using a two-step conversion. Lignin is first carbonized in water at 300 C and 1500 psi to produce biochar, which is then graphitized using a metal nitrate catalyst at 9001100 C in an inert gas at 15 psi. Graphitization effectiveness of three different catalystsiron, cobalt, and manganese nitratesis examined. The product is analyzed for morphology, thermal stability, surface properties, and electrical conductivity. Both temperature and catalyst type influenced the degree of graphitization. A good quality graphitic carbon was obtained using catalysis by Mn(NO3)2 at 900 C and Co(NO3)2 at 1100 C.

  8. Recent Development in Chemical Depolymerization of Lignin: A Review

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai; Tucker, Melvin; Ji, Yun

    2013-01-01

    This article reviewed recent development of chemical depolymerization of lignins. There were five types of treatment discussed, including base-catalyzed, acid-catalyzed, metallic catalyzed, ionic liquids-assisted, and supercritical fluids-assisted lignin depolymerizations. The methods employed in this research were described, and the important results were marked. Generally, base-catalyzed and acid-catalyzed methods were straightforward, but the selectivity was low. The severe reaction conditions (high pressure, high temperature, and extreme pH) resulted in requirement of specially designed reactors, which led to high costs of facility and handling. Ionic liquids, and supercritical fluids-assisted lignin depolymerizations had high selectivity, but the high costs of ionic liquids recyclingmore » and supercritical fluid facility limited their applications on commercial scale biomass treatment. Metallic catalyzed depolymerization had great advantages because of its high selectivity to certain monomeric compounds and much milder reaction condition than base-catalyzed or acid-catalyzed depolymerizations. It would be a great contribution to lignin conversion if appropriate catalysts were synthesized.« less

  9. Graphitic biocarbon from metal-catalyzed hydrothermal carbonization of lignin

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Demir, Muslum; Kahveci, Zafer; Aksoy, Burak; Palapati, Naveen K. R.; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Cullinan, Harry T.; El-Kaderi, Hani M.; Harris, Charles T.; Gupta, Ram B.

    2015-10-09

    Lignin is a high-volume byproduct from the pulp and paper industry and is currently burned to generate electricity and process heat. Moreover, the industry has been searching for high value-added uses of lignin to improve the process economics. In addition, battery manufacturers are seeking nonfossil sources of graphitic carbon for environmental sustainability. In our work, lignin (which is a cross-linked polymer of phenols, a component of biomass) is converted into graphitic porous carbon using a two-step conversion. Lignin is first carbonized in water at 300 °C and 1500 psi to produce biochar, which is then graphitized using a metal nitratemore » catalyst at 900–1100 °C in an inert gas at 15 psi. Graphitization effectiveness of three different catalysts—iron, cobalt, and manganese nitrates—is examined. The product is analyzed for morphology, thermal stability, surface properties, and electrical conductivity. Both temperature and catalyst type influenced the degree of graphitization. A good quality graphitic carbon was obtained using catalysis by Mn(NO3)2 at 900 °C and Co(NO3)2 at 1100 °C.« less

  10. A study of poplar organosolv lignin after melt rheology treatment as carbon fiber precursors

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sun, Qining; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akato, Kokouvi; Tao, Jingming; Labbe, Nicole; Gallego, Nidia C.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Rials, Timothy G.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; et al

    2016-06-16

    Lignins from various poplar genotypes were isolated by using organosolv fractionation and subjected to rheological treatment at various temperatures. Physicochemical characterization of the lignin variants shows a broad distribution of glass transition temperatures, melt viscosity, and pyrolysis char residues. Rheological treatment at 170 °C induces lignin repolymerization accompanied with an increase in condensed linkages, molecular weights, and viscosities. In contrast, rheology testing at 190 °C results in the decrease in lignin aliphatic and phenolic hydroxyl groups, β-O-aryl ether linkages, molecular weights, and viscosity values. Lignin under air cooling generates more oxygenated and condensed compounds, but lower amounts of ether linkagesmore » than lignin cooled under nitrogen. Here, lignin with a lower syringyl/guaiacyl ratio tends to form more cross-linkages along with higher viscosity values, higher molecular weight and larger amounts of condensed bonds.« less

  11. Consolidated bioprocessing of Populus using Clostridium (Ruminiclostridium) thermocellum: a case study on the impact of lignin composition and structure

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Akinosho, Hannah; Rodriguez, Miguel; Meng, Xianzhi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Natzke, Jace; Engle, Nancy L.; Sykes, Robert W.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Muchero, Wellington; et al

    2016-02-04

    Background: Higher ratios of syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) lignin components of Populus were shown to improve sugar release by enzymatic hydrolysis using commercial blends. Cellulolytic microbes are often robust biomass hydrolyzers and may offer cost advantages; however, it is unknown whether their activity can also be significantly influenced by the ratio of different monolignol types in Populus biomass. Hydrolysis and fermentation of autoclaved, but otherwise not pretreated Populus trichocarpa by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was compared using feedstocks that had similar carbohydrate and total lignin contents but differed in S/G ratios. Results: Populus with an S/G ratio of 2.1 was converted moremore » rapidly and to a greater extent compared to similar biomass that had a ratio of 1.2. For either microbes or commercial enzymes, an approximate 50% relative difference in total solids solubilization was measured for both biomasses, which suggests that the differences and limitations in the microbial breakdown of lignocellulose may be largely from the enzymatic hydrolytic process. Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially processed biomass was similar (17–18%) irrespective of S/G ratio, pointing to a similar mechanism of solubilization that proceeded at different rates. Fermentation metabolome testing did not reveal the release of known biomass-derived alcohol and aldehyde inhibitors that could explain observed differences in microbial hydrolytic activity. Biomass-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid was up to ninefold higher in low S/G ratio biomass fermentations, but was not found to be inhibitory in subsequent test fermentations. Cellulose crystallinity and degree of polymerization did not vary between Populus lines and had minor changes after fermentation. However, lignin molecular weights and cellulose accessibility determined by Simons’ staining were positively correlated to the S/G content. Conclusions: Higher

  12. Computational Analysis of the Pyrolysis of ..beta..-O4 Lignin Model Compounds: Concerted vs. Homolytic Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels is a very attractive technology for expanding the utilization of carbon neutral processes and reducing dependency on fossil fuel resources. As with all such emerging technologies, biomass conversion through gasification or pyrolysis has a number of obstacles that need to be overcome to make these processes cost competitive with the refining of fossil fuels. Our current efforts have focused on the investigation of the thermochemistry of the linkages between lignin units using ab initio calculations on dimeric lignin model compounds. All calculations were carried out using M062X density functional theory at the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The M062X method has been shown to be consistent with the CBS-QB3 method while being significantly less computationally expensive. To date we have only completed the study on the b-O4 compounds. The theoretical calculations performed in the study indicate that concerted elimination pathways dominate over bond homolysis reactions under typical pyrolysis conditions. However, this does not mean that concerted elimination will be the dominant loss process for lignin. Bimolecular radical chemistry could very well dwarf the unimolecular pathways investigated in this study. These concerted pathways tend to form stable, reasonably non-reactive products that would be more suited producing a fungible bio-oil for the production of liquid transportation fuels.

  13. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.

    1992-08-01

    Previous research has shown that addition of lignin and lignin-derived liquids to coal stirred in tetralin under mild reaction conditions (375{degrees}C and 300--500 psig) results in a marked enhancement in the rate of coal depolymerization. In this quarterly report, overall mass balances on experiments conducted with tetralin, coal, lignin and coal-lignin mixture are reported. Overall mass recoveries of 95--99% of the total mass charged to the reactor were obtained. A number of experiments were conducted on coal, lignin and coal-lignin depolymerization. A careful statistical analysis of the data shows that coal depolymerization is enhanced by 10.4%, due to the lignin addition. The liquids obtained are being examined for their elemental composition, and molecular weight determination by size exclusion chromatography. The stability of the liquid products is being examined in various environments. The gaseous product analyses show that the major gases produced during the course of depolymerization are CO, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2}. When coal and lignin are reacted together, the amount of CO and CH{sub 4}produced respectively 12% and 38% greater than the corresponding amount of gases calculated, based on the weighted average of values obtained for coal and lignin alone. The data obtained show that lignin addition to coal is synergistic in that not only is the extent of coal depolymerization increased, but the gas produced contains higher concentrations of more desirable gaseous products.

  14. Microsoft Word - Final Technical Report DE-FG02-07ER15891 Tien...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    But reducing lignin content and composition without compromising plant health and vigor has been proved to be difficult, due to the roles lignin plays in plant conductive systems, ...

  15. Lignin Based Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori; Rios, Orlando; Johs, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of Li-ion battery technology into electric and hybrid electric vehicles and portable electronic devices such as smart phones, laptops and tablets, creates a demand for efficient, economic and sustainable materials for energy storage. However, the high cost and long processing time associated with manufacturing battery-grade anode and cathode materials are two big constraints for lowering the total cost of batteries and environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Lignin, a byproduct of the pulp and paper industry and biorefinery, is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fibers with optimal properties for use as anode materials. Recent developments in the preparation of lignin precursors and conversion to carbon fiber-based anode materials have created a new class of anode materials with excellent electrochemical characteristics suitable for immediate use in existing Li- or Na-ion battery technologies.

  16. Solid Double-Layered Hydroxide Catalysts for Lignin Decomposition - Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Solid Double-Layered Hydroxide Catalysts for Lignin Decomposition National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Biomass-based fuel and chemical production has shown significant promise. However, costs and utilization rates of biomass have still been a challenge for large scale commercialization. Through appropriate decomposition and

  17. Inexpensive, Environmentally Friendly and Highly Permeable Lignin-Based Ion

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Exchangers - Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Inexpensive, Environmentally Friendly and Highly Permeable Lignin-Based Ion Exchangers Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary For more than 10 years, a partnership between Kazakh and US researchers has led to the synthesis and testing of highly permeable ion-exchangers. These materials possess an increased

  18. Biological and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars and Lignin | Bioenergy | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars and Lignin Our research group, comprised of staff scientists, postdoctoral associates, students, and technicians, develops biological and chemical catalysts for cost-effective production of fuels and chemicals from terrestrial biomass. Two side-by-side images. The left figure illustrates the domains of the synthase enzyme, represented as "surfaces" or "blobs," embedded in a lipid bilayer, represented as yellow multi-jointed

  19. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor. Final report. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, L.A.

    1994-11-01

    The ultimate objective of the DOE-sponsored program discussed in this report is to commercialize an instrument for real-time, in-situ measurement of lignin in wood pulp at a variety of locations in the pulp process stream. The instrument will be used as a primary sensor for process control in the pulp and paper industry. Work done by B&W prior to the initiation of this program had shown: there is a functional relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the Kappa number as measured at the pulp mill laboratory. Kappa number is a standard wet chemical method for determination of the lignin concentration; the relationship is one of decreasing intensity with Kappa number, indicating operation in the quenched fluorescence regime; a great deal of scatter in the data. Because of the preliminary nature of the study, the origin of the scatter was not identified. This report documents the results of laboratory measurements made on a variety of well defined pulp samples to generate the data necessary to: determine the feasibility of an instrument for on-line lignin concentration measurement using laser fluorescence; identify the preferred measurement strategy; define the range of applicability of the instrument; and to provide background information to guide the design of a field-worthy prototype.

  20. LBNL RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DE-FOA-0001615: REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: CELLULOSIC SUGAR AND LIGNIN PRODUCTION CAPABILITIES Response from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Prepared by Ning Sun and Deetpi Tanjore 1 Cyclotron Road MS 977 Berkeley, CA 94720 nsun@lbl.gov 510-495-8024 Category 2: Lignin If you currently operate a facility that produces lignin that you are willing and able to sell or otherwise make available to the research community, please provide information in response to the following questions. You may respond

  1. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, Larry A.; Malito, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method.

  2. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Jeffers, L.A.; Malito, M.L.

    1996-01-23

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method. 6 figs.

  3. Glydia Biotech RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Category 2: Lignin Question 1a: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell or otherwise provide your lignin? (e.g., university researchers, national laboratories, industry/private sector)? University researchers, national laboratories and industry/private sector Question 1b: Are there any types of research entities to whom you are not willing and able to sell your lignin? We have just started marketing the product. Yet to sell them to any customer. Based on our

  4. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  5. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  6. Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds - Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Lignin is a major component of non-edible biomass. It is a cheap byproduct of pulp and biofuel production and is one of the few naturally occurring sources of valuable aromatic compounds. Converting lignin's complex biopolymer structure into simple organic chemicals has attracted major interest. For example,

  7. Borregaard RFI DE-FOA-0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities Response from Borregaard AS, Hjalmar Wessels vei 6, 1721 Sarpsborg, NORWAY Response compiled by Martin Lersch, CTO Business development, martin.lersch@borregaard.com Category 2: Lignin Question 1: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell or otherwise provide your lignin? (e.g., university researchers, national laboratories, industry/private sector)? Are there any types of

  8. Sweetwater RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DOE Informational Questionnaire Sweetwater Energy, Inc. Jonathan Sherwood 300 Trolley Blvd. Rochester, NY 14606 585-647-5765 Jonathan.Sherwood@Sweetwater.us Category 2: Lignin Question 1: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell or otherwise provide your lignin? (e.g., university researchers, national laboratories, industry/private sector)? Are there any types of research entities to whom you are not willing and able to sell your lignin?  Sweetwater will sell

  9. Synthetic Metabolic Pathways for Bioconversion of Lignin Derivatives to Biofuels Presentation for BETO Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Synthetic Metabolic Pathways for Bioconversion of Lignin Derivatives to Biofuels WBS: 2.3.2.104 March 25, 2015 Technology Area Review: Biochemical Conversion Principal Investigator: Adam M. Guss Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Goal Statement * Goal: Develop microbial biocatalysts to convert lignin-rich streams into value-added products * Relevance: Adding value to the lignin fraction of plant biomass will improve the economics of biorefineries to enable a bioeconomy Fuels +

  10. ReaxFF Study of the Oxidation of Softwood Lignin in View of Carbon Fiber Production

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana

    2014-10-06

    We investigate the oxidative, thermal conversion of softwood lignin by performing molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field (ReaxFF). The lignin samples are constructed from coniferyl alcohol units, which are connected through linkages that are randomly selected from a natural distribution of linkages in softwood. The goal of this work is to simulate the oxidative stabilization step during carbon fiber production from lignin precursor. We find that at simulation conditions where stabilization reactions occur, the lignin fragments have already undergone extensive degradation. The 5-5 linkage shows the highest reactivity towards cyclization and dehydrogenation.

  11. ZeaChem RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ZeaChem Category 2: Lignin Q1: ZeaChem is willing and able to sell our lignocellulosic sugars to any and all research entities that may request them. Q2: ZeaChem is willing to provide small (1-10 kg) of lignin when it has such lignin readily available from a production run. Larger quantities of lignin may require dedicated production runs. ZeaChem is willing to complete such production runs pending its facility's availability. Q3: ZeaChem can accommodate various packaging desires of its

  12. ReaxFF Study of the Oxidation of Softwood Lignin in View of Carbon Fiber Production

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Beste, Ariana

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the oxidative, thermal conversion of softwood lignin by performing molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field (ReaxFF). The lignin samples are constructed from coniferyl alcohol units, which are connected through linkages that are randomly selected from a natural distribution of linkages in softwood. The goal of this work is to simulate the oxidative stabilization step during carbon fiber production from lignin precursor. We find that at simulation conditions where stabilization reactions occur, the lignin fragments have already undergone extensive degradation. The 5-5 linkage shows the highest reactivity towards cyclization and dehydrogenation.

  13. Final Report: Investigation of Catalytic Pathways for Lignin Breakdown into Monomers and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gluckstein, Jeffrey A; Hu, Michael Z.; Kidder, Michelle; McFarlane, Joanna; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Sturgeon, Matthew R

    2010-12-01

    Lignin is a biopolymer that comprises up to 35% of woody biomass by dry weight. It is currently underutilized compared to cellulose and hemicellulose, the other two primary components of woody biomass. Lignin has an irregular structure of methoxylated aromatic groups linked by a suite of ether and alkyl bonds which makes it difficult to degrade selectively. However, the aromatic components of lignin also make it promising as a base material for the production of aromatic fuel additives and cyclic chemical feed stocks such as styrene, benzene, and cyclohexanol. Our laboratory research focused on three methods to selectively cleave and deoxygenate purified lignin under mild conditions: acidolysis, hydrogenation and electrocatalysis. (1) Acidolysis was undertaken in CH2Cl2 at room temperature. (2) Hydrogenation was carried out by dissolving lignin and a rhodium catalyst in 1:1 water:methoxyethanol under a 1 atm H2 environment. (3) Electrocatalysis of lignin involved reacting electrically generated hydrogen atoms at a catalytic palladium cathode with lignin dissolved in a solution of aqueous methanol. In all of the experiments, the lignin degradation products were identified and quantified by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy and flame ionization detection. Yields were low, but this may have reflected the difficulty in recovering the various fractions after conversion. The homogeneous hydrogenation of lignin showed fragmentation into monomers, while the electrocatalytic hydrogenation showed production of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and substituted benzenes. In addition to the experiments, promising pathways for the conversion of lignin were assessed. Three conversion methods were compared based on their material and energy inputs and proposed improvements using better catalyst and process technology. A variety of areas were noted as needing further experimental and theoretical effort to increase the feasibility of lignin conversion to fuels.

  14. Biomass-derived Lignin to Jet Fuel Range Hydrocarbons via Aqueous Phase Hydrodeoxygenation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongliang; Ruan, Hao; Pei, Haisheng; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Xiaowen; Tucker, Melvin P.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-09-14

    A catalytic process, involving the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the dilute alkali extracted corn stover lignin catalysed by noble metal catalyst (Ru/Al2O3) and acidic zeolite (H+-Y), to produce lignin-substructure-based hydrocarbons (C7-C18), primarily C12-C18 cyclic structure hydrocarbons in the jet fuel range, was demonstrated.

  15. Cosolvent pretreatment in cellulosic biofuel production: Effect of tetrahydrofuran-water on lignin structure and dynamics

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Smith, Micholas Dean; Mostofian, Barmak; Cheng, Xiaolin; Petridis, Loukas; Cai, Charles M.; Wyman, Charles E.; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2015-10-05

    The deconstruction of cellulose is an essential step in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. However, the presence of lignin hinders this process. Recently, a novel cosolvent based biomass pretreatment method called CELF (Cosolvent Enhanced Lignocellulosic Fractionation) which employs tetrahydrofuran (THF) in a single phase mixture with water, was found to be highly effective at solubilizing and extracting lignin from lignocellulosic biomass and achieving high yields of fermentable sugars. Here, using all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation, we find that THF preferentially solvates lignin, and in doing so, shifts the equilibrium configurational distribution of the biopolymer from a crumpled globule to coil,more » independent of temperature. Whereas pure water is a bad solvent for lignin, the THF : water cosolvent acts as a "theta" solvent, in which solvent : lignin and lignin : lignin interactions are approximately equivalent in strength. Furthermore, under these conditions, polymers do not aggregate, thus providing a mechanism for the observed lignin solubilization that facilitates unfettered access of celluloytic enzymes to cellulose.« less

  16. Down-regulation of p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis leads to improved sugar release

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Foutz, Kirk; Rottmann, William H.; Kuhn, Sean A.; Foster, Cliff E.; Ziebell, Angela; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; et al

    2015-08-27

    In this study, lignocellulosic materials provide an attractive replacement for food-based crops used to produce ethanol. Understanding the interactions within the cell wall is vital to overcome the highly recalcitrant nature of biomass. One factor imparting plant cell wall recalcitrance is lignin, which can be manipulated by making changes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, eucalyptus down-regulated in expression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) or p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H, EC 1.14.13.36) were evaluated for cell wall composition and reduced recalcitrance.

  17. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  18. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex; Coutinho, Pedro M.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Findley, Keisha; Foster, Brian; Gaskell, Jill; Glotzer, Dylan; Gorecki, Pawel; Heitman, Joseph; Hesse, Cedar; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jurgens, Joel A.; Kallen, Nathan; Kersten, Phil; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Kumar, T. K. Arun; Kuo, Alan; LaButti, Kurt; Larrondo, Luis F.; Lindquist, Erika; Ling, Albee; Lombard, Vincent; Lucas, Susan; Lundell, Taina; Martin, Rachael; McLaughlin, David J.; Morgenstern, Ingo; Morin, Emanuelle; Murat, Claude; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Nolan, Matt; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Rokas, Antonis; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Salamov, Asaf; Samejima, Masahiro; Schmutz, Jeremy; Slot, Jason C.; St. John, Franz; Stenlid, Jan; Sun, Hui; Sun, Sheng; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tsang, Adrian; Wiebenga, Ad; Young, Darcy; Pisabarro, Antonio; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

    2012-03-12

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

  19. Recent Progress in Producing Lignin-Based Carbon Fibers for Functional Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Ryan; Burwell, Deanna; Dai, Xuliang; Naskar, Amit; Gallego, Nidia; Akato, Kokouvi

    2015-10-29

    Lignin, a biopolymer, has been investigated as a renewable and low-cost carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although successful lab-scale production of lignin-based carbon fibers has been reported, there are currently not any commercial producers. This paper will highlight some of the known challenges with converting lignin-based precursors into carbon fiber, and the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Several of the challenges with lignin are related to its diversity in chemical structure and purity, depending on its biomass source (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction method (e.g. organosolv, kraft). In order to make progress in this field, GrafTech and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are collaborating to develop lignin-based carbon fiber technology and to demonstrate it in functional applications, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office. The progress made to date with producing lignin-based carbon fiber for functional applications, as well as developing and qualifying a supply chain and value proposition, are also highlighted.

  20. Conversion of lignin into value-added materials and chemicals via laccase-assisted copolymerization

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cannatelli, Mark D.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-19

    With today’s environmental concerns and the diminishing supply of the world’s petroleum-based chemicals and materials, much focus has been directed toward alternative sources. Woody biomass presents a promising option due to its sheer abundance, renewability, and biodegradability. Lignin, a highly irregular polyphenolic compound, is one of the major chemical constituents of woody biomass and is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth, surpassed only by cellulose. The pulp and paper and cellulosic ethanol industries produce lignin on the scale of millions of tons each year as a by-product. Traditionally, lignin has been viewed as a waste material and burned asmore » an inefficient fuel. However, in recent decades, research has focused on more economical ways to convert lignin into value-added commodities, such as biofuels, biomaterials, and biochemicals, thus developing and strengthening the concept of fully integrated biorefineries. Owing to the phenolic structure of lignin, it is possible to enzymatically graft molecules onto its surface using laccases (benzenediol:oxygen oxidoreductases, EC 1.10.3.2) to create exciting novel biomaterials. These environmentally friendly enzymes use oxygen as their only co-substrate and produce water as their sole by-product, and have thus found great industrial application. Furthermore, this mini-review highlights recent advances in the field of laccase-facilitated functionalization of lignin as well as promising future directions for lignin-based polymers.« less

  1. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization. [Final] technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Muchmore, C.B.; Koropchak, J.A.; Kim, Jong Won

    1992-12-31

    Liquefaction of an Illinois bituminous and a caustic lignin was studied in an initial hydrogen pressure of 140 psig. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 325-375{degree}C in tetralin. The addition of lignin to coal was found to be synergistic in that it significantly improves the quality and yield of the liquid products obtained. Kinetic data for coal conversion enhancement due to lignin addition were obtained. A mathematical model describing the reaction chemistry, using lignin, has been proposed and developed. The analysis of the results indicates that the intermediates produced from lignin were responsible for enhancement in coal depolymerization rate, however, the intermediates are short-lived as compared to the time needed for a significant coal conversion yield. Coal depolymerization rate was found to be a function of time; compared to processing coal alone, it doubled upon reacting coal with lignin at 375{degree}C and after 67 minutes from the beginning of the experiment. Overall mass recoveries of 95--98% of the total mass charged to the reactor were obtained. A careful statistical analysis of the data shows that coal depolymerization yield is enhanced by 11.9% due to the lignin addition. The liquids obtained were examined for their elemental composition, and molecular weight determination by size exclusion chromatography. The stability of liquid products was characterized by determining their solubility in pentane and benzene, and by evaluating the molecular weight.

  2. Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of

  3. Use and value of reactive lignin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.E.; Mednick, R.L.; Stern, K.M.

    1988-03-01

    New York State has ample reserves of wood that are not suitable for lumber nor paper making. The Energy Authority has several research projects to utilize wood for the production of fuels and energy intensive chemicals. The Energy Authority and Chem Systems set out to characterize the market potential for lignins derived as by-products of wood-to-ethanol processes. Based on these analyses and subsequent ranking of the potential applications, three end uses (Phenol-Formaldehyde resin adhesives, carbon black substitutes and diesel fuel cetane enhancers) were characterized as having a high potential of commercial success. Epoxies were characterized as having a low potential. The prospects of the remaining end uses (activated carbon replacements, polyurethanes, dietary adsorbents, phenol/benzene and asphalt extenders) were classified as intermediate, along with those of the Urea-Formaldehyde resin portion of the adhesive market.

  4. GranBio RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sao Paulo, August 24, 2016. U.S. Department of Energy - Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Via e-mail: sugarandlignin@ee.doe.gov Ref. Request for Information - RFI - Categories 1 and 2: Lignocellulosic Sugars and Lignin Dear Sirs, We refer to your Request for Information - RFI DE-FOA-0001615, dated July 20, 2016, in relation to which we comment as follows: Category 2: Lignin: Question 1: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell or otherwise provide your lignin?

  5. Enhanced sampling simulation analysis of the structure of lignin in the THF–water miscibility gap

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Smith, Micholas Dean; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Mostofian, Barmak; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-26

    Using temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics, we characterize a globule-to-coil transition for a softwood-like lignin biopolymer in a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-water cosolvent system at temperatures at which the cosolvent undergoes a de-mixing transition. The lignin is found to be in a coil state, similar to that in the high-temperature miscible region. Analysis of the transition kinetics indicates that THF acts in a surfactant-like fashion. In conclusion, the present study thus suggests that THF-water based pretreatments may efficiently remove lignin from biomass even at relatively low (non-water boiling) temperatures.

  6. Controlling porosity in lignin-derived nanoporous carbon for supercapacitor applications

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jeon, Ju-Won; Zhang, Libing; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L.; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Lemmon, John P.; Choi, Daiwon; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Jie; Motkuri, Radha K.; et al

    2015-02-01

    Low-cost renewable lignin has been used as a precursor to produce porous carbons. However, to date, it has not been easy to obtain high surface area porous carbon without activation processes or templating agents. Here, we demonstrate that low molecular weight lignin yields highly porous carbon (1092 m² g⁻¹) with more graphitization through direct carbonization without additional activation processes or templating agents. We found that molecular weight and oxygen consumption during carbonization are critical factors to obtain high surface area, graphitized porous carbons. This highly porous carbon from low-cost renewable lignin sources is a good candidate for supercapacitor electrode materials.

  7. Lignin Process Design Confirmation and Capitol Cost Evaluation: Report 42002/02 -- Review of Design

    SciTech Connect

    Montague, L.

    2003-10-01

    Harris Group prepared this report on NREL's conceptual design for a process that converts lignin into a hydrocarbon that can be used as a high-octane automobile fuel additive.

  8. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ... 1:28:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  9. Leaf Resources RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities DATE: July 20, 2016 SUBJECT: Request for Information (RFI) Responder: COMPANY: Leaf Resources Ltd COMPANY CONTACT: Alex Baker, Chief Operating Officer 2806, Ipswich Rd Darra Queensland Australia Phone: +61 3273 9165 Cell: +61 419 028 372 Email: a.baker@leafresources.com.au Category 2: Lignin Question 1: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell or otherwise provide your

  10. ICM RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities RFI Number: DE-FOA-0001615 Submitted To: Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC Submitted By: ICM, Inc. 310 N. First Street Colwich, KS 67030 DUNS: 834683369 Contact: Douglas B. Rivers, Ph.D. 2811 S. 11 th Street, Suite 100 St. Joseph, MO 64503 douglas.rivers@icminc.com (316) 977-8502 August 24, 2016 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production

  11. Modification of Lignin by Protein Cross-linking to Facilitate Production of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biofuels From Poplar (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Modification of Lignin by Protein Cross-linking to Facilitate Production of Biofuels From Poplar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modification of Lignin by Protein Cross-linking to Facilitate Production of Biofuels From Poplar The limited supply of fossil fuels and the associated environmental issues associated with their utilization has resulted in much effort put forth to promote renewable resources of energy. Switching to

  12. NREL RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities 1 Company / institution name; The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Company / institution contact; Richard Bolin National Bioenergy Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 - 3305 (303)-384-7716 Richard.Bolin@NREL.gov NREL supplies lignocellulosic sugars and lignin derived from a variety of biomass types to the research community and to

  13. NREL RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities Company / institution name; The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Company / institution contact; Richard Bolin National Bioenergy Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 - 3305 (303)-384-7716 Richard.Bolin@NREL.gov NREL supplies lignocellulosic sugars and lignin derived from a variety of biomass types to the research community and to various

  14. FPInnovations Thunder Bay RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    XRequest for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) seeks input from industry, academia, national laboratories and other biofuels and bioproducts stakeholders to identify existing capabilities to produce lignocellulosic sugars and lignin for use by the research community. Purpose: The purpose of this RFI is to develop a comprehensive list of suppliers who are willing and able to produce and sell

  15. Clariant RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) / DE-FOA-0001615 CELLULOSIC SUGAR AND LIGNIN PRODUCTION CAPABILITIES Clariant Group Biotechnology Contact: Martin Mitchell / Business Development Manager, Americas Phone: +1 515 699 8518 Email: martin.mitchell@clariant.com Headquarters Clariant Produkte (Deutschland) GmbH Semmelweisstraße 1 82152 Planegg, Germany Category 2: Lignin Question #1 - To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell your or otherwise provide your

  16. NREL Refines Method to Convert Lignin to Nylon Precursor - News Releases |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL NREL Refines Method to Convert Lignin to Nylon Precursor Recent Findings Published in Energy & Environmental Science February 26, 2015 A new study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrates the conversion of lignin-derived compounds to adipic acid, an important industrial dicarboxylic acid produced for its use as a precursor to nylon, plasticizers, lubricants, polyesters, and other popular products and chemicals. The demonstration is an

  17. UMaine RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    UMaine Response to Request for Information Categories andQuestions Company / institution name; University of Maine, Forest Bioproducts Research Institute (FBRI) Company / institution contact; Dr. Hemant Pendse, Director FBRI Contact's address, phone number, and e-mail address. 5737 Jenness Hall, Room 115, Orono, ME 04469 1-207-581-2290 pendse@maine.edu Category 2: Lignin Lignin is often classified differently depending on who produces it, how it is produced and for which specific market it is

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    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  15. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  16. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  17. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  18. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  19. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  20. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  1. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers ...

  2. Genome sequence and description of the anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium Tolumonas lignolytica sp. nov.

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Billings, Andrew F.; Fortney, Julian L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; et al

    2015-11-19

    Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T sp. nov. is the type strain of T. lignolytica sp. nov., a proposed novel species of the Tolumonas genus. This strain was isolated from tropical rainforest soils based on its ability to utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Cells of Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T are mesophilic, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rods that are oxidase and catalase negative. The genome for this isolate was sequenced and returned in seven unique contigs totaling 3.6Mbp, enabling the characterization of several putative pathways for lignin breakdown. Particularly, we found an extracellular peroxidase involved in lignin depolymerization, as well as several enzymes involvedmore » in β-aryl ether bond cleavage, which is the most abundant linkage between lignin monomers. We also found genes for enzymes involved in ferulic acid metabolism, which is a common product of lignin breakdown. Finally, by characterizing pathways and enzymes employed in the bacterial breakdown of lignin in anaerobic environments, this work should assist in the efficient engineering of biofuel production from lignocellulosic material.« less

  3. Genome sequence and description of the anaerobic lignin-degrading bacterium Tolumonas lignolytica sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, Andrew F.; Fortney, Julian L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake; Davenport, Karen W.; Goodwin, Lynne; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Woyke, Tanja; DeAngelis, Kristen M.

    2015-11-19

    Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T sp. nov. is the type strain of T. lignolytica sp. nov., a proposed novel species of the Tolumonas genus. This strain was isolated from tropical rainforest soils based on its ability to utilize lignin as a sole carbon source. Cells of Tolumonas lignolytica BRL6-1T are mesophilic, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rods that are oxidase and catalase negative. The genome for this isolate was sequenced and returned in seven unique contigs totaling 3.6Mbp, enabling the characterization of several putative pathways for lignin breakdown. Particularly, we found an extracellular peroxidase involved in lignin depolymerization, as well as several enzymes involved in β-aryl ether bond cleavage, which is the most abundant linkage between lignin monomers. We also found genes for enzymes involved in ferulic acid metabolism, which is a common product of lignin breakdown. Finally, by characterizing pathways and enzymes employed in the bacterial breakdown of lignin in anaerobic environments, this work should assist in the efficient engineering of biofuel production from lignocellulosic material.

  4. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization (Towards Lignin valorization: How a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from "Lignolysis")

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Varman, Arul M.; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; Wu, Weihua; Wemmer, Sarah; Wrobel, Steven A.; Tang, Yinjie J.; Singh, Seema

    2016-09-15

    Lignin is a major resources for the production of next generation renewable aromatics. Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a bacterium that has been well-studied for the breakdown of lignin-derived compounds. There has been a lot of interest in SYK-6 lignolytic activity and many recent works have focused on understanding the unique catabolic pathway it possesses for the degradation of lignin derived monomers and oligomers. Furthermore, there has been no prior effort in understanding the central fluxome based on lignin derived substrates into value-added chemicals.

  5. Characterization of lignin derived from water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment of poplar wood at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Yan, Lishi; Wang, Zheming; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Swita, Marie S.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, flowthrough pretreatment of biomass has high potential to valorize lignin derivatives to high-value products, which is vital to enhance the economy of biorefinery plants. Comprehensive understanding of lignin behaviors and solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of providing flexible platform for lignin utilization. In this study, the effects of flowthrough pretreatment conditions on lignin separation from poplar wood were reported as well as the characteristics of three sub-sets of lignin produced from the pretreatment, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL), recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), and recovered soluble lignin in pretreatment liquid (RSL). Both the water-only and 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid pretreatments were performed at temperatures from 160 to 270°C on poplar wood in a flowthrough reactor system for 2-10 min. Results showed that water-only flowthrough pretreatment primarily removed syringyl (S units). Increased temperature and/or the addition of sulfuric acid enhanced the removal of guaiacyl (G units) compared to water-only pretreatments at lower temperatures, resulting in nearly complete removal of lignin from the biomass. Results also suggested that more RISL was recovered than ReL and RSL in both dilute acid and water-only flowthrough pretreatment at elevated temperatures. NMR spectra of the RISL revealed significant β-O-4 cleavage, α-β deoxygenation to form cinnamyl-like end groups, and slight β-5 repolymerization in both water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatments. In conclusion, elevated temperature and/or dilute acid greatly enhanced lignin removal to almost 100% by improving G unit removal besides S unit removal in flowthrough system. A new lignin chemistry transformation pathway was proposed and revealed the complexity of lignin structural change during

  6. NREL Overcomes Obstacles in Lignin Valorization (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Using a "funneling" pathway inherent in nature, NREL researchers show that lignin can be converted into renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials. It has long been known how to convert biomass-derived carbohydrates, such as glu- cose, into fuels and chemicals such as ethanol. However, plants also contain a significant amount of lignin, comprising up to 30% of their cell walls. Lignin is a heterogeneous aro- matic polymer that plants use for strength, for defense against pathogens, and

  7. Characterization of Lignin Derived from Water-only and Dilute Acid Flowthrough Pretreatment of Poplar Wood at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Libing; Yan, Lishi; Wang, Zheming; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Swita, Marie S.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Background: Flowthrough pretreatment of biomass has high potential to valorize lignin derivatives to high-value products, which is vital to enhance the economy of biorefinery plants. Comprehensive understanding of lignin behaviors and solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of providing flexible platform for lignin utilization. Results: In this study, the effects of flowthrough pretreatment conditions on lignin separation from poplar wood were reported as well as the characteristics of three sub-sets of lignin produced from the pretreatment, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL), recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), and recovered soluble lignin in pretreatment liquid (RSL). Both the water-only and 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid pretreatments were performed at temperatures from 160 to 270°C on poplar wood in a flowthrough reactor system for 2-10 min. Results showed that water-only flowthrough pretreatment primarily removed syringyl (S units). Increased temperature and/or the addition of sulfuric acid enhanced the removal of guaiacyl (G units) compared to water-only pretreatments at lower temperatures, resulting in nearly complete removal of lignin from the biomass. Results also suggested that more RISL was recovered than ReL and RSL in both dilute acid and water-only flowthrough pretreatment at elevated temperatures. NMR spectra of the RISL revealed significant β-O-4 cleavage, α-β deoxygenation to form cinnamyl-like end groups, and slight β-5 repolymerization in both water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatments. Conclusions: Elevated temperature and/or dilute acid greatly enhanced lignin removal to almost 100% by improving G unit removal besides S unit removal in flowthrough system. A new lignin chemistry transformation pathway was proposed and revealed the complexity of lignin structural change

  8. Downregulation of GAUT12 in Populus deltoides by RNA silencing results in reduced recalcitrance, increased growth and reduced xylan and pectin in a woody biofuel feedstock

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Hao, Zhangying; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Yang, Xiaohan; Winkeler, Kim; Collins, Cassandra; Mohanty, Sushree S.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Gelineo-Albersheim, Ivana; Hunt, Kimberly; et al

    2015-03-12

    The inherent recalcitrance of woody bioenergy feedstocks is a major challenge for their use as a source of second-generation biofuel. Secondary cell walls that constitute the majority of hardwood biomass are rich in cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The interactions among these polymers prevent facile accessibility and deconstruction by enzymes and chemicals. Plant biomass that can with minimal pretreatment be degraded into sugars is required to produce renewable biofuels in a cost-effective manner. The following are the results: GAUT12/IRX8 is a putative glycosyltransferase proposed to be involved in secondary cell wall glucuronoxylan and/or pectin biosynthesis based on concomitant reductions of bothmore » xylan and the pectin homogalacturonan (HG) in Arabidopsis irx8 mutants. Two GAUT12 homologs exist in Populus trichocarpa, PtGAUT12.1 and PtGAUT12.2. Knockdown expression of both genes simultaneously has been shown to reduce xylan content in Populus wood. We tested the proposition that RNA interference (RNAi) downregulation of GAUT12.1 alone would lead to increased sugar release in Populus wood, that is, reduced recalcitrance, based on the hypothesis that GAUT12 synthesizes a wall structure required for deposition of xylan and that cell walls with less xylan and/or modified cell wall architecture would have reduced recalcitrance. Using an RNAi approach, we generated 11 Populus deltoides transgenic lines with 50 to 67% reduced PdGAUT12.1 transcript expression compared to wild type (WT) and vector controls. Ten of the eleven RNAi lines yielded 4 to 8% greater glucose release upon enzymatic saccharification than the controls. The PdGAUT12.1 knockdown (PdGAUT12.1-KD) lines also displayed 12 to 52% and 12 to 44% increased plant height and radial stem diameter, respectively, compared to the controls. Knockdown of PdGAUT12.1 resulted in a 25 to 47% reduction in galacturonic acid and 17 to 30% reduction in xylose without affecting total lignin content, revealing that in

  9. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCAmore » decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.« less

  10. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization. [Quarterly] report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Muchmore, C.B.; Koropchak, J.A.; Kim, Jong Won

    1992-10-01

    In the last report, it was shown that when lignin is added to coal, the rate of coal depolymerization is enhanced. The results,-reported were based upon a number of experiments conducted for the following three reasons: (i) to generate enough quantities of liquid products so that their stability in various environments can be ascertained, (ii) to closely characterize the reaction products, so that individual atomic mass balances can be performed, and (iii) to determine the reproducibility of the experiments conducted. The stability of liquid products was characterized by determining their solubility in pentane and benzene. Exposure of the coal- and coal+lignin-derived liquids to air at 40 and 80{degrees}C led to a decrease in the pentane-soluble and asphaltene fractions with a concomitant enhancement in the benzene insoluble fraction. However, relatively no degradation was observed for the liquid samples exposed to an inert (N{sub 2}) atmosphere. Preliminary data show that the coal+lignin-derived liquids are more stable than that obtained by coal liquefaction. In this quarterly report, individual atomic mass balances on various experiments conducted with coal, lignin and coal+lignin mixtures are also reported. Although the overall mass recoveries of 95--98% of the total mass charged to the reactor were obtained, the atomic mass balance data are somewhat difficult to interpret due to the possible incorporation of tetralin (solvent) in the reaction products.

  11. Lignin-assisted coal depolymerization. Technical report, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.

    1991-12-31

    Previous research has shown that addition of lignin-derived liquids to coal stirred in tetralin under mild reaction conditions (375{degree}C and 300--500 psig) results in a marked enhancement in the rate of coal depolymerization. A mathematical model was developed to study the kinetics of coal depolymerization in the presence of liquid-derived liquids. In the present study, a reaction pathway was formulated to explain the enhancement in coal depolymerization due to lignin (solid) addition. The model postulated assumes that the products of lignin obtained during thermolysis interact with the reactive moieties present in coal while simultaneous depolymerization of coal occurs. A good fit between the experimental data and the kinetic model was found. The results show that in addition to the enhancement in the rate of coal depolymerization, lignin also reacts (and enhances the extent of depolymerization of coal) with those reaction sites in coal that are not susceptible to depolymerization when coal alone is reacted in tetralin under identical reaction conditions. Additional work is being carried out to determine a thorough materials balance on the lignin-assisted coal depolymerization process. A number of liquid samples have been obtained which are being studied for their stability in various environments. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Down-regulation of p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis leads to improved sugar release

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Foutz, Kirk; Rottmann, William H.; Kuhn, Sean A.; Foster, Cliff E.; Ziebell, Angela; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; Davis, Mark F.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, lignocellulosic materials provide an attractive replacement for food-based crops used to produce ethanol. Understanding the interactions within the cell wall is vital to overcome the highly recalcitrant nature of biomass. One factor imparting plant cell wall recalcitrance is lignin, which can be manipulated by making changes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, eucalyptus down-regulated in expression of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) or p-coumaroyl quinate/shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H, EC 1.14.13.36) were evaluated for cell wall composition and reduced recalcitrance.

  13. Top Value-Added Chemicals from Biomass - Volume IIResults of Screening for Potential Candidates from Biorefinery Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, John E.; White, James F.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Johnson, David

    2007-10-01

    This report evaluates lignins role as a renewable raw material resource. Opportunities that arise from utilizing lignin fit into one of three categories: 1)power, fuel and syngas (generally near-term opportunities) 2) macromolecules (generally medium-term opportunities) 3) aromatics and miscellaneous monomers (long-term opportunities). Biorefineries will receive and process massive amounts of lignin. For this reason, how lignin can be best used to support the economic health of the biorefinery must be defined. An approach that only considers process heat would be shortsighted. Higher value products present economic opportunities and the potential to significantly increase the amount of liquid transportation fuel available from biomass. In this analysis a list of potential uses of lignin was compiled and sorted into product types which are broad classifications (listed above as powerfuelsyngas; macromolecules; and aromatics). In the first product type (powerfuelgasification) lignin is used purely as a carbon source and aggressive means are employed to break down its polymeric structure. In the second product type (macromolecules) the opposite extreme is considered and advantage of the macromolecular structure imparted by nature is retained in high-molecular weight applications. The third product type (aromatics) lies somewhere between the two extremes and employs technologies that would break up lignins macromolecular structure but maintain the aromatic nature of the building block molecules. The individual opportunities were evaluated based on their technical difficulty, market, market risk, building block utility, and whether a pure material or a mixture would be produced. Unlike the Sugars Top 10 report it was difficult to identify the ten best opportunities, however, the potential opportunities fell nicely into near-, medium- and long-term opportunities. Furthermore, the near-, medium- and long-term opportunities roughly align with the three

  14. Ethanol Technologies RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Company name: Ethanol Technologies Limited (Ethtec) Contact: Dr Russell Reeves - Director and Chief Scientist Postal address: PO Box 166, Dungog, New South Wales 2420, Australia Phone numbers: Mobile +61 423 770 264 Landline +61 2 49 923 033 Email: russell.reeves@ethtec.com.au or Dr.Russell.Reeves@westnet.com.au Category 2 - Lignin 1. Ethtec will sell lignin cake to any interested party. 2. Due to the production location (Australia) shipment quantities of from 2kg to 100kg are likely to be the

  15. FPInnovations Point Claire RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Compared with existing biomass to sugar processes, TMP-Bio includes a pretreatment stage that produces a biomass stream that is easily hydrolysed to clean, fermentable sugars. This is due to a unique combination of mechanical action and mild chemical treatment, both of which limit the generation of inhibitors such as acetic acid, furfural or others. Finally, the mild conditions lead to a sulfur-free, high-quality, light colored H-lignin co-product which is close to native lignin in terms of

  16. FPInnovations Point Claire RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Compared with existing biomass to sugar processes, TMP-Bio includes a pretreatment stage that produces a biomass stream that is easily hydrolysed to clean, fermentable sugars. This is due to a unique combination of mechanical action and mild chemical treatment, both of which limit the generation of inhibitors such as acetic acid, furfural or others. Finally, the mild conditions lead to a sulfur-free, high-quality, light colored H-lignin co-product which is close to native lignin in terms of

  17. Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars

    DOEpatents

    Black, Stuart K.; Hames, Bonnie R.; Myers, Michele D.

    1998-01-01

    A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

  18. Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars

    DOEpatents

    Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

    1998-03-24

    A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

  19. Comparative results of the combustion of lignin briquettes and black coal

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Lurii

    2008-12-15

    A new type of biofuel - hydrolytic lignin briquettes - was tested as compared with ordinary SS coal from the Kuznetsk Basin in fuel-bed firing in a Universal-6 boiler. It was found that the (total) efficiency of the boiler with the firing of lignin briquettes was 38% higher than that with the use of black coal. Carbon loss in the combustion of briquettes was 1%, whereas it was 48.2% in the combustion of black coal. The emission of harmful gas pollutants into the environment in the combustion of briquettes was lower than that in the combustion of coal by a factor of 4.5.

  20. Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

    1999-03-21

    Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

  1. New perspective on glycoside hydrolase binding to lignin from pretreated corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, II, Larry E.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Sammond, Deanne W.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Crowley, Michael F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2015-12-18

    In this study, non-specific binding of cellulases to lignin has been implicated as a major factor in the loss of cellulase activity during biomass conversion to sugars. It is believed that this binding may strongly impact process economics through loss of enzyme activities during hydrolysis and enzyme recycling scenarios. The current model suggests glycoside hydrolase activities are lost though non-specific/non-productive binding of carbohydrate-binding domains to lignin, limiting catalytic site access to the carbohydrate components of the cell wall.

  2. Determining the syringyl/guaiacyl lignin ratio in the vessel and fiber cell walls of transgenic Populus plants

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Allison K.; Ma, Tao; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-06-20

    Observation of the spatial lignin distribution throughout the plant cell wall provides insight into the physicochemical characteristics of lignocellulosic biomass. The distribution of syringyl (S) and guaiacyl (G) lignin in cell walls of a genetically modified Populus deltoides and its corresponding empty vector control were analyzed with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and then mapped to determine the S/G lignin ratio of the sample surface and specific regions of interest (ROIs). The surface characterizations of transgenic cross-sections within 1 cm vertical distance of each other on the stem possess similar S/G lignin ratios. Furthermore, the analysis of the ROIsmore » determined that there was a 50% decrease in the S/G lignin ratio of the transgenic xylem fiber cell walls.« less

  3. Micro-Spectroscopic Imaging of Lignin-Carbohydrate Complexes in Plant Cell Walls and Their Migration During Biomass Pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Johnson, David K.; Himmel, Michael E.; Mosier, Nathan S.; Meilan, Richard; Ding, Shi-You

    2015-04-27

    In lignocellulosic biomass, lignin is the second most abundant biopolymer. In plant cell walls, lignin is associated with polysaccharides to form lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC). LCC have been considered to be a major factor that negatively affects the process of deconstructing biomass to simple sugars by cellulosic enzymes. Here, we report a micro-spectroscopic approach that combines fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering microscopy to probe in situ lignin concentration and conformation at each cell wall layer. This technique does not require extensive sample preparation or any external labels. Using poplar as a feedstock, for example, we observe variation of LCC in untreated tracheid poplar cell walls. The redistribution of LCC at tracheid poplar cell wall layers is also investigated when the chemical linkages between lignin and hemicellulose are cleaved during pretreatment. Our study would provide new insights into further improvement of the biomass pretreatment process.

  4. Cellulose and lignin: biodegradation. January 1978-May 1987 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for January 1978-May 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of waste cellulose, cellulose-containing substances, lignin, and lignin-containing substances. Attention is given to the organisms that decompose cellulose and lignin, and the processes by which this takes place. (This updated bibliography contains 379 citations, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  5. Cellulose and lignin: biodegradation. June 1987-September 1988 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for June 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of waste cellulose, cellulose-containing substances, lignin, and lignin-containing substances. Attention is given to the organisms that decompose cellulose and lignin, and the processes by which this takes place. (This updated bibliography contains 65 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  6. Cellulose and lignin: Biodegradation. June 1987-September 1989 (Citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Report for June 1987-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of waste cellulose, cellulose-containing substances, lignin, and lignin-containing substances. Attention is given to the organisms that decompose cellulose and lignin, and the processes by which this takes place. (This updated bibliography contains 120 citations, 46 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  7. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click ... Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)",1,"Monthly","32016" ,"Release ...

  8. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ... 1:29:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from ...

  9. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumed" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","District of Columbia Heat Content ...

  10. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic ...

  11. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Injections into Underground ... 7:00:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Injections into Underground ...

  12. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3:51:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP41","MTTIPR40-MP01","MTTIPR40-ME01","MTTIPR40-NAG...

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  1. Reductive deconstruction of organosolv lignin catalyzed by zeolite supported nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kasakov, Stanislav; Shi, Hui; Camaioni, Donald M.; Zhao, Chen; Barath, Eszter; Jentys, Andreas; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-11-01

    Mechanistic aspects of deconstruction and hydrodeoxygenation of organosolv lignin using supported Ni catalysts with (Ni/HZSM-5 and Ni/HBEA) and without Brønsted acid sites (Ni/SiO2) are reported. Lignin was deconstructed and converted to saturated cyclic hydrocarbons ranging from C5 to C14. In the one-stage reaction, full conversion with total yield of 70 ± 5 wt.% saturated hydrocarbons was achieved at 593 K and 20 bar H2. The organosolv lignin used consists of seven to eight monolignol subunits and has an average molecular weight of ca. 1200 g mol-1. The monolignols were mainly guaiacyl, syringyl and phenylcoumaran, randomly interconnected through β-O-4, 4-O-5, β-1, 5-5’ and β-β ether bonds. In situ IR spectroscopy was used to follow the changes in lignin constituents during reaction. The proposed reaction pathways for the catalytic transformation of this organosolv lignin to alkanes start with the hydrogenolysis of aryl alkyl ether bonds, followed by hydrogenation of the aromatic compounds on Ni to cyclic alcohols. Oxygen is removed from the alcohols via dehydration on Brønsted acid sites to yield cyclic alkenes that are further hydrogenated to alkanes. Formation of condensation products may occur via intermolecular recombination of aromatic monomers or alkylation of aromatic compounds by alkenes. The financial support from TUM-PNNL cooperation project “Development of new methods for in situ characterization in liquid phase reactions” (CN-177939) is highly appreciated. The work by S.K., H.S., and J.A.L was partially supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  2. Adsorption of Clostridium thermocellum cellulases onto pretreated mixed hardwood, avicel, and lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardez, T.D.; Lyford, K.; Hogsett, D.A.; Lynd, L.R. . Thayer School of Engineering)

    1993-09-20

    Adsorption of Avicel-hydrolyzing activity was examined with respect to: mixed hardwood flour pretreated with 1% sulfuric acid for 9 s at 220C (PTW220), lignin prepared from PTW220 by either acid or enzymatic hydrolysis, and Avicel. Experiments were conducted at 60C for all materials, and also at 25C for PTW220. Based on transient adsorption results and reaction rates, times were selected at which to characterize adsorption at 60C as follows: PTW220, 1 min; lignin, 30 min; and Avicel, 45 min. Similar results were obtained for adsorption of cellulase activity to PTW220 at 25 and 60C, and for lignin prepared by enzymatic and acid hydrolysis. For all materials, adsorption was described well by a Langmuir equation, although the reversibility of adsorption was not investigated. Langmuir affinity constants (L/g) were: PTW220, 109; lignin, 17.9; Avicel, 4.3; cellulose from PTW220, [ge]187. Langmuir capacity constants were 760 for PTW220 and 42 for Avicel; the cellulase binding capacity of lignin appeared to be very high under the conditions examined, and could not be determined. At low and moderate cellulase loadings at least, the majority of cellulase activity adsorbed to PTVV220 is bound to the cellulosic component. The results indicate that PTW220, and its cellulose component in particular, differ radically from Avicel with respect to adsorption. Avicel-hydrolyzing activity and CMC-hydrolyzing activities were found to bind to Avicel with a constant ratio of essentially one, consistent with adsorption of a multi-activity complex.

  3. Characterization of lignin derived from water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment of poplar wood at elevated temperatures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, Libing; Yan, Lishi; Wang, Zheming; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D.; Swita, Marie S.; Cort, John R.; Yang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    In this study, flowthrough pretreatment of biomass has high potential to valorize lignin derivatives to high-value products, which is vital to enhance the economy of biorefinery plants. Comprehensive understanding of lignin behaviors and solubilization chemistry in aqueous pretreatment such as water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatment is of fundamental importance to achieve the goal of providing flexible platform for lignin utilization. In this study, the effects of flowthrough pretreatment conditions on lignin separation from poplar wood were reported as well as the characteristics of three sub-sets of lignin produced from the pretreatment, including residual lignin in pretreated solid residues (ReL),more » recovered insoluble lignin in pretreated liquid (RISL), and recovered soluble lignin in pretreatment liquid (RSL). Both the water-only and 0.05% (w/w) sulfuric acid pretreatments were performed at temperatures from 160 to 270°C on poplar wood in a flowthrough reactor system for 2-10 min. Results showed that water-only flowthrough pretreatment primarily removed syringyl (S units). Increased temperature and/or the addition of sulfuric acid enhanced the removal of guaiacyl (G units) compared to water-only pretreatments at lower temperatures, resulting in nearly complete removal of lignin from the biomass. Results also suggested that more RISL was recovered than ReL and RSL in both dilute acid and water-only flowthrough pretreatment at elevated temperatures. NMR spectra of the RISL revealed significant β-O-4 cleavage, α-β deoxygenation to form cinnamyl-like end groups, and slight β-5 repolymerization in both water-only and dilute acid flowthrough pretreatments. In conclusion, elevated temperature and/or dilute acid greatly enhanced lignin removal to almost 100% by improving G unit removal besides S unit removal in flowthrough system. A new lignin chemistry transformation pathway was proposed and revealed the complexity of lignin structural change

  4. Cellulose and lignin: Biodegradation. January 1985-May 1989 (Citations from the Biobusiness data base). Report for January 1985-May 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of materials containing cellulose and lignin components. Natural wood decay and sludge digestion are considered. Detailed chemical and physical mechanisms of degradation and research on microorganisms involved are discussed for a variety of cellulose and lignin containing materials including straw, municipal wastes, living trees, paper, lumber, and grasses. Genetic engineering studies regarding the isolation, preparation, and characterization of suitable microorganisms for cellulose and lignin degradation are included. (Contains 87 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  5. Downregulation of GAUT12 in Populus deltoides by RNA silencing results in reduced recalcitrance, increased growth and reduced xylan and pectin in a woody biofuel feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Hao, Zhangying; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Yang, Xiaohan; Winkeler, Kim; Collins, Cassandra; Mohanty, Sushree S.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Gelineo-Albersheim, Ivana; Hunt, Kimberly; Ryno, David; Sykes, Robert W.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Ziebell, Angela; Gjersing, Erica; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Davis, Mark F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mohnen, Debra

    2015-03-12

    The inherent recalcitrance of woody bioenergy feedstocks is a major challenge for their use as a source of second-generation biofuel. Secondary cell walls that constitute the majority of hardwood biomass are rich in cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The interactions among these polymers prevent facile accessibility and deconstruction by enzymes and chemicals. Plant biomass that can with minimal pretreatment be degraded into sugars is required to produce renewable biofuels in a cost-effective manner. The following are the results: GAUT12/IRX8 is a putative glycosyltransferase proposed to be involved in secondary cell wall glucuronoxylan and/or pectin biosynthesis based on concomitant reductions of both xylan and the pectin homogalacturonan (HG) in Arabidopsis irx8 mutants. Two GAUT12 homologs exist in Populus trichocarpa, PtGAUT12.1 and PtGAUT12.2. Knockdown expression of both genes simultaneously has been shown to reduce xylan content in Populus wood. We tested the proposition that RNA interference (RNAi) downregulation of GAUT12.1 alone would lead to increased sugar release in Populus wood, that is, reduced recalcitrance, based on the hypothesis that GAUT12 synthesizes a wall structure required for deposition of xylan and that cell walls with less xylan and/or modified cell wall architecture would have reduced recalcitrance. Using an RNAi approach, we generated 11 Populus deltoides transgenic lines with 50 to 67% reduced PdGAUT12.1 transcript expression compared to wild type (WT) and vector controls. Ten of the eleven RNAi lines yielded 4 to 8% greater glucose release upon enzymatic saccharification than the controls. The PdGAUT12.1 knockdown (PdGAUT12.1-KD) lines also displayed 12 to 52% and 12 to 44% increased plant height and radial stem diameter, respectively, compared to the controls. Knockdown of PdGAUT12.1 resulted in a 25 to 47% reduction in galacturonic acid and 17 to 30% reduction in xylose without affecting total lignin content, revealing that in Populus

  6. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Contents","Data 1: U.S., PAD Districts, and States" "Sourcekey","8NA8O0NUSC","8NA8O0R10C","8NA8O0SDEC","8NA8O0SFLC","8NA8O0SGAC","8NA8O0SMDC","8NA8O0SN...

  7. Chapter 8: Pyrolysis Mechanisms of Lignin Model Compounds Using a Heated Micro-Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2015-10-03

    Lignin is an important component of biomass, and the decomposition of its thermal deconstruction products is important in pyrolysis and gasification. In this chapter, we investigate the unimolecular pyrolysis chemistry through the use of singly and doubly substituted benzene molecules that are model compounds representative of lignin and its primary pyrolysis products. These model compounds are decomposed in a heated micro-reactor, and the products, including radicals and unstable intermediates, are measured using photoionization mass spectrometry and matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. We show that the unimolecular chemistry can yield insight into the initial decomposition of these species. At pyrolysis and gasification severities, singly substituted benzenes typically undergo bond scission and elimination reactions to form radicals. Some require radical-driven chain reactions. For doubly substituted benzenes, proximity effects of the substituents can change the reaction pathways.

  8. LBNL RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DE-FOA-0001615: REQUEST FOR INFORMATION: CELLULOSIC SUGAR AND LIGNIN PRODUCTION CAPABILITIES Response from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Prepared by Ning Sun and Deetpi Tanjore 1 Cyclotron Road MS 977 Berkeley, CA 94720 nsun@lbl.gov 510-495-8024 Category 1: Lignocellulosic Sugars If you are a producer of lignocellulosic sugars and are willing and able to sell or otherwise make them available to the research community, please provide information in your response to the following questions. You

  9. Leaf Resources RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities DATE: July 20, 2016 SUBJECT: Request for Information (RFI) Responder: COMPANY: Leaf Resources Ltd COMPANY CONTACT: Alex Baker, Chief Operating Officer 2806, Ipswich Rd Darra Queensland Australia Phone: +61 3273 9165 Cell: +61 419 028 372 Email: a.baker@leafresources.com.au 1: Lignocellulosic Sugars Question 1: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell your lignocellulosic

  10. Lignin-modifying enzymes of the white rot basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    SciTech Connect

    D Merritt, C.S.; Reddy, C.A.

    1999-12-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a white rot basidiomycete widely distributed worldwide, was studied for the production of the lignin-modifying enzymes laccase, manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP), and lignin peroxidase (LiP). Laccase levels observed in high-nitrogen shaken cultures were much greater than those seen in low-nitrogen, malt extract, or wool-grown cultures and those reported for most other white rot fungi to date. Laccase production was readily seen in cultures grown with pine or poplar as the sole carbon and energy source. Cultures containing both pine and poplar showed 5- to 10-fold-higher levels of laccase than cultures containing pine or poplar alone. Since syringyl units are structural components important in poplar lignin and other hardwoods but much less so in pine lignin and other softwoods, pine cultures were supplemented with syringic acid, and this resulted in laccase levels comparable to those seen in pine-plus-poplar cultures. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of concentrated extracellular culture fluid from HM cultures showed two laccase activity bands, where as isoelectric focusing revealed five major laccase activity bands with estimated pIs of 3.0, 4.25, 4.5, and 5.1. Low levels of MnP activity were detected in poplar-grown cultures but not in cultures grown with pine, with pine plus syringic acid, or in HN medium. No LiP activity was seen in any of the media tested; however, probing the genomic DNA with the LiP cDNA (CLG4) from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium showed distinct hybridization bands suggesting the presence of lip-like sequences in G. lucidum.

  11. EK Laboratories RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ek Laboratories Response to (RFI) DE-FO!-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities Company Name: Ek Laboratories, LLC Company Contact: Jim Brown 235 West Marvin Ave; Longwood, FL 32750 Cell: 931-698-6732; jim@eklaboratories.com Sales Contact: Daniel de Liege; daniel@alliancebioe.com EK Laboratories (EK) is the Research and Development center supporting the scale-up and optimization of the patented Cellulose-to-Sugar (CTS) conversion process invented by Dr. Richard G. Blair.

  12. EK Laboratories RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ek Laboratories Response to (RFI) DE-FO!-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities Company Name: Ek Laboratories, LLC Company Contact: Jim Brown 235 West Marvin Ave; Longwood, FL 32750 Cell: 931-698-6732; jim@eklaboratories.com Sales Contact: Daniel de Liege; daniel@alliancebioe.com EK Laboratories (EK) is the Research and Development center supporting the scale-up and optimization of the patented Cellulose-to-Sugar (CTS) conversion process invented by Dr. Richard G. Blair.

  13. AVAPCO LLC RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    BIOREFINERY Capabilities, Published July 20, 2016 Category 2: Lignin Company name: AVAPCO LLC, Thomaston Biorefinery Company contact: Vesa Pylkkanen/CTO Company address: 300 McIntosh Parkway, Thomaston, GA 30286 Phone number: 404-872-8807; E-mail address: Biorefine@americanprocess.com Disclaimer and Important Notes: AVAPCO LLC and American Process Inc. reserve right to select the customers based on merit of the project after assessing the safety, environmental, availability and economic factors.

  14. American Process Inc RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    American Process Inc DE-FOA-0001615 Alpena Biorefinery Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities, Published July 20, 2016 Category 1: Lignocellulosic Sugars Company name: American Process, Inc, Company contact: Vesa Pylkkanen/CTO Company address: 412 Ford Ave, PO Box 337, Alpena, MI 49707 Phone number: 404-872-8807; E-mail address: Biorefine@americanprocess.com Disclaimer and Important Notes: American Process Inc. reserves right to

  15. DuPont RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Submitted by: August 23, 2016 DuPont Industrial Biosciences Jan Koninckx Route 141 Henry Clay Wilmington, DE 19880 Jan.Koninckx@dupont.com (302) 695-7054 U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Submitted via email to sugarandlignin@ee.doe.gov RE: Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities DuPont appreciates the opportunity to provide feedback in response to the Department of Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office Request for

  16. Clariant RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) / DE-FOA-0001615 CELLULOSIC SUGAR AND LIGNIN PRODUCTION CAPABILITIES Clariant Group Biotechnology Contact: Martin Mitchell / Business Development Manager, Americas Phone: +1 515 699 8518 Email: martin.mitchell@clariant.com Headquarters Clariant Produkte (Deutschland) GmbH Semmelweisstraße 1 82152 Planegg, Germany Category 1: Lignocellulosic Sugars Question #1 - To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell your

  17. Borregaard RFI DE-FOA 0001615_Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA-0001615: Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities Response from Borregaard AS, Hjalmar Wessels vei 6, 1721 Sarpsborg, NORWAY Response compiled by Martin Lersch, CTO Business development, martin.lersch@borregaard.com Category 1: Lignocellulosic sugars Question 1: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell your lignocellulosic sugar (e.g., university researchers, national laboratories, industry/private sector)? Are there any

  18. Differential Expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium of Membrane-Associated Proteins Relevant to Lignin Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Shary, Semarjit; Kapich, Alexander N.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Cullen, Dan; Hammel, Ken

    2008-10-02

    Fungal lignin-degrading systems must include membrane-associated proteins that participate in diverse processes such as uptake and oxidation of lignin fragments, secretion of ligninolytic secondary metabolites, and defense of the mycelium against ligninolytic oxidants. Despite their importance, little is known about the nature or regulation of these membrane-associated components. We grew the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium on cellulose or glucose as the carbon source and monitored the mineralization of a 14C-labeled synthetic lignin by these cultures to assess their ligninolytic competence. The results showed that the cellulose-grown cultures were ligninolytic, whereas the glucose-grown ones were not. We isolated microsomal membrane fractions from both types of culture and analyzed tryptic digests of them by shotgun liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Comparison of the results against the predicted P. chrysosporium proteome showed that a catalase (Joint Genome Institute P. chrysosporium protein I.D. 124398), an alcohol oxidase (126879), two transporters (137220 and 132234), and two cytochrome P450s (5011 and 8912) were up-regulated under ligninolytic conditions. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays showed that RNA transcripts encoding all of these proteins were also up-regulated in ligninolytic cultures. Catalase 124398, alcohol oxidase 126879, and transporter 137220 were found in a proteomic analysis of partially purified plasma membranes from ligninolytic P. chrysosporium, and are therefore most likely associated with the outer envelope of the fungus.

  19. Radical Coupling Reactions in Lignin Synthesis: A Density Functional Theory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sangha, A. K.; Parks, J. M.; Standaert, R. F.; Ziebell, A.; Davis, M.; Smith, J. C.

    2012-04-26

    Lignin is a complex, heterogeneous polymer in plant cell walls that provides mechanical strength to the plant stem and confers resistance to degrading microbes, enzymes, and chemicals. Lignin synthesis initiates through oxidative radical-radical coupling of monolignols, the most common of which are p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols. Here, we use density functional theory to characterize radical-radical coupling reactions involved in monolignol dimerization. We compute reaction enthalpies for the initial self- and cross-coupling reactions of these monolignol radicals to form dimeric intermediates via six major linkages observed in natural lignin. The 8-O-4, 8-8, and 8-5 coupling are computed to be the most favorable, whereas the 5-O-4, 5-5, and 8-1 linkages are less favorable. Overall, p-coumaryl self- and cross-coupling reactions are calculated to be the most favorable. For cross-coupling reactions, in which each radical can couple via either of the two sites involved in dimer formation, the more reactive of the two radicals is found to undergo coupling at its site with the highest spin density.

  20. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Consumers",52,"Monthly","8/2016","01/15/2012" ,"Data 2","Heat Content of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers",52,"Annual",2015,"06/30/2003" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm25vmall.xls" ,"Available from Web

  1. Sappi RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1) 2) 3) 4) Sappi North America 89 Cumberland Street PO Box 5000 Westbrook, ME 04098-1597 Tel: +1 207 856 3532 Fax:+1 207 856 3770 Subject: Response to "Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA- 0001615: Cellulosic Sugars and Lignin Production Capabilities" Company: Sappi North America Company Contact: Beth A. Cormier - VP - Research, Development & Innovation Sappi North America - Technology Center P.O. Box 5000 Westbrook, Maine 04098 (207) 856-3532 Email: beth.cormier@sappi.com

  2. Sappi RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1) 2) 3) Sappi North America 89 Cumberland Street PO Box 5000 Westbrook, ME 04098-1597 Tel: +1 207 856 3532 Fax:+1 207 856 3770 Subject: Response to "Request for Information (RFI) DE-FOA- 0001615: Cellulosic Sugars and Lignin Production Capabilities" Company: Sappi North America Company Contact: Beth A. Cormier - VP - Research, Development & Innovation Sappi North America - Technology Center P.O. Box 5000 Westbrook, Maine 04098 (207) 856-3532 Email: beth.cormier@sappi.com Category

  3. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Lignin-Rich Biorefinery Residues and Algae Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Zacher, Alan H.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Jones, Susanne B.; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.

    2009-11-03

    This report describes the results of the work performed by PNNL using feedstock materials provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KL Energy and Lignol lignocellulosic ethanol pilot plants. Test results with algae feedstocks provided by Genifuel, which provided in-kind cost share to the project, are also included. The work conducted during this project involved developing and demonstrating on the bench-scale process technology at PNNL for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of lignin-rich biorefinery residues and algae. A technoeconomic assessment evaluated the use of the technology for energy recovery in a lignocellulosic ethanol plant.

  4. GranBio RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sao Paulo, August 24, 2016. U.S. Department of Energy - Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Via e-mail: sugarandlignin@ee.doe.gov Ref. Request for Information - RFI - Categories 1 and 2: Lignocellulosic Sugars and Lignin Dear Sirs, We refer to your Request for Information - RFI DE-FOA-0001615, dated July 20, 2016, in relation to which we comment as follows: Category 1: Lignocellulosic Sugars: Question 1: To which types of research entities are you willing and able to sell your

  5. American Science and Technology RFI DE-FOA 0001615 Cellulosic Sugar and Lignin Production Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    RFI Category 2 - LIGNIN Company Name: American Science and Technology Corporation Technical Point of Contact: Ali Manesh, Ph.D. P.E., 6445 Packer Drive, Wausau WI 54401 Cell (312) 898-3333 Email: am@amsnt.com Commercial Point of Contact:Ali Manesh (Jr) 1330 West Ave., Suite 3305, Miami Beach FL 33139 Cell (305) 310-1141 Email: jr@amsnt.com Introduction: American Science and Technology Corporation (AST) is an R&D service provider with pilot plant capabilities that can process various

  6. Morphological changes in the cellulose and lignin components of biomass occur at different stages of steam pretreatment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Urban, Volker S.; Petridis, Loukas; Davison, Brian H.; Langan, Paul

    2014-01-09

    Morphological changes to the different components of lignocellulosic biomass were observed as they occurred during steam pretreatment by placing a pressure reaction cell in a neutron beam and collecting time-resolved neutron scattering data. Changes to cellulose morphology occurred mainly in the heating phase, whereas changes in lignin morphology occurred mainly in the holding and cooling phases. During the heating stage, water is irreversibly expelled from cellulose microfibrils as the elementary fibrils coalesce. During the holding phase lignin aggregates begin to appear and they increase in size most noticeably during the cooling phase. This experiment demonstrates the unique information that inmore » situ small angle neutron scattering studies of pretreatment can provide. This approach is potentially useful in optimizing the heating, holding and cooling stages of pretreatments to allow the exact size and nature of lignin aggregates to be controlled in order to enhance enzyme accessibility to cellulose and therefore the efficiency of biomass conversion.« less

  7. Genome Sequence of Halomonas sp. Strain KO116, an Ionic Liquid- Tolerant Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Lignin-Enriched Seawater Microcosm

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, Kaela; Woo, Hannah L.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Brown, Steven D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2015-05-07

    Halomonas sp. strain KO116 was isolated from Nile Delta Mediterranean Sea surface water enriched with insoluble organosolv lignin. It was further screened for growth on alkali lignin minimal salts medium agar. The strain tolerates the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate. Its complete genome sequence is presented in this report.

  8. Restricting lignin and enhancing sugar deposition in secondary cell walls enhances monomeric sugar release after low temperature ionic liquid pretreatment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Scullin, Chessa; Cruz, Alejandro G.; Chuang, Yi -De; Simmons, Blake A.; Loque, Dominique; Singh, Seema

    2015-07-04

    Lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to be a major source of renewable sugar for biofuel production. Before enzymatic hydrolysis, biomass must first undergo a pretreatment step in order to be more susceptible to saccharification and generate high yields of fermentable sugars. Lignin, a complex, interlinked, phenolic polymer, associates with secondary cell wall polysaccharides, rendering them less accessible to enzymatic hydrolysis. Herein, we describe the analysis of engineered Arabidopsis lines where lignin biosynthesis was repressed in fiber tissues but retained in the vessels, and polysaccharide deposition was enhanced in fiber cells with little to no apparent negative impact on growth phenotype.

  9. Restricting lignin and enhancing sugar deposition in secondary cell walls enhances monomeric sugar release after low temperature ionic liquid pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Scullin, Chessa; Cruz, Alejandro G.; Chuang, Yi -De; Simmons, Blake A.; Loque, Dominique; Singh, Seema

    2015-07-04

    Lignocellulosic biomass has the potential to be a major source of renewable sugar for biofuel production. Before enzymatic hydrolysis, biomass must first undergo a pretreatment step in order to be more susceptible to saccharification and generate high yields of fermentable sugars. Lignin, a complex, interlinked, phenolic polymer, associates with secondary cell wall polysaccharides, rendering them less accessible to enzymatic hydrolysis. Herein, we describe the analysis of engineered Arabidopsis lines where lignin biosynthesis was repressed in fiber tissues but retained in the vessels, and polysaccharide deposition was enhanced in fiber cells with little to no apparent negative impact on growth phenotype.

  10. EERE Website Content Checklist

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This checklist is a tool to guide EERE content developers and editors in creating and reviewing content for websites.

  11. Lignin-based active anode materials synthesized from low-cost renewable resources

    DOEpatents

    Rios, Orlando; Tenhaeff, Wyatt Evan; Daniel, Claus; Dudney, Nancy Johnston; Johs, Alexander; Nunnery, Grady Alexander; Baker, Frederick Stanley

    2016-06-07

    A method of making an anode includes the steps of providing fibers from a carbonaceous precursor, the carbon fibers having a glass transition temperature T.sub.g. In one aspect the carbonaceous precursor is lignin. The carbonaceous fibers are placed into a layered fiber mat. The fiber mat is fused by heating the fiber mat in the presence of oxygen to above the T.sub.g but no more than 20% above the T.sub.g to fuse fibers together at fiber to fiber contact points and without melting the bulk fiber mat to create a fused fiber mat through oxidative stabilization. The fused fiber mat is carbonized by heating the fused fiber mat to at least 650.degree. C. under an inert atmosphere to create a carbonized fused fiber mat. A battery anode formed from carbonaceous precursor fibers is also disclosed.

  12. Conceptual design assessment for the co-firing of bio-refinery supplied lignin project. Quarterly report, June 23--July 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, T.; Ranney, J.T.; Babb, C.L.

    2000-07-27

    The Conceptual Design Assessment for the Co-Firing of Bio-Refinery Supplied Lignin Project was successfully kicked off on July 23, 2000 during a meeting at the TVA-PPI facility in Muscle Shoals, AL. An initial timeline for the study was distributed, issues of concern were identified and a priority actions list was developed. Next steps include meeting with NETL to discuss de-watering and lignin fuel testing, the development of the mass balance model and ethanol facility design criteria, providing TVA-Colbert with preliminary lignin fuel analysis and the procurement of representative feed materials for the pilot and bench scale testing of the hydrolysis process.

  13. Cellulose and lignin: Biodegradation. December 1985-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the Biobusiness data base). Report for December 1985-May 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biodegradation of materials containing cellulose and lignin components. Natural wood decay and sludge digestion are considered. Detailed chemical and physical mechanisms of degradation and research on microorganisms involved are discussed for a variety of cellulose and lignin containing materials including straw, municipal wastes, living trees, paper, lumber, and grasses. Genetic engineering studies regarding the isolation, preparation, and characterization of suitable microorganisms for cellulose and lignin degradation are included. (This updated bibliography contains 135 citations, 48 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  14. Base-Catalyzed Depolymerization of Lignin with Heterogeneous Catalysts: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-513

    SciTech Connect

    Beckham, Gregg T.

    2015-08-04

    We will synthesize and screen solid catalysts for the depolymerization of lignin to monomeric and oligomeric oxygenated species, which could be fractionated and integrated into refinery intermediate streams for selective upgrading, or catalytically upgraded to fuels and chemicals. This work will primarily focus on the synthesis and application of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for depolymerization of lignin model compounds and softwood lignin. LDHs have been shown in our group to offer good supports and catalysts to promote base-catalyzed depolymerization of lignin model compounds and in preliminary experiments for the depolymerization of lignin from an Organosolv process. We will also include additional catalyst supports such as silica, alumina, and carbon as identified in ongoing and past efforts at NREL. This work will consist of two tasks. Overall, this work will be synergistic with ongoing efforts at NREL, funded by the DOE Biomass Program, on the development of catalysts for lignin depolymerization in the context of biochemical and thermochemical conversion of corn stover and other biomass feedstocks to advanced fuels and chemicals.

  15. Studies on Supercapacitor Electrode Material from Activated Lignin-Derived Mesoporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu; Li, Yunchao; Bi, Zhonghe; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Hensley, Dale K; Grappe, Hippolyte A.; Meyer III, Harry M; Dai, Sheng; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Naskar, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized mesoporous carbon from pre-cross-linked lignin gel impregnated with a surfactant as the pore-forming agent, and then activated the carbon through physical and chemical methods to obtain activated mesoporous carbon. The activated mesoporous carbons exhibited 1.5- to 6-fold increases in porosity with a maximum BET specific surface area of 1148 m2/g and a pore volume of 1.0 cm3/g. Slow physical activation helped retain dominant mesoporosity; however, aggressive chemical activation caused some loss of the mesopore volume fraction. Plots of cyclic voltammetric data with the capacitor electrode made from these carbons showed an almost rectangular curve depicting the behavior of ideal double-layer capacitance. Although the pristine mesoporous carbon exhibited the same range of surface-area-based capacitance as that of other known carbon-based supercapacitors, activation decreased the surface-area-based specific capacitance and increased the gravimetric-specific capacitance of the mesoporous carbons. Surface activation lowered bulk density and electrical conductivity. Warburg impedance as a vertical tail in the lower frequency domain of Nyquist plots supported good supercapacitor behavior for the activated mesoporous carbons. Our work demonstrated that biomass-derived mesoporous carbon materials continue to show potential for use in specific electrochemical applications.

  16. CONTENT MODEL HOW-TO

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    003241MLTPL00 Content Model Guidelines https://github.com/usgin/usginspecs/wiki/Content-Model-Guidelines

  17. Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

    2012-12-13

    The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of

  18. Effects of fungal degradation on the CuO oxidation products of lignin: A controlled laboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, J.I.; Weliky, K.; Devol, A.H. ); Blanchette, R.A. )

    1988-11-01

    Duplicate samples of birch wood were degraded for 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks by the white-rot fungus, Phlebia tremellosus, and for 12 weeks by 6 other white-rot and brown-rot fungi. P. tremellosus caused progressive weight losses and increased the H/C and O/C of the remnant wood by preferentially degrading the lignin component of the middle lamellae. Total yields of syringyl phenols were decreased 1.5 times as fast as total vanillyl phenol yields. Within both phenol families, aldehyde precursors were degraded faster than precursors of the corresponding ketones, which were obtained in constant proportion to the total phenol yield. Although two other white-rot fungi caused similar lignin compositional trends, a fourth white-rot species, Coriolus versicolor, simultaneously eroded all cell wall components and did not concentrate polysaccharides in the remnant wood. The brown-rot fungi also preferentially attacked syringyl structural units, but degraded all phenol precursors at a much slower rate than the white-rotters and did not produce excess vanillic acid. Degradation by P. tremellosus linearly increased the vanillic acid/vanillin ratio, (Ad/Al)v, of the remnant birch wood throughout the 12 week degradation study and exponentially decreased the absolute yields of total vanillyl phenols, total syringyl phenols and the syringyl/vanillyl phenol ratio, S/V. At the highest (Ad/Al)v of 0.50 total yields of syringyl and vanillyl phenols were decreased by 65% and 80%, respectively, with a resulting reduction of 40% in the original S/V. Many of the diagenetically related compositional trends that have been previously reported for lignins in natural environments can be explained by white-rot fungal degradation.

  19. Table of Contents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION J. B. Natowitz, Director SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS SECTION III: NUCLEAR...

  20. Fermilab Today - Related Content

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Content Subscribe | Contact Fermilab Today | Archive | Classifieds Search GO Classifieds Director's Corner Physics in a Nutshell Frontier Science Result Tip of the Week...

  1. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC05-00OR22800 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contents Page # TOC - i SECTION A - SOLICITATION/OFFER AND AWARD ......................................................................... A-i SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ........................................................ B-i B.1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................B-2 B.2 TRANSITION COST, ESTIMATED COST, MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEE, AND AVAILABLE FEE (Modification 295,

  2. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    3, Revision 0 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Summary .............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Discussion ............................................................................................................................ 4 3.1 Selection of Tanks for Level Decrease

  3. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    4, Revision 0 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Summary .............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Discussion ............................................................................................................................ 4 3.1 Selection of Tanks for Level Decrease

  4. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5, Revision 0 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Summary .............................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Discussion ............................................................................................................................ 4 3.1 Selection of Tanks for Level Decrease

  5. Contents.key

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul Clavin Contents Combustion Waves and Fronts in Flows P. Clavin and G. Searby Cambridge University Press (to appear) Orders of magnitude 2 Lecture 1: 1-1: Overall...

  6. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    008 High Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Peer Review Final Report i TABLE OF CONTENTS High Temperature Superconductivity for Electric Systems Program Overview ...... 1 The Peer Review................................................................................................................ 3 Review Criteria ................................................................................................................. 5 Guidelines

  7. Table_of_Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Contents 1. Physical Security .............................................................................................................................. 1-1 101. Headquarters Security Badges ........................................................................................ 101-1 102. HSPD-12 Badges and the PIV Process ........................................................................... 102-1 103. Prohibited Articles

  8. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    irecusa.org | LMI Guidelines | 0 www.irecusa.org | LMI Guidelines | i TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary iv Content Overview vii Introduction 1 I. Identifying LMI Customers and Designing Facilities to Serve LMI Customers 5 A. LMI Customers 5 B. Designing Facilities to Serve LMI Customers 6 II. Barriers to Adoption and Opportunities for Engagement 11 A. Financial Barriers 11 B. Ownership Barriers and Split Incentives 14 C. Marketing, Education, and Outreach Barriers 15 D. Opportunities for

  9. Research into the pyrolysis of pure cellulose, lignin, and birch wood flour in the China Lake entrained-flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, J.

    1980-06-01

    This experimental program used the China Lake entrained-flow pyrolysis reactor to briefly investigate the pyrolysis of pure cellulose, pure lignin, and birch wood flour. The study determined that the cellulose and wood flour do pyrolyze to produce primarily gaseous products containing significant amounts of ethylene and other useful hydrocarbons. During attempts to pyrolyze powdered lignin, the material melted and bubbled to block the reactor entrance. The pure cellulose and wood flour produced C/sub 2/ + yields of 12% to 14% by weight, which were less than yields from an organic feedstock derived from processed municipal trash. The char yields were 0.1% by weight from cellulose and 1.5% from birch wood flour - one to two orders of magnitude less than were produced from the trash-derived feedstock. In scanning electron microscope photographs, most of the wood flour char had a sintered and agglomerated appearance, although some particles retained the gross cell characteristics of the wood flour. The appearance of the char particles indicated that the material had once been molten and possibly vapor before it formed spheroidal particles about 1 ..mu..m diameter which agglomerated to form larger char particles. The ability to completely melt or vaporize lignocellulosic materials under conditions of high heating rates has now been demonstrated in a continuous flow reactor and promises new techniques for fast pyrolysis. This char was unexpectedly attracted by a magnet, presumably because of iron contamination from the pyrolysis reactor tube wall. The production of water-insoluble tars was negligible compared to the tars produced from trash-derived feedstock. The production of water-soluble organic materials was fairly low and qualitatively appeared to vary inversely with temperature. This study was of a preliminary nature and additional studies are necessary to optimize ethylene production from these feedstocks.

  10. Secure content objects

    DOEpatents

    Evans, William D.

    2009-02-24

    A secure content object protects electronic documents from unauthorized use. The secure content object includes an encrypted electronic document, a multi-key encryption table having at least one multi-key component, an encrypted header and a user interface device. The encrypted document is encrypted using a document encryption key associated with a multi-key encryption method. The encrypted header includes an encryption marker formed by a random number followed by a derivable variation of the same random number. The user interface device enables a user to input a user authorization. The user authorization is combined with each of the multi-key components in the multi-key encryption key table and used to try to decrypt the encrypted header. If the encryption marker is successfully decrypted, the electronic document may be decrypted. Multiple electronic documents or a document and annotations may be protected by the secure content object.

  11. Reduced waste generation, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-02-01

    The United States Department of Energy is committed to the principles of minimizing the quantity and transuranic content of its transuranium (TRU) waste being generated at its nuclear facilities. The reasons are to reduce costs associated with waste handling and disposal, and also to reduce radiation exposure to workers and risk for radionuclide release to man and the environment. The purpose of this document is to provide the USDOE with a plan of research and development tasks for waste minimization, and is prepared so as to provide the maximum impact on volumes based on cost/benefit factors. The document is to be updated annually or as needed to reflect current and future tasks. The Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of activities with the principal goals of (1) preventing the generation of waste and (2) converting TRU waste into low-level wastes (LLW) by sorting or decontamination. Concepts for reducing the volume such as in incineration and compaction are considered within the discipline of Reduced Waste Generation, but are considered as somewhat developed technology with only a need for implementation. 33 refs.

  12. Structure and Biochemestry of Laccases from the Lignin-Degrading Basidiomycete, Ganoderma lucidum

    SciTech Connect

    C.A.Reddy, PI

    2005-06-30

    G. lucidum is one of the most important and widely distributed ligninolytic white rot fungi from habitats such as forest soils, agricultural soils, and tropical mangrove ecosystems and produce laccases as an important family of lignin modifying enzymes. Biochemically, laccases are blue multi copper oxidases that couple four electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. There is a growing interest in the use of laccases for a variety of industrial applications such as bio-pulping and biobleaching as well as in their ability to detoxify a wide variety of toxic environmental pollutants. These key oxidative enzymes are found in all the three domains of life: Eukaryota. Prokarya, and Archaea. Ganoderma lucidum (strain no.103561) produces laccase with some of the highest activity (17,000 micro katals per mg of protein) reported for any laccases to date. Our results showed that this organism produces at least 11 different isoforms of laccase based on variation in mol. weight and/or PI. Our Studies showed that the presence of copper in the medium yields 15- to 20-fold greater levels of enzyme by G. lucidum. Dialysation of extra cellular fluid of G. lucidum against 10mM sodium tartrate (pH5.5) gave an additional 15 to 17 fold stimulation of activity with an observed specific activity of 17,000 {micro}katals/mg protein. Dialysis against acetate buffer gave five fold increase in activity while dialysis against glycine showed inhibition of activity. Purification by FPLC and preparative gel electrophoresis gave purified fractions that resolved into eleven isoforms as separated by isoelectric focusing, and the PI,s were 4.7, 4.6, 4.5, 4.3, 4.2, 4.1, 3.8, 3.7, 3.5, 3.4 and 3.3. Genomic clones of laccase were isolated using G. lucidum DNA as a template and using inverse PCR and forward/reverse primers corresponding to the sequences of the conserved copper binding region in the N-terminal domain of one of the laccases of this organism. Inverse PCR amplication of HindIII digested

  13. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    3, Field Analytical Technical Requirements Effective Date: 6/1/07 Vol. 3:i CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 FIELD SCREENING........................................................................................... 1-1 1.2 FIELD TESTING................................................................................................. 1-1 2.0 QUALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS

  14. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-EM0001840 Page 2 of 108 WIPP Transportation Services Table of Contents SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS ................................................................ 3 SECTION C - DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICTIONS ....................................................................................... 10 SECTION D -PACKAGING AND MARKING .............................................................................................. 34 SECTION E - INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE

  15. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6/1/2011 Decades of Discovery Decades of Discovery Page 2 6/1/2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................... 6 2 BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES .................................................................................................. 7 2.1 Adenosine Triphosphate: The Energy Currency of Life .............................................. 7 2.2 Making Better Catalysts

  16. Table of Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    COMMUNICATIONS REQUIREMENTS OF SMART GRID TECHNOLOGIES October 5, 2010 i Table of Contents I. Introduction and Executive Summary.......................................................... 1 a. Overview of Smart Grid Benefits and Communications Needs................. 2 b. Summary of Recommendations .................................................................... 5 II. Federal Government Smart Grid Initiatives ................................................ 7 a. DOE Request for Information

  17. Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

    2012-03-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

  18. Pyrolysis reaction networks for lignin model compounds: unraveling thermal deconstruction of β-O-4 and α-O-4 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yong S.; Singh, Rahul; Zhang, Jing; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Katahira, Rui; Chupka, Gina; Beckham, Gregg T.; Shanks, Brent H.

    2016-01-01

    Although lignin is one of the main components of biomass, its pyrolysis chemistry is not well understood due to complex heterogeneity. To gain insights into this chemistry, the pyrolysis of seven lignin model compounds (five ..beta..-O-4 and two ..alpha..-O-4 linked molecules) was investigated in a micropyrolyzer connected to GC-MS/FID. According to quantitative product mole balance for the reaction networks, concerted retro-ene fragmentation and homolytic dissociation were strongly suggested as the initial reaction step for ..beta..-O-4 compounds and ..alpha..-O-4 compounds, respectively. The difference in reaction pathway between compounds with different linkages was believed to result from thermodynamics of the radical initiation. The rate constants for the different reaction pathways were predicted from ab initio density functional theory calculations and pre-exponential literature values. The computational findings were consistent with the experiment results, further supporting the different pyrolysis mechanisms for the ..beta..-ether linked and ..alpha..-ether linked compounds. A combination of the two pathways from the dimeric model compounds was able to describe qualitatively the pyrolysis of a trimeric lignin model compound containing both ..beta..-O-4 and ..alpha..-O-4 linkages.

  19. Personalized professional content recommendation

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-11-05

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  20. Personalized professional content recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  1. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    through December 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 7 1.2 Vacuum System 9 1.3 Power Supplies 13 1.4 RF System 16 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 17 1.6 Cable Plant 18 1.9 Installation 19 2.0 Accelerator Physics 20 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress In the magnet area, the production of all major components (dipoles, quadrupoles, and sextupoles) has been completed on

  2. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 5 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 8 1.2 Vacuum System 12 1.3 Power Supplies 14 1.4 RF System 16 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 17 1.6 Cable Plant 18 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 19 1.8 Facilities 19 1.9 Installation 20 2.1 Accelerator Physics 21 2 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress The progress and highlights of each major technical system are summarized below. Additional details

  3. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    through June 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 9 1.2 Vacuum System 16 1.3 Power Supplies 21 1.4 RF System 25 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 26 1.6 Cable Plant 28 1.8 Facilities 28 2.0 Accelerator Physics 29 2.1 ES&H 31 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress Magnet System - The project has received three shipments of magnets from IHEP. A total of 55 dipole, quadrupole and

  4. TABLE OF CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    through September 2001 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Cost Reporting 4 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 9 1.2 Vacuum System 14 1.3 Power Supplies 21 1.4 RF System 24 1.5 Instrumentation & Controls 26 1.6 Cable Plant 27 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 28 1.8 Facilities 29 2.0 Accelerator Physics 30 2.1 ES&H 32 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress Summary - The SPEAR 3 project is near the 50% completion mark in terms of

  5. Kinetic analysis of the phenyl-shift reaction in $\\beta$-O-4 lignin model compounds: A computational study.

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Buchanan III, A C

    2011-01-01

    The phenyl-shift reaction in $\\beta$-phenethyl phenyl ether ($\\beta - \\rm PhCH_2CH_2OPh$, $\\beta$-PPE) is an integral step in the pyrolysis of PPE, which is a model compound for the $\\beta$-O-4 linkage in lignin. We investigated the influence of natural occurring substituents (hydroxy, methoxy) on the reaction rate by calculating relative rate constant using density functional theory in combination with transition state theory, including anharmonic correction for low-frequency modes. The phenyl-shift reaction proceeds through an intermediate and the overall rate constants were computed invoking the steady-state approximation (its validity was confirmed). Substituents on the phenethyl group have only little influence on the rate constants. If a methoxy substituent is located in para position of the phenyl ring adjacent to the ether oxygen, the energies of the intermediate and second transition state are lowered, but the overall rate constant is not significantly altered. This is a consequence of the dominating first transition from pre-complex to intermediate in the overall rate constant. {\\it O}- and di-{\\it o}-methoxy substituents accelerate the phenyl-migration rate compared to $\\beta$-PPE.

  6. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Low power factor is expensive and inefficient. Many utility companies charge you an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95. Low power factor also reduces your electrical system's distribu- tion capacity by increasing current flow and causing voltage drops. This fact sheet describes power factor and explains how you can improve your power factor to reduce electric bills and enhance your electrical system's capacity. REDUCING POWER FACTOR COST To understand power factor, visualize a

  7. Preparation of brightness stabilization agent for lignin containing pulp from biomass pyrolysis oils

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, Foster A.; Besler-Guran, Serpil

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing a brightness stabilization mixture of water-soluble organic compounds from biomass pyrolysis oils comprising: a) size-reducing biomass material and pyrolyzing the size-reduced biomass material in a fluidized bed reactor; b) separating a char/ash component while maintaining char-pot temperatures to avoid condensation of pyrolysis vapors; c) condensing pyrolysis gases and vapors, and recovering pyrolysis oils by mixing the oils with acetone to obtain an oil-acetone mixture; d) evaporating acetone and recovering pyrolysis oils; e) extracting the pyrolysis oils with water to obtain a water extract; f) slurrying the water extract with carbon while stirring, and filtering the slurry to obtain a colorless filtrate; g) cooling the solution and stabilizing the solution against thermally-induced gelling and solidification by extraction with ethyl acetate to form an aqueous phase lower layer and an organic phase upper layer; h) discarding the upper organic layer and extracting the aqueous layer with ethyl acetate, and discarding the ethyl acetate fraction to obtain a brown-colored solution not susceptible to gelling or solidification upon heating; i) heating the solution to distill off water and other light components and concentrating a bottoms fraction comprising hydroxyacetaldehyde and other non-volatile components having high boiling points; and j) decolorizing the stabilized brown solution with activated carbon to obtain a colorless solution.

  8. Table of Contents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    U . . S S . . D D E E P P A A R R T T M M E E N N T T O O F F E E N N E E R R G G Y Y O O F F F F I I C C E E O O F F I I N N S S P P E E C C T T O O R R G G E E N N E E R R A A L L Semiannual Report toCongress DOE/IG-0065 April 1 - September 30, 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS From the Desk of the Inspector General ..................................................... 2 Impacts Key Accomplishments ............................................................................................... 3 Positive

  9. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  10. Web Content Analysis and Inventories

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) recommends periodic content inventories and analyses of its websites. They will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance.

  11. Bed Agglomeration During the Steam Gasification of a High Lignin Corn Stover Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) Digester Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Daniel T.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Gray, Michel J.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Saraf, Laxmikant; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Wolcott, Michael P.

    2015-11-13

    This research investigates the bed agglomeration phenomena during the steam gasification of a high lignin residue produced from the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of corn stover in a bubbling fluidized bed. The studies were conducted at 895°C using alumina as bed material. Biomass was fed at 1.5 kg/hr, while steam was fed to give a velocity equal to 2.5 times the minimum fluidization velocity, with a steam/carbon ratio of 0.9. The pelletized feedstock was co-fed with a cooling nitrogen stream to mitigate feed line plugging issues. Tar production was high at 50.3 g/Nm3, and the fraction of C10+ compounds was greater than that seen in the gasification of traditional lignocellulosic feedstocks. Carbon closures over 94 % were achieved for all experiments. Bed agglomeration was found to be problematic, indicated by pressure drop increases observed below the bed and upstream of the feed line. Two size categories of solids were recovered from the reactor, +60 mesh and -60 mesh. After a 2.75-hour experiment, 61.7 wt % was recovered as -60 mesh particles and 38.2 wt% of the recovered reactor solids were +60 mesh. A sizeable percentage, 31.8 wt%, was +20 mesh. The -60 mesh particles were mainly formed by the initial bed material (Al2O3). Almost 50 wt. % of the + 20 mesh particles was found to be formed by organics. The unreacted carbon remaining in the reactor resulted in a low conversion rate to product gas. ICP-AES, SEM, SEM-EDS, and XRD confirmed that the large agglomerates (+ 20 mesh) were not encapsulated bed material but rather un-gasified feedstock pellets with sand particles attached to it.

  12. Reduced shear power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Northwestern U.; Shapiro, Charles; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; White, Martin J.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.

    2005-08-01

    Measurements of ellipticities of background galaxies are sensitive to the reduced shear, the cosmic shear divided by (1-{kappa}) where {kappa} is the projected density field. They compute the difference between shear and reduced shear both analytically and with simulations. The difference becomes more important an smaller scales, and will impact cosmological parameter estimation from upcoming experiments. A simple recipe is presented to carry out the required correction.

  13. ,"California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","California Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 10:59:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  14. ,"Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 11:00:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  15. ,"Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 11:00:12 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  16. Reducing rotor weight

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  17. Naval electrochemical corrosion reducer

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Howard L.

    1991-10-01

    A corrosion reducer for use with ships having a hull, a propeller mounted a propeller shaft and extending through the hull, bearings supporting the shaft, at least one thrust bearing and one seal. The improvement includes a current collector and a current reduction assembly for reducing the voltage between the hull and shaft in order to reduce corrosion due to electrolytic action. The current reduction assembly includes an electrical contact, the current collector, and the hull. The current reduction assembly further includes a device for sensing and measuring the voltage between the hull and the shaft and a device for applying a reverse voltage between the hull and the shaft so that the resulting voltage differential is from 0 to 0.05 volts. The current reduction assembly further includes a differential amplifier having a voltage differential between the hull and the shaft. The current reduction assembly further includes an amplifier and a power output circuit receiving signals from the differential amplifier and being supplied by at least one current supply. The current selector includes a brush assembly in contact with a slip ring over the shaft so that its potential may be applied to the differential amplifier.

  18. Visual Analysis of Weblog Content

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Payne, Deborah A.; McColgin, Dave; Cramer, Nick O.; Love, Douglas V.

    2007-03-26

    In recent years, one of the advances of the World Wide Web is social media and one of the fastest growing aspects of social media is the blogosphere. Blogs make content creation easy and are highly accessible through web pages and syndication. With their growing influence, a need has arisen to be able to monitor the opinions and insight revealed within their content. In this paper we describe a technical approach for analyzing the content of blog data using a visual analytic tool, IN-SPIRE, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We highlight the capabilities of this tool that are particularly useful for information gathering from blog data.

  19. SECTION J - TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Conformed to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section J Page i PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A ...

  20. JOBAID-LAUNCHING ONLINE CONTENT

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this jobaid you will learn how to launch Online Content "Items" or Courses. In the LMS you can launch most anything as an "item": documents, courses, webpages and track users that have completed...

  1. ARM - Measurement - Ice water content

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    content ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice water content The concentration (mass/vol) of ice water particles in a cloud. Categories Cloud Properties, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including

  2. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA); Dilgard, Lemoyne W. (Willits, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  3. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  4. Contents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Photo courtesy of Rocky Flats Workers seed the Rocky Flats site with native grasses. NTS ... To achieve the To use this feature, go to http:webappa.nv.doe.govappshsidefault.htm. ...

  5. CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    organization (such as Safety or Quality Assurance). Depending upon the site-specific organizational structure, the following reviewapprovals are recommended: DOERL-92-36,...

  6. CONTENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    responsible contractor's processes and, as a minimum, shall be signed and dated by the following: 1. Technical Approver (see Appendix A for definition) 2. Manager responsible...

  7. Contents

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    items, remeasurements and stranded cost recoveries 101 Note 5 - Finance income and ... 147 Note 33 - Sensitivities on areas of estimation and uncertainty 148 Note 34 - ...

  8. Contents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... by creating a set of ALOHA save files or (b) to be able to rerun a scenario in the future. ... for elevation, latitude, and longitude to calculate solar radiation and air pressure. ...

  9. Contents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Unicorn subcritical experiment completes key milestone New communication system takes ... Employees outside Las Vegas - toll-free (877) 209-8516 New communication system takes ...

  10. contents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Within a restricted area, such as a substation, one of the goals of a highly secure SCADA ... system is able to deter successful replacement or impersonation and manipulation ...

  11. Stewarding a Reduced Stockpile

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, B T; Mara, G

    2008-04-18

    The future of the US nuclear arsenal continues to be guided by two distinct drivers: the preservation of world peace and the prevention of further proliferation through our extended deterrent umbrella. Timely implementation of US nuclear policy decisions depends, in part, on the current state of stockpile weapons, their delivery systems, and the supporting infrastructure within the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In turn, the present is a product of past choices and world events. Now more than ever, the nuclear weapons program must respond to the changing global security environment and to increasing budget pressures with innovation and sound investments. As the nation transitions to a reduced stockpile, the successes of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) present options to transition to a sustainable complex better suited to stockpile size, national strategic goals and budgetary realities. Under any stockpile size, we must maintain essential human capital, forefront capabilities, and have a right-sized effective production capacity. We present new concepts for maintaining high confidence at low stockpile numbers and to effectively eliminate the reserve weapons within an optimized complex. We, as a nation, have choices to make on how we will achieve a credible 21st century deterrent.

  12. New system reduces sludge management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Roll, R.R. ); Koser, M.R. )

    1993-06-01

    This article describes a recently completed a $2.7-million project to upgrade the sludge dewatering and stabilizing system at a 48-mgd wastewater treatment facility in Niagara Fall, New York. The work was necessitated by the deteriorated condition of the plant's original vacuum filters and increasing costs to landfill the dewatered sludge. The new equipment has restored sludge production capacity while reducing the final material's moisture content. The Niagara Falls plant is one of the few municipal physical-chemical treatment plants built in this country, and is the largest still functioning. Constructed in the mid-1970s, it was designed to treat a combination of domestic sewage and industrial wastes. One third of the flow and one half of the solids are industrial in nature. The changes made reduced electrical power consumption and sanitary landfill costs.

  13. ,"Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas ...2016 6:34:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  14. Steam-explosion pretreatment of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, H.H.; Yu, E.K.C.; Saddler, J.N.

    1986-06-01

    Material balances for pentosan, lignin, and hexosan, during steam-explosion pretreatment of aspenwood, showed almost quantitative recovery of cellulose in the water-insoluble fraction. Dilute acid impregnation resulted in more selective hydrolysis of pentosan relative to undesirable pyrolysis, and gave a more accessible substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis. Thermocouple probes, located inside simulated aspenwood chips heated in 240 degrees C-saturated steam, showed rapid heating of air-dry wood, whereas green or impregnated wood heated slowly. Small chips, 3.2 mm in the fiber direction, whether green or air dry gave approximately equal rates of pentosan destruction and solubilization, and similar yields of glucose and of total reducing sugars on enzmatic hydrolysis with Trichoderma harzianum. Partial pyrolysis, destroying one-third of the pentosan of aspenwood at atmospheric pressure by dry steam at 276 degrees C, gave little increase in yield of reducing sugars on enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment with saturated steam at 240 degrees C gave essentially the same yields of butanediol and ethanol on fermentation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, whether or not 80% of the steam was bled off before explosion and even if the chips remained intact, showing that explosion was unnecessary. 17 references.

  15. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Meinke, Rainer

    2016-05-24

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  16. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Meinke, Rainer

    2011-08-09

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  17. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Meinke, Rainer

    2013-08-20

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  18. Use of phosphoranimines to reduce organic carbonate content in Li-ion battery electrolytes

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Dufek, Eric J.; Klaehn, John R.; McNally, Joshua S.; Rollins, Harry W.; Jamison, David K.

    2016-05-09

    In this study, the use of phosphoranimines (PAs), a class of linear, monomeric phosphazenes, as electrolytes for Li-ion battery applications has been investigated as a route to improve safety and stability for Li-ion batteries. Of the potential PAs for use in battery applications, this work focuses on the initial synthetic preparation and analysis of N-trimethylsilyl-P,P-bis((2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)-P-ethylphosphoranimine (PA-5). PA-5 has high LiPF6 solubility in excess of 2 M, high thermal stability with a melting point below -80°C and high thermal stability as a neat compound to at least 250°C. As part of electrolyte blends, the inclusion of PA-5 shifts the onset ofmore » thermal degradation by close to 40°C at 35% loading and by 20°C at a 10% loading, improves the low temperature performance of the electrolyte, and when used as a primary solvent leads to increases in the flash point (by 20°C) when compared to more traditional EC:EMC blends. Cycling capabilities of full-coin cells with graphite negative electrodes and Li1+w[Ni0.5Mn0.3Co0.2]1-wO2 positive electrodes using PA-5:EC:EMC electrolyte blends are comparable with the performance seen for traditional EC:EMC blends. Analysis of the impact of the use of additives such as vinylene carbonate in PA-5:EC:EMC blended electrolyte results in enhanced capacity retention and improved coulombic efficiency.« less

  19. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J. [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I. [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  20. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    DOEpatents

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  1. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  2. SECTION J - TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Conformed to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section J Page i PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work (Replaced by Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029) Appendix B Performance Evaluation Plan (Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084) Appendix C Contractor's Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F National Work Breakdown

  3. CONTENTS OF A VISIT REQUEST

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTENTS OF A VISIT REQUEST All visit requests are required to be submitted via JPAS according to AFI 31-101 and the NISPOM. Our SMO code is KV1MFSCC6. Please do not send an annual visit request for the conference. Use the dates of the conference for the duration of the visit. Please list Bing Serafico, 505-853-0451 as the Point of Contract for the visit. NOTE: Only use the following information if your companies DO NOT have access to JPAS. All faxed visit request for personnel that are in JPAS

  4. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P.; Schmoeckel, Alison K.; Vernstrom, George D.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Wood, Thomas E.; Yang, Ruizhi; Easton, E. Bradley; Dahn, Jeffrey R.; O'Neill, David G.

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  5. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (177.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden

  6. Template:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This is the ContentAssist template. It is intended for inclusion on any page and will highlight extracted energy-related terms from the...

  7. Energy.gov Content Management System

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy.gov Content Management SystemEERE's websites are hosted in Energy.gov's Drupal content management system (CMS), which is maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Public Affairs Office.

  8. An examination of content similarity within the memory of HPC applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Scott N.; Bridges, Patrick G.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Trott, Christian Robert

    2013-01-01

    Memory content similarity has been e ectively exploited for more than a decade to reduce memory consumption. By consolidating duplicate and similar pages in the address space of an application, we can reduce the amount of memory it consumes without negatively a ecting the application's perception of the memory resources available to it. In addition to memory de-duplication, there may be many other ways that we can exploit memory content similarity to improve system characteristics. In this paper, we examine the memory content similarity of several HPC applications. By characterizing the memory contents of these applications, we hope to provide a basis for ef- forts to e ectively exploit memory content similarity to improve system performance beyond memory deduplication. We show that several applications exhibit signi cant similarity and consider the source of the similarity.

  9. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  10. Reducing Regulatory Burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Burden Reducing Regulatory Burden Request for information on reducing regulatory burden Reducing Regulatory Burden (289.74 KB) More Documents & Publications Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 SEVENTH RFI COMMENTS ON REDUCING REGULATORY BURDEN

  11. Reduce air, reduce compliance cost new patented spray booth technology

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, F.

    1997-12-31

    A New Paint Spray Booth System that dramatically reduces air volumes normally required for capturing and controlling paint overspray that contains either Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) or Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP), or both. In turn, a substantial reduction in capital equipment expenditures for air abatement systems and air make-up heaters as well as related annual operating expenses is realized.

  12. Microbial methods of reducing technetium

    DOEpatents

    Wildung, Raymond E. [Richland, WA; Garland, Thomas R. [Greybull, WY; Gorby, Yuri A. [Richland, WA; Hess, Nancy J. [Benton City, WA; Li, Shu-Mei W. [Richland, WA; Plymale, Andrew E. [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a method for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanelia putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

  13. Diagnosing the Causes and Severity of One-sided Message Contention

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, Nathan R.; Vishnu, Abhinav; van Dam, Hubertus; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Kerbyson, Darren J.; Hoisie, Adolfy

    2015-02-11

    Two trends suggest network contention for one-sided messages is poised to become a performance problem that concerns application developers: an increased interest in one-sided programming models and a rising ratio of hardware threads to network injection bandwidth. Unfortunately, it is difficult to reason about network contention and one-sided messages because one-sided tasks can either decrease or increase contention. We present effective and portable techniques for diagnosing the causes and severity of one-sided message contention. To detect that a message is affected by contention, we maintain statistics representing instantaneous (non-local) network resource demand. Using lightweight measurement and modeling, we identify the portion of a message's latency that is due to contention and whether contention occurs at the initiator or target. We attribute these metrics to program statements in their full static and dynamic context. We characterize contention for an important computational chemistry benchmark on InfiniBand, Cray Aries, and IBM Blue Gene/Q interconnects. We pinpoint the sources of contention, estimate their severity, and show that when message delivery time deviates from an ideal model, there are other messages contending for the same network links. With a small change to the benchmark, we reduce contention up to 50% and improve total runtime as much as 20%.

  14. METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Johns, I.B.

    1958-06-01

    A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

  15. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOEpatents

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  16. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  17. Position Paper for High Moisture Content Waste

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nevada Test Site Generator Work Group High Moisture Content Waste Subgroup EXECUTIVE SUMMARY During the 1995 Annual Waste Generator Workshop, discussions were held regarding ...

  18. Energy.gov Content Management System Webforms

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, Energy.gov's content management system (CMS) has the ability to create webforms.

  19. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  20. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  1. Ferroelectric capacitor with reduced imprint

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Jr., Joseph T.; Warren, William L.; Tuttle, Bruce A.; Dimos, Duane B.; Pike, Gordon E.

    1997-01-01

    An improved ferroelectric capacitor exhibiting reduced imprint effects in comparison to prior art capacitors. A capacitor according to the present invention includes top and bottom electrodes and a ferroelectric layer sandwiched between the top and bottom electrodes, the ferroelectric layer comprising a perovskite structure of the chemical composition ABO.sub.3 wherein the B-site comprises first and second elements and a dopant element that has an oxidation state greater than +4. The concentration of the dopant is sufficient to reduce shifts in the coercive voltage of the capacitor with time. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the ferroelectric element comprises Pb in the A-site, and the first and second elements are Zr and Ti, respectively. The preferred dopant is chosen from the group consisting of Niobium, Tantalum, and Tungsten. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the dopant occupies between 1 and 8% of the B-sites.

  2. Reducing carbon dioxide to products

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

    2014-09-30

    A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

  3. ,"West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  4. MapReduce SVM Game

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently andmore » recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.« less

  5. MapReduce SVM Game

    SciTech Connect

    Vineyard, Craig M.; Verzi, Stephen J.; James, Conrad D.; Aimone, James B.; Heileman, Gregory L.

    2015-08-10

    Despite technological advances making computing devices faster, smaller, and more prevalent in today's age, data generation and collection has outpaced data processing capabilities. Simply having more compute platforms does not provide a means of addressing challenging problems in the big data era. Rather, alternative processing approaches are needed and the application of machine learning to big data is hugely important. The MapReduce programming paradigm is an alternative to conventional supercomputing approaches, and requires less stringent data passing constrained problem decompositions. Rather, MapReduce relies upon defining a means of partitioning the desired problem so that subsets may be computed independently and recom- bined to yield the net desired result. However, not all machine learning algorithms are amenable to such an approach. Game-theoretic algorithms are often innately distributed, consisting of local interactions between players without requiring a central authority and are iterative by nature rather than requiring extensive retraining. Effectively, a game-theoretic approach to machine learning is well suited for the MapReduce paradigm and provides a novel, alternative new perspective to addressing the big data problem. In this paper we present a variant of our Support Vector Machine (SVM) Game classifier which may be used in a distributed manner, and show an illustrative example of applying this algorithm.

  6. Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing ...

  7. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory Web Content Analysis and ... It also includes a notes field, which can be used for a Web content analysis. Content ...

  8. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  9. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Slavik, Charles J.; Rhudy, Ralph G.; Bushman, Ralph E.

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  10. Training Program Content, 4/10/95

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for establishing the content of training programs.  The process to be evaluated includes (1)...

  11. Widget:ContentAssist | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ContentAssist Jump to: navigation, search This widget generates a bar of recommended reading related to the page on which it is embedded. Additionally, this widget mines the...

  12. Table of Contents for Desk Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    September, 2014 U. S. Department of Energy - Real Estate Desk Guide Revised 2014 Real Estate Desk Guide Table of Contents Chapter 1-- Purpose of Desk Guide............................................................................... 1 Chapter 2-- Introduction ................................................................................................. 3 Chapter 3-- Planning Policy ........................................................................................... 9 Chapter 4-- Real

  13. BETO Quiz - Interactive Content | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    BETO Quiz - Interactive Content BETO Quiz - Interactive Content Welcome to the Bioenergy Quiz! Navigate through the quiz by clicking on the circular buttons and selecting the correct answers to the questions. Use the scrollbar to move down the page and view all of the information displayed. Hover over words and phrases highlighted in orange for an explanation of terms. Share the information by clicking on the buttons in the Share This block. Use the arrow button found in the bottom right-hand

  14. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electricity & Fuel Appliances & Electronics Reducing Your Electricity Use Reducing Your Electricity Use An energy audit can help you find the most effective ways to save...

  15. Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration Risk Through Integration of Water-Rock Interactions and Magnetotelluric Surveys Innovative Computational Tools for Reducing Exploration ...

  16. RH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2007-07-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits

  17. AVLIS documentation overview and tables of contents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    Three documents constitute the executive summary series in Data Package III: this document (Documentation Overview and Tables of Contents (E001)) plus the AVLIS Production Plant Executive Summary (E010) and the AVLIS Production Plant Overall Design Report (E020). They provide progressively greater detail on the key information and conclusions contained within the data package. The Executive Summary and Overall Design Report present summaries of each Data Package III document. They are intended to provide a global overview of AVLIS Production Plant deployment including program planning, project management, schedules, engineering design, production, operations, capital cost, and operating cost. The purpose of Overview and Tables of Contents is threefold: to briefly review AVLIS goals for Data Package III documentation, to present an overview of the contents of the data package, and to provide a useful guide to information contained in the numerous documents comprising the package.

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of reduced europium molybdates and tungstates

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysinghe, Dileka; Gerke, Birgit; Morrison, Gregory; Hsieh, Chun H.; Smith, Mark D.; Pöttgen, Rainer; Makris, Thomas M.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2015-09-15

    Single crystals of K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} were grown from molten chloride fluxes contained in vacuum-sealed fused silica and structurally characterized via single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. All four compounds crystallize in the tetragonal space group of I4{sub 1}/a and adopt the scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) structure type. The magnetic susceptibility of the reported compounds shows paramagnetic behavior down to 2 K. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. All the compounds were further characterized by EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. - Graphical abstract: TOC Caption Two new reduced europium containing quaternary oxides, K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4} and K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, and two previously reported ternary reduced oxides, EuWO{sub 4} and EuMoO{sub 4}, were synthesized via an in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} under flux method using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze the relative Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content of the samples. - Highlights: • K{sub 0.094}Eu{sub 0.906}MoO{sub 4}, K{sub 0.097}Eu{sub 0.903}WO{sub 4}, EuWO{sub 4}, and EuMoO{sub 4} have been synthesized and characterized. • The in situ reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} was carried out using Mo, W, and Zn as metal reducing agents. • Magnetic susceptibility data were collected. • {sup 151}Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to analyze Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} content.

  19. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2006-12-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits

  20. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments

  1. Local content of bipartite qubit correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Branciard, Cyril; Gisin, Nicolas [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Scarani, Valerio [Centre for Quantum Technologies and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117543 Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-02-15

    One of the last open problems concerning two qubits in a pure state is to find the exact local content of their correlation, in the sense of Elitzur, Popescu, and Rohrlich (EPR2) [A. C. Elitzur, S. Popescu, and D. Rohrlich, Phys. Lett. A162, 25 (1992)]. We propose an EPR2 decomposition that allows us to prove, for a wide range of states |{psi}({theta})>=cos{theta}|00>+sin{theta}|11>, that their local content is p{sub L}({theta})=cos2{theta}. We also share reflections on how to possibly extend this result to all two-qubit pure states.

  2. OpenEI:Core content policies | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Core content policies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI models its core content policies after those established by the Wikipedia.1 Specifically, the OpenEI core content...

  3. ,"North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 10:27:02 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas ...

  4. ,"North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 10:27:03 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas ...

  5. ,"New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas ... 10:27:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed

  6. Table of Contents for Desk Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    May, 2013 U. S. Department of Energy - Real Estate Desk Guide Revised 2013 Real Estate Desk Guide Table of Contents Chapter 1-- Purpose of Desk Guide ........................................................................ 1 Chapter 2-- Introduction ......................................................................................... 3 Chapter 3-- Planning Policy .................................................................................... 7 Chapter 4-- Real Estate Function

  7. Method of determining a content of a nuclear waste container

    DOEpatents

    Bernardi, Richard T.; Entwistle, David

    2003-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for identifying contents of a nuclear waste container. The method includes the steps of forming an image of the contents of the container using digital radiography, visually comparing contents of the image with expected contents of the container and performing computer tomography on the container when the visual inspection reveals an inconsistency between the contents of the image and the expected contents of the container.

  8. The Energy.gov Content Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The Energy.gov Content Team About Us The Energy.gov Content Team - Office of Public Affairs The Energy.gov Content Team Formed in 2010, the Energy Department's digital content team is comprised of professional digital content producers who tell stories about energy, science, technology and why they matter. Part of the Office of Public Affairs, the team creates multimedia content for Energy.gov and the Energy Department's social media channels, working to make energy and science topics exciting

  9. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel ...

  10. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid ...

  11. Widget:DivContentWrapper | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    div For example: Widget:DivContentWrapper | classui-corner-all | stylebackground-color: green; padding: 5px; color: white; | contentText Text Retrieved from "http:...

  12. Energy.gov Data Tables in Content Management System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Data Tables in Content Management System Energy.gov Data Tables in Content Management System For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, follow these...

  13. T-663: Cisco Content Services Gateway ICMP Processing Flaw Lets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3: Cisco Content Services Gateway ICMP Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service T-663: Cisco Content Services Gateway ICMP Processing Flaw Lets Remote Users Deny Service July...

  14. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Genetics and Molecular Biology of Hydrogen Metabolism in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria The degradation of our environment and the depletion of fossil fuels make the exploration of alternative fuels evermore imperative. Among the alternatives is biohydrogen which has high energy content by weight and produces only water when

  15. Immunoassay panel profile for detecting total PCB content

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.; Allen, R.; Gui, J.; Barren, E.; Berdahl, D.

    1995-12-31

    Immunoassay test kits are being widely used to provide rapid, inexpensive screening of soil samples for the presence of PCBs at or above a given threshold value. Currently available immunoassay methods are sensitive to aroclor preparations that contain the more highly chlorinated PCB congeners. The interpretation of these tests is accomplished by comparison to an appropriate aroclor standard. If PCB contamination at a site has undergone significant changes through weathering or biological degradation, or if contamination has occurred from lower chlorinated species, the relative sensitivity of available test methods is reduced. This paper describes the results of a program to develop and demonstrate an Immunoassay Panel Method that normalizes the recovery of PCBs detected and thereby provides an accurate representation of the total PCB content of a sample. The development and validation of this method, and the associative correlation testing data using laboratory and environmental samples, will be discussed.

  16. Reducing Your Electricity Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Reducing energy use in your home saves you money, increases our energy security, and reduces the pollution that is emitted from non-renewable sources of energy. If you are planning ...

  17. Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-10-01

    BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency by reducing pumping costs through optimum pipe sizing.

  18. Genome Sequence of a Chromium-Reducing Strain, Bacillus cereus S612

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wang, Dongping; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Doug S.; Reimus, Paul W.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Johnson, Shannon L.; Li, Po-E

    2015-12-10

    We report here the genome sequence of an effective chromium-reducing bacterium,Bacillus cereusstrain S612. We found that the size of the draft genome sequence is approximately 5.4 Mb, with a G+C content of 35%, and it is predicted to contain 5,450 protein-coding genes.

  19. Remote possibly hazardous content container sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Volz, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus capable of sampling enclosed containers, where the contents of the container is unknown. The invention includes a compressed air device capable of supplying air pressure, device for controlling the amount of air pressure applied, a pneumatic valve, a sampling device having a hollow, sampling insertion needle suspended therein and device to communicate fluid flow between the container and a containment vessel, pump or direct reading instrument.

  20. CONTENTS Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sand

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTENTS Gas Hydrate-Bearing Sand Reservoir Systems in the Offshore of India: Results of the India National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 02 ..............1 The Potential for Abiotic Methane in Arctic Gas Hydrates .................9 Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Chemo- Mechanical (THCM) Models for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments ....13 Emerging Issues in the Development of Geologic Models for Gas Hydrate Numerical Simulation ................19 Announcements ...................... 23 * DOE/NETL FY2016 Methane

  1. Analysis of Joint Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Kohta

    2015-10-01

    Adding insulation to the interior side of walls of masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw, have known solutions, but wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated versus non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  2. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory A content inventory and analysis will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance. They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. This content template and sample inventory were created in Excel. The sample lists URLs, page names, navigation, navigation hierarchy, and section

  3. Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint We're dedicated to cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent across the Lab, from facilities to transportation. January 30, 2014 Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint From monitoring storm water run-off in Los Alamos Canyon to riding their bikes to work, employees in the field all over the Lab's 36 square miles see the landscape around them as an inspiration and reminder to go green at work

  4. Removal of introduced inorganic content from chipped forest residues via air classification

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Aston, John E.; Westover, Tyler L.; Cherry, Robert S.; Thompson, David N.

    2015-08-04

    Inorganic content in biomass decreases the efficiency of conversion processes, especially thermochemical conversions. The combined concentrations of specific ash forming elements are the primary attributes that cause pine residues to be considered a degraded energy conversion feedstock, as compared to clean pine. Air classification is a potentially effective and economical tool to isolate high inorganic content biomass fractions away from primary feedstock sources to reduce their ash content. In this work, loblolly pine forest residues were air classified into 10 fractions whose ash content and composition were measured. Ash concentrations were highest in the lightest fractions (5.8–8.5 wt%), and inmore » a heavy fraction of the fines (8.9–15.1 wt%). The removal of fractions with high inorganic content resulted in a substantial reduction in the ash content of the remaining biomass in forest thinnings (1.69–1.07 wt%) and logging residues (1.09–0.68 wt%). These high inorganic content fractions from both forest residue types represented less than 7.0 wt% of the total biomass, yet they contained greater than 40% of the ash content by mass. Elemental analysis of the air classified fractions revealed the lightest fractions were comprised of high concentrations of soil elements (silicon, aluminum, iron, sodium, and titanium). However, the elements of biological origin including calcium, potassium, magnesium, sulfur, manganese, and phosphorous were evenly distributed throughout all air classified fractions, making them more difficult to isolate into fractions with high mineral concentrations. Under the conditions reported in this study, an economic analysis revealed air classification could be used for ash removal for as little as $2.23 per ton of product biomass. As a result, this study suggests air classification is a potentially attractive technology for the removal of introduced soil minerals from pine forest residues.« less

  5. Removal of introduced inorganic content from chipped forest residues via air classification

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Aston, John E.; Westover, Tyler L.; Cherry, Robert S.; Thompson, David N.

    2015-08-04

    Inorganic content in biomass decreases the efficiency of conversion processes, especially thermochemical conversions. The combined concentrations of specific ash forming elements are the primary attributes that cause pine residues to be considered a degraded energy conversion feedstock, as compared to clean pine. Air classification is a potentially effective and economical tool to isolate high inorganic content biomass fractions away from primary feedstock sources to reduce their ash content. In this work, loblolly pine forest residues were air classified into 10 fractions whose ash content and composition were measured. Ash concentrations were highest in the lightest fractions (5.8–8.5 wt%), and in a heavy fraction of the fines (8.9–15.1 wt%). The removal of fractions with high inorganic content resulted in a substantial reduction in the ash content of the remaining biomass in forest thinnings (1.69–1.07 wt%) and logging residues (1.09–0.68 wt%). These high inorganic content fractions from both forest residue types represented less than 7.0 wt% of the total biomass, yet they contained greater than 40% of the ash content by mass. Elemental analysis of the air classified fractions revealed the lightest fractions were comprised of high concentrations of soil elements (silicon, aluminum, iron, sodium, and titanium). However, the elements of biological origin including calcium, potassium, magnesium, sulfur, manganese, and phosphorous were evenly distributed throughout all air classified fractions, making them more difficult to isolate into fractions with high mineral concentrations. Under the conditions reported in this study, an economic analysis revealed air classification could be used for ash removal for as little as $2.23 per ton of product biomass. As a result, this study suggests air classification is a potentially attractive technology for the removal of introduced soil minerals from pine forest residues.

  6. Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.

    2005-12-27

    Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

  7. Understanding Hazardous Combustion Byproducts Reduces Factors...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Combustion Byproducts Reduces Factors Impacting Climate Change - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate ...

  8. Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study: Reducing...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study: Reducing Water Consumption of Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation Report to Congress U.S. Department of Energy ...

  9. Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water Treatment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing Logistics ...

  10. Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water Treatment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water ...

  11. Reduced AC losses in HTS coated conductors

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2004-10-05

    Methods for reducing hysteresis losses in superconductor coated ribbons where a flux distribution is set into the superconductor coated ribbon prior to the application of alternating current.

  12. Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel Reducing Petroleum Despendence in California: Uncertainties About Light-Duty Diesel 2002 DEER Conference ...

  13. Analysis of Joist Masonry Moisture Content Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Kohta

    2015-10-08

    There are many existing buildings with load-bearing mass masonry walls, whose energy performance could be improved with the retrofit of insulation. However, adding insulation to the interior side of walls of such masonry buildings in cold (and wet) climates may cause performance and durability problems. Some concerns, such as condensation and freeze-thaw have known solutions. But wood members embedded in the masonry structure will be colder (and potentially wetter) after an interior insulation retrofit. Moisture content & relative humidity were monitored at joist ends in historic mass brick masonry walls retrofitted with interior insulation in a cold climate (Zone 5A); data were collected from 2012-2015. Eleven joist ends were monitored in all four orientations. One limitation of these results is that the renovation is still ongoing, with limited wintertime construction heating and no permanent occupancy to date. Measurements show that many joists ends remain at high moisture contents, especially at north- and east-facing orientations, with constant 100% RH conditions at the worst cases. These high moisture levels are not conducive for wood durability, but no evidence for actual structural damage has been observed. Insulated vs. non-insulated joist pockets do not show large differences. South facing joists have safe (10-15%) moisture contents. Given the uncertainty pointed out by research, definitive guidance on the vulnerability of embedded wood members is difficult to formulate. In high-risk situations, or when a very conservative approach is warranted, the embedded wood member condition can be eliminated entirely, supporting the joist ends outside of the masonry pocket.

  14. Cell Wall Composition and Underlying QTL in an F1 Pseudo-Testcross Population of Switchgrass

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Serba, Desalegn D.; Sykes, Robert W.; Gjersing, Erica L.; Decker, Stephen R.; Daverdin, Guillaume; Devos, Katrien M.; Brummer, E. Charles; Saha, Malay C.

    2016-04-23

    Natural genetic variation for reduced recalcitrance can be used to improve switchgrass for biofuel production. A full-sib switchgrass mapping population developed by crossing a lowland genotype, AP13, and upland genotype, VS16, was evaluated at three locations (Ardmore and Burneyville, OK and Watkinsville, GA). Biomass harvested after senescence in 2009 and 2010 was evaluated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for sugar release using enzymatic hydrolysis and for lignin content and syringyl/guaiacyl lignin monomer (S/G) ratio using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS). Glucose and xylose release ranged from 120 to 313 and 123 to 263 mg g-1, respectively, whilemore » lignin content ranged from 19 to 27% of the dry biomass. Statistically significant differences were observed among the genotypes and the environments for the cell wall composition traits. Regression analysis showed that a unit increase in lignin content reduced total sugar release by an average of 10 mg g-1. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis detected 9 genomic regions underlying sugar release and 14 for lignin content. The phenotypic variation explained by the individual QTL identified for sugar release ranged from 4.5 to 9.4 and for lignin content from 3.8 to 11.1%. Mapping of the QTL regions to the switchgrass genome sequence (v1.1) found that some of the QTL colocalized with genes involved in carbohydrate processing and metabolism, plant development, defense systems, and transcription factors. Finally, the markers associated with QTL can be implemented in breeding programs to efficiently develop improved switchgrass cultivars for biofuel production.« less

  15. Electronic structure of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutar, D. S.; Singh, Gulbagh; Divakar Botcha, V.

    2012-09-03

    Graphene oxide (GO) monolayers obtained by Langmuir Blodgett route and suitably treated to obtain reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayers were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. Upon reduction of GO to form RGO C1s x-ray photoelectron spectra showed increase in graphitic carbon content, while ultraviolet photoelectron spectra showed increase in intensity corresponding to C2p-{pi} electrons ({approx}3.5 eV). X-ray excited Auger transitions C(KVV) and plasmon energy loss of C1s photoelectrons have been analyzed to elucidate the valence band structure. The effective number of ({pi}+{sigma}) electrons as obtained from energy loss spectra was found to increase by {approx}28% on reduction of GO.

  16. Predicting Individual Affect of Health Interventions to Reduce HPV Prevalence

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Courtney D.; Mihalcea, Rada; Mikler, Armin R.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-04-01

    Recently, human papilloma virus has been implicated to cause several throat and oral cancers and hpv is established to cause most cervical cancers. A human papilloma virus vaccine has been proven successful to reduce infection incidence in FDA clinical trials and it is currently available in the United States. Current intervention policy targets adolescent females for vaccination; however, the expansion of suggested guidelines may extend to other age groups and males as well. This research takes a first step towards automatically predicting personal beliefs, regarding health intervention, on the spread of disease. Using linguistic or statistical approaches, sentiment analysis determines a texts affective content. Self-reported HPV vaccination beliefs published in web and social media are analyzed for affect polarity and leveraged as knowledge inputs to epidemic models. With this in mind, we have developed a discrete-time model to facilitate predicting impact on the reduction of HPV prevalence due to arbitrary age and gender targeted vaccination schemes.

  17. Reduction of carbon content in waste-tire combustion ashes by bio-thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.C.; Lee, W.J.; Shih, S.I.; Mou, J.L.

    2009-07-01

    Application of bio-catalyst (NOE-7F) in thermal treatment can adequately dispose dark-black fly ashes from co-combustion of both waste tires and coal. After thermal treatment of fly ashes by adding 10% NOE-7F, the carbon contents reduced by 37.6% and the weight losses increased by 405%, compared with the fly ashes without mixing with NOE-7F. The combustion behaviors of wasted tires combustion fly ashes with NOE-7F were also investigated by both thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The results verify that NOE-7F has positive effects on the combustion of residual carbon and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) enhance the energy release and reduce the toxicity during the process of thermal treatment. Furthermore, using NOE-7F to dispose high-carbon content fly ashes did improve the compressive strength of fly ashes and concrete mixtures. Therefore, NOE-7F is a promising additive which could decrease treatment cost of high-carbon content fly ashes and reduce the amount of survival toxic PAHs.

  18. SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar This announcement contains ...

  19. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents 2016 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Table of Contents The Table of Contents is an outline of all the chapters and sections of the Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan (HQFMSP). It directs the reader to the portion of the HQFMSP that will most likely explain the Headquarters (HQ) security procedures he/she is seeking. 2016

  20. Improved Technique of Hydrogen Content Analysis by Slow Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Rainwater, L. J.; Havens, W. W. Jr.

    1945-02-28

    A slow-neutron-transmission method fro determining the H content of fluorcarbons is described (G.Y.)

  1. Reducing Power Factor Cost | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Many utility companies charge an additional fee if your power factor is less than 0.95. Low power factor also reduces your electrical system's distribution capacity by increasing ...

  2. Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov

    2009-05-15

    Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

  3. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, Alfred J.

    1993-01-01

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product.

  4. Process for reducing aqueous nitrate to ammonia

    DOEpatents

    Mattus, A.J.

    1993-11-30

    Powdered aluminum is added to a nitrate-containing alkaline, aqueous solution to reduce the nitrate and/or nitrite to ammonia and co-produce a sinterable ceramic product. 3 figures.

  5. Reducing mode circulating fluid bed combustion

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Yung-Yi; Sadhukhan, Pasupati; Fraley, Lowell D.; Hsiao, Keh-Hsien

    1986-01-01

    A method for combustion of sulfur-containing fuel in a circulating fluid bed combustion system wherein the fuel is burned in a primary combustion zone under reducing conditions and sulfur captured as alkaline sulfide. The reducing gas formed is oxidized to combustion gas which is then separated from solids containing alkaline sulfide. The separated solids are then oxidized and recycled to the primary combustion zone.

  6. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction.

  7. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  8. Complete genome sequence of the chromate-reducing bacterium Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus strain BSB-33

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Pamela; Barnebey, Adam; Zemla, Marcin; Goodwin, Lynne; Auer, Manfred; Yannone, Steven M.

    2015-10-05

    Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus BSB-33 is a thermophilic gram positive obligate anaerobe isolated from a hot spring in West Bengal, India. Unlike other T. thermohydrosulfuricus strains, BSB-33 is able to anaerobically reduce Fe(III) and Cr(VI) optimally at 60 °C. BSB-33 is the first Cr(VI) reducing T. thermohydrosulfuricus genome sequenced and of particular interest for bioremediation of environmental chromium contaminations. Here we discuss features of T. thermohydrosulfuricus BSB-33 and the unique genetic elements that may account for the peculiar metal reducing properties of this organism. The T. thermohydrosulfuricus BSB-33 genome comprises 2597606 bp encoding 2581 protein genes, 12 rRNA, 193 pseudogenes and hasmore » a G + C content of 34.20 %. Lastly, putative chromate reductases were identified by comparative analyses with other Thermoanaerobacter and chromate-reducing bacteria.« less

  9. Complete genome sequence of the chromate-reducing bacterium Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus strain BSB-33

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Pamela; Barnebey, Adam; Zemla, Marcin; Goodwin, Lynne; Auer, Manfred; Yannone, Steven M.

    2015-10-05

    Thermoanaerobacter thermohydrosulfuricus BSB-33 is a thermophilic gram positive obligate anaerobe isolated from a hot spring in West Bengal, India. Unlike other T. thermohydrosulfuricus strains, BSB-33 is able to anaerobically reduce Fe(III) and Cr(VI) optimally at 60 °C. BSB-33 is the first Cr(VI) reducing T. thermohydrosulfuricus genome sequenced and of particular interest for bioremediation of environmental chromium contaminations. Here we discuss features of T. thermohydrosulfuricus BSB-33 and the unique genetic elements that may account for the peculiar metal reducing properties of this organism. The T. thermohydrosulfuricus BSB-33 genome comprises 2597606 bp encoding 2581 protein genes, 12 rRNA, 193 pseudogenes and has a G + C content of 34.20 %. Lastly, putative chromate reductases were identified by comparative analyses with other Thermoanaerobacter and chromate-reducing bacteria.

  10. Process for reducing sulfur in coal char

    DOEpatents

    Gasior, Stanley J.; Forney, Albert J.; Haynes, William P.; Kenny, Richard F.

    1976-07-20

    Coal is gasified in the presence of a small but effective amount of alkaline earth oxide, hydroxide or carbonate to yield a char fraction depleted in sulfur. Gases produced during the reaction are enriched in sulfur compounds and the alkaline earth compound remains in the char fraction as an alkaline earth oxide. The char is suitable for fuel use, as in a power plant, and during combustion of the char the alkaline earth oxide reacts with at least a portion of the sulfur oxides produced from the residual sulfur contained in the char to further lower the sulfur content of the combustion gases.

  11. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  12. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-10-07

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  13. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  14. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1982-05-06

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid meidum of the formula NR/sub 3/ and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  15. Infrared photoemitting diode having reduced work function

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    In electro-optical detectors which include as elements a photoemitting photocathode and anode, a photoemitting diode is fabricated which lowers the diode's work function, thus reducing the cooling requirement typically needed for this type of device. The work function is reduced by sandwiching between the photocathode and anode a liquid medium of the formula NR.sub.3 and having an electron affinity for the electrons of the photocathode, which liquid medium permits free electrons leaving the photocathode to remain as stable solvated species in the liquid medium. Thus, highly light-absorbent, and therefore thin, metallic layers can be used for detection, thereby reducing dark current at a given temperature, with a consequent reduction in cooling requirements at constant detector performance.

  16. Genome Sequence of a Chromium-Reducing Strain, Bacillus cereus S612

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dongping; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Ware, Doug S.; Reimus, Paul W.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Johnson, Shannon L.; Li, Po-E

    2015-12-10

    We report here the genome sequence of an effective chromium-reducing bacterium,Bacillus cereusstrain S612. We found that the size of the draft genome sequence is approximately 5.4 Mb, with a G+C content of 35%, and it is predicted to contain 5,450 protein-coding genes.

  17. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.

    2010-05-11

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  18. Reduced No.sub.x combustion method

    DOEpatents

    Delano, Mark A.

    1991-01-01

    A combustion method enabling reduced NO.sub.x formation wherein fuel and oxidant are separately injected into a combustion zone in a defined velocity relation, combustion gases are aspirated into the oxidant stream prior to intermixture with the fuel, and the fuel is maintained free from contact with oxygen until the intermixture.

  19. Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town Reduce Costs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Judith Mondre spent the past two months learning the ins and outs of Upper Darby Township, Pa.'s energy usage. She's analyzed energy bills, observed town facilities and interviewed staff to put together a plan to help the municipality reduce its total energy usage.

  20. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOEpatents

    Laabs, Gary W.; Funk, David J.; Asay, Blaine W.

    1998-01-01

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile.

  1. Light gas gun with reduced timing jitter

    DOEpatents

    Laabs, G.W.; Funk, D.J.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-06-09

    Gas gun with reduced timing jitter is disclosed. A gas gun having a prepressurized projectile held in place with a glass rod in compression is described. The glass rod is destroyed with an explosive at a precise time which allows a restraining pin to be moved and free the projectile. 4 figs.

  2. Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection | National Nuclear Security ... Home NNSA Blog Reducing emissions to improve nuclear test detection Reducing emissions ...

  3. Expanded Content Envelope For The Model 9977 Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G. A.; Loftin, B. M.; Nathan, S. J.; Bellamy, J. S.

    2013-07-30

    An Addendum was written to the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging adding a new content consisting of DOE-STD-3013 stabilized plutonium dioxide materials to the authorized Model 9977 contents. The new Plutonium Oxide Content (PuO{sub 2}) Envelope will support the Department of Energy shipment of materials between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Savannah River Site facilities. The new content extended the current content envelope boundaries for radioactive material mass and for decay heat load and required a revision to the 9977 Certificate of Compliance prior to shipment. The Addendum documented how the new contents/configurations do not compromise the safety basis presented in the 9977 SARP Revision 2. The changes from the certified package baseline and the changes to the package required to safely transport this material is discussed.

  4. Energy.gov Content Management System Requirements and Guidance | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Websites & Digital Media » Energy.gov Content Management System Requirements and Guidance Energy.gov Content Management System Requirements and Guidance The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) websites are hosted in Energy.gov's Drupal content management system (CMS), which is maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Public Affairs Office. Learn more about Energy.gov's Drupal CMS requirements and guidance for: Page types Block types Linking File

  5. Energy.gov Content Management System Data Tables

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    For Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, follow these guidelines for creating Section 508-compliant data tables in the Energy.gov content management system.

  6. Information Content of the Low-Energy Electric Dipole Strength...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Purpose: We study the information content carried by the ... Methods: We use the self-consistent nuclear density ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word ...

  7. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water ... in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas ...

  8. Similarity Engine: Using Content Similarity to Improve Memory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Similarity to Improve Memory Resilience. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Similarity Engine: Using Content Similarity to Improve Memory Resilience. Abstract not provided. ...

  9. Deposition of device quality low H content, amorphous silicon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A high quality, low hydrogen content, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film is ... Midwest Research Institute; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO; Solar ...

  10. Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Domestic Material Content in Molten-Salt Concentrating Solar Power Plants Craig Turchi, ... Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy ...

  11. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2006-08-22

    A device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance for vehicles having a generally rectangular body disposed above rear wheels, comprising a plurality of load bearing struts attached to the bottom of the rectangular body adjacent its sides, a plurality of opposing flat sheets attached to the load bearing struts, and angled flaps attached to the lower edge of the opposing sheets defining an obtuse angle with the opposing flat sheets extending inwardly with respect to the sides of the rectangular body to a predetermined height above the ground, which, stiffen the opposing flat sheets, bend to resist damage when struck by the ground, and guide airflow around the rear wheels of the vehicle to reduce its aerodynamic resistance when moving.

  12. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Chau, Hoi Fung

    1998-01-01

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

  13. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

    1998-03-24

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

  14. Methods of reducing vehicle aerodynamic drag

    SciTech Connect

    Sirenko V.; Rohatgi U.

    2012-07-08

    A small scale model (length 1710 mm) of General Motor SUV was built and tested in the wind tunnel for expected wind conditions and road clearance. Two passive devices, rear screen which is plate behind the car and rear fairing where the end of the car is aerodynamically extended, were incorporated in the model and tested in the wind tunnel for different wind conditions. The conclusion is that rear screen could reduce drag up to 6.5% and rear fairing can reduce the drag by 26%. There were additional tests for front edging and rear vortex generators. The results for drag reduction were mixed. It should be noted that there are aesthetic and practical considerations that may allow only partial implementation of these or any drag reduction options.

  15. FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruether, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

  16. Cascaded Microinverter PV System for Reduced Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bellus, Daniel R.; Ely, Jeffrey A.

    2013-04-29

    In this project, a team led by Delphi will develop and demonstrate a novel cascaded photovoltaic (PV) inverter architecture using advanced components. This approach will reduce the cost and improve the performance of medium and large-sized PV systems. The overall project objective is to develop, build, and test a modular 11-level cascaded three-phase inverter building block for photovoltaic applications and to develop and analyze the associated commercialization plan. The system will be designed to utilize photovoltaic panels and will supply power to the electric grid at 208 VAC, 60 Hz 3-phase. With the proposed topology, three inverters, each with an embedded controller, will monitor and control each of the cascade sections, reducing costs associated with extra control boards. This report details the final disposition on this project.

  17. NREL Transportation Project to Reduce Fuel Usage

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Project to Reduce Fuel Usage For more information contact: Sarah Holmes Barba, 303-275-3023 email: Sarah Barba Golden, Colo., Mar. 23, 2001 - The Jefferson County Seniors Resource Center (SRC) Paratransit Service has become an important part of Eulalia Gaillard's life since her stroke in 1996. She calls on SRC to drive her to cardiologist, neurologist and chiropractor appointments each week. "It's wonderful," Gaillard says. "I'd give this program 150 plus in regards

  18. Device for reducing vehicle aerodynamic resistance

    DOEpatents

    Graham, Sean C.

    2005-02-15

    A device for a vehicle with a pair of swinging rear doors, which converts flat sheets of pliable material hinged to the sides of the vehicle adjacent the rear thereof into effective curved airfoils that reduce the aerodynamic resistance of the vehicle, when the doors are closed by hand, utilizing a plurality of stiffeners disposed generally parallel to the doors and affixed to the sheets and a plurality of collapsible tension bearings struts attached to each stiffener and the adjacent door.

  19. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  20. Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency

    ScienceCinema

    Arvizu, Dan

    2016-07-12

    In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf