National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for operable environmental equipment

  1. Line Equipment Operator

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    There are several Line Equipment Operator positions located in Washington and Oregon. A successful candidate in this position will perform Line Equipment Operator work operating trucks and all...

  2. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  3. Zhejiang DunAn Artificial Environmental Equipment Co Ltd | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    DunAn Artificial Environmental Equipment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang DunAn Artificial Environmental Equipment Co Ltd Place: Zhuji, Zhejiang Province, China...

  4. Workshop on environmental qualification of electric equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Lofaro, R.; Gunther, W.; Villaran, M.; Lee, B.S.; Taylor, J.

    1994-05-01

    Questions concerning the Environmental Qualification (EQ) of electrical equipment used in commercial nuclear power plants have recently become the subject of significant interest to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Initial questions centered on whether compliance with the EQ requirements for older plants were adequate to support plant operation beyond 40 years. After subsequent investigation, the NRC Staff concluded that questions related to the differences in EQ requirements between older and newer plants constitute a potential generic issue which should be evaluated for backfit, independent of license renewal activities. EQ testing of electric cables was performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under contract to the NRC in support of license renewal activities. Results showed that some of the environmentally qualified cables either failed or exhibited marginal insulation resistance after a simulated plant life of 20 years during accident simulation. This indicated that the EQ process for some electric cables may be non-conservative. These results raised questions regarding the EQ process including the bases for conclusions about the qualified life of components based upon artificial aging prior to testing.

  5. Field surveys of office equipment operating patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Roberson, Judy A.; Brown, Richard E.; Payne, Christopher T.; Nordman, Bruce; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2001-09-05

    This paper presents the results of 11 after-hours walk-throughs of offices in the San Francisco CA and Washington D.C. areas. The primary purpose of these walk-throughs was to collect data on turn-off rates for various types of office equipment (computers, monitors, printers, fax machines, copiers, and multifunction products). Each piece of equipment observed was recorded and its power status noted (e.g. on, off, low power). Whenever possible, we also recorded whether power management was enabled on the equipment. The floor area audited was recorded as well, which allowed us to calculate equipment densities. We found that only 44 percent of computers, 32 percent of monitors, and 25 percent of printers were turned off at night. Based on our observations we estimate success rates of 56 percent for monitor power management and 96 percent for enabling of power management on printers.

  6. Operating Experience Level 3, Industrial Equipment Impacts Infrastruct...

    Energy Saver

    mission and schedule, divert resources, and change momentum. PDF icon OE-3 2014-06: Industrial Equipment Impacts infrastructure More Documents & Publications Operating...

  7. Tools and Equipment Modeling for Automobile Interactive Assembling Operating Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Dianliang; Zhu Hongmin

    2010-05-21

    Tools and equipment play an important role in the simulation of virtual assembly, especially in the assembly process simulation and plan. Because of variety in function and complexity in structure and manipulation, the simulation of tools and equipments remains to be a challenge for interactive assembly operation. Based on analysis of details and characteristics of interactive operations for automobile assembly, the functional requirement for tools and equipments of automobile assembly is given. Then, a unified modeling method for information expression and function realization of general tools and equipments is represented, and the handling methods of manual, semi-automatic, automatic tools and equipments are discussed. Finally, the application in assembly simulation of rear suspension and front suspension of Roewe 750 automobile is given. The result shows that the modeling and handling methods are applicable in the interactive simulation of various tools and equipments, and can also be used for supporting assembly process planning in virtual environment.

  8. DOE Issues Safety Assessments for Diesel-Operated Equipment Underground at WIPP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    January 5, 2015 DOE Issues Safety Assessments for Diesel-Operated Equipment Underground at WIPP The Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, within the U.S. Department of Energy's independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA), recently issued reports following reviews conducted on the WIPP Recovery Plan for Operating Diesel Equipment with available underground airflows and the Conduct of Maintenance and associated planned program enhancements. The onsite portions of the

  9. Test fire environmental testing operations at Mound Applied Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes Mound Laboratory`s environmental testing operations. The function of environmental testing is to perform quality environmental (thermal, mechanical, spin, resistance, visual) testing/conditioning of inert/explosive products to assure their compliance with specified customer acceptance criteria. Capabilities, organization, equipment specifications, and test facilities are summarized.

  10. Operating Experience Level 3, Danger! Equipment Hits Overhead Lines

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3 2016-01: This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to workers and operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities where equipment has struck overhead communication cables and energized power lines.

  11. Operating Experience Level 3, Industrial Equipment Impacts Infrastructure

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information on a safety concern related to heavy industrial equipment that contacts and damages structures and electrical, gas, and water lines. Although these contacts did not cause injuries, the events did impact mission and schedule, divert resources, and change momentum.

  12. Reactor operation environmental information document

    SciTech Connect

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Air Operating Permit...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Air Operating PermitPermitting...

  14. Lease Operations Environmental Guidance Document

    SciTech Connect

    Bureau of Land Management

    2001-02-14

    This report contains discussions in nine different areas as follows: (1) Good Lease Operating Practices; (2) Site Assessment and Sampling; (3) Spills/Accidents; (4) Containment and Disposal of Produced Waters; (5) Restoration of Hydrocarbon Impacted Soils; (6) Restoration of Salt Impacted Soils; (7) Pit Closures; (8) Identification, Removal and Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM); and (9) Site Closure and Construction Methods for Abandonment Wells/Locations. This report is primary directed towards the operation of oil and gas producing wells.

  15. Reactor operation environmental information document

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.; Specht, W.L.; Mackey, H.E.; Paller, M.H.; Wilde, E.W.; Dicks, A.S.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a large United States Department of Energy installation on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina. The SRS contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, varied wetlands including Carolina Bays, the Savannah River swamp system, and impoundment related and riparian wetlands, and the aquatic habitats of several stream systems, two large cooling reservoirs, and the Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a large variety of plants and animals including many commercially or recreational valuable species and several rare, threatened or endangered species. This volume describes the major habitats and their biota found on the SRS, and discuss the impacts of continued operation of the K, L, and P production reactors.

  16. Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview PDF icon Oak Ridge Operations Office of...

  17. Shasta/Mustique subsea equipment platform interface and operability

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferies, A.T.; Loegering, C.; Steib, D.; Schlater, D.

    1996-12-31

    The economic benefits of all inclusive systems engineering approach is now recognized in the offshore industry. Nowhere is this more evident than in the area of deepwater subsea tiebacks to existing facilities. This type of development requires effective management of the interfaces between personnel on the existing facility and the new project team, the interfaces between the new subsea facilities and the existing platform, and the interface of the new operating procedures with the existing platform daily routine. A second factor in the economic viability of many of these projects is the need to minimize operating costs by avoiding the need for subsea system repair intervention. An operability analysis focusing on the subsea system and platform interface engineering was used on the Hardy projects to address the concerns with the potential for interventions. With minimum operating costs as a primary goal, Hardy encouraged participation from both host platform operating groups from the outset of both projects. This cooperation was critical since both projects were planned to more than double the throughput for both host platforms without adding platform operating personnel. The approach of operator involvement also ensured a safe, reliable, and economic transition between the installation and operating phases of the developments.

  18. Environmental concerns gaining importance in industry operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    This paper reports that environmental concerns have leapt to the forefront of industry's concerns in operating in Latin America. The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro June 3-14 focused a strong world spotlight on the region's environmental and commercial resources. Protection of the region's rain forests, which accounts for a huge share of the world's total, is emerging as an especially contentious issue. Ecuador's Oriente region may well prove the litmus test of how or whether oil and gas companies are able to operate in Latin American rain forests. Controversy over industry operations in the Oriente have heated to the point that environmentalist and native groups have routinely picketed company offices in Quito and used mass fundraiser mailings in North America.

  19. Early Warning Expert System for Equipment Operability Surveillance

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1996-12-18

    EWES is an Al-based expert system for signal validation and sensor operability surveillance in industrial applications that require high-reliability, high-sensitivity annunciation of degraded sensors, discrepant signals, or the onset or incipience of system disturbances.

  20. Tensiometer, drive probe for use with environmental testing equipment, and methods of inserting environmental testing equipment into a sample

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2005-07-26

    A method of inserting a tensiometer into a sample, comprises providing a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment; supporting a porous member from the drive probe; and driving the drive probe into the sample using a cone penetrometer. A tensiometer comprises a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment or a cone penetrometer; a porous member supported by the drive probe; and a pressure sensor in pressure sensing relation to the porous member.

  1. Topsides equipment, operating flexibility key floating LNG design

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, K.; Lopez, R.; Mok, J.

    1998-03-09

    Use of a large-scale floating liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant is an economical alternative to an onshore plant for producing from an offshore field. Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, has advanced a design for such a plant that is technically feasible, economical, safe, and reliable. Presented were descriptions of the general design basis, hull modeling and testing, topsides and storage layouts, and LNG offloading. But such a design also presents challenges for designing topsides equipment in an offshore environment and for including flexibility and safety. These are covered in this second article. Mobil`s floating LNG plant design calls for a square concrete barge with a moon-pool in the center. It is designed to produce 6 million tons/year of LNG with up to 55,000 b/d of condensate from 1 bcfd of raw feed gas.

  2. Method and apparatus for operating equipment in a remote location

    SciTech Connect

    Cassity, T.G.; Montgomery, W.C.; Baker, G.S.; Wedel, A.W.; Taylor, W.M.

    1989-08-29

    This patent describes an apparatus for manipulating equipment including a well component in a subsea wellhead of a subsea marine well. It comprises: detecting means for detecting the occurrence of a condition with respect to the well component within the subsea wellhead, transmitting means for transmitting a signal to the water surface, means for supporting the detecting means and the transmitting means on the running string with the well component, a running string for lowering the well component, the detecting means and the transmitting means into the subsea marine well. The detecting means upon the detection of the occurrence of a condition with respect to the well component within the subsea wellhead causing the transmitting means to transmit a signal to the water surface that the condition has occurred.

  3. Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-10-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the lease of facilities and equipment to USEC Inc. (USEC), which would be used in its Gas Centrifuge Research and Development (R&D) Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) [hereinafter referred to as the USEC EA]. The USEC EA analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE leasing facility K-101 and portions of K-1600, K-1220 and K-1037 at the ETTP to USEC for a minimum 3-year period, with additional option periods consistent with the Oak Ridge Accelerated Clean-up Plan (ACP) Agreement. In July 2002, USEC notified DOE that it intends to use certain leased equipment at an off-site facility at the Centrifuge Technology Center (CTC) on the Boeing Property. The purpose of the USEC Gas Centrifuge R&D Project is to develop an economically attractive gas centrifuge machine and process using DOE's centrifuge technology.

  4. Equipment Operator

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will perform right-of-way clearing activities and miscellaneous work pertaining to right-of-way accessibility, and gate and road work.

  5. A Discussion of Procedures and Equipment for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection Environmental Sampling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, Ned A.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Payne, Rosara F.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Friese, Judah I.; Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Hanlen, Richard C.; Onishi, Yasuo; Hayes, James C.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper is intended to serve as a scientific basis to start discussions of the available environmental sampling techniques and equipment that have been used in the past that could be considered for use within the context of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on-site inspections (OSI). This work contains information on the techniques, equipment, costs, and some operational procedures associated with environmental sampling that have actually been used in the past by the United States for the detection of nuclear explosions. This paper also includes a discussion of issues, recommendations, and questions needing further study within the context of the sampling and analysis of aquatic materials, atmospheric gases, atmospheric particulates, vegetation, sediments and soils, fauna, and drill-back materials.

  6. Real Time Quantitative Radiological Monitoring Equipment for Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    John R. Giles; Lyle G. Roybal; Michael V. Carpenter

    2006-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, analyze, and characterize radiological contamination in soil. These systems have been successfully deployed at several Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and Cold War Legacy closure sites. Traditionally, these systems have been used during the characterization and remediation of radiologically contaminated soils and surfaces; however, subsequent to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the applications of these systems have expanded to include homeland security operations for first response, continuing assessment and verification of cleanup activities in the event of the detonation of a radiological dispersal device. The core system components are a detector, a spectral analyzer, and a global positioning system (GPS). The system is computer controlled by menu-driven, user-friendly custom software designed for a technician-level operator. A wide variety of detectors have been used including several configurations of sodium iodide (NaI) and high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, and a large area proportional counter designed for the detection of x-rays from actinides such as Am-241 and Pu-238. Systems have been deployed from several platforms including a small all-terrain vehicle (ATV), hand-pushed carts, a backpack mounted unit, and an excavator mounted unit used where personnel safety considerations are paramount. The INL has advanced this concept, and expanded the system functionality to create an integrated, field-deployed analytical system through the use of tailored analysis and operations software. Customized, site specific software is assembled from a supporting toolbox of algorithms that streamline the data acquisition, analysis and reporting process. These algorithms include region specific spectral stripping, automated energy calibration, background subtraction, activity calculations based on measured detector efficiencies, and on-line data quality checks

  7. Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hanford | Department of Energy Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford (238.34 KB) Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford (56.27 KB) More Documents & Publications Idaho

  8. Operational Environmental Monitoring Program Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.J.

    1994-08-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and operational environmental monitoring performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company as it implements the Operational Environmental Monitoring program. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company in implementing the Operational Environmental Monitoring program at the Hanford Site.

  9. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual

    SciTech Connect

    DALE, R.N.

    2000-05-01

    A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

  10. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... equipment, forklift, and crane operations associated with ... Accessed Aug. 2003. Parks, J.W., 1997, Data for Revised No ... Chemical accidents David J. LePoire M.S., Computer Science, ...

  11. Environmental research brief: Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of automotive lighting equipment and accessories

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, M.; Couch, B.; Handmaker, A.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a Pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacture who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lac the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) we established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee performed an assessment at a plant that manufactures outboard motors for water craft. Three basic subunits received from other manufacturing plants undergo primarily painting and assembly operations in order to produce the final product. The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint overspray waste and spent clean-up solvent are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by installing robotic paint application equipment. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  12. Operations Manual for the Portable NDA II Equipment (Version 2.2)

    SciTech Connect

    Bandong, B B; Wong, J L; Valentine, J D; Decman, D J

    2002-06-27

    This document describes the operation and use of the Portable Nondestructive Assay (NDA) II equipment for use in the determination of {sup 235}U enrichment of uranium of various chemical forms and contained in different vessels. The Portable NDA II is the next generation NDA equipment assembled by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the Department of Energy's Highly Enriched Uranium-Transparency Implementation Program (HEU-TIP). Presented in this document is an overview of the enrichment measurement methodology, instructions for the assembly and disassembly of the equipment, description of and user's guide for the UMeter enrichment meter software and a section on system troubleshooting. Also included herewith are facility-specific information and parameters for each of the HEU-processing sites subject to the HEU Transparency Implementation Program.

  13. Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-05-05

    This order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels Interim Management Directive No. 5001, Safety, Health And Environmental Protection dated 9-29-77.

  14. Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview Oak Ridge Operations Office of Environmental Management Overview (2 MB) More Documents & Publications OREM Hosts Community Workshop ORSSAB Meeting - August 2013 Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Deactivation &

  15. Hi-Res Environmental Data For Enhanced UDW Operations Safety

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACT REPORT HI-RES ENVIRONMENTAL DATA FOR ENHANCED UDW OPERATIONS SAFETY Fugro GEOS/C26157/RPSEA Doc No. 11121.5801.01.FINAL Page i Hi-Res Environmental Data for Enhanced UDW Operations Safety Final Contract Report RPSEA Document No. 11121.5801.01.FINAL Hi-Res Environmental Data for Enhanced UDW Operations Safety RPSEA Project No. 11121-5801-01 October 3, 2016 Grant A. Stuart Project Manager Fugro 6100 Hillcroft Houston, TX 77081 FINAL CONTRACT REPORT HI-RES ENVIRONMENTAL DATA FOR ENHANCED

  16. Adaptation of the control equipment to permit 3-terminal operation of the HVDC link between Sardinia, Corsica and mainland Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzoldi, F.; Taisne, J.P.; Martin, C.J.B.; Rowe, B.A.

    1989-04-01

    After more than 20 years service as a conventional 2-terminal HVdc link, the Sardinia-Mainland Italy hvdc link (200MW, 200kV) is now operating as a three-terminal system. The original control equipment has been modified to allow the introduction of a tapping station on the line for 3-terminal operation. The adaptations to the control equipment, including the means to ensure that the convertors are operated within their capabilities, are explained.

  17. Apparatuses and methods of determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Michael L.; Keller, Paul Edwin; Amaya, Ivan A.

    2015-06-16

    A method of, and apparatus for, determining if a person operating equipment is experiencing an elevated cognitive load, wherein the person's use of a device at a first time is monitored so as to set a baseline signature. Then, at a later time, the person's use of the device is monitored to determine the person's performance at the second time, as represented by a performance signature. This performance signature can then be compared against the baseline signature to predict whether the person is experiencing an elevated cognitive load.

  18. Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Program for DOE Operations

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1981-08-13

    This Order establishes the Environmental Protection, Safety. and Health Protection Program for Department of Energy (DOE) operations. Cancels DOE 5480.1, dated 5-5-1980, its chapters are not canceled. Canceled by DOE O 5480.1B

  19. Operation of Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hare, K.

    1995-12-31

    The final environmental impact statement (EIS) on the operation of Glen Canyon Dam was filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the Bureau of Reclamation on March 21, 1995. The poster display depicts this highly complex EIS process and its results.

  20. Design and Operation of Equipment to Detect and Remove Water within Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Bottles

    SciTech Connect

    C.C. Baker; T.M. Pfeiffer; J.C. Price

    2013-09-01

    Inspection and drying equipment has been implemented in a hot cell to address the inadvertent ingress of water into used nuclear fuel storage bottles. Operated with telemanipulators, the system holds up to two fuel bottles and allows their threaded openings to be connected to pressure transducers and a vacuum pump. A prescribed pressure rebound test is used to diagnose the presence of moisture. Bottles found to contain moisture are dried by vaporization. The drying process is accelerated by the application of heat and vacuum. These techniques detect and remove virtually all free water (even water contained in a debris bed) while leaving behind most, if not all, particulates. The extracted water vapour passes through a thermoelectric cooler where it is condensed back to the liquid phase for collection. Fuel bottles are verified to be dry by passing the pressure rebound test.

  1. Results from Operational Testing of the Siemens Smart Grid-Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2015-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Siemens smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Siemens for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Siemens smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  2. Results from the Operational Testing of the Eaton Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Brion

    2014-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the Eaton smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from Eaton for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Eaton smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  3. Environmental Impacts from the Operation of Cooling Towers at SRP

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III

    2001-06-26

    An assessment has been made of the environmental effects that would occur from the operation of cooling towers at the SRP reactors. A more realistic numerical model of the cooling tower plume has been used to reassess the environmental impacts. The following effects were considered: (1) the occurrence of fog and ice and their impact on nearby structures, (2) drift and salt deposition from the plume, (3) the length and height of the visible plume, and (4) the possible dose from tritium.

  4. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-05-18

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  5. Exploration and production operations in an environmentally sensitive area

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, G.W.; Steele, E.J.; Robalino, J.; Baldwin, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Ecuadorian portion of the Amazon Basin, known locally as the Oriente, is the major oil producing region in Ecuador. The tropical rain forests of the Oriente contain some of the Earth`s most biologically diverse and ecologically sensitive areas. In addition, the rain forest is home to several groups of indigenous peoples.When formulating an exploration plan and prior to beginning E and P activities in the Oriente, operators must understand the environmental and sociocultural issues in the region. These concerns are considered throughout the planning process, from project conception to project closure. An environmental management plan is adopted which addresses environmental and sociocultural concerns, minimizes environmental impact, prevents delays, and limits environmental liability.

  6. Seismic operations in environmentally sensitive areas IAGC initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, D.G. )

    1993-08-01

    Because of the diversity of circumstances faced by geophysical field crews and the potential adverse impact from such activities, this industry must develop heightened sensitivity and operating practices that demonstrate that such work can be done in an environmentally compatible manner. The International Association of Geophysical Contractors (IAGC) has taken a proactive approach to this issue by producing a comprehensive set of recommended worldwide operating guidelines to assist its member companies and others in planning and carrying out geophysical data acquisition activities in an environmentally responsible manner. These IAGC guidelines are designed to address key environmental issues present in six specific operating environments: arctic areas, coastal areas (including wetlands and marshes), level and semilevel forested areas, and marine areas. Careful planning, proper communication with the public and government agencies, and knowledge of specific local issues can help to bring about a cooperative and positive approach to future petroleum exploration and development in environmentally sensitive areas. Furthermore, recognition, acceptance, and adoption of these IAGC guidelines by both the petroleum industry and regulatory agencies can help promote access to explore-without unreasonable or unnecessary restrictions-in environmentally sensitive areas. This can help reduce oil company client and geophysical contractor liability and, at the same time, provide a much needed boost to this industry's public image. Development of these guidelines has been a truly international effort incorporating input from all regions of the world as to content, format, and localized semantics. In trying to achieve worldwide functionality, IAGC has attempted to establish a balance between environmental diligence, reasonable practices, and economic considerations.

  7. Evaluating Operational Irregularities at Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Albright, W.H.; Ray, D.P.; Smegal, J.S.; Robertson, Jr.O.C.; Gupta, D.C.

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the findings of an independent technical review that investigated operational irregularities at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford. The ERDF is a large-scale disposal facility authorized by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology to receive waste from Hanford cleanup activities. The irregularities included (i) failure to recognize that pumps for the leachate collection system were not functioning for an extended period and (ii) falsification of compaction data by a technician responsible for monitoring waste placement in the ERDF. Other issues related to compaction of the waste were also considered during the independent technical review. A number of important lessons were learned as part of this review. These lessons are summarized in the paper. They are relevant to the ERDF as well as other landfill operations at Department of Energy facilities. (authors)

  8. Data Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider Operating Temperature and Humidity Ranges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    provides an overview of how operators of data centers can increase energy efficiency at wider operating temperatures and humidity ranges

  9. Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale Contents * Introduction * Motor Gasoline Summer Volatility (RVP) Regulations o Table 1. Summer Volatility Regulations for Motor Gasoline o Table 2. Refinery Inputs and Production of Normal Butane o Figure 1. Refinery Inputs and Production of Normal Butane o Table 3. Price Relationship Between Normal Butane and Motor Gasoline o Table 4. Market Price Premium for Low Vapor Pressure (RVP) Gasoline *

  10. Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Case Study: Selection of Electrical Equipment to Be Subjected to Environmental Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    D. P. Blanchard; R. W. Youngblood

    2014-06-01

    The Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) pathway of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program focuses on advancing the state of the art in safety analysis and risk assessment to support decision-making on nuclear power plant operation well beyond the originally designed lifetime of the plants (i.e., beyond 60 years). Among the issues being addressed in RISMC is the significance of SSC aging and how confident we are about our understanding of its impact on the margin between the loads SSCs are expected to see during normal operation and accident conditions, and the SSC capacities (their ability to resist those loads) as the SSCs age. In this paper, a summary is provided of a case study that examines SSC aging from an environmental qualification (EQ) perspective. The case study illustrates how the state of knowledge regarding SSC margin can be characterized given the overall integrated plant design, and was developed to demonstrate a method for deciding on which cables to focus, which cables are not so important from an environmental qualification margin standpoint, and what plant design features or operating characteristics determine the role that environmental qualification plays in establishing a safety case on which decisions regarding margin can be made. The selection of cables for which demonstration of margin with respect to aging and environmental challenges uses a technique known as Prevention Analysis. Prevention Analysis is a Boolean method for optimal selection of SSCs (that is, those combinations of SSCs both necessary and sufficient to meet a predetermined selection criterion) in a manner that allows demonstration that plant-level safety can be demonstrated by the collection of selected SSCs alone. Choosing the set of SSCs that is necessary and sufficient to satisfy the safety objectives, and demonstrating that the safety objectives can be met effectively, determines where resources are best allocated to assure SSC

  11. Regulatory analysis for resolution of Unresolved Safety Issue A-46, seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Anderson, N.R.

    1987-02-01

    The margin of safety provided in existing nuclear power plant equipment to resist seismically induced loads and perform required safety functions may vary considerably, because of significant changes in design criteria and methods for the seismic qualification of equipment over the years. Therefore, the seismic qualification of equipment in operating plants must be reassessed to determine whether requalification is necessary. The objective of technical studies performed under Task Action Plan A-46 was to establish an explicit set of guidelines and acceptance criteria to judge the adequacy of equipment under seismic loading at all operating plants, in lieu of requiring these plants to meet the criteria that are applied to new plants. This report presents the regulatory analysis for Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-46. It includes: Statement of the Problem; the Objective of USI A-46; a Summary of A-46 Tasks; a Proposed Implementation Procedure; a Value-Impact Analysis; Application of the Backfit Rule; 10 CFR 50.109; Implementation; and Operating Plants To Be Reviewed to USI A-46 Requirements.

  12. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R. J.

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  13. The operation results with the modified charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.J.; Pi, Y.J.; Kim, J.R.; Lee, J.N.

    1996-12-31

    There will be another blast furnace, the production capacity of which is 3.0 million tonnes per year in 1999 and mini mill plant, the production capacity of which is 1.8 million tonnes per year in 1996 at Kwangyang Works. Therefore, the coke oven gas and burnt lime will be deficient and more sinter will be needed. To meet with these situations, the authors modified the charging equipment and ignition furnace at Kwangyang No. 2 sinter plant in April 1995. After the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace, the consumption of burnt lime and coke oven gas could be decreased and the sinter productivity increased in spite of the reduction of burnt lime consumption. This report describes the operation results with the modification of the charging equipment and ignition furnace in No. 2 sinter plant Kwangyang works.

  14. Geological and environmental remote sensing for international petroleum operations

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    Remote sensing allows the petroleum industry to make better and quicker interpretations of geological and environmental conditions in areas of present and future operations. Often remote sensing (including aerial photographs) is required because existing maps are out-of-date, too small of scale, or provide only limited information. Implementing remote sensing can lead to lower project costs and reduced risk. The same satellite and airborne data can be used effectively for both geological and environmental applications. For example, earth scientists can interpret new lithologic, structural, and geomorphic information from near-infrared and radar imagery in terrains as diverse as barren desert and tropical jungle. Environmental applications with these and other imagery include establishing baselines, assessing impact by documenting changes through time, and mapping land-use, habitat, and vegetation. Higher resolution sensors provide an up-to-date overview of onshore and offshore petroleum facilities, whereas sensors capable of oblique viewing can be used to generate topographic maps. Geological application in Yemen involved merging Landsat TM and SPOT imagery to obtain exceptional lithologic discrimination. In the Congo, a topographic map to plan field operations was interpreted from the overlapping radar strips. Landsat MSS and TM, SPOT, and Russian satellite images with new aerial photographs are being used in the Tengiz supergiant oil field of Kazakhstan to help establish an environmental baseline, generate a base map, locate wells, plan facilities, and support a geographical information system (GIS). In the Niger delta, Landsat TM and SPOT are being used to plan pipeline routes and seismic lines, and to monitor rapid shoreline changes and population growth. Accurate coastlines, facility locations, and shoreline types are being extracted from satellite images for use in oil spill models.

  15. Post operational investigation of the recovered North East Frigg subsea production equipment after 10 year`s service

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, L.J.; Fjaertoft, L.

    1995-12-31

    Elf Petroleum Norge had for 10 years been operating the North East Frigg field. This gas field was the first subsea field on the Norwegian Continental shelf. It was shut down on the 8th May 1993. Elf Petroleum Norge used the shut down as an ideal opportunity to review the performance of the subsea equipment. An investigation was initiated,its purpose, to gather information regarding the history, wear, effect of cathodic protection, corrosion etc from the X-mas tree components.

  16. EIS-0195: Remedial Actions at Operable Unit 4, Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to conduct remedial action at Operable Unit 4 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project.

  17. A report on training equipment enhancements for the U.S. Special Operations Command

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Training support systems - including devices, simulators and simulations - significantly improve training. Of course this is important for all military units. But for Special Operations Forces, such improvements are critical. Special Operations Forces must be prepared to operate in the most difficult, least forgiving of environments and do it right on the first try. The objective of this project is to report on the latest state-of-the-art training devices and systems which can enhance the training of Special Operations Forces.

  18. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  19. Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

  20. Annual radiological environmental operating report: Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas not influenced by plant operations. Station locations are selected after careful consideration of the weather patterns and projected radiation doses to the various areas around the plant. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. Results from stations near the plant are compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts of plant operations. Small amounts of Co-60 and Cs-134 were found in sediment samples downstream from the plant. This activity in stream sediment would result in no measurable increase over background in the dose to the general public.

  1. Operating Experience Level 3, Ergonomically Correct Equipment Can Decrease the Risk for Work Station Injuries

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    OE-3 2016-02: This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information that managers and workers at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities can use to improve productivity and comfort, while also decreasing the risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and injuries when working at or around a computer work station for extended periods.

  2. Results from the Operational Testing of the General Electric Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Barney Carlson; Don Scoffield; Brion Bennett

    2013-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory conducted testing and analysis of the General Electric (GE) smart grid capable electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE), which was a deliverable from GE for the U.S. Department of Energy FOA-554. The Idaho National Laboratory has extensive knowledge and experience in testing advanced conductive and wireless charging systems though INL’s support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. This document details the findings from the EVSE operational testing conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory on the GE smart grid capable EVSE. The testing conducted on the EVSE included energy efficiency testing, SAE J1772 functionality testing, abnormal conditions testing, and charging of a plug-in vehicle.

  3. Environmental assessment for the resiting, construction, and operation of the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) presents estimated environmental impacts from the resiting, construction, and operation of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is proposed to be constructed and operated on land near the south boundary of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The EMSL, if constructed, would be a modern research facility in which experimental, theoretical, and computational techniques can be focused on environmental restoration problems, such as the chemical and transport behavior of complex mixtures of contaminants in the environment. The EMSL design includes approximately 18,500 square meters (200,000 square feet) of floor space on a 12-hectare (30-acre) site. The proposed new site is located within the city limits of Richland in north Richland, at the south end of DOE`s 300 Area, on land to be deeded to the US by the Battelle Memorial Institute. Approximately 200 persons are expected to be employed in the EMSL and approximately 60 visiting scientists may be working in the EMSL at any given time. State-of-the-art equipment is expected to be installed and used in the EMSL. Small amounts of hazardous substances (chemicals and radionuclides) are expected to be used in experimental work in the EMSL.

  4. Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operating Guidelines Appendix C D.DOC� Operating Guidelines Appendix C D.DOC� Operating Guidelines Appendix C D.DOC� (41.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Operating Guidelines Appendix A B.DOC� DOE HR Guidebook 12_15_05.DOC� Questions and Answers 202-05-03 | Department of Energy

    Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC in Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03 Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC in Compliance with Order No. 202-05-03

  5. Fault-detection sensors for gas-insulated equipment. Final report. [Operation and performance of chemical, optical and magnetic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Wittle, J.K.; Houston, J.M.; Carlson, G.J.; Davis, W.D.; Itani, A.M.; Jewell, J.G.; Perry, M.P.; Rautenberg, T.H.

    1982-02-01

    The EPRI-GE program develops new techniques for detecting and locating faults or internal insulation degradation in SF/sub 6/-insulated equipment, particularly coaxial conductors used extensively in EHV and UHV substations. The development is described of three types of sensors useful in determining the location of high current faults within the enclosed apparatus: resistive thin-film, optical, and magnetic. All are small in size, operate from inexpensive batteries, are long-lived, and incorporate inherent memory. Each has at least one visual output indicator which is activated when a fault current of sufficient magnitude has occurred. The thin-film sensor changes resistance from approximately 10/sup 12/ to 10/sup 6/ ohms when exposed to typical arced SF/sub 6/ by-products. The optical sensor detects arc light using a phototransistor coupled to an optical fiber which penetrates the container. The resistive and optical sensors may be able to detect prolonged low-level arcing (corona) even without a high-current fault and thus could be valuable in providing advance warning of incipient faults. The resistive and optical sensors that require conductor penetrations and therefore retrofitting to existing GIS equipment may be inconvenient. The magnetic sensor has the advantage that no penetration is required and retrofitting is simple. The magnetic sensor is a battery-powered magnetometer which measures the component of magnetic flux density outside of the outer GIS conductor in the direction parallel (axial) to the conductors, which is present only during fault conditions. Due to the limited spatial coverage of one sensor, it is practical to instrument only limited regions of a substation, such as disconnect switches or the disc insulators on the coaxial line. To completely instrument an insulator position, two magnetic sensors 180/sup 0/ apart are required.

  6. Heavy Equipment Operator- Journeyman

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration, Rocky Mountain Region, Western Colorado Maintenance Office (J5300), Montrose,...

  7. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility ... Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred ...

  8. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

  9. Environmental improvements and better economics in EOR operations

    SciTech Connect

    Taber, J.J. . New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center)

    1990-12-01

    This paper discusses how environmental improvements in EOR technology continues to advance. Successful EOR requires the injection of a fluid which produces incremental oil for the least overall cost. When the net volumetric costs of EOR injection fluids are compared at reservoir conditions, it is clear that only a few liquids or compressed gases can be used to displace crude oil on a barrel for barrel basis. Although high-concentration surfactants have the potential for very efficient displacements, reservoir heterogeneity increases the economic uncertainty of the process, especially at today's oil prices. Water is always the cheapest fluid to inject, even with small amounts of polymer added, and polymer flooding can be cost- effective for new waterfloods. However, polymer flooding is not efficient for displacing tertiary oil. Water converted to steam still accounts for most of the EOR production in the U.S.A., but low oil prices and stricter environmental regulations now restrain large expansions and new projects. Cogeneration of steam and electricity improves the economics markedly for thermal EOR projects, and gas-fired boilers reduce the emissions to the atmosphere. By firing the cogeneration boilers with coal or gas, the more plentiful fossil fuels are converted into much-needed liquid fuels efficiently and economically.

  10. Environmental regulations and changes in petroleum refining operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lidderdale, T.C.M.

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. petroleum industry has responded to four major new federal rules on motor gasoline product quality in the last 6 years: Phase 1 Summer Volatility (Rvp) Regulation, June 1989; Phase 2 Summer Volatility (Rvp) regulation, May 1992; oxygenated Gasoline, November 1992; and reformulated Gasoline Phase I Simple Model, December 1994. These regulations have generated significant changes in domestic refinery operations, affecting marginal production costs and market prices, refinery yields, and the seasonality of production. Some changes have been dramatic. The price of motor gasoline has increased by as much as 60 {cents}/gal due to regulations. Refinery yields of motor gasoline (refinery output of motor gasoline as a fraction of refinery inputs or total refinery output), which historically peaked in the early summer to meet high summer driving demand, now are highest during the winter months. These changes in domestic refining operations are identified and related to the vapor pressure, oxygenated and reformulated gasoline (RFG) product quality regulations. This analysis uses linear regression equations from the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts appearing in the EIA`s Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  11. Microsoft Word - Environmental Document for Continued Operation of LLNL August 2011.docx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. Department of Energy News Media Contact For Immediate Release John Belluardo August 11, 2011 (925) 422-2567 DETERMINATION ISSUED REGARDING ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENT FOR CONTINUED OPERATION OF LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY: Livermore, CA --The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration / Livermore Site Office announced today a determination regarding the Supplement Analysis of the 2005 Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of

  12. Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FIRST QUARTER 20 08 REPORT Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison Prepared by: A U G U S T 2 0 0 8 FIRST QUARTER 2008 REPORT OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING WITHIN A THREE-MILE RADIUS OF PROJECT RULISON Prepared for: Noble Energy Production, Inc. Prepared by: URS Corporation 8181 East Tufts Avenue Denver, CO 80237 August 12, 2008 First Quarter 2008 Report August 2008 i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 Introduction

  13. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental impacts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) operations, this assessment includes a descriptive section which is intended to provide sufficient detail to allow the various impacts to be viewed in proper perspective. In particular, details are provided on site characteristics, current programs, characterization of the existing site environment, and in-place environmental monitoring programs. In addition, specific facilities and operations that could conceivably impact the environment are described at length. 77 refs., 16 figs., 47 tabs.

  14. Impact of environmental concerns on cooling-tower design and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    New and sometimes unexpected environmental concerns surface from time to time, and each has its special effect on the selection, pricing, and operation of cooling towers. This paper discusses the following concerns, which are either current or are becoming significant: water conservation, energy conservation, noise, drift, blowdown, visual impact, and construction materials that are environmentally sensitive. 3 refs.

  15. Operation of Glen Canyon Dam. Final environmental impact statement, summary, comments and responses

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The Federal action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is the operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project (CRSP), Arizona. The purpose of the reevaluation is to determine specific options that could be implemented to minimize--consistent with law-adverse impacts on the downstream environmental and cultural resources, as well as Native American interests in Glen and Grand Canyons.

  16. Operation of N Reactor and Fuels Fabrication Facilities, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Benton County, Washington: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    Environmental data, calculations and analyses show no significant adverse radiological or nonradiological impacts from current or projected future operations resulting from N Reactor, Fuels Fabrication and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities. Nonoccupational radiation exposures resulting from 1978 N Reactor operations are summarized and compared to allowable exposure limits.

  17. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-10

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

  18. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 2, Operator`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    This report discusses the procedures that establish the configuration control processes for the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) software. The procedures also provide the charter and function of the HEIS Configuration Control Board (CCB) for maintaining software. The software configuration control items covered under these procedures include the HEIS software and database structure. The configuration control processes include both administrative and audit functions. The administrative role includes maintaining the overall change schedule, ensuring consistency of proposed changes, negotiating change plan adjustments, setting priorities, and tracking the status of changes. The configuration control process audits to ensure that changes are performed to applicable standards.

  19. Water Efficiency Improvements At Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practices Case Study #12 „ Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. EPA completed projects in all of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) 14 Best Management Practice (BMP) categories. The projects highlighted below demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in the laboratory/medical equipment BMP category by implementing vacuum pump and steam steril-

  20. Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    THIRD QUARTER 20 08 REPORT Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison Prepared by: M A R C H 2 0 0 9 THIRD QUARTER 2008 REPORT OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING WITHIN A THREE-MILE RADIUS OF PROJECT RULISON Prepared for: Noble Energy Inc. EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. Williams Production RMT Inc. Prepared by: URS Corporation 8181 East Tufts Avenue Denver, CO 80237 March 16, 2009 Rulison Third Quarter 2008 Report March 2009 i TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    FOURTH QUARTER 20 08 REPORT Operational and Environmental Monitoring Within a Three-Mile Radius of Project Rulison F F Prepared by: M A R C H 2 0 0 9 FOURTH QUARTER 2008 REPORT OPERATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING WITHIN A THREE-MILE RADIUS OF PROJECT RULISON Prepared for: Noble Energy Inc. EnCana Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. Williams Production RMT Inc. Prepared by: URS Corporation 8181 East Tufts Avenue Denver, CO 80237 March 26, 2009 Rulison Fourth Quarter 2008 Report March 2009 i TABLE OF

  2. Operable Unit 3: Proposed Plan/Environmental Assessment for interim remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This document presents a Proposed Plan and an Environmental Assessment for an interim remedial action to be undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) within Operable Unit 3 (OU3) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). This proposed plan provides site background information, describes the remedial alternatives being considered, presents a comparative evaluation of the alternatives and a rationnale for the identification of DOE`s preferred alternative, evaluates the potential environmental and public health effects associated with the alternatives, and outlines the public`s role in helping DOE and the EPA to make the final decision on a remedy.

  3. Environmental dose assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations.

  4. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect

    2000-09-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  5. Environmental Management Richland Operations Office FY 2014 President's Budget FY 2015 Budget Request Regulator Briefing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Public Briefing FY 2013 Appropriations FY 2014 President's Budget FY 2015 Budget Request Jon Peschong, Richland Operations Office Central Plateau and River Corridor May 8, 2013 Draft Pre-Decisional Information Public Briefing - Richland Operations Office May 2013 Draft Pre-Decisional Information 2 "Complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons development, production, and Government-sponsored nuclear energy research" EM

  6. Environmental analysis of the operation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (X-10 site)

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.W.; Blumberg, R.; Cotter, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    An environmental analysis of the operation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facilities in Bethel Valley and Melton Valley was conducted to present to the public information concerning the extent to which recognizable effects, or potential effects, on the environment may occur. The analysis addresses current operations of the ORNL X-10 site and completed operations that may continue to have residual effects. Solid wastes from ORNL operations at the Y-12 site which are transported to the X-10 site for burial (e.g., Biology Division animal wastes) are included as part of X-10 site operation. Socioeconomic effects are associated primarily with the communities where employees live and with the Knoxville Bureau of Economic Analysis economic area as a whole. Therefore, ORNL employees at both Y-12 and X-10 sites are included in the ORNL socioeconomic impact analysis. An extensive base of environmental data was accumulated for this report. Over 80 reports related to ORNL facilities and/or operations are cited as well as many open-literature citations. Environmental effects of the operation of ORNL result from operational discharges from the onsite facilities; construction and/or modification of facilities, transportation to and from the site of persons, goods and services; socioeconomic impacts to the local, regional, and general population; and accidental discharges if they should occur. Operational discharges to the environnment are constrained by federal, state, and local regulations and by criteria established by the US Department of Energy to minimize adverse impacts. It is the purpose of this document to evaluate the operation of the ORNL insofar as impacts beyond the site boundary may occur or have the potential for occurrence.

  7. CRAD, Environmental Protection- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Environmental Compliance program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  8. EA-0995: Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations, Golden, Colorado

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate a drum storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden,...

  9. EIS-0238-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Albuquerque Operations Office, has prepared a Supplemental Analysis (SA) to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a proposal for modifying current methods utilized to receive and manage certain offsite unwanted radioactive sealed sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory or if additional documentation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is needed.

  10. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Regents of the University of California (UC) propose the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition, DOE proposes the continued operation, including near-term proposed projects, of Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Continued operation plus proposed projects at the two Laboratories is needed so that the research and development missions established by Congress and the President can continue to be supported. As provided and encouraged by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), DOE and UC have prepared this document as a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to analyze the impacts of the proposed action. In addition, this document discusses a no action alternative for continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative focused on specific adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative. This document also examines the alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. The environmental documentation process provides information to the public, government agencies, and decision makers about the environmental impacts of implementing the proposed and alternative actions. In addition, this environmental documentation identifies alternatives and possible ways to reduce or prevent environmental impacts. A list of the issues raised through the EIS/EIR scoping process is presented.

  11. Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan 1990-1999 : Environmental Strategy. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-09-01

    In operating and maintaining its regional power transmission system, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) must address environmental concerns. Pollution sources and pathways for pollution migration, including potential contamination from hazardous or toxic materials, are present. BPA must develop and follow precautionary measures, respond to emergencies, minimize wastes, redress past problems, alert and train employees to problems and safety needs, constantly evaluate this effort and update the program for improvements and changes in regulations and technology. Part of BPA's mission is to conduct its operation, maintenance, and replacement programs in an environmentally sound manner. BPA recognizes its responsibility to be good stewards of the environment. BPA will meet its environmental obligations as set forth in environmental laws and regulations. BPA intends to make consistent and measurable progress toward meeting these responsibilities. The target for the 10-Year Plan is to achieve environmental compliance and meet the following goals: (1) protect human health and the environment; (2) avoid or limit liability (3) set up an effective internal management structure to maintain compliance; and (4) achieve cost-effective compliance. 6 figs.

  12. DOE Nevada Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1993--November 9, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Elle, D.R.; Townsend, Y.E.; Latham, A.R.; Black, S.C.

    1993-11-01

    DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` established environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to assure that the Department of Energy (DOE) operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter III of DOE Order 5400.1 required that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order by no later than November 9, 1989, and update the plan annually. Therefore, the Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has prepared this fourth annual update of its Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP). The Order and corresponding guidances also require estimated budgetary resources necessary for implementation of the Order be identified in the Environmental Protection Implementation Plan. To satisfy this requirement, the estimated costs to effectuate necessary changes in existing programs or processes and to institute new programs or processes for compliance with the Order are provided in the following sections of this plan. The DOE/NV Assistant Manager for Environment, Safety, Security, & Health (AMESSH), in consultation with other organizations responsible for line management of plan implementation, is responsible for annual plan revisions.

  13. Environmental impact report addendum for the continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R. F.

    1996-10-01

    An environmental impact statement/environmental impact report (ES/EIR) for the continued operation and management of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was prepared jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC). The scope of the document included near-term (within 5-10 years) proposed projects. The UC Board of Regents, as state lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), certified and adopted the EIR by issuing a Notice of Determination on November 20, 1992. The DOE, as the lead federal agency under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), adopted a Record of Decision for the ES on January 27, 1993 (58 Federal Register [FR] 6268). The DOE proposed action was to continue operation of the facility, including near-term proposed projects. The specific project evaluated by UC was extension of the contract between UC and DOE for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL (both sites) from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1997. The 1992 ES/EIR analyzed impacts through the year 2002. The 1992 ES/EIR comprehensively evaluated the potential environmental impacts of operation and management of LLNL within the near-term future. Activities evaluated included programmatic enhancements and modifications of facilities and programs at the LLNL Livermore site and at LLNL`s Experimental Test Site (Site 300) in support of research and development missions 2048 established for LLNL by Congress and the President. The evaluation also considered the impacts of infrastructure and building maintenance, minor modifications to buildings, general landscaping, road maintenance, and similar routine support activities.

  14. Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ERDF ETR Report Date: June 2007 ETR-6 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility(ERDF) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The ERDF is a large- scale disposal facility authorized to receive waste from Hanford cleanup activities. It contains double-lined cells with a RCRA Subtitle C- type liner and leachate collection system. By 2007, 6.8 million tons of

  15. Environmental Management Richland Operations Office FY 2014 President's Budget FY 2015 Budget Request Regulator Briefing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) Environmental Management

  16. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

  17. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  18. Hazardous waste site inspectors and operators: Their perceptions of the media and environmental groups

    SciTech Connect

    Graber, D.R.; Musham, C.

    1995-12-01

    This study assesses and compares the views and opinions of two groups (representing the `regulators` and the `regulated`) in one area of environmental management - the operation of commercial hazardous waste sites. A survey, sent to 141 managers of commercial treatment, storage, and disposal sites and 110 hazardous waste inspectors. This paper reports on their views of the role and influence of the media. In addition, the expectations for hazardous waste management by several stakeholder groups was examined.

  19. Operative environmental temperatures and basking behavior of the turtle Pseudemys scripta

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, K.M.; Spotila, J.R.; Standora, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Operative environmental temperatures (T/sub e/, an index of the thermal environment) were measured for basking Pseudemys scripta in South Carolina. Operative environmental temperatures were good predictors of the basking behavior of P. scripta. Turtles in this study generally did not bask unless T/sub e/ was 28/sup 0/C (preferred body temperature) or higher. This demonstrated that basking was not a random behavior in respect to T/sub e/, and implicated thermoregulation as a major factor eliciting basking behavior. Operative environmental temperature was positively related to short-wave and total solar radiation as well as to air and substrate temperature. Substrate temperature was the best single predictor of T/sub e/. A multiple regression equation (T/sub e/ = 0.005R + 0.103T/sub a/ - 1.16 log V + 0.932T/sub s/ - 2.54, r/sup 2/ = .90, where R = total radiation in watts per square metre, T/sub a/ = air temperature in degrees Celsius, V = wind speed in metres per second, and T/sub s/ = substrate temperature in degrees Celsius) defines the relationship of T/sub e/ to microclimate variables. Movement of the sun through the day results in spatial variation in T/sub e/'s available to turtles and influences their location and basking behavior.

  20. Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2, Appendices A--D

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices which provide technical support for the analyses in Volume 1 and also provide additional information and references.

  1. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 4, Comments and responses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains copies of the written comments and transcripts of individual statements at the public hearing and the responses to them.

  2. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 1, Text

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR, which in part relies on the detailed information in the appendices, and comprehensively discusses the proposed action, the alternatives, and the existing conditions and impacts of the proposed action and the alternatives.

  3. Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 3, Appendices F--M

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) is prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 10 years) proposed projects, of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). Additionally, this document analyzes a no action alternative involving continuing operations at FY 1992 funding levels without further growth, a modification of operations alternative to reduce adverse environmental impacts of operations or facilities, and a shutdown and decommissioning alternative of UC discontinuing its management of LLNL after the current contract expires on September 30, 1992. This document assesses the environmental impacts of the Laboratories` operations on air and water quality, geological and ecological systems, occupational and public health risks, prehistoric and historic resources, endangered species, floodplains and wetlands, socioeconomic resources, hazardous waste management, site contamination, and other environmental issues. The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices F through M. Appendix L has been revised to reflect public information activities since publication of the Draft EIS/EIR. These appendices provide technical support for the analyses in Volume 1 and also provide additional information and references.

  4. Annual radiological environmental monitoring report: Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report describes the preoperational environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas that will not be influenced by plant operations. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. During plant operations, results from stations near the plant will be compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts to the public. Exposures calculated from environmental samples were contributed by naturally occurring radioactive materials, from materials commonly found in the environment as a result of atmospheric fallout, or from the operation of other nuclear facilities in the area. Since WBN has not operated, there has been no contribution of radioactivity from the plant to the environment.

  5. Environmental effects of dredging: Alternative dredging equipment and operational methods to minimize sea turtle mortalities. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, D.D.; Nelson, D.A.

    1990-12-01

    Five species of sea turtles occur along the United States coastlines and are listed as threatened or endangered. The loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) is listed as threatened, while the Kemp`s ridley (Lepidochelys kenipi), the hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata), and the leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) are all less abundant and listed as endangered. Florida breeding populations of the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) are listed as endangered, but green turtles in other US waters are considered threatened. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has determined, based on the best available information, that because of their life cycle and behavioral patterns only the loggerhead, the green, and the Kemp`s ridley are put at risk by hopper dredging activities (Studt 1987).

  6. Operational and environmental benefits of oxy-fuel combustion in the steel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, L.M.; Pavlack, T.T.; Rich, L.

    1995-03-01

    Due to the high flame temperature of conventional oxygen-fuel burners, these burners have typically not been used in reheat furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical. Praxair has developed a number of burners and associated control systems that have been successfully operated in a variety of reheat furnaces beginning in 1980. The burners have also recently been used for ladle preheating. All burners have been operated with 100% oxygen. The patented burners have designs that result in flame temperatures equivalent to conventional air-fuel burners. Flexible flame patterns are possible, resulting in uniform temperature distribution. In addition, the low flame temperature combined with minimal nitrogen in the furnace results in very low NO{sub x} emissions. The design of the control systems insure safe and reliable operation. In the following sections, oxygen-fuel combustion will be described, with a discussion of fuel savings and other benefits. Unique designs will be discussed along with the features which make them applicable to reheat applications and which result in lower emissions. Other equipment provided with the burners to complete the oxy-fuel combustion system will be described briefly. There will also be a short discussion of how both the fuel and oxygen price can affect the economics of fuel saving. Results from the commercial retrofit installations in continuous and batch reheat furnaces, soaking pits and ladle preheaters will be described. Finally, NO{sub x} emissions data will be discussed.

  7. Environmental assessment report: Nuclear Test Technology Complex. [Construction and operation of proposed facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tonnessen, K.; Tewes, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) is planning to construct and operate a structure, designated the Nuclear Test Technology Complex (NTTC), on a site located west of and adjacent to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NTTC is designed to house 350 nuclear test program personnel, and will accommodate the needs of the entire staff of the continuing Nuclear Test Program (NTP). The project has three phases: land acquisition, facility construction and facility operation. The purpose of this environmental assessment report is to describe the activities associated with the three phases of the NTTC project and to evaluate potential environmental disruptions. The project site is located in a rural area of southeastern Alameda County, California, where the primary land use is agriculture; however, the County has zoned the area for industrial development. The environmental impacts of the project include surface disturbance, high noise levels, possible increases in site erosion, and decreased air quality. These impacts will occur primarily during the construction phase of the NTTC project and can be mitigated in part by measures proposed in this report.

  8. Superconducting Super Collider site environmental report for calendar year 1991. Pre-operational

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This is the first annual SER prepared for the SSC project. It is a pre-operational report, intended primarily to describe the baseline characterization of the Ellis County, Texas site that has been developed subsequent to the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the Supplemental Environmental impact Statement (SEIS). As such, the emphasis will be on environmental compliance efforts, including monitoring and mitigation programs. The SER also reports on the measures taken to meet the commitments made in the EIS and SEIS. These measures are detailed in the Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) (Department of Energy (DOE), 1991), which was prepared following the signing of the Record of Decision (ROD) to construct the SSC in Texas. The SER will continue to be preoperational until the first high-energy (20 trillion electron volt or TeV) protons collisions are observed, at which point the SSC will become operational. At that time, the SER will place more emphasis on the radiological monitoring program. This SER will report on actions taken in 1991 or earlier and briefly mention some of those planned for calendar year 1992. AU actions completed in 1992 will be addressed in the SER for calendar year 1992.

  9. Environmental restoration and waste management site-specific plan for Richland Operations Office. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This document was prepared to implement and support the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) national plan. The national plan, entitled Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (DOE 1990b) (hereinafter referred to as the DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan) is the cornerstone of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) long-term strategy in environmental restoration and waste management. The DOE-HQ Five-Year Plan addresses overall philosophy and environmental and waste-related activities under the responsibilities of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The plan also reaffirms DOE-HQ goals to bring its nuclear sites into environmental compliance in cooperation with its regulators and the public, and to clean up and restore the environment by 2019 (the commitment for the Hanford Site is for one year sooner, or 2018). This document is part of the site-specific plan for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). It is the first revision of the original plan, which was dated December 1989 (DOE-RL 1989a). This document is a companion document to the Overview of the Hanford Cleanup Five-Year Plan (DOE-RL 1989d) and The Hanford Site Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan Activity Data Sheets (DOE-RL 1991). Although there are three documents that make up the complete DOE-RL plan, this detailed information volume was prepared so it could be used as a standalone document. 71 refs., 40 figs., 28 tabs.

  10. Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1998, DOE operations at Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.D.

    1999-09-22

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1998 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International (AI) Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned company-operated, test facility within Area IV. AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D and D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year of 1998 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Rocketdyne sites. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, and direct radiation. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and other sites approved by DOE and licensed for radioactive waste. Liquid radioactive wastes are not released into the environment and do not constitute an exposure pathway.

  11. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Samuels, Sandy; Lee, Majelle

    2004-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2003 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing Rocketdyne’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2003 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  12. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power. DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K. S.

    1998-11-23

    This .Annual Site Environmental Report for 1997 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory) (SSFL) and De Soto facilities. In the past. these operations included development. fabrication. and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). Other activities included the operation of large scale liquid metal facilities for the testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC). a government owned company operated, test facility within Area IV. .AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1981 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently. all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996.

  13. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE operations annual site environmental report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R.J.

    1997-11-10

    Rocketdyne currently operates several facilities in the San Fernando Valley/Simi Valley area, for manufacturing, testing, and research and development (R and D). These operations include manufacturing liquid-fueled rocket engines, such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and engines used for expendable launch vehicles used to place artificial satellites into orbit. This work includes fabrication and testing of rocket engines, lasers, and heat-transfer systems; and R and D in a wide range of high-technology fields, such as the electrical power system for the Space Station. Previously, this work also included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials, under the Atomics International Division (AI). AI was merged into Rocketdyne in 1984 and many of the AI functions were transferred to existing Rocketdyne departments. This nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. The majority of this work is done for the Department of Energy (DOE). This Annual Site Environmental Report for 1996 concentrates on the environmental conditions related to DOE operations at Area IV of SSFL and at De Soto.

  14. Emergency Management - Equipment Boxes

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Emergency Equipment Boxes Boxes filled with emergency equipment are positioned in four locations on site. The equipment in the boxes is for use when responding to or preventing a life-threatening or environmental emergency. A box may be moved to wherever it is needed. The normal locations and custodians of the boxes are: Building 85 (MCC) in the control room - MCC Safety Warden Building 90 (EEL) near the west wall in the high bay - Bert Manzlak - x7556 Building 58 (Test Lab) outside room 1137 -

  15. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.S.

    1998-11-23

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

  16. Task 23 - background report on subsurface environmental issues relating to natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Topical report, February 1, 1994--February 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    This report describes information pertaining to environmental issues, toxicity, environmental transport, and fate of alkanolamines and glycols associated with natural gas sweetening and dehydration operations. Waste management associated with the operations is also discussed.

  17. Environmental arsenic, cadmium and lead dust emissions from metal mine operations: Implications for environmental management, monitoring and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark Patrick Mould, Simon Anthony; Kristensen, Louise Jane; Rouillon, Marek

    2014-11-15

    Although blood lead values in children are predominantly falling globally, there are locations where lead exposure remains a persistent problem. One such location is Broken Hill, Australia, where the percentage of blood lead values >10 μg/dL in children aged 1–4 years has risen from 12.6% (2010), to 13% (2011) to 21% (2012). The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of metal contamination in places accessible to children. This study examines contemporary exposure risks from arsenic, cadmium, lead, silver and zinc in surface soil and dust, and in pre- and post-play hand wipes at six playgrounds across Broken Hill over a 5-day period in September 2013. Soil lead (mean 2,450 mg/kg) and zinc (mean 3,710 mg/kg) were the most elevated metals in playgrounds. Surface dust lead concentrations were consistently elevated (mean 27,500 μg/m{sup 2}) with the highest lead in surface dust (59,900 μg/m{sup 2}) and post-play hand wipes (60,900 μg/m{sup 2}) recorded close to existing mining operations. Surface and post-play hand wipe dust values exceeded national guidelines for lead and international benchmarks for arsenic, cadmium and lead. Lead isotopic compositions ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb, {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) of surface dust wipes from the playgrounds revealed the source of lead contamination to be indistinct from the local Broken Hill ore body. The data suggest frequent, cumulative and ongoing mine-derived dust metal contamination poses a serious risk of harm to children. - Highlights: 1.Playground soils and surface dust in a mining town have high metal concentrations. 2.Elevated levels of As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust are found on playground users′ hands. 3.Pb isotope analysis shows that the source of playground dust is ore body Pb. 4.Surface mine operations must be contained to reduce childhood lead exposure risks. 5.Mine environmental licences need to set trigger values for As, Cd, Pb and Zn dust.

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

  19. Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.

  20. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1997-11-24

    Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved continued data analysis and report writing. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) was issued as a final report during the previous reporting period. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities included the preparation of the final report. There were no Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities to report. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  1. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  2. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  3. Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.; Fassett, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Johnson, V.G.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Moss, K.J.; Perkins, C.J.; Richterich, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1994 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

  4. Tracking equipment on hire

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    The first comprehensive computer-based system for managing large inventories of rental equipment in the North Sea has been commissioned by British oilfield services group Expro. Now, after a year of operations in which the system has proved its worth in improving the efficiency of Expro's well testing and other services, it is being offered for sale to other oil industry companies with problems in controlling movement of capital equipment. The computer-based inventory control system to is described.

  5. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1993-09-01

    This report contains the environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site for 1992. Monitoring and surveillance on and around the NTS by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1992 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.15 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All 1992 nuclear events took place during the first three quarters of the calendar year prior to the Congressional testing moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 0.012 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 78 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  6. Data Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider Operating Temperature and Humidity Ranges Data Center Efficiency and IT Equipment Reliability at Wider Operating Temperature ...

  7. Maintaining gas cooling equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, J.D.

    1997-05-01

    An often overlooked key to satisfactory operation and longevity of any mechanical device is proper operation and maintenance in accordance with the manufacturer`s written instructions. Absorption chillers, although they use a different technology than the more familiar vapor compression cycle to produce chilled water, operate successfully in a variety of applications if operated and maintained properly. Maintenance procedures may be more frequent than those required for vapor compression chillers, but they are also typically less complex. The goal of this article is to describe the basic operation of an absorption chiller to provide an understanding of the relatively simple tasks required to keep the machine operating at maximum efficiency for its design life and beyond. A good starting point is definitions. Gas cooling equipment is generally defined as alternative energy, non-electric cooling products. This includes absorption chillers, engine-drive chillers and packaged desiccant units, among others. Natural gas combustion drives the equipment.

  8. Cleanroom Equipment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Conventional Machining Engis Lapping and Polishing Machine MET One particle Counter Sand Blaster Cabinet Flycutting Machine Lithography Equipment Mann 600 Pattern Generator Oriel UV Exposure Station with Aligner Quintel UL7000-OBS Aligner and DUV Exposure Station Metrology Equipment AFT 210XP Nanospec Digital Instrument 3100 SPM Hitachi S-4500II Field Emission SEM Hitachi U-2001 NIR-UV-VUS Spectrophotometer Nikon MM-22U Measuroscope Nikon OPTIPHOT-88 Optical Microscope OXFORD Plasmalab System

  9. Draft Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-02-27

    This ''Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement'' (LLNL SW/SPEIS) describes the purpose and need for agency action for the continued operation of LLNL and analyzes the environmental impacts of these operations. The primary purpose of continuing operation of LLNL is to provide support for the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship missions. LLNL, located about 40 miles east of San Francisco, California, is also needed to support other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs and Federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Defense, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the newly established U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This LLNL SW/SPEIS analyzes the environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for ongoing and foreseeable future operations, facilities, and activities at LLNL. The reasonable alternatives include the No Action Alternative, Proposed Action, and the Reduced Operation Alternative. The major decision to be made by DOE/NNSA is to select one of the alternatives for the continued operation of the LLNL. As part of the Proposed Action, DOE/NNSA is considering: using additional materials including plutonium on the National Ignition Facility (NIF); increasing the administrative limit for plutonium in the Superblock, which includes the Plutonium Facility, the Tritium Facility, and the Hardened Engineering Test Building; conducting the Integrated Technology Project, using laser isotope separation to provide material for Stockpile Stewardship experiments, in the Plutonium Facility; increasing the material-at-risk limit for the Plutonium Facility; and increasing the Tritium Facility material-at-risk. A discussion of these issues is presented in Section S.5.2, Proposed Action. The ''National

  10. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  11. Environmental assessment for construction and operation of a Human Genome Laboratory at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) proposes to construct and operate a new laboratory for consolidation of current and future activities of the Human Genome Center (HGC). This document addresses the potential direct, indirect, and cumulative environmental and human-health effects from the proposed facility construction and operation. This document was prepared in accordance the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (United States Codes 42 USC 4321-4347) (NEPA) and the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Final Rule for NEPA Implementing Procedures [Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR 1021].

  12. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2012-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2011 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2011 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  13. Site Environmental Report For Calendar Year 2012. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2013-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2012 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  14. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

  15. Efficiencies in the Environmental Restoration Operations at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico - 12198

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada, Joe G.; Cochran, John R.

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Environmental Restoration Operations at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico is to complete all necessary corrective actions at 268 legacy release soil sites and three groundwater Areas of Concern. Additional scope impacted the anticipated 2009 completion of corrective action at the remaining 32 soil sites and the three groundwater Areas of Concern. This additional scope is base-lined to require 10 years (2011-2020) at an estimated cost of $34 M to $39 M. Efficiencies been proposed to reduce the impact of this recently realized additional corrective action scope: (1) Perform activities concurrently when possible to help reduce the length of the overall schedule; (2) Implement a 'high-performance, one-pass' concept based on an early resolution of deficiencies in draft documents and attempt to avoid multi-submission cycles with long turnaround review times, and (3) Assess the appropriateness of progressing 'at risk' from groundwater characterization to groundwater remediation using existing data, conceptual models and potential remedies. The ongoing promotion and implementation of these ideas with the New Mexico Environment Department will produce scope and cost saving -- without any reduction in the protection of public health and the environment. DOE/SSO developed and presented to the NMED three areas where efficiencies in ER Operations may be realized. The NMED has not formally responded to these proposals, but in discussions with NMED in the fall of 2011 the NMED is conceptually supportive of these proposals. NMED cannot commit to an outcome (such as no NOD), but NMED is very willing to seek efficiencies that will reduce the overall scope, while achieving regulatory compliance and considering public input. The challenge of finding efficiencies to reduce the new schedule and cost has become even more of a necessity due to shrinking budgets. A prioritization of remaining activities has been discussed with the regulatory authority

  16. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1993-09-01

    These appendices contain 1992 NTS onsite and offsite environmental monitoring results. The onsite data presented are accompanied by summaries of statistical evaluations of the data. Other offsite data collected by the EPA are available from the US Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada.

  17. Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-09

    This report describes environmental monitoring activities at Hanford Reservation. Attention is focused on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. All Hanford contractors reviewed potential sources of contamination. A facility effluent monitoring plan was written for each facility with the potential to release significant quantities of hazardous materials, addressing both radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring. The environmental surveillance program assesses onsite and offsite environmental impacts and offsite human health exposures. The program monitors air, surface water, sediment, agricultural products, vegetation, soil, and wildlife. In addition, independent onsite surveillance is conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Hanford Site effluent controls in order to comply with applicable environmental standards and regulations.

  18. Right-Sizing Laboratory Equipment Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Frenze, David; Greenberg, Steve; Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Starr, William

    2005-11-29

    Laboratory equipment such as autoclaves, glass washers, refrigerators, and computers account for a significant portion of the energy use in laboratories. However, because of the general lack of measured equipment load data for laboratories, designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' rated data, or design assumptions from prior projects. Consequently, peak equipment loads are frequently overestimated. This results in oversized HVAC systems, increased initial construction costs, and increased energy use due to inefficiencies at low part-load operation. This best-practice guide first presents the problem of over-sizing in typical practice, and then describes how best-practice strategies obtain better estimates of equipment loads and right-size HVAC systems, saving initial construction costs as well as life-cycle energy costs. This guide is one in a series created by the Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs21') program, a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Energy. Geared towards architects, engineers, and facilities managers, these guides provide information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  19. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Lenox, Art; Blair, Lori; Amar, Ravnesh; Costa, Paul; Galvez, Lydia; Jameson, Blythe; Galvez, Lydia

    2008-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  20. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3070)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitoun, A.

    1994-08-01

    This two-volume Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Volume 1 contains the assessment of the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, by Louisiana Energy Services, LP. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are construction, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D)- of the site. Issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment. The FEIS supports issuance of a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility.

  1. MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

    1981-04-01

    The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: • Inhalation • External exposure from ground concentrations • External exposure from cloud immersion • Ingestioo of vegetables • Ingestion of meat • Ingestion of milk • Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based

  2. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1994-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  3. operations center

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    servers and other critical Operations Center equipment

  4. Independent air supply system filtered to protect against biological and radiological agents (99.7%).
  5. <...

  6. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix T (Second Continued Volume): Comments & Responses.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This is Appendix T (second continued volume) giving public comments and responses to the final environmental impact statement for the Columbia River System.

  7. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  8. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2011-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2010 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2010 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  9. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2010-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2009 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2009 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  10. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2009-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2008 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended by the DOE. The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2008 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  11. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2013. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2013 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2013 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. Due to the suspension of D&D activities in Area IV, no effluents were released into the atmosphere during 2013. Therefore, the potential radiation dose to the general public through airborne release was zero. Similarly, the radiation dose to an offsite member of the public (maximally exposed individual) due to direct radiation from SSFL is indistinguishable from background. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste

  12. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  13. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  14. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  15. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  16. Radionuclide releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1971. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Bates, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One source of radionuclide releases to the Columbia River was from production reactor operations. This report provides a quantitative estimate of the amount of radioactivity released each month (1944--1971) to the Columbia River from eleven radionuclides as well as from gross beta activity.

  17. Radionuclide releases to the Columbia River from Hanford Operations, 1944--1971. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.; Bates, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of radionuclide emissions since 1944 from the Hanford Site. One source of radionuclide releases to the Columbia River was from production reactor operations. This report provides a quantitative estimate of the amount of radioactivity released each month (1944--1971) to the Columbia River from eleven radionuclides as well as from gross beta activity.

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

  19. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Applications

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Select the "Search Equipment" menu link. Enter the type of equipment desired into the search box or choose the "Equipment List" link, which will allow you see a complete list of ...

  20. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment List

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment List Already know the item control number? Submit Reset Item Control Number Equipment Name Date Entered Condition Picture 89022961820152 75164 VACUUM CONDENSER 07272016 ...

  21. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Before you Apply, please Print This Page for your records Equipment Details No Package found. Item Control Number: Equipment Type: Condition: Date Entered: (you have 30 days from ...

  22. Proceedings of the sixteenth international symposium on mine planning and equipment selection (MPES 2007) and the tenth international symposium on environmental issues and waste management in energy and mineral production (SWEMP 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, R.K.; Fytas, K.; Jongsiri, S.; Ge, Hao

    2007-07-01

    Papers presented at MPES 2007 covered: coal mining and clean coal processing technologies; control, design and planning of surface and underground mines; drilling, blasting and excavation engineering; mining equipment selection; automation and information technology; maintenance and production management for mines and mining systems; health, safety and environment; cost effective methods of mine reclamation; mine closure and waste disposal; and rock mechanics and geotechnical issues. Papers from SWEMP 2007 discussed methods and technologies for assessing, minimizing and preventing environmental problems associated with mineral and energy production. Topics included environmental impacts of coal-fired power projects; emission control in thermal power plants; greenhouse gas abatement technologies; remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater; environmental issues in surface and underground mining of coal, minerals and ores; managing mine waste and mine water; and control of effluents from mineral processing, metallurgical and chemical plants.

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-09-20

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the ''Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory'' (SWEIS) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a proposal for modifying current methods utilized to receive and manage certain offsite unwanted radioactive sealed sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory or if additional documentation under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is needed. The need for a SA to an existing environmental impact statement (EIS) is initiated by subsequent changes in the basis upon which the original EIS was prepared and the need to evaluate whether or not the EIS is adequate in light of those changes. It is submitted according to the requirements for determining the need for supplemental environmental impact statements (10 CFR 1021.314) in the Department of Energy's regulation for implementing NEPA. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of a program evaluated in the SWEIS with those of a proposal that would change the approach of this management. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in earlier NEPA analysis.

  2. Assessment of Synthane mechanical equipment

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, J.T.; Kramberger, F.E.; Hao, B.R.; Dubis, D.; Carson, S.E.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a base-line condition assessment of the key equipment of the synthane process pilot plant based on a historical review of performance, vibration monitoring and a preliminary systems analysis. The historical review of equipment performance was conducted by reviewing all available maintenance and repair records filed at the Synthane pilot plant, interviewing key Maintenance and Operations personnel and observing repair and maintenance procedures where possible. Field vibration measurements of all major rotating components were made periodically to detect current and approaching equipment problems. An overview of the influence of mechanical equipment on plant performance was provided by a systems analysis. The process equipment was categorized according to subsystem function, design source and application to future-generation plants. The analysis was conducted by examining data from the plant operating log to clarify the causes and implications of important equipment-related events. The results of this base line condition assessment of the key equipment at the Synthane pilot plant emphasize the need to expand the objectives of future pilot and demonstration plants and provide for the following recommendations: include equipment performance and reliability objectives as an integral part of the operational program; maintain an effective maintenance and repair data-collection system; conduct comprehensive equipment-failure analysis; establish structured corrective action procedures with high-level disposition; and conduct concurrent systems analysis and provide feedback to plant operations. The incorporation of these recommendations in future pilot and demonstration plants will yield major cost benefits in the operating phases of these programs and in future commercial plants.

  3. Environmental Assessment for the Installation and Operation of Combustion Turbine Generators at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-12-12

    NEPA requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the U.S. DOE, NNSA, follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). At this time, the NNSA must make a decision regarding installing, operating and maintaining two approximately 20 Megawatt (MW) combustion turbine generators (CTGs) within the Technical Area (TA)-3 Co-generation Complex (Building 3-22) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL is a Federal facility located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises 43 square miles (111 square kilometers) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). LANL is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of the Proposed Action--installing and operating two CTGs--and of the No Action Alternative. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for DOE action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for Agency Action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action; and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the effects of the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those

  4. SRNL Science and Innovation - Environmental Stewardship

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tank Waste Processing and Disposition Science and Innovation Environmental Stewardship - Tank Waste Processing and Disposition SRNL designs, develops, and tests processes, flow sheets, and equipment to support processing and disposition of radioactive tank waste. This core competency includes qualification and validation of ongoing operational processes, development and demonstration of next-generation technology options, program analysis, and troubleshooting of process operations. This

  5. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

  6. Operational concepts for the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Configuration Study

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    DOE has initiated a planning process in anticipation of upgrading all DOE waste management operations and facilities. The EM Configuration Study examines four areas: (1) planning considerations, (2) system configuration, (3) operational concepts, and (4) resource assessments. Each area is addressed by a different team. Objective of the Operational Concepts Team 3 study is to investigate, identify, define, and evaluate alternative ways to manage DOE waste management facilities, while taking into consideration the information gathered by the other EM Configuration teams. This report provides information and criteria for evaluating the relative effectiveness and efficiency of various organizational alternatives that can be used to operate and manage DOE waste facilities. Intent of this report is not to select one best management alternative but rather to provide recommendations, conclusions, and background information from which decisions will be made at a future date.

  7. Environmental Assessment for Enhanced Operations of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2003-06-27

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with continued and enhanced operation of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), including modifications, upgrades, and new facilities, at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) in DuPage County, Illinois. This proposed action is needed to meet DOE's mission of sponsoring cutting-edge science and technology. Continued operation would include existing research activities. In 2002, 23 user teams had beamlines in use in 28 sectors of the experiment hall, and approximately 2,000 individual users visited annually (see Section 3.1.1). Enhanced scientific capabilities would include research on Biosafety Level-3 (BSL-3) materials in an existing area originally constructed for such work, and would not require new construction or workforce (see Section 3.1.2). A new experimental unit, the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), would be constructed along the west side of the APS facility and would be used for bench-scale research in nanoscience (see Section 3.1.3). Under the No Action Alternative, current APS operations would continue. However, initiation of BSL-3 research would not occur, and the proposed CNM research facility would not be constructed. The environmental consequences of the Proposed Action are minor. Potential effects to the environment are primarily related to ecological effects during construction and operation of the proposed CNM and human health effects during BSL-3 activities. The potential ecological effects of construction and operation of the CNM would be impacts of stormwater runoff into a restored wetland to the north of the CNM. DOE would minimize stormwater impacts during construction of the CNM by ensuring adequate erosion control before and during construction. Stormwater impacts would be minimized during operation of the CNM by

  8. Environmental Management Richland Operations Office FY 2014 President's Budget FY 2015 Budget Request Regulator Briefing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Acquisition Planning Presented by: Karen Flynn and Ellen Mattlin March 16, 2016 March 2016 2 * River Corridor (WCH) 9/30/2016 * Tank Operations (WRPS) 9/30/2018 * Plateau Remediation (CHPRC) 9/30/2018 * Mission Support (MSA) 5/25/2019 * Occupational Medicine (HPM) 9/30/2018 * Miscellaneous small contracts 2018-2021 DOE Contract Expiration Dates March 2016 3 * The Richland Operations Office created the Office of Hanford Acquisitions (OHA) and the Office of River Protection created an Acquisition

  9. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Trippet, W.A. II ); Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  10. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Before you Apply, please Print This Page for your records Equipment Details No Package found. Item Control Number: Equipment Type: Condition: Date Entered: (you have 30 days from this date to acquire equipment) Manufacturer: Make: Model: FSC Number: Detailed Description: Location of Equipment: Address Line 2: Address Line 3: City: State: Zip: Contact: Phone: Fax: Email address: Quantity: Original Acquisition Cost: $0.00

  11. Agricultural Lighting and Equipment Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Vermont, agricultural operations are eligible for prescriptive and customized incentives for equipment proven to help make farms more efficient. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting...

  12. Operational and environmental benefits of oxy-fuel combustion in the steel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, L.M. ); Pavlack, T.T. . Linde Division); Rich, L. )

    1993-07-01

    A number of patented, field-tested 100% oxy-fuel burner systems have been developed which provide fuel savings, reduced emissions (CO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]) and improved operational performances. These systems can be applied to high-temperature continuous and batch reheat furnaces, soaking pits and ladle preheaters. Fuel consumption and carbon dioxide and NO[sub x] emissions can be reduced by 40 to 60%. Burner design (including nonwater cooled models), commercial experience, measured and projected emissions reductions, and additional operating benefits associated with new and retrofitted applications are described.

  13. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2004. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Lee, Majelle

    2005-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2004 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeings Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2004 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  14. Site environmental report for calendar year 2002. DOE operations at the Boeing Company, Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2002 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing' s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL)). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations at ETEC included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities at ETEC involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and, subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2002 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property ( land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive w astes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes are released into the environment, and no structural debris from buildings w as transferred to municipal landfills or recycled in 2002.

  15. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2006. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil

    2007-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2006 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Closure of the liquid metal test facilities began in 1996. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2006 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  16. Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations (Released in the STEO June 1998)

    Reports and Publications

    1998-01-01

    Changes in domestic refining operations are identified and related to the summer Reid vapor pressure (RVP) restrictions and oxygenate blending requirements. This analysis uses published Energy Information Administration survey data and linear regression equations from the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts appearing in the Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  17. Technical, economic, and environmental impact study of converting Uzbekistan transportation fleets to natural gas operation. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-30

    This study, conducted by Radian International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report assesses the feasibility (technical, economic and environmental) of converting the Uzbek transportation fleets to natural gas operation. The study focuses on the conversion of high fuel use vehicles and locomotives to liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the conversion of moderate fuel use veicles to compressed natural gas (CNG). The report is divided into the following sections: Executive Summary; (1.0) Introduction; (2.0) Country Background; (3.0) Characterization of Uzbek Transportation Fuels; (4.0) Uzbek Vehicle and Locomotive Fleet Characterization; (5.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Vehicle Conversion Shops; (6.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Infrastructure; (7.0) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) for Vehicular Fuel in Uzbekistan; (8.0) Economic Feasibility Study; (9.0) Environmental Impact Analysis; References; Appendices A - S.

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  19. Environmental Assessment for the proposed modification and continued operation of the DIII-D facility

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The EA evaluates the proposed action of modifying the DIII-D fusion facility and conducting related research activities at the GA San Diego site over 1995-1999 under DOE contract number DE-ACO3-89ER51114. The proposed action is need to advance magnetic fusion research for future generation fusion devices such as ITER and TPX. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment according to NEPA; therefore a finding of no significant impact is made and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  20. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, Site

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2003-11-28

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth site in Ohio (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Portsmouth to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. The facility would also convert the DUF{sub 6} from the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) site near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the Federal Register on September 18, 2001 (Federal Register, Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (United States Code, Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a Federal Register Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Portsmouth site; from the transportation of all ETTP cylinders (DUF{sub 6}, low-enriched UF6

  1. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2003-11-28

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF{sub 6} stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride

  2. Selected Hanford reactor and separations operating data for 1960--1964. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this letter report is to reconstruct from available information that data which can be used to develop daily reactor operating history for 1960--1964. The information needed for source team calculations (as determined by the Source Terms Task Leader) were extracted and included in this report. The data on the amount of uranium dissolved by the separations plants (expressed both as tons and as MW) is also included in this compilation.

  3. Water-Using Equipment: Domestic

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2006-01-24

    Water management is an important aspect of energy engineering. This article addresses water-using equipment primarily used for household purposes, including faucets, showers, toilets, urinals, dishwashers, and clothes washers, and focuses on how the equipment can be optimized to save both water and energy. Technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes are the primary methods discussed for water and energy conservation. Auditing to determine current consumption rates is also described for each technology.

  4. Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, David A

    1999-10-28

    The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of three terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. The products of the effort will be a series of technical reports detailing the study procedures, results, and conclusions which contribute to the transfer of technology to the scientific community, petroleum industry, and state and federal agencies.

  5. Documents containing operating data for Hanford separations processes, 1944--1972. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gydesen, S.P.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this letter report is to identify documents that record batch, daily, or selected monthly separations processes operating information at the Hanford Site for the years 1944-1972. The information found in these documents is needed to develop the source terms necessary to make dose estimates. The documents have been identified, located, declassified if necessary, evaluated, and made available to the HEDR Project in general, the HEDR Task 03 (Source Terms) in particular, and the public. Complete bibliographic citations and some sample pages from the Hanford separations processes documents are included.

  6. Environmental Protection Department Operations and Regulatory Affairs Division LLNL NESHAPs 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J; Peterson, S R; Wilson, K; Bowen, B; MacQueen, D; Wegrecki, A

    2006-06-19

    This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs; Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61, Subpart H). Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 {micro}Sv) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from operations in 2005 are summarized here. Livermore site: 0.0065 mrem (0.065 {micro}Sv) (41% from point source emissions, 59% from diffuse source emissions). The point source emissions include gaseous tritium modeled as tritiated water vapor as directed by EPA Region IX; the resulting dose is used for compliance purposes. Site 300: 0.018 mrem (0.18 {micro}Sv) (48% from point source emissions, 52% from diffuse source emissions). The EDEs were calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air dispersion/dose-assessment model, except for doses for two diffuse sources that were estimated using measured radionuclide concentrations and dose coefficients. Specific inputs to CAP88-PC for the modeled sources included site-specific meteorological data and source emissions data, the latter variously based on continuous stack effluent monitoring data, stack flow or other release-rate information, ambient air monitoring data, and facility knowledge.

  7. CRAD, Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan CRAD, Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as

  8. ESTIMATE OF SOLAR MAXIMUM USING THE 1-8 Å GEOSTATIONARY OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITES X-RAY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, L. M.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present an alternate method of determining the progression of the solar cycle through an analysis of the solar X-ray background. Our results are based on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray data in the 1-8 Å band from 1986 to the present, covering solar cycles 22, 23, and 24. The X-ray background level tracks the progression of the solar cycle through its maximum and minimum. Using the X-ray data, we can therefore make estimates of the solar cycle progression and the date of solar maximum. Based upon our analysis, we conclude that the Sun reached its hemisphere-averaged maximum in solar cycle 24 in late 2013. This is within six months of the NOAA prediction of a maximum in spring 2013.

  9. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    This annual report describes the environmental monitoring programs related to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) facility located in Ventura County, California during 2005. Part of the SSFL facility, known as Area IV, had been used for DOE’s activities since the 1950s. A broad range of energy related research and development (R&D) projects, including nuclear technologies projects, was conducted at the site. All the nuclear R&D operations in Area IV ceased in 1988. Current efforts are directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and closure of facilities used for liquid metal research.

  10. Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

  11. Environmental decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  12. University of Delaware | CCEI Equipment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    CCEI Equipment Click column headings to sort Type Equipment Details Institution Professor Type Equipment Details Institution Lab BACK TO TOP

  13. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Zeiss Axiovert 200 Optical Microscope Spark Cutter Fully Equipped Metallographic Laboratory Electropolisher Dimpler

  14. Final environmental impact statement for the construction and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation to store the Three Mile Island Unit 2 spent fuel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Docket Number 72-20

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) contains an assessment of the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) fuel debris at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory (INEEL). US Department of Energy-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is proposing to design, construct, and operate at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The TMI-2 fuel debris would be removed from wet storage, transported to the ISFSI, and placed in storage modules on a concrete basemat. As part of its overall spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management program, the US DOE has prepared a final programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS) that provides an overview of the spent fuel management proposed for INEEL, including the construction and operation of the TMI-2 ISFSI. In addition, DOE-ID has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to describe the environmental impacts associated with the stabilization of the storage pool and the construction/operation of the ISFSI at the ICPP. As provided in NRC`s NEPA procedures, a FEIS of another Federal agency may be adopted in whole or in part in accordance with the procedures outlined in 40 CFR 1506.3 of the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). Under 40 CFR 1506.3(b), if the actions covered by the original EIS and the proposed action are substantially the same, the agency adopting another agency`s statement is not required to recirculate it except as a final statement. The NRC has determined that its proposed action is substantially the same as actions considered in DOE`s environmental documents referenced above and, therefore, has elected to adopt the DOE documents as the NRC FEIS.

  15. EIS-0380: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NNSA identified and assessed three alternatives for continued operation of LANL: (1) No Action, (2) Reduced Operations, and (3) Expanded Operations.

  16. Environmental Sustainability

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability community-environmentassetsimagesiconearthday.jpg Environmental Sustainability: Creating the Future Exercising our commitment to operating a sustainable site...

  17. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 1, Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public.

  18. Draft environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

  19. Assessment of Synthane mechanical equipment. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, J.T.; Kramberger, F.E.; Hao, B.R.; Dubis, D.; Carson, S.E.

    1980-05-01

    Mechanical equipment in the Synthane pilot plant was subjected to operating conditions outside manufacturers' specifications. In some cases, these encounters were intentional and in other cases they resulted from insufficient data. All 106 of the test runs were terminated involuntarily. For the most part, the repetitive failures of plant materials and equipment originated from a combination of excessive solids overloading and corrosion/erosion caused by abnormal conditions of operation on fluid process streams. The extremes of these conditions were not anticipated nor were they taken into consideration in the design of the plant and in the selection of equipment and materials. Because of this situation, approximately half of the test run terminations were directly attributed to mechanical failures. Generally, for reasons given the maintenance, repair or replacement of failed equipment was not successful in eliminating or alleviating many failures until early 1978. Appropriate early planning can eliminate all these causes of failure in the future. Factors contributing to the difficulties in maintenance, repair, and replacement of failied materials and equipment are listed. In future construction, heavy reliance should be placed on engineering assessments of the equipment selection specifications, acceptance procedures, and the manner in which the equipment is installed, interconnected and operated. It is recommended that an effective and responsive data collection system on equipment specifications, operating conditions, performance, maintenance and repairs of critical equipment be incorporated as part of each pilot and demonstration plant effort. This step is essential to define required operating environments, equipment capabilities, failure histories, equipment and process interactions, as well as plant performance.

  20. DWPF liquid sample station: Status of equipment development

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, J.R.

    1987-04-06

    This report summarizes operating experience and equipment status of the DWPF liquid sample cell. Operation hours to date, results of equipment inspections and problems encountered and their solutions are discussed. An equipment and instrumentation status updating DPST-85-592, DWPF LIQUID SAMPLE CELL MOCK-UP, is presented. Remaining development items are also outlined.

  1. Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  2. Annual Site Environmental Report, Department of Energy Operations at the Energy Technology Engineering Center – Area IV, Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Frazee, Brad; Hay, Scott; Wondolleck, John; Sorrels, Earl; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David; Jones, John

    2015-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2014 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the DOE at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The ETEC, a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  3. Removal of Process Gas Equipment Marks Portsmouth Site Cleanup...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Removal of Process Gas Equipment Marks Portsmouth Site Cleanup Milestone Clearing Away Process Gas Equipment Moves Portsmouth D&D Forward Crane operator Brian Lambert of Fluor-BWXT ...

  4. United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan: November 9, 1993, to November 9, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    The hub of today`s programs at the Hanford Site are activities dedicated to managing stored and new wastes and cleanup of waste sites. To ensure focused planning and implementing efforts for these programs, management of the site is assigned to DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This report describes policies and procedures in the following areas: Compliance activities; Environmental restoration; Waste management; and Technology development. Procedures for notification of environmental occurrences, long-range environmental protection planning and reporting, waste management programs; environmental monitoring programs, and quality assurance and data verification are also described and discussed.

  5. Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Environmental Safety Health (ES and H) FY 2000 and FY 2001 Execution Commitment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    REEP, I.E.

    2000-12-01

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the Safety and Health (S&H) resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 2000 and 2001 information and data contained in the Richland Operations Environment, Safefy and Health Fiscal Year 2002 Budget-Risk Management Summary (RL 2000a) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2001 activities are based on the President's Amended Congressional Budget Request of $689.6 million for funding Ofice of Environmental Management (EM) $44.0 million for Fast Flux Test Facility standby less $7.0 million in anticipated DOE, Headquarters holdbacks for Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE); and $55.3 million for Safeguards and Security (SAS). Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2003 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2001. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2001 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H guidance contained in the FY 2002 Field Budget Call (DOE 2000).

  6. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3-70). Volume 2, Public comments and NRC response

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitoun, A.

    1994-08-01

    The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (Volume 1), was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to assess the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana by Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are co on, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the site. In order to help assure that releases from the operation of the facility and potential impacts on the public are as low as reasonably achievable, an environmental monitoring program was developed by LES to detect significant changes in the background levels of uranium around the site. Other issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment, and proposes to issue a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility. The letters in this Appendix have been divided into three sections. Section One contains letters to which the NRC responded by addressing specific comments. Section Two contains the letters that concerned the communities of Forest Grove and Center Springs. Section Three is composed of letters that required no response. These letters were generally in support of the facility.

  7. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R.

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  8. Assessment of HYGAS mechanical equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, P.R.; Kramberger, F.E.; Recupero, R.M.; Verden, M.L.; Rees, K.

    1980-10-01

    The HYGAS process, which converts coal to substitute natural gas, is being developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) using an 80 ton per day pilot plant located in Chicago, Illinois. Plant design started in 1967 and testing began in October 1971. Since then, 18,000 tons of both Eastern and Western coal have been gasified. Assessment of the mechanical equipment was made by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) in collaboration with a DOE on-site representative and a representative from IGT, the operating contractor. Data for the assessment were obtained by reviewing all available maintenance records, by interviewing key personnel from maintenance and operations, and by observing repairs and maintenance procedures where possible. While operating the plant, a variety of equipment problems were addressed, many of which are generic to HYGAS as well as other coal conversion processes. Some problems were solved completely while others were solved to suit the limited needs of the pilot plant. Accordingly, the emphasis of this study is on the degree of success in dealing with equipment failures, the unresolved problems and the implication to future coal conversion plants.

  9. Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians

    SciTech Connect

    Leah Glameyer

    2012-07-12

    The overall goal of this project has been to develop curricula, certification requirements, and accreditation standards for training on energy efficient practices and technologies for commercial building technicians. These training products will advance industry expertise towards net-zero energy commercial building goals and will result in a substantial reduction in energy use. The ultimate objective is to develop a workforce that can bring existing commercial buildings up to their energy performance potential and ensure that new commercial buildings do not fall below their expected optimal level of performance. Commercial building equipment technicians participating in this training program will learn how to best operate commercial buildings to ensure they reach their expected energy performance level. The training is a combination of classroom, online and on-site lessons. The Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) developed curricula using subject matter and adult learning experts to ensure the training meets certification requirements and accreditation standards for training these technicians. The training targets a specific climate zone to meets the needs, specialized expertise, and perspectives of the commercial building equipment technicians in that zone. The combination of efficient operations and advanced design will improve the internal built environment of a commercial building by increasing comfort and safety, while reducing energy use and environmental impact. Properly trained technicians will ensure equipment operates at design specifications. A second impact is a more highly trained workforce that is better equipped to obtain employment. Organizations that contributed to the development of the training program include TEEX and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) (both members of The Texas A&M University System). TEES is also a member of the Building Commissioning Association. This report includes a description of the project

  10. Environmental Sustainability Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stories Environmental Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable ...

  11. Use of Biostratigraphy to Increase Production, Reduce Operating Costs and Risks and Reduce Environmental Concerns in Oil Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Marks

    2005-09-09

    out at the top of the late Miocene, early Mohnian: Bolivina aff hughesi, Rotalia becki, Suggrunda californica, Virgulina grandis, Virgulina ticensis, Bulimina ecuadorana, Denticula lauta and Nonion medio-costatum. Please see Appendix B, Fig. 1, Neogene Zones, p. 91 and Appendix C, chart 5, p. 99 By the use of Stratigraphy, employing both Paleontology and Lithology, we can increase hydrocarbon production, reduce operating costs and risks by the identification of the productive sections, and reduce environmental concerns by drilling less dry holes needlessly.

  12. Environmental considerations associated with siting, constructing, and operating a special isotope separation plant at INEL: Volume 2, Proceedings: Report of public hearings. [AVLIS; Pu isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report documents the two public hearings conducted for the purpose of determining the scope of issues to be addressed in relation to the siting, constructing, and operating of a special isotope separation plant at INEL. The report includes transcripts of the public hearings held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, February 24, 1987, and in Boise, Idaho, February 26, 1987, and includes the exhibits of record relating to those hearings. The review and hearing process meets pertinent National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations, and DOE guidelines.

  13. Environmental considerations associated with siting, constructing, and operating a special isotope separation plant at INEL: Volume 1, Proceedings: Report of public hearings. [AVLIS; Pu isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report documents the two public hearings conducted for the purpose of determining the scope of issues to be addressed in relation to the siting, constructing, and operating of a special isotope separation plant at INEL. The report includes transcripts of the public hearings held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, February 24, 1987, and in Boise, Idaho, February 26, 1987, and includes the exhibits of records relating to those hearings. The review and hearing process meets pertinent National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations, and DOE guidelines.

  14. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

  15. New Emergency Equipment Notifications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Notifications Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Todd A. Shrader/CBFO and Philip J. Breidenbach/NWP dated October 20, 2015 Underground Fire Suppression Vehicles (2) Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dana C. Bryson/CBFO and Philip J. Breidenbach/NWP dated September 30, 2015 Underground Ambulance #3 Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number:

  16. power systems equipment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    power systems equipment - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator ... Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy ...

  17. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    in Procurement of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment This Guidance provides a description of the types of requirements to be included in an employer's workplace charging request for ...

  18. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (HMEM)...

  19. Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, CB

    2002-05-06

    Boiler owners and operators who need additional generating capacity face a number of legal, political, environmental, economic, and technical challenges. Their key to success requires selection of an adequately sized low-emission boiler and combustion equipment that can be operated in compliance with emission standards established by state and federal regulatory agencies. Recognizing that many issues are involved in making informed selection decisions, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsored efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a guide for use in choosing low-emission boilers and combustion equipment. To ensure that the guide covers a broad range of technical and regulatory issues of particular interest to the commercial boiler industry, the guide was developed in cooperation with the American Boiler Manufacturers Association (ABMA), the Council of Industrial Boiler Owners (CIBO), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The guide presents topics pertaining to industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boilers. Background information about various types of commercially available boilers is provided along with discussions about the fuels that they burn and the emissions that they produce. Also included are discussions about emissions standards and compliance issues, technical details related to emissions control techniques, and other important selection considerations. Although information in the guide is primarily applicable to new ICI boilers, it may also apply to existing boiler installations.

  20. SWEIS Yearbook-2012 Comparison of 2012 Data to Projections of the 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Hallie B.; Wright, Marjorie Alys

    2014-01-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) operations data for Calendar Year (CY) 2012 mostly fell within the 2008 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) projections. Operation levels for one LANL facility exceeded the 2008 SWEIS capability projections—Radiochemistry Facility; however, none of the capability increases caused exceedances in radioactive air emissions, waste generation, or National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) discharge. Several facilities exceeded the2008 SWEIS levels for waste generation quantities; however, all were one-time, non-routine events that do not reflect the day-to-day operations of the Laboratory. In addition, total site-wide waste generation quantities were below SWEIS projections for all waste types, reflecting the overall levels of operations at both the Key and Non-Key Facilities. Although gas and electricity consumption have remained within the 2008 SWEIS limits for utilities, water consumption exceeded the 2008 SWEIS projections by 27 million gallons in CY 2012.

  1. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    SciTech Connect

    1999-06-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

  2. Troubleshooting rotating equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that equipment problems in a Peruvian refinery illustrate the process engineer's role as a troubleshooter. Examples show that rotating equipment problems can stem from mechanical or process factors and involve both inspection/maintenance specialists and process engineers.

  3. Universal null DTE (data terminal equipment)

    DOEpatents

    George, M.; Pierson, L.G.; Wilkins, M.E.

    1987-11-09

    A communication device in the form of data terminal equipment permits two data communication equipments, each having its own master clock and operating at substantially the same nominal clock rate, to communicate with each other in a multi-segment circuit configuration of a general communication network even when phase or frequency errors exist between the two clocks. Data transmitted between communication equipments of two segments of the communication network is buffered. A variable buffer fill circuit is provided to fill the buffer to a selectable extent prior to initiation of data output clocking. Selection switches are provided to select the degree of buffer preload. A dynamic buffer fill circuit may be incorporated for automatically selecting the buffer fill level as a function of the difference in clock frequencies of the two equipments. Controllable alarm circuitry is provided for selectively generating an underflow or an overflow alarm to one or both of the communicating equipments. 5 figs.

  4. EIS-0466: Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Continued Operation of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the DOE/NNSA activities at Sandia National Laboratories. The SWEIS will consider a No Action Alternative, which is to continue current operations through implementation of the 1999 Record of Decision and subsequent NEPA decisions, and three action alternatives proposed for consideration.

  5. EIS-0466: Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Ongoing Operations at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the continued operation of the DOE/NNSA activities at Sandia National Laboratories. The SWEIS will consider a No Action Alternative, which is to continue current operations through implementation of the 1999 Record of Decision and subsequent NEPA decisions, and three action alternatives proposed for consideration.

  6. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Construction and Operations of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-02-26

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's own NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision-makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. This EA has been prepared to assess environmental consequences resulting from the construction and operation of a Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) laboratory facility within the boundaries of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL is one of the national security laboratories under the authority of the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security of the NNSA who serves as the Administrator for Nuclear Security and Head of the NNSA (50 USC Chapter 41, Section 2402(b)). The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for NNSA action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action and other reasonable alternatives; and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process

  7. Environmental Sustainability

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability Environmental Sustainability: Creating the Future Exercising our commitment to operating a sustainable site by creating a 50-year horizon of planning and preparing ...

  8. Water-Using Equipment: Commercial and Industrial

    SciTech Connect

    Solana, Amy E.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2006-01-24

    Water is an important aspect of many facets in energy engineering. While the previous article detailed domestic related water-using equipment such as toilets and showerheads, this article focuses on various types of water-using equipment in commercial and industrial facilities, including commercial dishwashers and laundry, single-pass cooling equipment, boilers and steam generators, cooling towers, and landscape irrigation. Opportunities for water and energy conservation are explained, including both technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes. Water management planning and leak detection are also included as they are essential to a successful water management program.

  9. Subsea equipment marriage is top ROV priority

    SciTech Connect

    Redden, J.

    1985-04-01

    Interfacing subsea equipment with remotely operated vehicles (ROV's) and the further development of arctic-class units are the primary challenges facing manufacturers. Worldwide use of the ROV for drilling support has exploded during this decade as oil companies continue their search in deeper waters. If the unmanned vehicles are to become an even more integral tool of the oilman, experts say they must be able to perform more complex tasks. The evolution of more multi-purpose ROVs, however, hinges on the redesigning of subsea equipment. The severe limitations on subsea support (by ROVs) is the obsolete design associated with the subsea equipment itself. These limitations are discussed.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office Environmental Monitoring Program, Summary Data Report, First Calendar Quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Townsednd, Y.E.

    1996-11-01

    This report discusses environmental surveillance activities conducted on the Nevada Test Site during the first calendar quarter of 1996. Surveillance activities included collection and analysis of air, noble gas, tritiated water vapor, and other water samples. Samples were analyzed for both radiological and non-radiological effluents.

  11. DOE/EIS-0238, Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (1999)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE proposes to continue operating the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) located in Los Alamos County, in north-central New Mexico. DOE has identified and assessed four alternatives for the...

  12. Glen Ganyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona. The short-run economic cost of environmental constraints on hydropower operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harpman, D.A.

    1997-06-01

    In October of 1995, the Secretary of the Interior announced that Glen Canyon Dam would be operated under the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) criteria to protect downstream archeological, cultural, aquatic and riparian resources. Although the annual and monthly amounts of water released downstream remain the same, MLFF imposes a unique and complex set of constraints on hourly and daily hydropower operations. These constraints include restrictions on ramp rates (hourly rate of change in release), minimum flows, maximum flows, and the daily change in flow. In addition, a key component of MLFF operations is adaptive management which establishes a framework of research and monitoring on which future changes in operation will be based. Consequently, MLFF operations are not static and variants of these hourly constraints may be contemplated in the future. This paper summarizes the environmental concerns which led to MLFF, reviews some pertinent electric power concepts, and describes current institutional and market conditions. A generalized method for simulating and valuing hourly hydroelectric generation under various operational constraints is then introduced.

  13. Solar Equipment Certification

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Solar Energy Standards Act of 1976, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is responsible for certifying all solar equipment sold in Florida. A manufacturer who wishes to have their solar...

  14. Supplement Analysis to the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Proposed Disposition of Certain Large Containment Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-02-12

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) (DOE 1999a) adequately addresses the environmental effects of introducing a proposed project for the clean-out and decontamination (DECON) of certain large containment vessels into the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 3, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. After undergoing the clean-out and DECON steps, the subject containment vessels would be disposed of at LANL's TA-54 low-level waste (LLW) disposal site or, as appropriate, at a DOE or commercial offsite permitted LLW-regulated landfill; after actinides were recovered from the DECON solution within the CMR Building, they would be moved to LANL's TA-55 Plutonium Facility and undergo subsequent processing at that facility for reuse. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an environmental impact statement (EIS) when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns, or there are changed circumstances or new or changed information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 10211.314(c) of the DOE's regulations for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation that states: ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis''. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the proposed project action with the LANL operations capabilities evaluated in the 1999 SWEIS in support DOE's long-term hydrodynamic testing program at LANL, as well as the waste disposal capabilities evaluated in

  15. HAND TRUCK FOR HANDLING EQUIPMENT

    DOEpatents

    King, D.W.

    1959-02-24

    A truck is described for the handling of large and relatively heavy pieces of equipment and particularly for the handling of ion source units for use in calutrons. The truck includes a chassis and a frame pivoted to the chassis so as to be operable to swing in the manner of a boom. The frame has spaced members so arranged that the device to be handled can be suspended between or passed between these spaced members and also rotated with respect to the frame when the device is secured to the spaced members.

  16. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  17. Operating Costs

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  18. Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area.

  19. Appliance and Equipment Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Standards April 22, 2014 John Cymbalsky Program Manager 1 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Appliance & Equipment Standards Mission The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program's Mission to Fulfill its Statutory Obligation to: * Develop and amend energy conservation standards that achieve the maximum energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. * Develop and amend test procedures that are repeatable, reproducible, representative,

  20. Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Equipment Certification Guide U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office December 10 th , 2015 Presenter: Nick Barilo Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program Manager DOE Host: Will James - DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Question and Answer * Please type your questions into the question box 2 / / Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide: Introduction and Kickoff for the Stakeholder Review Nick Barilo PNNL

  1. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix F: Irrigation, Municipal and Industrial/Water Supply.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operations Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    Since the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been harnessed for the benefit of the Northwest and the nation. Federal agencies have built 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries. Dozens of non-Federal projects have been developed as well. The dams provide flood control, irrigation, navigation, hydro-electric power generation, recreation, fish and wildlife, and streamflows for wildlife, anadromous fish, resident fish, and water quality. This is Appendix F of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System, focusing on irrigation issues and concerns arrising from the Irrigation and Mitigation of impacts (M&I) working Group of the SOR process. Major subheadings include the following: Scope and process of irrigation/M&I studies; Irrigation/M&I in the Columbia Basin Today including overview, irrigated acreage and water rights, Irrigation and M&I issues basin-wide and at specific locations; and the analysis of impacts and alternative for the Environmental Impact Statement.

  2. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  3. Environmental surveys during operation and following removal of the OTEC-1 system off Keahole Point, Hawaii. Final report, January-April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, E.K.; Bienfang, P.K.; Kimmerer, W.J.; Walsh, T.W.

    1981-09-01

    Detailed are two biological chemical cruises off Keahole Point, Hawaii, which took place during (HOTEC-11, January 1981) and immediately after cessation (HOTEC-12, April 1981) of operation of OTEC-1. The objectives of the study were to: (1) compare site specific data taken before OTEC-1 was operating to data taken after OTEC-1 left the site; and (2) perform an analysis of OTEC environmental effects to indicate areas in which future sampling efforts might be expended. Data from temperature, nutrient, phytoplankton and zooplankton analyses taken immediately after OTEC-1 left the site show only minor differences with data taken before OTEC-1 occupied the site (HOTEC-01-06, MSG-82-013). The differences were not significant, and therefore, OTEC-1 had no demonstrable post-operational impacts on these environmental variables. From temperature records the minimum /sup 0/T between surface waters (0-30 m) and 700 m water was about 18/sup 0/C. There was no demonstrable temperature effect due to operation of OTEC-1. Significant increases in near surface water (0 to 70 m) nitrate concentrations were noted at Station 1 (Control) during OTEC-1 operations; while after shut-down no effect was seen. This effect can not be directly attributed to OTEC-1. Increased chlorophyll a standing stock downstream of OTEC-1 indicated some effect of OTEC-1. No toxic effect was noted and primary productivity rates were the same at all stations. The chlorophyll a biomass in the < 5 ..mu..m size fraction was significantly higher at the downstream station. No effect on zooplankton were noted at any station. Abundance of ichthytoplankton taxa are reported but there is insufficient data to perform an analysis.

  4. Used energy-related laboratory equipment grant program for institutions of higher learning. Eligible equipment catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges and other nonprofit educational institutions of higher learning in the United States for use in energy-oriented educational programs in the life, physical and environmental sciences and engineering. Proposals for the grant of available equipment in this program should be submitted by eligible non-profit educational institution to the DOE Field Office responsible for the site where the specific equipment is known to be located.

  5. FY 1991 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office: Work plan and quarterly reports, first and second quarter reports

    SciTech Connect

    1991-05-01

    The work carried out on behalf of the DOE by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies, site mitigation plans, compliance activities, and historical research; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to stat and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design, laboratory, field, and administrative activities. In addition to these, archaeological site characterization, flood hazards for rail transportation, and paleofaunal investigations will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, review and classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports, e.g., quarterly reports, not included in the requirements of the individual projects. A new set of programs funded by the Office of Technology Development will be in place by the third quarter of FY 1991. These projects will address environmental restoration and waste management concerns, among other related topics. This document contains the Work Plan, including project descriptions, tasks, deliverables and quarterly progress reports on each project for FY 1991.

  6. Environmental Assessment for Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-02-16

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the southeast tip of Technical Area (TA) 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been developed in order to assess the environmental effects of the Proposed Action and No Action alternative. The Proposed Action includes the lease of land for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna in TA-54, just north of Pajarito Road and State Highway 4. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under the No Action Alternative, DOE would not lease land on LANL property for the siting and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna; the DOE would not have a local station for emergency response use; and the land would continue to be covered in native vegetation and serve as a health and safety buffer zone for TA-54 waste management activities. Other potential sites on LANL property were evaluated but dismissed for reasons such as interference with sensitive laboratory experiments. Potential visual, health, and environmental effects are anticipated to be minimal for the Proposed Action. The radio broadcasting antenna would be visible against the skyline from some public areas, but would be consistent with other man-made objects in the vicinity that partially obstruct viewsheds (e.g. meteorological tower, power lines). Therefore, the net result would be a modest change of the existing view. Electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions from the antenna would be orders or magnitude less than permissible limits. The proposed antenna construction would not affect known cultural sites, but is located in close proximity to two archaeological sites. Construction would be monitored to ensure that the associated road and utility corridor would avoid cultural sites.

  7. FY 1990 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office. Work plan and quarterly reports, first through fourth quarter reports

    SciTech Connect

    1990-11-01

    This work includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies and site mitigation plans; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design activities. In addition to these, archaeological and other activities will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, derivative classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports not included in the requirements of the individual projects.

  8. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-12-01

    Solvent extraction processing has demonstrated the ability to achieve high decontamination factors for uranium and plutonium while operating at high throughputs. Historical application of solvent extraction contacting equipment implies that for the HA cycle (primary separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products) the equipment of choice is pulse columns. This is likely due to relatively short residence times (as compared to mixer-settlers) and the ability of the columns to tolerate solids in the feed. Savannah River successfully operated the F-Canyon with centrifugal contactors in the HA cycle (which have shorter residence times than columns). All three contactors have been successfully deployed in uranium and plutonium purification cycles. Over the past 20 years, there has been significant development of centrifugal contactor designs and they have become very common for research and development applications. New reprocessing plants are being planned in Russia and China and the United States has done preliminary design studies on future reprocessing plants. The choice of contactors for all of these facilities is yet to be determined.

  9. Process Description and Operating History for the CPP-601/-640/-627 Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    E. P. Wagner

    1999-06-01

    The Fuel Reprocessing Complex (FRC) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was used for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from the early 1950's until 1992. The reprocessing facilities are now scheduled to be deactivated. As part of the deactivation process, three Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim status units located in the complex must be closed. This document gathers the historical information necessary to provide a rational basis for the preparation of a comprehensive closure plan. Included are descriptions of process operations and the operating history of the FRC. A set of detailed tables record the service history and present status of the process vessels and transfer lines.

  10. Nuclear Operations Application to Environmental Restoration at Corrective Action Unit 547, Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, at the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Cabble , Mark Krauss and Patrick Matthews

    2011-03-03

    than at an operating facility and environmental restoration activities may result in the complete removal of source material.

  11. Health Care Buildings: Equipment Table

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Equipment Table Buildings, Size and Age Data by Equipment Types for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet)...

  12. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Guidelines

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... What equipment is available under the LEDP program? Examples of typical items of educational training apparatus or equipment that may be requested are listed below. It should be ...

  13. Hanford Site Evaluation of Electrical Equipment for Beryllium Procedure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2-005 Revision 0 Hanford Site Evaluation of Electrical Equipment for Beryllium Procedure Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Approved for Public Release; Further Dissemination Unlimited DOE-0342-005, Rev. 0 Hanford Site Evaluation of Electrical Equipment for Beryllium Procedure Published Date: 09-19-2013 Effective Date: 05-14-2014 Signature Page 1 of 1 DOE-0342-005, Rev. 0 Hanford Site Evaluation of Electrical Equipment for Beryllium

  14. Integration of health physics, safety and operational processes for management and disposition of recycled uranium wastes at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, James; Buckley, James

    2003-02-23

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald), the contractor for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), recently submitted a new baseline plan for achieving site closure by the end of calendar year 2006. This plan was submitted at DOE's request, as the FEMP was selected as one of the sites for their accelerated closure initiative. In accordance with the accelerated baseline, the FEMP Waste Management Project (WMP) is actively evaluating innovative processes for the management and disposition of low-level uranium, fissile material, and thorium, all of which have been classified as waste. These activities are being conducted by the Low Level Waste (LLW) and Uranium Waste Disposition (UWD) projects. Alternatives associated with operational processing of individual waste streams, each of which poses potentially unique health physics, industrial hygiene and industrial hazards, are being evaluated for determination of the most cost effective and safe met hod for handling and disposition. Low-level Mixed Waste (LLMW) projects are not addressed in this paper. This paper summarizes historical uranium recycling programs and resultant trace quantity contamination of uranium waste streams with radionuclides, other than uranium. The presentation then describes how waste characterization data is reviewed for radiological and/or chemical hazards and exposure mitigation techniques, in conjunction with proposed operations for handling and disposition. The final part of the presentation consists of an overview of recent operations within LLW and UWD project dispositions, which have been safely completed, and a description of several current operations.

  15. Analysis of environmental issues related to small-scale hydroelectric development. VI. Dissolved oxygen concentrations below operating dams

    SciTech Connect

    Cada, G.F.; Kumar, K.D.; Solomon, J.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an effort aimed at determining whether or not water quality degradation, as exemplified by dissolved oxygen concentrations, is a potentially significant issue affecting small-scale hydropower development in the US. The approach was to pair operating hydroelectric sites of all sizes with dissolved oxygen measurements from nearby downstream US Geological Survey water quality stations (acquired from the WATSTORE data base). The USGS data were used to calculate probabilities of non-compliance (PNCs), i.e., the probabilities that dissolved oxygen concentrations in the discharge waters of operating hydroelectric dams will drop below 5 mg/l. PNCs were estimated for each site, season (summer vs remaining months), and capacity category (less than or equal to 30 MW vs >30 MW). Because of the low numbers of usable sites in many states, much of the subsequent analysis was conducted on a regional basis. During the winter months (November through June) all regions had low mean PNCs regardless of capacity. Most regions had higher mean PNCs in summer than in winter, and summer PNCs were greater for large-scale than for small-scale sites. Among regions, the highest mean summer PNCs were found in the Great Basin, the Southeast, and the Ohio Valley. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the effects of season and capacity on potential dissolved oxygen problems, cumulative probability distributions of PNC were developed for selected regions. This analysis indicates that low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the tailwaters below operating hydroelectric projects are a problem largely confined to large-scale facilities.

  16. Environmental Outreach

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Outreach Environmental Outreach Our vision is to operate a proactive and interactive environmental communication and public involvement program that is inclusive and responsive to communities, tribes, agencies, and federal and state governments. May 30, 2012 An example of environmental outreach at LANL Interested citizens examine a storm water monitoring station in DP Canyon. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216

  17. Environmental Protection Department Operations and Regulatory Affairs Division Contingency Plan for Site 300 Waste Accumulation Area(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R

    2005-07-14

    This Contingency Plan identifies personnel responsibilities, emergency equipment, and required actions necessary to mitigate potential incidents at the Waste Accumulation Area(s) (WAA)(s) located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site 300 (Site 300) as shown in Figure 1. This Plan is designed to prepare personnel to minimize hazards to human health and the environment from fires, explosions, or any sudden or nonsudden release of hazardous, radioactive, or mixed waste constituents to the air, ground surface, or water from waste stored in the WAA(s). The LLNL Site 300 currently has one WAA. The location of the WAA is shown in Figure 2 and identified in Table 1. As programmatic needs change, it may become necessary to establish additional WAAs at Site 300. The WAA is a small, regularly monitored storage area where waste can be accumulated and stored temporarily. Hazardous and mixed waste can be stored or accumulated in a WAA for up to 90 days, after which it must be transferred to a Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) authorized onsite treatment or storage facility or an authorized offsite treatment, storage, or disposal facility (TSDF). The onsite TSDFs authorized by DTSC are managed by the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division and by the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate (CMS) at Site 300. Hazardous, radioactive, or mixed waste is referred to as ''waste'' in this document. Radioactive waste has been included in this Plan as a ''Best Management Practice'' to aid in response, where appropriate. However, radioactive waste is not regulated by DTSC under this Plan. This Contingency Plan is divided into two parts: (1) The first part, referred to as the ''General Plan'', is general information that is applicable to the existing and any subsequent WAAs. The General Plan includes Sections 1-7 and Appendices A-C. (2) The second part, referred to as the ''Site-Specific Plan'', contains site

  18. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1995-07-31

    Progress is described on the determination of environmental impacts from waste discharges to the aquatic ecosystems from oil and gas operations. Task 2 (Preparation of the Sampling and Analysis Plan) activities involved revisions and additions to the Sampling and Analysis Plan. Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included analyses of water, sediment, and tissue samples as well as data management. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the continued analyses of samples and conducting field sampling at Bay de Chene. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included preparing a draft final report and review by the Scientific Review Committee (SRC). Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work involved the preparation of the draft final report and review by the SRC. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities involved the presentation of four papers. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  19. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1995-10-31

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. (CSA) was contracted to conduct a three-year study of the environmental and health related impacts of produced water and sand discharges from oil and gas operations. Data on naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), heavy metals, and hydrocarbons in water, sediment, and biota will be collected and evaluated. Health related impacts will be studied through field collections and analyses of commercially- and recreationally-important fish and shellfish tissues. Additionally, information on seafood catch, consumption, and use patterns for the Gulf of Mexico will be gathered and analyzed. The facilities to be studied will include both offshore and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Coastal sites will be additionally studied to determine ecological recovery of impacted wetland and open bay areas. The economic impact of existing and proposed effluent federal and state regulations will also be evaluated. This report represents the thirteenth quarterly technical summary for the study ``Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.`` Activities associated with Tasks 3 through 8 are discussed in this report.

  20. Reduction of fire hazards on large mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Maria I. De Rosa

    2008-09-15

    Although standards and regulations are in place to prevent large mining equipment fires, recent analyses of mine accident data show that mining equipment fires still occur with alarming frequency and grave consequences, particularly at all surface mines and in underground metal/nonmetal mines. Recently technological advances in fire protection, combined with the statistical data on equipment fires, led NIOSH to reinvestigate this and to improve operator safety. NIOSH demonstrated that newly developed technologies, such as dual cab fire inerting systems and engine compartment fire barriers, can greatly enhance operator safety and lessen the damage of property during large mobile equipment fires. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Directives, Delegations, and Other Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Monitoring Program summary data report, second calendar quarter 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1997-02-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, has been the primary location for testing of nuclear explosives in the continental US. Testing began in 1951 and continued until the moratorium in 1992. Waste storage and disposal facilities for defense radioactive and mixed waste are located in Areas 3 and 5. At the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS-5), low-level wastes (LLW) from US Department of Energy (DOE) affiliated onsite and offsite generators are disposed of using standard shallow land disposal techniques. Transuranic wastes are retrievably stored at the RWMS-5 in containers on a surface pad, pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility in New Mexico. Nonradioactive hazardous wastes are accumulated at a special site before shipment to a licensed offsite disposal facility. Non-standard packages of LLW are buried in subsidence craters in the Area 3 RWMS. This report describes these activities on and around the NTS and includes a listing of the results obtained from environmental surveillance activities during the second calendar quarter of 1996.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Supported Equipment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Supported Equipment Alt text This list of PSL supported equipment identifies the electrical Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) for which the Primary Standards Laboratory has either developed a calibration procedure or identified a commercial calibration source. Calibration of equipment that is not listed may take additional time and resources. Please contact the PSL at 845-8855 for additional information.

  4. Specification for procurement and fabrication of TRUPACT-I auxiliary equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Operation of the TRansUranic PACkage Transporter (TRUPAC) requires the use of specific auxiliary equipment for loading, unloading, handling, packing, and leak testing. Descriptions and specifications are presented for the following equipment: loading platforms, leak testing equipment, protective covers for door seals, dunnage, and general handling devices. Quality Assurance requirements for equipment procurement are identified.

  5. Lessons Learned From a Decade of Design, Construction, and Operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 12062

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Joe

    2012-07-01

    The Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) is the Department of Energy's on-site disposal facility for radioactive and hazardous waste generated by the CERCLA cleanup of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). EMWMF recently completed building out to its maximum site capacity and is approaching a decade of operating experience. In meeting the challenges of design, construction, and operation of a mixed waste and low-level radioactive waste disposal facility within the framework of CERCLA, the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) project team learned valuable lessons that may be beneficial to other disposal facilities. Since project inception in 1998, the scope of the effort includes five regulator-approved designs, four phases of construction, and utilization of half of EMWMF's 1.63 M m{sup 3} of airspace during disposal of waste streams from across the ORR. Funding came from the broadest possible range of sources - privatization, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and two funding appropriation accounts. In the process of becoming the cost effective disposal outlet for the majority of the ORR cleanup waste, EMWMF overcame numerous challenges. Lessons learned were a key factor in achieving that success. Many of EMWMF's challenges are common to other disposal facilities. Sharing the successes and lessons learned will help other facilities optimize design, construction, and operations. (author)

  6. Operations and Maintenance in Federal Facilities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Maintenance in Federal Facilities Operations and Maintenance in Federal Facilities Effective operations and maintenance plans help ensure federal equipment, such as this water ...

  7. Validation of International Atomic Energy Agency Equipment Performance Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, PJ

    2004-02-17

    Performance requirements and testing protocols are needed to ensure that equipment used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is reliable. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the US Support Program, tested equipment to validate performance requirements protocols used by the IAEA for the subject equipment categories. Performance protocol validation tests were performed in the Environmental Effects Laboratory in the categories for battery, DC power supply, and uninterruptible power supply (UPS). Specific test results for each piece of equipment used in the validation process are included in this report.

  8. Alternative technologies for cooling and refrigeration equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Matchett, J.

    1995-12-01

    Significant national and international attention has focused on the role that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) play in stratospheric ozone depletion. The Clean Air Act of 1990 calls for the production of the most harmful CFCs to completely cease by December 31, 1995. This production phaseout affects many CFC-refrigerants which are commonly used in commercial, residential, and industrial cooling processes. The production phaseout of CFCs will require owners of CFC-based refrigeration equipment to make plans to replace their equipment. Many equipment owners find themselves in a {open_quotes}rut{close_quotes}replacing CFCs with another chemical coolant, rather than a new cooling process. Since many of the chemical alternatives are structurally similar to CFCs (i.e., HCFCs, HFCs, and blends) they require minimal changes to current equipment. However, these substances are also believed to affect the global climate. Hence, they may not be the most environmentally sound alternative and probable are subject to other Federal regulations. There are other HVAC/R alternatives which are less environmentally damaging than these chemicals and may actually be more cost-effective and energy efficient and than the {open_quotes}traditional{close_quotes} CFC chemical substitutes. Alternative cooling technologies include absorption systems, desiccant cooling, evaporative cooling, and ammonia vapor compression. These alternative technologies are proven alternatives and are commercially available. Further, significant technological developments in recent years have made these technologies feasible alternatives for applications previously believed to be unacceptable. This paper describes these alternative technologies and the conditions in which they are viable alternatives to CFC-based equipment. Additionally, energy efficiency and life-cycle cost analysis considerations are addressed to provide a more completes analysis of cooling equipment alternatives.

  9. Microgrid Equipment Selection and Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Microgrid Equipment Selection and Control Microgrid Equipment Selection and Control Project Objective The U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) is a pioneering research and development (R&D) consortium bringing together governments, key policymakers, researchers, and industry to develop a long-term platform for sustainable U.S.-China joint R&D. Ultra-efficient buildings and microgrids require complex optimization both for operations and when choosing equipment. This CERC project

  10. Secure authenticated video equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Doren, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    In the verification technology arena, there is a pressing need for surveillance and monitoring equipment that produces authentic, verifiable records of observed activities. Such a record provides the inspecting party with confidence that observed activities occurred as recorded, without undetected tampering or spoofing having taken place. The secure authenticated video equipment (SAVE) system provides an authenticated series of video images of an observed activity. Being self-contained and portable, it can be installed as a stand-alone surveillance system or used in conjunction with existing monitoring equipment in a non-invasive manner. Security is provided by a tamper-proof camera enclosure containing a private, electronic authentication key. Video data is transferred communication link consisting of a coaxial cable, fiber-optic link or other similar media. A video review station, located remotely from the camera, receives, validates, displays and stores the incoming data. Video data is validated within the review station using a public key, a copy of which is held by authorized panics. This scheme allows the holder of the public key to verify the authenticity of the recorded video data but precludes undetectable modification of the data generated by the tamper-protected private authentication key.

  11. BCM 1 Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Equipment Inventory « Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Title Equipment Type Description Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter The Corning 430 pH meter is designed to handle laboratory applications from the most routine to the highly complex. Encased in spill-resistant housings and feature chemical-resistant, sealed keypad. Model 430 (pH range 0.00 to 14.00) is a basic, yet reliable meter providing accurate, efficient digital measurements. Offers simplified, four-button operation,

  12. Operation of Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, Dockets Nos. 50-416 and 50-417: Mississippi Power and Light Company, Middle South Energy, Inc. , South Mississippi Electric Power Association. Final environmental statement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The information in this Final Environmental Statement is the second assessment of the environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the Mississippi River in Claiborne County, Mississippi. The Draft Environmental Statement was issued in May 1981. The first assessment was the Final Environmental Statement related to construction, which was issued in August 1973 prior to issuance of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station construction permits. In September 1981 Grand Gulf Unit 1 was 92% complete and Unit 2 was 22% complete. Fuel loading for Unit 1 is scheduled for December 1981. The present assessment is the result of the NRC staff review of the activities associated with the proposed operation of the Station, and includes the staff responses to comments on the Draft Environmental Statement.

  13. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

  14. Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... source air emissions characterization (including monitoring programs), air pollution control equipment operation and maintenance, and reporting and compliance management systems. ...

  15. Environmental Programs

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy and Assistance Environmental Policy and Assistance The Department of Energy’s (DOE) goal is to carry out all cleanup operations in a manner that protects the public and the environment. The Department of Energy's (DOE) goal is to carry out all cleanup operations in a manner that protects the public and the environment. DOE Headquarters works with field offices to foster continuous improvement in environmental protection before incidents occur. Headquarters provides corporate

  16. Environmental Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Feature Stories Environmental Protection Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup contamination from the past, minimize impacts for current environmental operations, and create a sustainable future. Well R-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory has detected chromium at levels which exceed New Mexico standards. Photo taken during well construction in 2011. Los Alamos National Laboratory begins pumping tests on chromium plume The chromium originated from cooling towers at a

  17. Agricultural Equipment Technology Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 20th Agricultural Equipment Technology Conference will be held Feb. 8–10, 2016, in Louisville, Kentucky. The conference will bring together professionals and experts in the agricultural and biological engineering fields. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Terrestrial Feedstocks Technology Manager Sam Tagore will be in attendance. Mr. Tagore will moderate a technical session titled “Ash Reduction Strategies for Improving Biomass Feedstock Quality.” The session will include presentations by researchers from Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory supporting BETO, as well as from university and industry.

  18. Equipment Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Equipment Specialist Equipment Specialist Submitted by admin on Sat, 2016-01-16 00:16 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency SubElement Bonneville Power...

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Assistant Secretary for Safety and Management Operations ... Management Advisory Board EM SSAB - Environmental ... ETR - External Technical Review ETTP - East Tennessee ...

  20. Supplement Analysis for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Proposed Horizontal Expansion of the Restricted Airspace up to 5,000 feet at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-09-21

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of modifying the horizontal restricted airspace boundaries at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to include LANL's Technical Areas (TA)-33 and TA-54, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the Proposed Action that are relevant to Environmental concerns or when there are new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the Proposed Action or its impacts. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of this proposal to the SWEIS impact analysis, and considers LANL operational accident analyses. The Sa concludes with a finding of fact regarding whether the environmental effects of the Proposed Action are adequately bounded by the analyses of impacts projected by the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, or whether a Supplemental EIS is required.

  1. Self-Tuning SPRT for Continuous Surveillance of Processes & Equipment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1996-12-18

    SABLE is an Al-based expert system for process and equipment operability surveillance in industrial applications that require high reliability, high sensitivity annunciation of degraded sensors, discrepant signals, or the incipience of system disturbances.

  2. EA-0995: Final Environmental Assessment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations

  3. Equipment Pool | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Pool What is the Equipment Pool? Property that is no longer required or being used by a research group or administrative office is sent to the Ames Laboratory's warehouse Equipment Pool area for reuitilization within the Laboratory. What property is in the Equipment Pool? 1. Visit the Equipment Pool Listing page, or 2. Visit our Ames Laboratory warehouse between the hours of 7:30-4 p.m. to view the items in the equipment pool. How do I request property from the Pool? Contact Brian Aspengren,

  4. The new Kaiserstuhl coking plant: The heating system -- Design, construction and initial operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Strunk, J.

    1996-12-31

    At the end of 1992 the new coke plant Kaiserstuhl in Dortmund/Germany with presently the largest coke ovens world-wide started its production operation in close linkage to the Krupp-Hoesch Metallurgical Works after about 35 months construction time. This plant incorporating comprehensive equipment geared to improve environmental protection is also considered as the most modern coke plant of the world. The heating-system and first results of operation will be presented.

  5. Operational improvements at Jewell Coal and Coke Company`s non-recovery ovens

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, C.E.; Pruitt, C.W.

    1995-12-01

    Operational improvements at Jewell Coal and Coke Company over the past five years includes safety and environmental concerns, product quality, equipment availability, manpower utilization, and productivity. These improvements with Jewell`s unique process has allowed Jewell Coal and Coke Company to be a consistent, high quality coke producer. The paper briefly explains Jewell`s unique ovens, their operating mode, improved process control, their maintenance management program, and their increase in productivity.

  6. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1993-07-26

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. (CSA) was contracted to conduct a three-year study of the environmental and health related impacts of produced water and sand discharges from oil and gas operations. Data on naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), heavy metals, and hydrocarbons in water, sediment, and biota will be collected and evaluated. Health related impacts will be studied through field collections and analyses of commercially- and recreationally-important fish and shellfish tissues. Additionally, information on seafood catch, consumption, and use patterns for the Gulf of Mexico will be gathered and analyzed. The facilities to be studied will include both offshore and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Coastal sites will be additionally studied to determine ecological recovery of impacted wetland and open bay areas. The economic impact of existing and proposed effluent federal and state regulations will also be evaluated. The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of four terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana and Texas; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  8. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  9. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Equipment Dismantlement Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Lagos, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    The dismantlement of radioactively contaminated process equipment is a major concern during the D and D process. As buildings undergo the D and D process, metallic equipment contaminated with radionuclides such as uranium and plutonium must be dismantled before final disposal.The primary objective for equipment dismantlement is to reduce the potential for personnel and environmental exposure to contaminants during the decommissioning of the nuclear facility. The selection of the appropriate technologies to meet the dismantlement objectives for a given site is a difficult process in the absence of comprehensive and comparable data. Choosing the wrong technology could result in increased exposure of personnel to contaminants and an increase in D and D project costs. Innovative technologies are being developed with the goal of providing safer and more cost-effective alternatives that generate less secondary waste, thereby decreasing the operating costs for dismantlement. During the development and implementation process, performance indicators for the success of these technologies must be reviewed to ensure that these aims are being met. This project provides a mechanism for the assessment of innovative and commercially available nuclear and non-nuclear technologies for equipment dismantlement.

  10. Electrical Room Equipment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Room Equipment voltage phase Max Number Cap Bay High Voltage Power supply(6) 208/220 1 phase 30 Amp 6 Vacuum Pump Station 208/220 3 phase 30 Amp 1 Chiller (Nd:YAG) 208/220 3 phase 30 Amp 1 Short Pulse Lab Nd:YAG Laser 208/220 3 phase 30 Amp 1 Front End Rod Amplifier 208/220 1 phase 30 Amp 1 Purple/Pipe & C beam Vacuum Vacuum Pump Station 208/220 3 phase 30 Amp 1 Target Area Vacuum Pump Station 208/220 3 phase 30 Amp 1 He Cryo Compressor(2) 208/220 3 phase 30 Amp 2 total 7 single

  11. Machine protection system for rotating equipment and method

    DOEpatents

    Lakshminarasimha, Arkalgud N.; Rucigay, Richard J.; Ozgur, Dincer

    2003-01-01

    A machine protection system and method for rotating equipment introduces new alarming features and makes use of full proximity probe sensor information, including amplitude and phase. Baseline vibration amplitude and phase data is estimated and tracked according to operating modes of the rotating equipment. Baseline vibration and phase data can be determined using a rolling average and variance and stored in a unit circle or tracked using short term average and long term average baselines. The sensed vibration amplitude and phase is compared with the baseline vibration amplitude and phase data. Operation of the rotating equipment can be controlled based on the vibration amplitude and phase.

  12. Environmental protection Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Holland

    1999-12-01

    This ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California's commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The ``Environmental Protection Implementation Plan'' helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities.

  13. Equipment design guidance document for flammable gas waste storage tank new equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Smet, D.B.

    1996-04-11

    This document is intended to be used as guidance for design engineers who are involved in design of new equipment slated for use in Flammable Gas Waste Storage Tanks. The purpose of this document is to provide design guidance for all new equipment intended for application into those Hanford storage tanks in which flammable gas controls are required to be addressed as part of the equipment design. These design criteria are to be used as guidance. The design of each specific piece of new equipment shall be required, as a minimum to be reviewed by qualified Unreviewed Safety Question evaluators as an integral part of the final design approval. Further Safety Assessment may be also needed. This guidance is intended to be used in conjunction with the Operating Specifications Documents (OSDs) established for defining work controls in the waste storage tanks. The criteria set forth should be reviewed for applicability if the equipment will be required to operate in locations containing unacceptable concentrations of flammable gas.

  14. Puerto Rico - Renewable Energy Equipment Certification | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    State Puerto Rico Program Type Equipment Certification Summary Certification of Photovoltaic Equipment EAA specifies that PV equipment must meet UL 1703 requirements, and...

  15. Waste Management Plan for the Remedial Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This Waste Management Plan (WMP) supplements the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project WMP and defines the criteria and methods to be used for managing and characterizing waste generated during activities associated with the RI of 23 wells near the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF). These wells are within the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 area of contamination (AOC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Field activities for the limited RI of Operable Unit (OU) 3 of WAG 10 will involve sampling and measurement of various environmental media (e.g., liquids and gases). Many of these activities will occur in areas known to be contaminated with radioactive materials or hazardous chemical substances, and it is anticipated that contaminated solid and liquid wastes and noncontaminated wastes will be generated as a result of these activities. On a project-wide basis, handling of these waste materials will be accomplished in accordance with the RI/FS Project WMP and the procedures referenced throughout the plan.

  16. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 23 June 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1992-11-10

    A Sampling and Analysis Plan was prepared and submitted to a Scientific Review Committee for comment. Substantial comments relative to study objectives, sampling design, and sampling periods coupled with the passage of Hurricane Andrew precluded the scheduled initiation of sampling at offshore and coastal sites (Tasks 3 -- Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics and 4 -- Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas). A proposed revised schedule has been prepared for Tasks 3 and 4. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region), activities have involved identification and collection of the necessary data for the economic analysis. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Region Consumption and Use Patterns), activities have included near completion of the literature review and a reevaluation of the data collection efforts relative to the wholesaler, process plant, and restaurant components. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan), work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting.

  17. Internal corrosion monitoring of subsea oil and gas production equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Joosten, M.W.; Fischer, K.P.; Lunden, K.C.

    1995-10-01

    Internal corrosion monitoring provides data vital to the operation of high-capital-cost, subsea equipment such as pipelines, flowlines, manifolds and water injection equipment. Monitoring can be used to determine the efficacy of corrosion/erosion mitigation techniques and allows operation of subsea equipment to maximize useful equipment life and minimize maintenance. For the operation of subsea systems that utilized corrosion inhibitors, there is a particular need to monitor the inhibitor performance. Methods for remote monitoring of corrosion are rapidly developing as the pace of subsea developments increase. Subsea completions set a record in 1993, exceeding the previous all-time high by 18% and exceeding 1992 installations by 73%. This paper will review experiences with offshore corrosion monitoring, the currently installed subsea corrosion monitoring systems, discuss the use of intelligent pigs as monitoring tools, and review some of the technologies that could possibly be utilized in the future such as ion selective electrodes, radioactive tracers and spectroscopy.

  18. Suppliers and Environmental Innovation: The Automotive Paint Process

    SciTech Connect

    Geffen, Charlette A.; Rothenberg, Sandra

    2000-01-01

    Automobile assembly plants worldwide face increasing pressures in the environmental arena. How a plant responds to these issues has significant implications for the cost and quality of plant operations. This paper uses three case studies of U.S. assembly plants to examine the role of partnerships between original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and their suppliers in improving the environmental performance of manufacturing operations. We find that strong partnerships with suppliers, supported by appropriate incentive systems, were a significant element of the successful application of innovative environmental technologies. Supplier staff members were an important part of achieving environmental performance improvements while maintaining production quality and cost goals. The management factors influencing the extent and nature of supplier involvement are identified. The results of this work point to the importance of suppliers in addressing the manufacturing challenges of the future.

  19. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Ancillary Equipment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancillary Equipment For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Sample Environments responsible: Victor Fanelli | vfanelli@lanl.gov | 505.667.8755 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact the Lujan Center Experiment Coordinator: TBA Low Temperature Equipment Specifications Flight Path/Instrument Compatibility Responsible Displex closed-cycle refrigerators Tmin= 4 K to 12 K Tmax= 300 K to 340 K 11 - Asterix 04 - HIPPO 03 - HIPD 10

  20. Equipment Loans | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Loans Requirements to Loan Property: Ames Laboratory may loan Government Property provided the equipment is not excess to the Laboratory's needs. In order to loan equipment, the following criteria must be met: 1) Equipment shall be used in performing research, studies, and other efforts that result in benefits to both the U.S. Government, the borrower, and provided that the DOE mission is not affected. 2) Used by another DOE organization, contractor, Government agency, or organization that has a

  1. Pollution prevention assessment for a manufacturer of food service equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, H.W.; Kostrzewa, M.F.; Looby, G.P.

    1995-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. In an effort to assist these manufacturers Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected universities and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. The WMAC team at Colorado State University performed an assessment at a plant that manufacturers commercial food service equipment. Raw materials used by the plant include stainless steel, mild steel, aluminum, and copper and brass. Operations performing in the plant include cutting, forming, bending, welding, polishing, painting, and assembly The team`s report, detailing findings and recommendations, indicated that paint-related wastes (organic solvents) are generated in large quantities and that significant cost savings could be achieved by retrofitting the water curtain paint spray booth to operate as a dry filter paint booth. Toluene could be replaced by a less toxic solvent. This Research Brief was developed by the principal investigators and EPA`s National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH, to announce key findings of an ongoing research project that is fully documented in a separate report of the same title available from University City Science Center.

  2. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... conditioning (HVAC) system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of a house. ...

  3. Commercial Kitchen Equipment Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Vermont offers rebates for ENERGY STAR certified fryers, griddles, convection ovens, and steam cookers. Custom rebates for other types of commercial cooking equipment may be available...

  4. Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide" held on December 10, 2015.

  5. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Webinar: Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar titled "Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide" on Thursday, December 10, from 1 to 2 p.m. EST.

  8. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  9. Equipment Certification | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Hydroelectric (Small) Natural Gas Nuclear Solar Photovoltaics Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes Madison - Equipment...

  10. DOE-STD-1039-93; Guide to Good Practices for Control of Equipment...

    Energy Saver

    ... This permits coordination of interrelated activities among work groups. 4.8 Equipment ... "Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Processes." DOE Order 5480.19, ...

  11. EIS-0426: Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of the Department of Energy / National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Site-Wide EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of proposed alternatives for continued management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site) and other U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)-managed sites in Nevada.

  12. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1993-01-18

    Tasks 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities have included the narrowing of the list of potential offshore platforms for study off Louisiana and Texas and a preliminary selection of three coastal sites in Louisiana. After an extensive search effort, it was concluded that no coastal sites are available in Texas. A meeting was held between the contractor, Department of Energy (DOE), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel to discuss potential sites and sampling designs. A letter was sent to the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) providing a general description of the revised site selection process and sampling designs. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included continued evaluation of data types available for the economic analysis. Historical field basis data were acquired. The identification of permitted discharge points was also initiated. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities have involved the completion of the literature review. Drafts of the fisherman and wholesaler surveys were prepared. It was determined with DOE and BNL personnel that the retailer survey would be eliminated and a subsistence fisherman survey would be added. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service (MMS) Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities have involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  13. Incorporating Equipment Condition Assessment in Risk Monitors for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

    2013-10-01

    Advanced small modular reactors (aSMRs) can complement the current fleet of large light-water reactors in the USA for baseload and peak demand power production and process heat applications (e.g., water desalination, shale oil extraction, hydrogen production). The day-to-day costs of aSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance (O&M); however, the effect of diverse operating missions and unit modularity on O&M is not fully understood. These costs could potentially be reduced by optimized scheduling, with risk-informed scheduling of maintenance, repair, and replacement of equipment. Currently, most nuclear power plants have a “living” probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which reflects the as-operated, as-modified plant and combine event probabilities with population-based probability of failure (POF) for key components. “Risk monitors” extend the PRA by incorporating the actual and dynamic plant configuration (equipment availability, operating regime, environmental conditions, etc.) into risk assessment. In fact, PRAs are more integrated into plant management in today’s nuclear power plants than at any other time in the history of nuclear power. However, population-based POF curves are still used to populate fault trees; this approach neglects the time-varying condition of equipment that is relied on during standard and non-standard configurations. Equipment condition monitoring techniques can be used to estimate the component POF. Incorporating this unit-specific estimate of POF in the risk monitor can provide a more accurate estimate of risk in different operating and maintenance configurations. This enhanced risk assessment will be especially important for aSMRs that have advanced component designs, which don’t have an available operating history to draw from, and often use passive design features, which present challenges to PRA. This paper presents the requirements and technical gaps for developing a framework to integrate unit

  14. Environmental Assessment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    728D Environmental Assessment Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 Approved for Public Release; Further Disseminat ion Uillimited June 2011 DOE/EA-1728D June 2011 1 2 3 4 5 6 This page intentionally left blank. 7 8 U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1728D Draft Environmental Assessment iii June 2011 CONTENTS 1 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION

  15. Proceedings: Substation equipment diagnostics conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, K.L.

    1994-07-01

    This Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference held November 3--5, 1993, in New Orleans, Louisiana, reviewed the status of EPRI research on transmission substation diagnostics as well as that of universities, manufacturers, testing organizations, and other researchers. The papers presented were organized under four categories of diagnostics: Transformers, Circuit Breakers, Other Substation Equipment, and Diagnostic Systems.

  16. Resumption of exploratory drilling operations by Texaco, Inc. : state oil and gas lesses - PRC 2725. 1 (Jade Prospect), PRC 2206. 1 (Anita Prospect), PRC 2955. 1 (Refugio Prospect), Santa Barbara County. Final environmental impact report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    An update is presented on air quality conditions in Santa Barbara County, Califorina. Data on photochemical oxidants (measured as ozone), nitrogen dioxide, sulfide dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total suspended particulates are included. Also included are the comments received during the public review and during the public hearing on the Draft Environmental Impact Report on Texaco, Inc.'s proposed Resumption of Exploratory Drilling Operations, State Oil and Gas Leases PRC 2725.1, PRC 2206.1 and PRC 2955.1, responses to these written and oral (hearing) comments, and a modification to the Draft EIR Air Quality Setting section, incorporating updated ambient air quality data. This volume, when added to the Draft Environmental Impact Report, constitutes the Final Environmental Impact Report in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the State Lands Commission's regulations implementing CEQA.

  17. Information technology equipment cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  18. Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SWEIS Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement We analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with Laboratory operations and facilities. Contact Environmental...

  19. Improve Operations & Maintenance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Improve Operations & Maintenance Improve Operations & Maintenance Photo of an equipment room in a high-rise commercial office building with red and green equipment. Every building's energy consumption can benefit from rigorous operations and maintenance (O&M) practices. Properly planned and executed O&M is one of the most cost-effective strategies for ensuring equipment longevity, reliability, safety, and energy efficiency in commercial buildings. By one estimate, O&M

  20. Design review report for modifications to RMCS safety class equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.E.

    1997-05-30

    This report documents the completion of the formal design review for modifications to the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) safety class equipment. These modifications are intended to support core sampling operations in waste tanks requiring flammable gas controls. The objective of this review was to approve the Engineering Change Notices affecting safety class equipment used in the RMCS system. The conclusion reached by the review committee was that these changes are acceptable.

  1. Interim Stabilization Equipment Essential and Support Drawing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-10-22

    The purpose of this document is to list the Interim Stabilization equipment drawings that are classified as Essential or Support drawings. Essential Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation of the facility or equipment. Support Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff that further describe the design details of structures, systems or components shown on essential drawings.

  2. Interim Stabilization Equipment Essential and Support Drawing Plan

    SciTech Connect

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-17

    The purpose of this document is to list the Interim Stabilization equipment drawings that are classified as Essential or Support drawings. Essential Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff as necessary to directly support the safe operation of the facility or equipment. Support Drawings: Those drawings identified by the facility staff that further describe the design details of structures, systems or components shown on essential drawings.

  3. Microsoft Word - Equipment Use Policy Oct2710.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Use Policy revised 10/10 General Rules 1. An Operator is a trained/authorized user who is enabled access to specific equipment after receiving training and authorization for use. 2. Cleanroom staff provides: a. training and orientation to machines and capabilities b. technical assistance as needed upon request by the user c. service charged separately as an act of labor on a machine for another person, group or business. Specific machines have been designated for services purposes only

  4. Environmental Qualification at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.A.; Murphy, S.L.; Riley, P.J.; Sharma, M.K.; Sheikh, N.A.; Weister, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of Environmental Qualification (EQ) is to demonstrate that equipment essential to the mitigation of consequences from, and monitoring of plant conditions following Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) will operate as intended under normal/abnormal and accident environmental conditions over the installed life. For example, if a component is needed to maintain the reactor in a safe shutdown condition during an accident, and if the component is subjected to a harsh environment during that accident, then documentation must be prepared addressing the ability of the equipment to work properly in the accident environment. The requirement for an EQ program at SRS was mandated by the Department of Energy (DOE) K-Reactor Safety Evaluation Report (SER) which requires SRS to: (1) provide a long term plan for an EQ program with DOE approval prior to restart and (2) prepare and submit to DOE, Justifications for Continued Operations, that justify restarting and operating the K-Reactor until a long term compliance can be achieved with DOE approval.

  5. Corporate International Operations | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hills, Arizona Zip: AZ 85268 Sector: Solar Product: Supplier of solar cells, module manufacturing equipment and materials. References: Corporate International Operations1 This...

  6. Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Inventory « Equipment Resources Title Equipment Type Facility Laboratory Building Room Accumet Basic AB15 pH meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Agate Mortar & Pestle Sets Buchi V-700 Vacuum Pump & condenser Campden Instruments Vibrating Manual Tissue Cutter HA 752 Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 1 120 257 Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Corning 476436 3-in-1 Combo Electrode pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab

  7. Operations & Maintenance Best Practices Guide: Release 3.0

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    is to provide you, the Operations and Maintenance (O&M)Energy manager and practitioner, ... first defer to the manufacturer's recommendations on equipment operation and maintenance. ...

  8. New Emergency Equipment Notifications 2016

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Notifications 2016 Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Todd A. Shrader/CBFO and Philip J. Breidenbach/NWP dated January 8, 2016 Underground Fire Suppression Vehicles

  9. Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been...

  10. Guidelines for an original equipment manufacturer starting a remanufacturing operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, R.T.; Skeels, F.D.

    1983-07-01

    Remanufacturing is an industrial process in which worn-out products (called cores) are restored to like-new condition. In a typical remanufacturing process, identical cores are grouped into production batches, completely disassembled, and thoroughly cleaned. Component parts are replaced or refurbished as necessary to bring their performance at least back to the level of the product when new. The product is assembled, finished, tested, packaged, and distributed in the same manner as new products. Even the warranty on the remanufactured product is usually similar or identical to the OEM new product warranty. Marketing, distribution, collection, technology, economics, organizational aspects, and legal considerations of remanufacturing are discussed.

  11. Oil and Gas Lease Equipment and Operating Costs 1994 Through...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... Costs for water storage tanks, injection plant, filtering systems, injection lines and ... separator with two storage tanks (a lease condensate sales tank and a water storage tank). ...

  12. Webinar December 10: Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar titled "Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide" on Thursday, December 10, from 1 to 2 p.m. EST. The webinar will introduce the Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide, a document intended to aid in equipment approval until listed equipment are available for the entirety of equipment and components.

  13. MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transportation Equipment MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006) All available footprints and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Transportation Equipment (121.43 KB) More Documents & Publications Transportation Equipment

  14. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be

  15. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report on the October 15, 2001, Grout Injection Operator Injury at the Cold Test Pit South, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by Mark W. Frei, Acting Manager, Idaho Operations Office, U. S. Department of Energy.

  16. Investigation of self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, W I; Downing, J P; Enderlin, C W; Sanquist, T F; Pope, W S

    1992-06-01

    The US Coast Guard commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to conduct this study of 45 self-help oil-spill response techniques and equipment for oceangoing tankers and inland tank barges to assess the potential effectiveness of the proposed countermeasure categories. This study considers the hypothetical outflow of oil in the case of side damage and bottom damage to single-hull designs. The results will be considered by the Coast Guard in drafting regulations pertaining to the requirement for tanker vessels to carry oil pollution response equipment (i.e., in response to the oil Pollution Act of 1990). PNL's approach to this investigation included: assessing time-dependent oil outflow in the cases of collision and grounding of both tankers and barges; identifying environmental constraints on self-help countermeasure operation; identifying human factor issues, such as crew performance, safety, and training requirements for the self-help countermeasures considered; and assessing each self-help countermeasure with respect to its potential for minimizing oil loss to the environment. Results from the time-dependent oil outflow, environmental limitations, and human factors requirements were input into a simulation model.

  17. Environmental Impacts of Smart Grid

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research & Development » Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. A trained falcon, equipped with a GPS and a VHF tracker, gathers radar data that is helping scientists improve bird detection technologies at wind facilities. The Wind Program works to remove barriers to wind

  18. Environmental protection implementation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    This Environmental Protection Implementation Plan is intended to ensure that the environmental program objectives of Department of Energy Order 5400.1 are achieved at SNL/California. This document states SNL/California`s commitment to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and responsible manner. The Environmental Protection Implementation Plan helps management and staff comply with applicable environmental responsibilities. SNL is committed to operating in full compliance with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental laws, regulations, and standards. Furthermore, SNL/California strives to go beyond compliance with legal requirements by making every effort practical to reduce impacts to the environment to levels as low as reasonably achievable.

  19. EA-1906: Draft Environmental Assessment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental Assessment for Operations, Upgrades, and Consolidation at the Western Command Site, New Mexico, April 2012

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Equipment Options to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel

  1. Environmental Management System Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

    2009-03-24

    DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out

  2. CVD Equipment Corp | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Ronkonkoma, New York Zip: 11779 Sector: Solar Product: New York-based maker of chemical vapour deposition process equipment. This equipment is used in the manufacture of...

  3. Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All ... To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry ...

  4. Commercial Refrigeration Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    standards. File Commercial Refrigeration Equipment -- v2.0 More Documents & Publications Beverage Vending Machines Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

  5. Cruising Equipment Company CECO | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Equipment Company (CECO) Place: Seattle, Washington Zip: 98107 Product: Maker of pollution control equipment - bought by Xantrex in 2000. Coordinates: 47.60356,...

  6. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale ...

  7. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

  8. DMSE Equipment Scheduling | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduling Equipment ownercustodian reserves the right to override the schedule for maintenance andor other justified reasons. Abuse of the scheduling system or equipment may...

  9. Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: ...

  10. REAL ESTATE & EQUIPMENT LEASING / RENTAL CALIFORNIA LAWRENCE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Email dtchen@lbl.gov Construction, Mining, and Forestry Machinery and Equipment ... Email swanson6@llnl.gov Construction, Mining, and Forestry Machinery and Equipment ...

  11. Processing and Manufacturing Equipment | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:...

  12. Personal Computing Equipment | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Computing Equipment Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Personal Computing Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePersona...

  13. China Shandong Penglai Electric Power Equipment Manufacturing...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Penglai Electric Power Equipment Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Shandong Penglai Electric Power Equipment Manufacturing Place: Penglai, Shandong Province,...

  14. Moncada Solar Equipment | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Moncada Solar Equipment Place: Italy Product: Developer and manufacturer of thin-film modules. References: Moncada Solar Equipment1 This article is a stub. You can...

  15. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Guidelines/FAQ

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    eligible to participate in the Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP) program. ... physically attached to an energy-related laboratory equipment system); General supplies. ...

  16. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - About Us

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    About LEDP The Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), formerly the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) Grant Program, was established by the United States Department ...

  17. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Home Page

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy (DOE), in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment. equipment

  18. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - LEDP Widget

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LEDP Widget You can access key features of the Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP) website by downloading the LEDP widget. Use the widget to search, view the equipment ...

  19. Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program: Task, Characterization of Potential Waste Sources at Auxiliary Reactor Area-1 Operable Unit 5--07 site ARA-02

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, S.L.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  20. Health and Safety Plan for Operations Performed for the Environmental Restoration Program: Task, Characterization of Potential Waste Sources at Auxiliary Reactor Area-1 Operable Unit 5--07 site ARA-02

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, S.L.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-06-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the ERP. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  1. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and the world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge{trademark} level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  2. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Idaho Operations Office

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Idaho Operations Office.

  3. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Idaho Operations Office.

  4. OPS 9.18 Equipment and Piping Labeling 8/24/98 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8 Equipment and Piping Labeling 8/24/98 OPS 9.18 Equipment and Piping Labeling 8/24/98 The objective of this surveillance is to verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. OPS9-18.doc (31.5 KB) More Documents

  5. Trends in powder processing equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, L.M.

    1993-05-01

    Spray drying is the most widely used process for producing particles. It is used in industries other than ceramics including food, chemicals, and pharmaceutical. The process involves the atomization of a liquid feed stock into a spray of droplets and contacting the droplets with hot air in a drying chamber. The sprays are produced by either rotary or nozzle atomizers. Evaporation of moisture from the droplets and formation of dry particles proceed under controlled temperature and airflow conditions. Powder is then discharged continuously from the drying chamber. Spray drying equipment is being improved to handle an ever-increasing number of applications. Several developments in particle-size reduction equipment are also described.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... appearance, working conditions, and sanitation (such as ... Routine maintenance may result in replacement to the extent ... If operations or equipment causes terrain damage, the ...

  7. EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the adoption of amended energy conservation standards as required by The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended) for direct heating equipment,...

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  9. Reliability and maintainability data acquisition in equipment development tests

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, M.J.; Gift, E.H.

    1983-10-01

    The need for collection of reliability, maintainability, and availability data adds a new dimension to the data acquisition requirements of equipment development tests. This report describes the reliability and maintainability data that are considered necessary to ensure that sufficient and high quality data exist for a comprehensive, quantitative evaluation of equipment and system availability. These necessary data are presented as a set of data collection forms. Three data acquisition forms are discussed: an inventory and technical data form, which is filed by the design engineer when the design is finished or the equipment is received; an event report form, which is completed by the senior test operator at each shutdown; and a maintainability report, which is a collaborative effort between senior operators and lead engineers and is completed on restart. In addition, elements of a reliability, maintainability evaluation program are described. Emphasis is placed on the role of data, its storage, and use in such a program.

  10. Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Environmental Assessment for the Terminal Expansion Project.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-02-01

    The Terminal Expansion Project is proposed by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Southern California Edison (SCE), and the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) to increase the operating capacity of the existing bipole direct current (dc) Intertie line between the Celilo Converter Station at The Dalles, Oregon, and the Sylmar converter Station at Sylmar, California. The proposal will allow a greater exchange of electric power between the Pacific Northwest (PNW) and Southern California without constructing new interregional transmission lines. By adding more alternating ac/dc converter equipment at the terminals, the conductors on the existing 845-mile dc intertie transmission line can be operated at full design capacity. The dc Intertie plus two other ac lines which terminate near San Francisco comprise the ''Intertie.'' Though the project is interregional, relatively little construction will be needed. This Environmental Assessment addresses the environmental impacts of the proposed actions and makes a determination as to their significance. Though LADWP is complying with the State environmental process, as required by the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the impacts of their construction are being considered as part of the impacts of the overall proposal and are considered in the determination of significance.

  12. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Idle Equipment, August 21, 1997

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  13. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Idle Equipment, August...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Management Plan for Material Contained in Idle ... be enforceable as a requirement of this Order on ... through the RFCA budget planning process. * If ...

  14. Strategy Guideline. HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2012-02-01

    This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, FL. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  15. 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Savannah River Operations Office 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact ...

  16. Draft environmental impact statement for construction and operation of the proposed Bangor Hydro-Electric Company`s second 345-kV transmission tie line to New Brunswick

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    This Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) was prepared by the US Department of Energy (US DOE). The proposed action is the issuance of Presidential Permit PP-89 by DOE to Bangor Hydro-Electric Company to construct and operate a new international transmission line interconnection to New Brunswick, Canada that would consist of an 83.8 mile (US portion), 345-kilovolt (kV) alternating current transmission line from the US-Canadian border at Baileyville, Maine to an existing substation at Orrington, Maine. The principal environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the transmission line would be incremental in nature and would include the conversion of forested uplands (mostly commercial timberlands) and wetlands to right-of-way (small trees, shrubs, and herbaceous vegetation). The proposed line would also result in localized minor to moderate visual impacts and would contribute a minor incremental increase in the exposure of some individuals to electromagnetic fields. This DEIS documents the purpose and need for the proposed action, describes the proposed action and alternatives considered and provides a comparison of the proposed and alternatives routes, and provides detailed information on analyses of the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternatives, as well as mitigative measures to minimize impacts.

  17. Health and safety plan for operations performed for the Environmental Restoration Program. Task, OU 1-03 and OU 4-10 Track 2 investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Trippet, W.A. II; Reneau, M.; Morton, S.L.

    1992-04-01

    This document constitutes the generic health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP). It addresses the health and safety requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910.120 standard; and EG&G Idaho, Inc. This plan is a guide to individuals who must complete a health and safety plan for a task performed for the EPR. It contains a task specific addendum that, when completed, specifically addresses task specific health and safety issues. This health and safety plan reduces the time it takes to write a task specific health and safety plan by providing discussions of requirements, guidance on where specific information is located, and specific topics in the Addendum that must be discussed at a task level. This format encourages a complete task specific health and safety plan and a standard for all health and safety plans written for ERP.

  18. Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Industrial Power Efficient Simple Clean Today Industrial Power Efficient Simple Clean Today Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching

  19. Energy-related laboratory equipment (ERLE) guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the Used Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment grants, and eligibility and procedures for participation. The document contains tables identifying typical equipment that may be requested, where to review ERLE equipment lists, and where to mail applications, a description of the eligible equipment grants access data system, and a copy of the ERLE grant application and instructions for its completion and submission.

  20. Neural Network Based System for Equipment Startup Surveillance

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1996-12-18

    NEBSESS is a system for equipment surveillance and fault detection which relies on a neural-network based means for diagnosing disturbances during startup and for automatically actuating the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) as a signal validation means during steady-state operation.

  1. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Oak Ridge Operations Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Oak Ridge Operations Office (OR) (See Environmental Management ...

  2. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Idaho Operations Office (ID) (See Environmental Management). ...

  3. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Savannah River Operations Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Savannah River Operations Office (SRS) (See also Environmental Management). ...

  4. SWEIS annual review - CY2002 : a comparison of CY2002 operations to projections included in the site-wide environmental impact statement for continued operation of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Linda Sue; White, Brenda Bailey; Guerrero, Joseph Vincent; Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2003-10-01

    The SNL/NM CY2002 SWEIS Annual Review discusses changes in facilities and facility operations that have occurred in selected and notable facilities since source data were collected for the SNL/NM SWEIS (DOE/EIS-0281). The following information is presented: {sm_bullet} An updated overview of SNL/NM selected and notable facilities and infrastructure capabilities. {sm_bullet} An overview of SNL/NM environment, safety, and health programs, including summaries of the purpose, operations, activities, hazards, and hazard controls at relevant facilities and risk management methods for SNL/NM. {sm_bullet} Updated base year activities data, together with related inventories, material consumption, emissions, waste, and resource consumption. {sm_bullet} Appendices summarizing activities and related hazards at SNL/NM individual special, general, and highbay laboratories, and chemical purchases.

  5. Evaluation audit report. Bulgarian petroleum refinery, Neftochim, Bourgas. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the report is to present opportunities for energy improvement and reduction of emissions for the Neftochim refinery in Bourgas, Bulgaria. Other defined and specified goals include a consideration of refinery operating flexibility, an observation of the plants general condition, and comments on maintenance practices for their effect on operations. It is a further objective to characterize modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of effort and capital requirements anticipated. The report details the results of an Evaluation and Audit Study performed on selected process units. The conclusions of the study are a series of recommendations.

  6. Evaluation audit report. Romanian petroleum refinery, Petrobrazi, Ploiesti. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Jurish, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the report is to present opportunities for energy improvement and reduction of emissions for the Petrobrazi refinery which is located 12 kilometers southwest of Ploiesti, Romania. Other defined and specified goals of the study include a consideration of the refinery's operating flexibility; an evaluation of fuel switching including the use of coal as a substitute for energy supply; and an observation of the refinery's general condition and its maintenance practice for its effect on operations. A further objective is to characterize the modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of effort and the capital requirements anticipated.

  7. Evaluation audit report. Czechoslovakian petroleum refinery, Slovnaft, Bratislava. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Jurish, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    It is the objective of the report to present opportunities for energy improvement and reduction of emissions for the Slovnaft refinery in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia. Other defined and specified goals of the study include a consideration of refinery operating flexibility, an evaluation of fuel switching including the use of coal as a substitute for energy supply, and an observation of the plants general condition and of its maintenance practice for its effect on operations. It is a further objective to characterize the modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of effort and capital requirements anticipated.

  8. Evaluation audit report. Polish petroleum refinery, Plock, Poland. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Jurish, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the report is to present opportunities for energy improvement and the reduction of emissions for the Mazovian refinery in Plock, Poland. Other defined and specified goals of the study include a consideration of refinery operating flexibility, an evaluation of fuel switching including the use of coal as a substitute for energy supply, and an observation of the plants general condition and of their maintenance practices with their effect on operations. A further objective is to characterize the modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of the effort and the capital requirements anticipated.

  9. Evaluation audit report. Polish petroleum refinery, Gdansk, Poland. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Jurish, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    The primary objective of the report is to present opportunities for energy improvement and reduction of emissions for the Gdansk Refinery. A secondary objective is to characterize the modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of effort and capital requirements anticipated. Other goals of the study include a consideration of refinery operating flexibility, an evaluation of fuel switching, including the use of coal as a substitute energy supply, and an observation of the plant's general condition and of its maintenance practices for their effect on operations.

  10. Evaluation audit report. Czechoslovakian petroleum refinery, Chemopetrol, Litvinov. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Jurish, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    It is the objective of the report to present opportunities for energy improvement and reduction of emissions for the Chemopetrol Refinery in Litvinov, CSFR. Other defined and specified goals of the study include a consideration of refinery operating flexibility, an evaluation of fuel switching including the use of coal as a substitute for energy supply, an observation of the plants' general condition and the effect of its maintenance practice on operations. It is a further objective to characterize modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of effort and capital requirements anticipated.

  11. Evaluation audit report. Romanian petroleum refinery, Petrotel, Ploiesti. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The objective of the report is to present opportunities for energy improvement and reduction of emissions for the Petrotel Refinery in Brazi near Ploiesti, Romania. Other defined and specified goals of the study include a consideration of refinery operating flexibility, an evaluation of fuel switching opportunities, including the use of coal as a substitute for energy supply, and an observation of the plants general condition and of its maintenance practice for its effect on operations. A further objective is to characterize the modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of effort and capital requirements anticipated.

  12. Evaluation audit report. Czechoslovakian petroleum refinery, Kaucuk, Kralupy. A selective refinery analysis for operation, energy use, environmental impacts, and improvement opportunities, May 1992. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Jurish, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    It is the objective of the report to present opportunities for energy improvement and reduction of emissions for the Kaucuk refinery in Kralupy, Czechoslovakia. Other defined and specified goals of the study include a consideration of refinery operating flexibility, an evaluation of fuel switching including the use of coal as a substitute for energy supply, and an observation of the plants general condition and of its maintenance practice for its effect on operations. It is a further objective to characterize the modifications for achieving expected benefits in accordance with the magnitude of effort and capital requirements anticipated.

  13. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Major residential equipment and commercial heating, cooling, & water heating equipment ... major residential equipment and commercial heating, cooling, and water heating equipment. ...

  14. Operating Experience Level 3: Safety Concern: Occurrences of...

    Energy Saver

    of crushing injuries faced by workers who operate various types of equipment, including electric cars, skid-steers, and life equipment. PDF icon OE-3 2012-05: Safety Concern:...

  15. Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment Sector (NAICS 336) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Transportation Equipment (125.57 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010

  16. Environmental Sciences Division environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-05-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action. This report contains a monthly update of environmental regulatory activity that is of interest to the Department of Energy. It is provided to DOE operations and contractor staff to assist and support environmental management programs by tracking regulatory developments. Any proposed regulation that raises significant issues for any DOE operation should be reported to the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance.

  17. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. concentrations in produced water discharge plume / receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentration of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  18. Radionuclides, Metals, and Hydrocarbons in Oil and Gas Operational Discharges and Environmental Samples Associated with Offshore Production Facilities on the Texas/Louisiana Continental Shelf with an Environmental Assessment of Metals and Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    This report presents concentrations of radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons in samples of produced water and produced sand from oil and gas production platforms located offshore Texas and Louisiana. Concentrations in produced water discharge plume/receiving water, ambient seawater, sediment, interstitial water, and marine animal tissue samples collected in the vicinity of discharging platforms and reference sites distant from discharges are also reported and discussed. An environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

  19. Environmental, safety, and health engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, G.; Kocurek, D.

    1997-12-31

    A complete guide to environmental, safety, and health engineering, including an overview of EPA and OSHA regulations; principles of environmental engineering, including pollution prevention, waste and wastewater treatment and disposal, environmental statistics, air emissions and abatement engineering, and hazardous waste storage and containment; principles of safety engineering, including safety management, equipment safety, fire and life safety, process and system safety, confined space safety, and construction safety; and principles of industrial hygiene/occupational health engineering including chemical hazard assessment, personal protective equipment, industrial ventilation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, noise, and ergonomics.

  20. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Griggs, K.S.; Myers, D.S.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1985-02-01

    A strict effluent-control program that emphasizes controlling effluents at the source has been in effect since LLNL began operation. The Environmental Monitoring program evaluates the effectiveness of these measures, documents whether effluents from LLNL and Site 300 operations are within applicable standards, and estimates the impact of these operations on the environment. Sensitive monitoring equipment is used that can detect radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants at environmental background levels. The program includes the collection and analysis of air, soil, water, sewer effluent, vegetation, foodstuffs, and milk samples. Also, environmental background radiation is measured at numerous locations in the vicinity of LLNL using gamma and neutron dosimeters. This report summarizes the results of the 1984 program. 28 refs, 25 figs., 40 tabs.

  1. Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

  2. Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.F.

    1991-12-31

    Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

  3. Cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  4. LMHC/TWRS year 2000 equipment project renovation and contingency plan

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, M.R.

    1999-05-12

    A program has been completed to assess, renovate and document tank farm field equipment year 2000 compliance. A communication plan has also been prepared (see section 8.0). The objective of the program was to assure that no adverse effects occur in tank farm operations as a result of equipment malfunction due to the advent of year 2000. The purposes of this document are to: describe the process used to assess field equipment; document items found to be compliant; document items found to be non-compliant including options for making the equipment year 2000 functional and/or tolerant; describe location and management of field equipment year 2000 documentation; assess overall vulnerability of TWRS field equipment with regard to year 2000 problems and describe plans to communicate year 2000 equipment review results and corrective actions.

  5. Feasibility of high recovery highwall mining equipment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Three equipment systems exhibited significant promise: the RSV Miner, a surface longwall using standard underground equipment, and the variable angle auger. Other equipment systems showing considerable merit were the surface shortwall, and the two extended depth augers. Of the three most significant systems, the RSV Miner exhibits the greatest versatility and adaptability. It may be used competently in many surface mining applications and readily adapts to geologic anomalies and changing seam heights. The machine employs steering and guidance equipment and provides the necessary capabilities for extended depth operation. Safety is good, as no men are required to work underground. However, most important is the system's recovery factor of approximately 75% to 80% of the in-situ coal reserve within reach. The surface longwall system using standard underground equipment (preferably a ranging drum shearer in conjunction with shield supports) is most suited to either a trench mining or a modified area mining application. Both applications would allow the length of the face to be held constant. Another important consideration is legal requirements for a tailgate entry, which would necessitate additional equipment for development in a modified area mining application. When compared to surface shortwall, surface longwall exhibits higher productivity, a far greater equipment selection which allows system tailoring to geologic conditions, and greater roof control due to the significantly smaller section of overburden that must be supported. Recovery should approach, and possibly exceed, 90% of the coal in-place. The variable angle auger, which is currently only a concept, fills a very real need for which no other equipment is available at this time.

  6. Environmental Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Documents Community Environmental Documents Tours Community Programs Friends of Berkeley Lab Navigate Section Community Environmental Documents Tours Community ...

  7. Equipment Listing | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Listing Crystal Preparation and Characterization Resistance Heated Bridgman Crystal Growth Systems Back-Reflection Laue X-ray System Electro-Discharge Machining High and Low speed Diamond Saws Arc Zone Melting Crystal Growth System Lapping Fixtures for Precise Orientation of Crystals (0.1°) Physical Properties Measurement Facilities - Hardness Testing Vickers and Rockwell Hardness Testing Brinell Hardness Instrument Wilson Tukon Micro Hardness Tester Forming and Characterization

  8. Used energy-related laboratory equipment grant program for institutions of higher learning. Eligible equipment catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This is a listing of energy related equipment available through the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment Grant Program which grants used equipment to institutions of higher education for energy-related research. Information included is an overview of the program, how to apply for a grant of equipment, eligibility requirements, types of equipment available, and the costs for the institution.

  9. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2012-02-01

    The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  10. Toward more testable security equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, D.D.; Murray, D.W. )

    1991-01-01

    An important functional aspect of most security related equipment is the need for periodic performance testing. Sensors, entry-control devices, and other such security equipment usually have some sort or reliability or testing requirements. Unfortunately, testing requirements are seldom considered during equipment design, and testing becomes a prohibitively expensive or inconvenient afterthought. In this paper work at Sandia National Laboratories to address this concern is presented, focusing on metal detectors as a test case. Field testing of metal detectors is usually done by passing a test object through the opening to see whether an alarm is generated or not. Such alarm/no-alarm data are poor for making reliability estimates, and thus, a large quantity of such data is required to make good reliability statements. The detector itself uses much better internal information. Experiments tapping into some of this internal data will be discussed, and conclusions will be drawn about the possibility of redesign of metal detectors for enhanced testability. Such conclusions have implications for other types of security-related devices, as well.

  11. Operational Area Monitoring Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan

  12. EA-1859: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EA-1859: Final Environmental Assessment Kirkwood Community College Wind Turbine Project ... who would use these funds to purchase equipment for one 2.5-megawatt wind turbine. ...

  13. Ex-Im Bank Environmental Export Finance Program | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    financing for U.S. exports of: Renewable energy equipment Wastewater treatment projects Air pollution technologies Waste management services Other various environmental goods and...

  14. An Updated Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Coles, Garill A.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Ivans, William J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2014-07-18

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment, as AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results on augmenting an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors that integrate real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors. Methods to propagate uncertainty through the enhanced risk monitor are evaluated. Available data to quantify the level of uncertainty and the POF of key components are examined for their relevance, and a status update of this data evaluation is described. Finally, we describe potential targets for developing new risk metrics that may be useful for studying trade-offs for economic

  15. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  16. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 4, Task 5, Operation of PFH on beneficiated shale, Task 6, Environmental data and mitigation analyses and Task 7, Sample procurement, preparation, and characterization: Final report, September 1987--May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The objective of Task 5 (Operation of Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydro-Retorting (PFH) on Beneficiated Shale) was to modify the PFH process to facilitate its use for fine-sized, beneficiated Eastern shales. This task was divided into 3 subtasks: Non-Reactive Testing, Reactive Testing, and Data Analysis and Correlations. The potential environment impacts of PFH processing of oil shale must be assessed throughout the development program to ensure that the appropriate technologies are in place to mitigate any adverse effects. The overall objectives of Task 6 (Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses) were to obtain environmental data relating to PFH and shale beneficiation and to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the integrated PFH process. The task was divided into the following four subtasks. Characterization of Processed Shales (IGT), 6.2. Water Availability and Treatment Studies, 6.3. Heavy Metals Removal and 6.4. PFH Systems Analysis. The objective of Task 7 (Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization) was to procure, prepare, and characterize raw and beneficiated bulk samples of Eastern oil shale for all of the experimental tasks in the program. Accomplishments for these tasks are presented.

  17. 2004 Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Althouse, P E; Bertoldo, N A; Brown, R A; Campbell, C B; Clark, L M; Gallegos, G M; Grayson, A R; Harrach, R J; Jones, H E; MacQueen, D H; Mathews, S; Nisbet, B A; Noyes, C D; Paterson, L; Peterson, S R; Revelli, M A; Rueppel, D; Sanchez, L; Taffet, M J; Tate, P J; Wilson, K

    2005-09-28

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) annual Environmental Report, prepared for the Department of Energy (DOE) and made available to the public, presents summary environmental data that characterizes site environmental management performance, summarizes environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year, confirms compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlights significant programs and efforts. By explaining the results of effluent and environmental monitoring, mentioning environmental performance indicators and performance measure programs, and assessing the impact of Laboratory operations on the environment and the public, the report also demonstrates LLNL's continuing commitment to minimize any potentially adverse impact of its operations. The combination of environmental and effluent monitoring, source characterization, and dose assessment showed that radiological doses to the public caused by LLNL operations in 2004 were less than 0.26% of regulatory standards and more than 11,000 times smaller than dose from natural background. Analytical results and evaluations generally showed continuing low levels of most contaminants; remediation efforts further reduced the concentrations of contaminants of concern in groundwater and soil vapor. In addition, LLNL's extensive environmental compliance activities related to water, air, endangered species, waste, wastewater, and waste reduction controlled or reduced LLNL's effects on the environment. LLNL's environmental program clearly demonstrates a commitment to protecting the environment from operational impacts.

  18. Environmental Monitoring

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Tour Sampling for known and unexpected contaminants

  19. Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    BULK HAULING EQUIPMENT FOR CHG Don Baldwin Director of Product Development - Hexagon Lincoln HEXAGON LINCOLN TITAN(tm) Module System Compressed Hydrogen Gas * Capacity 250 bar - 616 kg 350 bar - 809 kg 540 bar - 1155 kg * Gross Vehicle Weight (with prime mover) 250 bar - 28 450 kg 350 bar - 30 820 kg 540 bar - 39 440 kg * Purchase Cost 250 bar - $510,000 350 bar - $633,750 540 bar - $1,100,000 Compressed Natural Gas * Capacity (250 bar at 15 C) - 7412 kg * GVW (With prime mover) - 35 250 kg *

  20. Experimental Equipment | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment SSRL plans the distribution of its limited equipment on the basis of the ... positioner (3) Keithly 427 current-to-voltage amplifier TEK 2215 60 MHZ 2 channel scope ...

  1. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Application Process

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equipment listings on the LEDP web site are obtained from the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Energy Asset Disposal System (EADS). Once equipment is listed, EADS allows ...

  2. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - About Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    About LEDP The Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), formerly the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) Grant Program, was established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to grant surplus and available used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges in the United States for use in energy oriented educational programs. This grant program is sponsored by the Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS). The listing of equipment

  3. Independent Specific Administrative Controls Review, Richland Operations Office- December 2010

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Specific Administrative Controls Review with the Office of Environmental Management at DOE-Richland Operations Office

  4. VALVE FUNNEL SPRING PIN PRESS PERFORMANCE AND FUNCTIONAL REQUIREMENTS EVALUATION FOR SPECIAL TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    WITHERSPOON JT

    2009-12-30

    This evaluation allows use of the valve funnel spring pin press and describes appropriate handling instructions for the tool. The engineering evaluation is required for operations and field use of special tools and equipment.

  5. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference IX

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The ninth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  6. Proceedings: Tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference

    SciTech Connect

    2002-06-01

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  7. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference VIII

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-01

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The eighth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  8. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-04-18

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or

  9. Equipment-performance survey of the Bi-Gas coal-gasification pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-29

    An equipment performance survey was conducted at the Bi-Gas Coal Gasification Pilot Plant, Homer City, Indiana, under contract with the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Review of plant design files and maintenance records identified incidences of malfunctions and history of corrective modifications of equipment in the pilot plant. Interviews with plant engineering, operation, and maintenance personnel were made to obtain details of the malfunctions, probable causes, corrective actions, and the results of the corrective actions on ten selected equipment items. Based on the survey, significant experience and technology gaps in the equipment for the Bi-Gas pilot plant were identified.

  10. Practical aspects of steam injection processes: A handbook for independent operators

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K.

    1992-10-01

    More than 80% of the total steam injection process operating costs are for the production of steam and the operation of surface and subsurface equipment. The proper design and operation of the surface equipment is of critical importance to the success of any steam injection operation. However, the published monographs on thermal recovery have attached very little importance to this aspect of thermal oil recovery; hence, a definite need exists for a comprehensive manual that places emphasis on steam injection field practices and problems. This handbook is an attempt to fulfill this need. This handbook explores the concept behind steam injection processes and discusses the information required to evaluate, design, and implement these processes in the field. The emphasis is on operational aspects and those factors that affect the technology and economics of oil recovery by steam. The first four chapters describe the screening criteria, engineering, and economics of steam injection operation as well as discussion of the steam injection fundamentals. The next four chapters begin by considering the treatment of the water used to generate steam and discuss in considerable detail the design, operation and problems of steam generations, distribution and steam quality determination. The subsurface aspects of steamflood operations are addressed in chapters 9 through 12. These include thermal well completion and cementing practices, insulated tubulars, and lifting equipment. The next two chapters are devoted to subsurface operational problems encountered with the use of steam. Briefly described in chapters 15 and 16 are the steam injection process surface production facilities, problems and practices. Chapter 17 discusses the importance of monitoring in a steam injection project. The environmental laws and issues of importance to steam injection operation are outlined in chapter 18.

  11. Final environmental assessment for off-site transportation of low-level waste from four California sites under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office (DOE/OAK) manages sites within California that generate Low Level Waste (LLW) in the course or routine site operations. It is the preference of the DOE to dispose of LLW at federally owned and DOE-operated disposal facilities; however, in some circumstances DOE Headquarters has determined that disposal at commercial facilities is appropriate, as long as the facility meets all regulatory requirements for the acceptance and disposal of LLW, including the passage of a DOE audit to determine the adequacy of the disposal site. The DOE would like to ship LLW from four DOE/OAK sites in California which generate LLW, to NRC-licensed commercial nuclear waste disposal facilities such as Envirocare in Clive, Utah and Chem Nuclear in Barnwell, South Carolina. Transportation impacts for shipment of LLW and MLLW from DOE Oakland sites to other DOE sites was included in the impacts identified in the Department`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS), published in May, 1997, and determined to be low. The low impacts for shipment to commercial sites identified herein is consistent with the WM-PEIS results.

  12. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed reactor system at Building 9212. Draft environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is Iocated within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The current AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems were designed and constructed more than 40 years ago. Because of their deteriorating condition, the corrosive nature of the materials processed, and the antiquated design philosophy upon which they are based, their long-term reliability cannot be assured. The current AHF supply system cannot mitigate an accidental release of AHF and vents fugitive AHF directly to the atmosphere during operations. the proposed action would reduce the risk of exposing the Y-12 Plant work force, the public, and the environment to an accidental release of AHF and would ensure the continuing ability of the Y-12 Plant to manufacture highly enriched uranium metal and process uranium from retired weapons for storage.

  13. Michigan antrim shale production facilities and equipment. Topical report, June 1995-March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, R.

    1996-04-01

    This report summarizes the results from a Gas Research Institute (GRI) sponsored study to document and evaluate the production facilities and operating practices used in the Michigan Basin Antrim Shale. This report provides a historical documentation of this evolution for future Antrim developers, but focuses on the current operator practices. Economic analyses are presented to illustrate the best combination of individual well production equipment, flowline type, and processing equipment to maximize project returns.

  14. Inventory control program for laboratory equipment written in the C programming language

    SciTech Connect

    Dishman, J.L.; Shipp, S.G.

    1986-10-01

    A property inventory package has been written in the C programming language to keep track of general laboratory equipment. All functions which would be expected for a master inventory database are available including add, delete, edit, and find. The package was developed on a Digital Equipment Corporation LSI 11/73 computer using the ULTRIX-11 operating system, and can be adapted for use on any UNIX based system, or any operating system with a C compiler.

  15. Operations and Maintenance Lead-by-Example Resources

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    State and local governments can lead by example by promoting energy efficiency programs and policies for public facilities, equipment, and government operations.

  16. Proceedings: Substation equipment diagnostics conference 6

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, T.P.

    1998-09-01

    Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference 6 was held to assemble, assess and communicate information on the latest diagnostic techniques, test devices, and systems for substation equipment. It focused on the latest in diagnostic equipment and techniques being developed by EPRI and others in research programs, as well as the equipment and programs now available and in service by electric utilities. The conference brought together the views of researchers, manufacturers and users. The papers presented were organized under three categories: Transformers, Circuit Breakers and Other Substation Equipment, and Communications/Data Management/System Integration. Exhibit booths were provided for attendees to obtain detailed information about vendor products or services.

  17. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Application Process

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equipment listings on the LEDP web site are obtained from the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Energy Asset Disposal System (EADS). Once equipment is listed, EADS allows 30 days for grantees from eligible institutions to apply for it on the LEDP site. Equipment Condition Codes are found near the top of the "LEDP Equipment Information" page for each item. The condition of equipment is graded as follows: 1: Unused Good Condition 4: Used Good Condition 7: Repairable Requires

  18. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Contact Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    End of Year Reports At the end of the first year of using LEDP grant equipment, the grantee must provide DOE with a report on the use of the equipment. If a grantee does not submit a report, the DOE OPMO who approved the grant application can pull the equipment back, or not allow that institution to apply for more equipment. The report should describe: Any new courses instituted as a result of the grant of the equipment; Existing courses which have been expanded as a result of the grant of the

  19. Multimedia environmental management

    SciTech Connect

    Soesilo, J.A.; Wiley, W.D.

    1999-09-01

    This book explores and supports the argument that effective environmental management must be based on a multimedia approach, which focuses simultaneously on air, water, and waste and enables managers to assess the resulting financial, operation, and management benefits. The multimedia approach, which can be used to design an effective compliance program, includes proper waste and material handling management, systematic monitoring, and record keeping requirements. This approach integrates a wide array of environmental requirements and decision processes, which the authors examine in sixteen chapters, organized into four parts: the role of environmental management; environmental aspects of business operation, environmental processes; and environmental management trends. Within these parts, the authors highlight the development of modern environmental management and provide an overview of federal laws pertinent to multimedia environmental management. They examine such issues as chemical storage and transportation, tank system operations and requirements, waste determination, spill response procedures, and employee training. Environmental processes addressed in the book include the management of solid and hazardous waste, wastewater treatment systems, stormwater management, air emission control, and site remediation. The authors also briefly discuss significant initiatives in US environmental management and look toward corporate sustainable development.

  20. Clearing Away Process Gas Equipment Moves Portsmouth D&D Forward |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Clearing Away Process Gas Equipment Moves Portsmouth D&D Forward Clearing Away Process Gas Equipment Moves Portsmouth D&D Forward December 29, 2015 - 12:05pm Addthis Clearing Away Process Gas Equipment Moves Portsmouth D&D Forward Crane operator Brian Lambert of Fluor-BWXT Portsmouth, EM decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) contractor, lowers the last compressor to the operations floor of the X-326 uranium enrichment process building at the

  1. Environmental Cleanup

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Cleanup Tour Environmental Cleanup See how LANL is cleaning up the environmental legacy of the Manhattan Project and Cold War

  2. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

  3. Sustainable Environmental Stewardship

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports the understanding and implementation of sustainability programs throughout its network of laboratories and facilities. DOE provides corporate technical assistance, coordination, and integration to its operational units to help resolve sustainability issues and improve environmental performance.

  4. Technical Report on Preliminary Methodology for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Integrated Equipment Condition Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.

    2013-09-17

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) generally include reactors with electric output of ~350 MWe or less (this cutoff varies somewhat but is substantially less than full-size plant output of 700 MWe or more). Advanced SMRs (AdvSMRs) refer to a specific class of SMRs and are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts. AdvSMRs may provide a longer-term alternative to traditional light-water reactors (LWRs) and SMRs based on integral pressurized water reactor concepts currently being considered. Enhancing affordability of AdvSMRs will be critical to ensuring wider deployment. AdvSMRs suffer from loss of economies of scale inherent in small reactors when compared to large (~greater than 600 MWe output) reactors. Some of this loss can be recovered through reduced capital costs through smaller size, fewer components, modular fabrication processes, and the opportunity for modular construction. However, the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs will be dominated by operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Technologies that help characterize real-time risk are important for controlling O&M costs. Risk monitors are used in current nuclear power plants to provide a point-in-time estimate of the system risk given the current plant configuration (e.g., equipment availability, operational regime, and environmental conditions). However, current risk monitors are unable to support the capability requirements listed above as they do not take into account plant-specific normal, abnormal, and deteriorating states of active components and systems. This report documents technology developments that are a step towards enhancing risk monitors that, if integrated with supervisory plant control systems, can provide the capability requirements listed and meet the goals of controlling O&M costs. The report describes research results from an initial methodology for enhanced risk monitors by integrating real-time information about equipment condition and POF into risk monitors.

  5. Augmented reality building operations tool

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2014-09-09

    A method (700) for providing an augmented reality operations tool to a mobile client (642) positioned in a building (604). The method (700) includes, with a server (660), receiving (720) from the client (642) an augmented reality request for building system equipment (612) managed by an energy management system (EMS) (620). The method (700) includes transmitting (740) a data request for the equipment (612) to the EMS (620) and receiving (750) building management data (634) for the equipment (612). The method (700) includes generating (760) an overlay (656) with an object created based on the building management data (634), which may be sensor data, diagnostic procedures, or the like. The overlay (656) is configured for concurrent display on a display screen (652) of the client (642) with a real-time image of the building equipment (612). The method (700) includes transmitting (770) the overlay (656) to the client (642).

  6. Environmental Management Performance Report 11/1999

    SciTech Connect

    EDER, D.M.

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of the Environmental Management Performance Report (EMPR) is to provide the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL's) report of Hanford's Environmental Management performance by: US Department of Energy, Richland Operation

  7. PNNL: About: Site Environmental Report

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    with federal, state and local governmental laws and regulations; and its regional environmental monitoring efforts. The report addresses facility operations and...

  8. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R.

    1993-10-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

  9. Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal Resources Novel Energy Conversion Equipment for Low Temperatures Geothermal Resources Novel Energy Conversion Equipment ...

  10. Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Material Handling Equipment Early Markets: Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment This fact sheet describes the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power material handling equipment ...

  11. Category:Smart Grid Projects - Equipment Manufacturing | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Smart Grid Projects - Equipment Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Smart Grid Projects - Equipment Manufacturing category. Pages in category "Smart Grid Projects - Equipment...

  12. Equipment performance survey of the Westinghouse Coal Gasification Process Development Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-30

    An equipment performance survey was conducted by Mechanical Technology Inc. at the Westinghouse Coal Gasification Process Development Unit, located in Waltz Mill, Pennsylvania. The work was performed under a contract with the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Plant design files and maintenance records were reviewed to identify incidences of malfunctions and a history of corrective modifications of equipment operated in the plant. Interviews with plant engineering, operations, and maintenance personnel were made to obtain additional information on the malfunctions, probable causes, corrective actions, and the results of the corrective actions on selected equipment items. Based on the survey, significant operating experience and technology gaps in the equipment for the Westinghouse Coal Gasification Plant were identified. 15 figures, 6 tables.

  13. Drilling equipment with adaptor for steering long boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D. R.

    1984-10-16

    Drilling equipment for steering relatively long boreholes in rock strata comprises an adaptor for installation adjacent to the drill bit, the adaptor having an inner rotary component drivably connected between the drill rod assembly and the drill bit and a relatively outer component. Releasable latch means are provided having two operational modes in the first of which the inner and outer components are fixedly engaged for rotary motion and in the second mode of which the inner component can rotate relative to the outer component. Also actuatable means are provided for controlling the operational mode of the releasable latch means.

  14. Environmental report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, G.C.; Gallegos, G.M.; Tate, P.J.; Balke, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility operated by the University of California, serves as a national resource of scientific, technical, and engineering capability with a special focus on national security. Over the years, the Laboratory`s mission has been broadened to encompass such areas as strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, the economy, and education. The Laboratory carries out this mission in compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulatory requirements and takes measures to ensure that its operations do not adversely affect the environment or public health. It does so with the support of the Environmental Protection Department, which is responsible for environmental monitoring, environmental restoration, hazardous waste management, and ensuring environmental compliance. During 1993, the Environmental Protection Department conducted sampling of air, sewage effluent, ground water, surface water, soil, vegetation and foodstuffs, and took measurements of environmental radiation. It performed more than 190,000 analyses of environmental samples. The analytical results are summarized along with evaluations of the impact of radioactive and nonradioactive materials, a discussion of the effects of LLNL operations on the environment, and a summary of the activities undertaken to comply with local, state, and federal environmental laws.

  15. Environmental Stewardship

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship community-environmentassetsimagesiconearthday.jpg Environmental Stewardship Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will clean up contamination from the...

  16. Environmental Stories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Feature Stories community-environmentassetsimagesicon-environment.jpg Environmental Protection Stories Our environmental stewardship commitment: we will cleanup contamination...

  17. Environmental Protection | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Protection Argonne's environmental stewardship leverages our R&D programs to help reduce our own electricity use, water consumption and environmental emissions. Environment Argonne National Laboratory is helping our nation build an economy based on renewable energy, a reduced carbon footprint and freedom from foreign oil. We continually monitor our energy use and emissions to minimize our environmental impact and improve our day-to-day operations. Our environmental stewardship

  18. Better metallurgy for process equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Metallurgy choices have expanded significantly for process equipment and pumps used for handling difficult corrosive fluids. If they have been specifying the austenitic AISI types 316, 316L, 317, 317L or the newer first generation alloy 329 in their pumps, there is a strong message in recent literature. Based on tests and experience there are better, often less costly alternatives. In the case of CD[sub 4]MCu, N08020 and 904L, there are lower-cost material alternatives for many applications. For SA S31254 and SA N08367, there are some less aggressive can be substituted. These alternatives are the new second generation duplex steels. The lower cost of the duplex alloys is a result of the reduced nickel content, which is about half that of the standard austenitics. Also, their carbon content is low; the same as 316L and 317L for most alloys, including S31803. The second generation duplex alloys offer significant value improvement in a vast majority of applications over the common austenitics and ferritics. Further, their improved resistance to corrosion and improved physical properties relative to the expensive. and in many cases proprietary, highly corrosion-resistant, super-ferritics and super-austenitics, means that they can and should be considered as an alternative for applications where those materials are now overqualified. Strength, toughness and wide corrosion resistance are all-important properties and considerations for process pump materials. Combine these with competitive cost and there is an opportunity that must be investigated.

  19. NREL: Energy Storage - Facilities and Equipment

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities and Equipment Arial photo of several buildings. NREL's ESIF is the first U.S. facility with capabilities to conduct megawatt-scale R&D examining integration of power grids, buildings, vehicles, charging systems, and energy storage systems. Photo of scientific equipment in a laboratory setting. Differential scanning calorimeter. Photo of a row of ten tall rectangular panels (battery cyclers). Battery cyclers. Photo of scientific equipment and computer monitors in a laboratory

  20. Decontamination and Decommisioning Equipment Tracking System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1994-08-26

    DDETS is Relational Data Base Management System (RDBMS) which incorporates 1-D (code 39) and 2-D (PDF417) bar codes into its equipment tracking capabilities. DDETS is compatible with the Reportable Excess Automated Property System (REAPS), and has add, edit, delete and query capabilities for tracking equipment being decontaminated and decommissioned. In addition, bar code technology is utilized in the inventory tracking and shipping of equipment.

  1. Equipment-Resources-PHaSe-EFRC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Equipment photo Last update 30 April 2015. People wishing to use equipment listed below must first receive training and permission from the Facility Director, or present instrument contact person, who can provide basic training and information from an experienced user. Training and access must be arranged in advance of first use. Reservation of usage time for a number of instruments requires you to set up an account on the Facilities Online Manager (FOM) service! Connect to the

  2. Environmental Sciences Division environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-03-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiative so interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  3. Environmental Sciences Division: Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Langston, M.E.; Nikbakht, A.; Salk, M.S.

    1988-09-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  4. Department of defense central heating plant operator training and certification program: An overview. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, M.K.; Moshage, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    The variety of equipment found in Department of Defense (DOD) central energy plants (CEPs) and the complexity of these plants demands the CEP operators are highly qualified personnel. Given the serious danger posed by improperly operated boilers, similar operations in the private sector have long maintained processes to establish credentials for their employees. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA 1990) also recognize the importance of trained and certified fuel plant operators toward improving air quality. As a result of CAAA 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) will eventually require all operators of boilers with capacities greater than10 million BTU per hour (298 Boiler HP) to be trained and certified. A DOD-wide training and certification program for CEP operators needs to be developed and implemented to increase the safety and reduce the energy and environmental cost of operating central energy plants, and to meet the CAAA 1990 requirements. This study examined the training needs of central energy plant operators at DOD installations to identify the resources required to meet those needs and to assess their effectiveness in the field.

  5. Commercial and Industrial Kitchen Equipment Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: All equipment must be installed on or after January 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015. The documentation must be received no later than March 31, 2016. 

  6. Process Equipment Cost Estimation, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    H.P. Loh; Jennifer Lyons; Charles W. White, III

    2002-01-01

    This report presents generic cost curves for several equipment types generated using ICARUS Process Evaluator. The curves give Purchased Equipment Cost as a function of a capacity variable. This work was performed to assist NETL engineers and scientists in performing rapid, order of magnitude level cost estimates or as an aid in evaluating the reasonableness of cost estimates submitted with proposed systems studies or proposals for new processes. The specific equipment types contained in this report were selected to represent a relatively comprehensive set of conventional chemical process equipment types.

  7. Equips Nucleares SA | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    SA Place: Madrid, Spain Zip: 28006 Sector: Services Product: ENSA is a Spanish nuclear components and nuclear services supply company. References: Equips Nucleares, SA1...

  8. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (1 Mechanic Shop)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate will perform preventative, predictive, and corrective maintenance on Bonneville Power Administration (BPA's) light and heavy mobile equipment in maintenance and filed...

  9. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    D.C. PDF icon esarravt002flicker2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing...

  10. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic...

  11. CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Mechanical Equipment -...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Nuclear Facility Construction - Mechanical Equipment Installation, (HSS CRAD 45-53, Rev. 0) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (HSS CRAD 45-53) establishes review criteria...

  12. Equipment Certification Requirements | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Hydroelectric (Small) Natural Gas Nuclear Solar Photovoltaics Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes Madison - Equipment...

  13. PPP Equipment Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    PPP Equipment Corporation Sector: Solar Product: PPP-E designs, produces and markets Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) reactors and converter systems producing high-purity...

  14. China Power Equipment Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Power Equipment Inc Place: Xian, China Zip: 70075 Product: China-based manufacturer of energy saving transformers and transformer cores....

  15. MOV surge arresters: improved substation equipment protection

    SciTech Connect

    Niebuhr, W.D.

    1985-07-01

    The introduction of metal-oxide-varistor (MOV) surge arresters has added a new dimension to substation equipment protection. Through the optimal use of these arresters, it is possible to lower surge arrester ratings and thereby improve protective margins, resulting in a possible reduction of the insulation levels (BIL) of substation equipment. This reduction in BIL can lead to a significant reduction in the cost of substation equipment. General methods are delineated for selecting MOV surge arresters for substation protection and the resulting effect on substation equipment insulation levels.

  16. Smart Buildings Equipment Initiative | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    ...equipment; and 3) developing and (selectively) executing test procedures that can be used to evaluate the "demand response compliant" statusmaturity of various technologies. ...

  17. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Contact Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contact Us If you have a question about the Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), we recommend you check frequently asked questions. If your question still has not been ...

  18. Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International SEMI | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI) Place: San Jose, California Zip: 95134 2127 Product: Global trade association, publisher and conference...

  19. INL Equipment to Aid Regional Response Team

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    transferred are a Crossley Custom Bomb Trailer for transporting suspect devices to a safe location, and a 3500 GVWR trailer for transporting equipment. Editorial Date November 28...

  20. Stangl Semiconductor Equipment AG | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    German manufacturer of wet chemistry systems for processing silicon and thin-film solar cells. References: Stangl Semiconductor Equipment AG1 This article is a stub. You...

  1. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    SciTech Connect

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  2. Coiled tubing operations and services

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworsky, A.S. II )

    1991-11-01

    Coiled tubing offers many advantages over conventional jointed tubing used for drilling in oil fields, including time savings, pumping flexibility, fluid placement, reduced formation damage and safety. The article gives an overview of coiled tubing history and development. Operating concepts are explained, along with descriptions of the major equipment and components associated with coiled tubing use in the oil field today.

  3. Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 1 of 15 operations and maintenance, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.H.

    1986-01-17

    The basic purpose of the transition program in the operations area was to obtain a detailed understanding of the FMPC operations with emphasis on equipment and organization, Also considered in this evaluation were several extant conditions at FMPC which may have significant impact on initiatives adopted in the operations area. These conditions are as follows: capital expenditures over the last several years averaged less than 20% of what might be considered minimum to sustain such a facility in a good operating condition; the production load is ramping up placing greater demands on an old facility; the workforce is relatively inexperienced (68% with less than five (5) years) at FMPC; plans are in place to institute major upgrading of FMPC facilities; the RFP described the need for a major effort in the Environment, Safety and Health Area. Considering the above concerns, the transition program was focused in the following areas: Procedures - An inexperienced workforce operating in an atmosphere requiring rigid compliance with more rigorous environmental criteria necessitates clear, concise up-to-date procedures to enhance performance; Training - New equipment, new people and rigorous environmental constraints demand an aggressive, focused training program. Equipment - Site conditions are not conducive to reliable equipment performance. Specific knowledge of forecasted equipment performance is imperative to control the present and plan the future. Restoration - The massive planned expenditures must be well understood to ensure that the future production needs are satisfied and that priorities are aligned with need. Maintenance - Based on the site descriptions provided in the RFP, it was clear that the past maintenance practice has been reactive. The facility upgrade program, to be successful, must be complemented by an agressively managed maintenance program.

  4. Appliance/Equipment Efficiency Standards | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ApplianceEquipment Efficiency Standards Massachusetts Boilers Furnaces No Appliance Energy Efficiency Standards (Maryland) ApplianceEquipment Efficiency Standards Maryland...

  5. Testimony of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... We are finishing the cleaning of electrical equipment from smoke damage and we are ... of dust during mining and removal of exhaust fumes during diesel engine operations. ...

  6. Microsoft Word - Environmental Document for Continued Operation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Laboratory document repository, located at Building 6525 (enter East Gate on Greenville Road), and the following websites: DOE website: http:www.doeal.govlso Laboratory ...

  7. Desert Birthday Be Prepared Environmental Management's Operation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and establishing an efficient, effective way to achieve authorization to conduct ... its four-year anniversary in April. Born from the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the ...

  8. Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Restoration Disposal Facility(ERDF) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The ERDF is a large- scale disposal facility authorized to receive waste from Hanford cleanup...

  9. Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... of the US Department of Energy (DOE) convened an ... H. Albright, PhD (Desert Research Institute; Reno, NV), and ... Geological Society of America Annual Meeting, Abstracts with ...

  10. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Ecuador). Refinery equipment, parts, and accessories, March 1991. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    The petroleum sector in Ecuador brings in about 65 percent of the country's revenue. Three of the refineries are located in the coastal region. The other two, plus the Liquified Petroleum Gas Plant (LPG), are located in the Oriente region (Amazon jungle). The refineries operate at about 85% of their installation capacity. The Petroindustrial and Petropeninsula investment plan for 1991 comtemplates the expansion of the Esmeraldas refinery to 110,000 barrels a day, and the up-grading of the Shushufindi and Libertad refineries located near the city of Guayaquil. The United States is by far the largest supplier of refinery equipment, parts and accessories, controlling about 90% of the total market.

  11. Jefferson Lab accelerator upgrade completed: Initial operations set to

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    begin while experimental equipment upgrades continue | Jefferson Lab accelerator upgrade completed: Initial operations set to begin while experimental equipment upgrades continue Jefferson Lab accelerator upgrade completed: Initial operations set to begin while experimental equipment upgrades continue areial Aerial of Jefferson Lab NEWPORT NEWS, VA, August 12, 2014 - The Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility ("Jefferson Lab") has just received formal

  12. Handbook for face-to-face moves of longwall equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, R.F.J.; Pimentel, R.A.; Shoff, W.E.

    1982-10-01

    The problem of moving the equipment of a longwall face from one (the finished) panel to the next has always been an issue critical to any longwall operation. In the United States, moving longwall equipment from panel to panel takes an average of 20 days, and moves as long as 30 days are no exception. With $8 million invested and a 20% return on investment, a longwall move of four weeks represents a $135,000 opportunity loss, in addition to the $200,000 labor required to perform the move and the interest and depreciation related to the equipment. A four to six week move each year will decrease the longwall yearly production by 10% to 15%. For the average US longwall, move time reduction is second only to increasing the system availability in its production improvement potential. The reduction of move time can only be achieved through careful planning, optimal method development, and effective and efficient operational procedures. This handbook has been developed to provide the US coal mining industry with a comprehensive background for and guidance in performing safe and efficient face-to-face moves.

  13. General Restaurant Equipment: Order (2013-CE-5344)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered General Restaurant Equipment Co. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding General Restaurant Equipment had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  14. Instruction and information on used energy-related laboratory equipment grants for educational institutions of higher learning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The USDOE, in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges and other nonprofit educational institutions of higher learning in the US for use in energy-oriented educational programs in the life, physical, and environmental sciences and engineering. This booklet gives information on eligibility and procedure, typical equipment, and institutional costs, along with a proposal guide and terms and conditions of a grant. Appendixes give addresses as to where to review equipment lists and where to mail proposals for used equipment grants. (RWR)

  15. What Is Environmental Justice? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    What Is Environmental Justice? What Is Environmental Justice? Environmental justice is fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people with respect to development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies. Fair treatment means that no population bears a disproportionate share of negative environmental consequences resulting from industrial, municipal, and commercial operations or from the execution of federal, state, and local laws; regulations;

  16. Reliability and durability enhancement for fossil power units` main equipment metal

    SciTech Connect

    Rezinskikh, V.F.; Grin, E.A.; Zlepko, V.F.

    1999-11-01

    By the 90s, the design service life of 100,000 hrs, initially specified for boilers and turbines of power units, had been exhausted by almost 75% of the total number of operating units, and for a quarter of them the operating time was over 200,000 hrs. Today`s economic situation in this country prevents wide-scale replacement of the old equipment. Thus, maintaining operability of the installed equipment while meeting the reliability and safety requirements is of great importance.

  17. Standardized wellheads proven economical for subsea operations

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, C.C.; Silva Paulo, C.A. )

    1994-05-02

    A standardization program for subsea wellheads and completion equipment has made development of Brazil's offshore fields more economical and efficient. The resulting operational flexibility associated with the use of field-proven equipment and procedures saves rig time and can reduce production loss during workovers. Additionally, investments can be rationalized economically by installing part of the completion equipment at the end of the drilling job and then delaying purchase and installation of the christmas tree and the flow lines until installation of the production platform. Savings are also realized from the reduction in the number of spare parts and tools. Moreover, the savings related to improved operations exceed considerably those from equipment acquisition and storage. Thus, the greatest benefit is the operational flexibility. The paper discusses initial standards, the subsea programs, philosophy, implementation, diver-assisted trees, diverless trees, and economics.

  18. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOEpatents

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  19. Unmanned boiler operation a reality in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Ilg, E.

    1996-08-01

    With the rise in liquid level technology in Europe comes new standards for boiler operation. SMART technology for level probes and auxiliary equipment, means many European countries allow a boiler to operate completely unmanned (without operators) for up to 72 hours at a time. It is not just a level control system, but a total boiler control scheme. This incorporates level control, continuous TDS monitoring with blowdown, automatic timed bottom blowdown, feed water control, contamination detection systems for monitoring of incoming feed water, monitoring of exhaust stack temperatures, over pressure alarms and timed automatic blowdown of level pots. One of the main reasons for the development of the SMART equipment and the new boiler codes was to increase reliability of boiler operation. Surveys in Germany and England showed that almost 90 percent of boiler failures was due to operator error, this has almost been eliminated through the use of new equipment based on the new codes.

  20. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Richland Operations Office ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Richland Operations Office (RL) (see also Office of River Protection and Environmental Management). ...