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Sample records for opec angola colombia

  1. Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Notes: Petroleum imports include crude oil and petroleum products. Other OPEC Countries include Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Gabon, Indonesia, Iran, Qatar, and ...

  2. OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet

    Reports and Publications

    2013-01-01

    This report includes estimates of OPEC net oil export revenues, based on historical estimates and forecasts from the latest Energy Information Administration (EIA) Short-Term Energy Outlook.

  3. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  4. OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001 History Projections Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, March 2001. Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide ...

  5. Fact #563: March 23, 2009 OPEC Petroleum Imports

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the 1970's, the U.S. imported more petroleum from OPEC than from non-OPEC countries. The oil embargo in the early 1980's changed that. Though the amount of petroleum imports from OPEC has grown,...

  6. Angola: a great future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The companies represented in Angola and their concessions by area are tabulated, including offshore leases. The government of this only recently independent country puts great emphasis on petroleum development and welcomes foreign companies. The major portion of the production comes from the fields in the Cabinda area. In the future, the reserves in the Congo basin will become more important. Exploration activity is intense and concentrated on the near offshore area of the country. The gas reserves are still not entirely known; present production serves only the needs of petroleum production, including a gas injection project in the Cabinda area and the production of LPG. A map of the offshore concession blocks also is shown.

  7. OPEC Crude Oil Production 1998-2001

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    OPEC began increasing production again in 2000. World oil production increased by 3.5 million barrels per day from fourth quarter 1999 to fourth quarter 2000 to reach 77.9 million ...

  8. OPEC reorganization could spell relief

    SciTech Connect

    Crouse, P.C.

    1987-02-01

    Last year proved to be one of carnage in the oil industry, with only the large, vertically integrated, international oil companies showing strength during the oil price collapse. Independent producers and the manufacturing/service sector watched 50% or greater reductions in income. And this year holds little prospect for significant relief during its first half, although the last half could be better if and when Opec decides to once again test its strength. An Iranian victory in the Iran/Iraq war could also cause an upward movement in price. However, price instability should be less than in 1986, as the business heads toward a consensus price via political factors. The U.S. economy again showed improvement through 1986, with moderate growth of 2.6% in Gross National Product (GNP). The ongoing expansion has lasted four years and is already 17 months longer than the average peacetime expansion. However, important energy components did not show strength, and industrial production continued at level rates for the past two years.

  9. Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo Basin Jump to: navigation, search Name Angola-Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) in the Congo...

  10. Exclusive: OPEC's story - denies it is a cartel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-23

    Coverage of OPEC news in the Western press exploded in 1973 during the Arab Oil Embargo and blossomed during the 1979 oil price hike. Since then, however, coverage wanes when OPEC's problems are its own and not widely impacting consuming nations. OPECNA, the OPEC News Agency, was established in 1980 to improve the quantity and quality of world press coverage of OPEC activities. Since then, OPECNA has also been OPEC's historian. It is felt that OPECNA has achieved its principal goal, that of providing reliable and frequent information about OPEC and the activities of its member countries; however, it appears to have little success in restructuring world opinion. Included here is an exclusive interview by Energy Detente with Mr. Gonzalo Plaza, Director of OPECNA. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for March 1983 are presented for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  11. Fact #934: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Crude Oil Production by State and Federal Offshore Region, 2015 Year Canada Mexico Russia Other Non-OPEC Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Other OPEC Countries Total Imports Percent ...

  12. Is there oil after OPEC : Ecuador's Pasaje

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-14

    Since 1973 when Ecuador joined the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, crude oil production increased by nearly half and domestic petroleum consumption has more than tripled. Oil's percent of Gross Domestic Product was just 3% in 1972, peaked at 17.3% in 1974, and has since declined to 11.71% in 1991. In 1992 the national perspective changed and found that OPEC membership was working against, not in favor of, economic growth. This issue addresses Ecuador's status change and its plans for its petroleum and economic future.

  13. OPEC production: Untapped reserves, world demand spur production expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, I.A.H. )

    1994-05-02

    To meet projected world oil demand, almost all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) have embarked on ambitious capacity expansion programs aimed at increasing oil production capabilities. These expansion programs are in both new and existing oil fields. In the latter case, the aim is either to maintain production or reduce the production decline rate. However, the recent price deterioration has led some major OPEC producers, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, to revise downward their capacity plans. Capital required for capacity expansion is considerable. Therefore, because the primary source of funds will come from within each OPEC country, a reasonably stable and relatively high oil price is required to obtain enough revenue for investing in upstream projects. This first in a series of two articles discusses the present OPEC capacity and planned expansion in the Middle East. The concluding part will cover the expansion plans in the remaining OPEC countries, capital requirements, and environmental concerns.

  14. Angola: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Country Profile Name Angola Population 18,498,000 GDP 129,785,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.20 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code AO 3-letter ISO code AGO Numeric ISO...

  15. OPEC: policy implications for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, R.C.; Klass, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    The oil embargo of 1973-74 first brought the issue of raw-material supply disruptions to public attention. Since then, OPEC has kept oil prices high, and the threat of a renewed embargo remains credible. But other kinds of disruption, such as gasoline rationing, are also possible. On the policy side, the U.S. is now building a stockpile of crude oil for emergency use. That and other policy options to mitigate the impact of future supply cutbacks are examined under four scenarios. Of the technical options, only conversion to coal and reduced lead times show a positive net benefit. Stockpiling, tariffs, quotas, and subsidies to crude oil production only show a positive net benefit if an embargo actually occurs. 269 references, 5 figures, 105 tables

  16. OPEC: 10 years after the Arab oil boycott

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.H.

    1983-09-23

    OPEC's dominance over world oil markets is waning 10 years after precipitating world-wide energy and economic crises. The 1979 revolution in Iran and the start of the Iranian-Iraqi war in 1980 introduced a second shock that caused oil importers to seek non-OPEC supplies and emphasize conservation. No breakup of the cartel is anticipated, however, despite internal disagreements over production and price levels. Forecasters see OPEC as the major price setter as an improved economy increases world demand for oil. Long-term forecasts are even more optimistic. 24 references, 2 figures, 2 tables. (DCK)

  17. OPEC's maximum oil revenue will be $80 billion per year

    SciTech Connect

    Steffes, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    OPEC's income from oil is less than $80 billion this year, only one fourth its 1981 revenue. The optimum revenue OPEC can expect is 15 MBB/D at $15/barrel. Energy conservation will continue despite falling prices because consumers no longer feel secure that OPEC can deliver needed supplies. Eleven concepts which affect the future world economic outlook include dependence upon petroleum and petroleum products, the condition of capital markets, low energy and commodity prices, the growth in money supply without a corresponding growth in investment, and the high debt level of the US and the developing countries.

  18. Learning to live with OPEC oil: the Arab view

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Either OPEC or a similar Middle East organizaiton will recapture the dominant role in oil market as non-OPEC oil sources are depleted. An interview with Ali Ahmed Attiga of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC) suggests the possibility of another embargo, but emphasizes the common bond that both oil-importing and oil-exporting countries have if they become over-dependent on oil. Attiga points out that OAPEC will produce 40% of the energy consumed at the end of 10 years. He credits the 1973 embargo with reminding the US of its vital interest in the Arab world, but admits it did not accomplish the withdrawal of Israel from occupied territory. In response to other questions Attiga doubts other producers will join OPEC, explains OPEC pricing and production policies, and describes its development programs. 1 figure.

  19. OPEC needs help from other exporters to balance market

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1988-11-14

    For the past 5 years the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries has been telling oil producers around the world that it can no longer carry the burden of trying to balance supply and demand without outside help. Non-OPEC exporters have, on several occasions, examined the benefits of sharing the burden of production cuts, but rightly have been nervous of close cooperation with an unpredictable and undisciplined competitor. Cooperation will certainly depend on OPEC reaching its own production cutting agreement. That must be done in a way that given non-OPEC countries confidence that any new production and pricing pact will not fall apart during the first half of next year. OPEC exports to the developing world have been trimmed by the advent of new producers. In most of these countries local production only eliminates or reduces imports. Few are in the class of North Yemen where the initial flow could meet local demand and provide a surplus for export.

  20. An oil and gas cartel OPEC in evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-23

    More than ever before, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting countries is faced with a sophisticated and complex market, a highly charged environmental movement, and new calls for energy conservation and alternative fuels. It has lost a member, Ecuador. However OPEC's future evolves, it will be challenged to change. As non-OPEC oil production continues to decline, OPEC's future could brighten considerably. Natural gas presents a great opportunity to OPEC as many industrial and developing countries utilize gas more extensively because of price and environmental advantages. Whether oil or gas, OPEC will require large amounts of capital to satisfy the world's appetite for petroleum. The loss of Ecuador seems a setback to the Organization, but there are burgeoning Soviet Republics with large reserves in need of development assistance to tap into their natural resources more effectively. On the demand side, many companies are seeking hospitable recipients for their exploratory activities and investment capital. OPEC's role might somehow include the embrace of these developments for the betterment of its individual, unique members.

  1. OPEC Middle East plans for rising world demand amid uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, I.A.H.

    1996-05-27

    The Middle Eastern members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries must plan for huge increases in oil production capacity yet wonder whether markets for the new output will develop as expected. With worldwide oil consumption rising and non-OPEC output likely to reach its resource limits soon, OPEC member countries face major gains in demand for their crude oil. To meet the demand growth, those with untapped resources will have to invest heavily in production capacity. Most OPEC members with such resources are in the Middle East. But financing the capacity investments remains a challenge. Some OPEC members have opened up to foreign equity participation in production projects, and others may eventually do so as financial pressures grow. That means additions to the opportunities now available to international companies in the Middle East. Uncertainties, however, hamper planning and worry OPEC. Chief among them are taxation and environmental policies of consuming-nation governments. This paper reviews these concerns and provides data on production, pricing, capital investment histories and revenues.

  2. As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Independence | Department of Energy As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy Independence As OPEC Ministers Meet, Secretary Chu Stresses the Importance of Energy Independence March 15, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - As OPEC ministers held a meeting in Vienna Sunday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu again stressed the need for energy independence and called for global cooperation on energy, economic and climate challenges. "While OPEC's actions are

  3. The oil price and non-OPEC supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, A.

    1991-01-01

    The design of any effective oil pricing policy by producers depends on a knowledge of the nature and complexity of supply responses. This book examines the development of non-OPEX oil reserves on a field-by-filed basis to determine how much of the increase in non-OPEC production could be attributable to the price shocks and how much was unambiguously due to decisions and developments that preceded the price shocks. Results are presented in eighteen case-studies of non-OPEC producers. This study will be of interest to economists and planners specializing in the upstream and to policy makers both in oil producing and consuming countries.

  4. Angola, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Angola, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.6383925, -79.0278156 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  5. Angola on the Lake, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Angola on the Lake, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.6547811, -79.0489273 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    imports by country from 1973 to 2011. See table below for more detailed information. Note: OPEC Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries Supporting Information Crude Oil ...

  7. 1990s bright for post-OPEC Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Ecuador, in its first full year outside the fold of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, stands poised for a significant expansion of production in the 1990s. While preparing for Ecuador's eventual withdrawal from OPEC last fall, the government since early summer 1992 has moved quickly to approve a number of key development projects. It was, perhaps, no coincidence that the most important conference on Ecuadorian petroleum prospects in recent years was timed to coincide with the government's public confirmation of the pullout. All foreign companies operating in Ecuador attended, with details disclosed of projects planned or under way. This article summarizes these projects and other key issues raised at the conference.

  8. Ecuador to withdraw from OPEC; group to maintain present flow

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-28

    This paper reports that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, which has agreed to maintain its present combined production of 24.2 million b/d of oil in the fourth quarter, will soon see the first pullout of a member. The 13 member group will shrink to 12, probably in November, when Ecuador withdraws. Ecuador President Sixto Duran Ballen issued notice of the pullout Sept. 17, a little more than 1 month after he took office. Ecuador, strapped for cash, wants to save OPEC membership dues reported to be $2-3 million/year. It plans to remain an associate member, although it wasn't immediately clear what that means. No other countries are regarded as associate members.

  9. Non-OPEC oil production set to decline for the first time since 2008

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Non-OPEC oil production set to decline for the first time since 2008 Total oil production from countries outside of OPEC, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, is expected to decline next year for the first time since 2008. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said it expects non- OPEC oil production to grow by 1.1 million barrels per day this year....and then decline by 300,000 barrels per day next year. As a result, the rate of growth in

  10. Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset Fact 836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset Excel file ...

  11. Fact #934: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third of U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Imports | Department of Energy 4: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third of U.S. Petroleum Imports Fact #934: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third of U.S. Petroleum Imports SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The figure below shows the volume and source of imported petroleum to the United States from 1960 to 2015. The countries which are members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are shown in shades of blue while non-OPEC countries

  12. Fact #934: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third of U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Imports - Dataset | Department of Energy 4: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third of U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset Fact #934: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third of U.S. Petroleum Imports - Dataset Excel file and dataset for OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third of U.S. Petroleum Imports fotw#934_web.xlsx (31.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports -

  13. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply in 2010-2011 (Released in the STEO January 2010)

    Reports and Publications

    2010-01-01

    Two large categories define the world's producing countries of crude oil and other liquid fuels (hereafter liquids): those that are members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and those that are outside that group (non-OPEC). This article takes a closer look at the latter category.

  14. Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Production | Department of Energy from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production Statement from Energy Secretary Bodman on OPEC's Decision to Cut Crude Oil Production October 19, 2006 - 9:17am Addthis "We continue to believe that it is best for oil producers and consumers alike to allow free markets to determine issues of supply, demand and price. Despite the recent downturn in crude oil prices, they remain at historically high levels, clearly indicating a

  15. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Even though Saudi Arabia is the world's largest producer of petroleum, and OPEC countries produce much of the oil in the global market, the U.S. imports most of its oil from Canada, Mexico and...

  16. Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The figure below shows the volume and source of imported petroleum to the United States from 1960 to 2013. The countries which are members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries...

  17. Fact #836: September 1, 2014 Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports – Dataset

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #836: Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two-thirds of U.S. Petroleum Imports

  18. Outlook for Non-OPEC Oil Supply Growth in 2008-2009 (Released in the STEO February 2008)

    Reports and Publications

    2008-01-01

    In 2008-2009, the Energy Information Administration expects that non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) petroleum supply growth will surpass that in recent years because of the large number of new oil projects scheduled to come online during the forecast period.

  19. Colombia Ministry of Environment | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Colombia Ministry of Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Colombia Ministry of Environment Name: Colombia Ministry of Environment Address: Calle 37 No. 8-40 - Bogot,...

  20. OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances

    SciTech Connect

    Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

    1988-12-01

    The East-West Center has received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and petroleum trade. The project was later extended to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. As the study progressed, a number of preliminary presentations were made at the US Department of Energy in order to receive feedback from DOE officials and to refine the focus of our analysis. During one of the presentations on June 4, 1987, the then Director of Division of Oil and Gas, John Stanley-Miller, advised us to focus our work on the Persian Gulf countries, since these countries were of special interest to the United States Government. Since then, our team has visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. The political turmoil in the Gulf, the Iran/Iraq war, and the active US military presence have all worked to delay the final submission of our report. Even in countries where the United States has close ties, access to information has been difficult. In most countries, even mundane information on petroleum issues are treated as national secrets. As a result of these difficulties, we requested a one-year no cost extension to the grant and submitted an Interim Report in May 1988. As part of our grant extension request, we proposed to undertake additional tasks which appear in this report. 20 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Word Pro - S9

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    34 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 9.2 F.O.B. Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ................. W W - 7.81 3.25 - 5.39 3.68 5.43 4.80 1975 Average .................. 10.97 - 11.44 11.82 10.87 - 11.04 10.88 11.34 10.62 1980 Average ..................

  2. Analysis of changes in OPEC's crude oil prices, current account, and surplus investments, with emphasis upon oil-revenue purchasing power - 1973 through 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Tadayon, S.

    1984-01-01

    The study sought to provide a comprehensive investigation of changes in the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) crude oil prices, current-account balance, and current-account surplus investments abroad. The study emphasized analysis and, to some extent, quantification of the real value, or purchasing power, of OPEC oil revenues. The research approach was descriptive-elemental to expand upon characteristics of variables identified for the study. Research questions were answered by direct findings for each question. The method utilized for the study included document research and statistical analyses of data derived. The aim was to obtain complete and accurate information. The study compiled documented data regarding OPEC's crude oil prices, current-account balance, and current-account surplus investments abroad and analyzed the purchasing power of oil revenues as time passed and events occurred over the eight years from 1973 through 1980.

  3. CDM Projects in Colombia | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Projects in Colombia Jump to: navigation, search Name CDM Projects in Colombia AgencyCompany Organization C-O2 Sector Energy, Land Topics Finance, Implementation, Market analysis...

  4. Colombia-Cartagena Vulnerability Assessment | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Colombia-Cartagena Vulnerability Assessment (Redirected from CDKN-Colombia-Cartagena Vulnerability Assessment) Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-CDKN-Cartagena...

  5. Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-CDKN-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan Agency...

  6. Colombia-Cartagena Vulnerability Assessment | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Colombia-Cartagena Vulnerability Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-CDKN-Cartagena Vulnerability Assessment AgencyCompany Organization Climate and Development...

  7. Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan (Redirected from CDKN-Colombia-The Development of a Climate Compatible Agriculture Plan) Jump to: navigation,...

  8. GEF-Colombia-Geothermal Energy Grant | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Colombia-Geothermal Energy Grant Jump to: navigation, search Name GEF-Colombia-Geothermal Energy Grant AgencyCompany Organization Global Environment Facility (GEF),...

  9. Colombia-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Offset Project "The Colombia Rio Frio Carbon Offset Project aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions fro the wastewater treatment sector in Colombia by modernizing the Rio Frio...

  10. IDB-Colombia-Renwable Energy and Energy Efficiency Finance Facility...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    IDB-Colombia-Renwable Energy and Energy Efficiency Finance Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name IDB-Colombia-Renwable Energy and Energy Efficiency Finance Facility Agency...

  11. Colombia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Tools Climate-Smart Agriculture Country Profiles Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets Energy Technology Systems Analysis Program (MARKAL) An Enabling Framework for Wind Power in Colombia:...

  12. Word Pro - S9

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 9.3 Landed Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ............... W 5.33 W - 9.08 5.37 - 5.99 5.91 6.85 5.64 1975 Average ................ 11.81 12.84 - 12.61 12.70 12.50 - 12.36 12.64 12.70 12.70 1980 Average ................ 34.76 30.11 W 31.77 37.15 29.80 35.68 25.92 30.59 33.56 33.99 1985

  13. An Energy Overview of Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2003-10-20

    The DOE Office of Fossil Energy is maintaining a web site that is meant to provide useful business- and energy-related information about countries and regions of the world for exporters, project developers, and researchers. The site consists of more than 130 country pages (organized into seven different world regions), with each country page having its own set of links to information sources about that country. There are also more than 30 Country Energy Overviews at the web site--each of these is a comprehensive review of a specific country's entire energy situation, including sections on Energy Policy, Oil, Natural Gas, Coal, Hydroelectric/Renewables, Nuclear Power, Energy Transmission Infrastructure, Electricity, Electric Industry Overview, Environmental Activities, Privatization, Trade, and Economic Situation. The specific country highlighted in this Country Energy Overview is Colombia. The site is designed to be dynamic. Updates to the overviews will be made as need and resources permit.

  14. Energy Watchers I

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    The International Research Center for Energy and Economic Development (CEED) has undertaken a number of activities involving research, publications, and conferences to meet its stated objective of stimulating knowledge in the fields of energy and economic development. The Shadow OPEC area conference sought to trace and weigh primarily the emergency of those seven countries which, for several years prior to 1989, had been in touch with the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) through special missions. Among the major questions addressed in the sessions were: How do Angola, China, Colombia, Egypt, Malaysia, Mexico, and Oman envisage their energy policies within this bloc and within the wider context of possible cooperation with OPEC What will be the impact on other non-OPEC Producers, such as Norway, North Yemen, Canada, the USSR, and certain US states of a closer relationship between OPEC and its shadow group of seven The international energy conference on A Reintegrated Oil Industry was designed to evaluate and assess the trends evident within the oil and gas industry worldwide that include the relatively new arrangements between producer-country firms and other energy companies, largely those in the consuming, importing nations. These arrangements involved stockholding buyouts of downstream facilities, joint ventures, and other approaches. What effect are such developments expected to have on investment, market share, security of supply, exploration, investment, pricing, and even privatization ICEED has selected the title of Energy Watchers for the series under which to publish these proceedings as well as forthcoming conferences. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    exporters operating as OPEC." Prof. M. Adelman, MIT, 2004. Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia UAE Venezuela 0 20 40 60 80 100 120...

  16. TABLE38.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook

    OPEC ... 72,086 1,138 9,203 1,472 417 19 404 571 0 74 Angola ... 1,474 0 80 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina...

  17. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    per day from a base production level of 27.5 million barrels per day (excluding Angola and Iraq), have firmed oil markets. Although OPEC did not achieve total compliance,...

  18. Colombia-UNDP Climate Activities | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    and adaptation to climate change in the Colombian Massif National awareness campaign on climate change "Fall in love with your Planet", Colombia Strengthening the...

  19. Colombia-US Forest Service Program | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    US Forest Service Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-US Forest Service Program AgencyCompany Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area...

  20. Production optimization in the Provincia field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Blann, J.; Jacobson, L.; Faber, C.

    1989-02-01

    Designing or redesigning production facilities for optimum operation usually results in the generation of maximum profit from an installation. But in older fields, or fields where a short life is expected, design changes may not be a viable option. In such cases, obtaining maximum production within the limits of existing facilities, thereby minimizing new investments, may be an attractive option. This paper discusses application of the latter technique in the Provincia field, Colombia, to optimize oil and gas production within constraints imposed by periodic temporary gas-compression-capacity restrictions and by the configuration of existing oil and gas facilities. The multistep optimization program used at Provincia included improvement of individual well performance, optimization of individual well facilities, fieldwide optimization of surface facilities, and optimization of the field production scheme.

  1. Southern Colombia's Putumayo basin deserves renewed attention

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, A.J. ); Portilla, O. )

    1994-05-23

    The Putumayo basin lies in southern Colombia between the Eastern Cordillera of the Andes and the Guyana-Brazilian shield. It covers about 50,000 sq km between 0--3[degree]N. Lat. and 74--77[degree]W. Long. and extends southward into Ecuador and Peru as the productive Oriente basin. About 3,500 sq km of acreage in the basin is being offered for licensing in the first licensing round by competitive tender. A recent review of the available data from this area by Intera and Ecopetrol suggests that low risk prospects and leads remain to be tested. The paper describes the tectonic setting, stratigraphy, structure, hydrocarbon geology, reservoirs, and trap types.

  2. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    F.O.B.[a] costs of imported crude oil by selected country dollars per barrel Year month Selected countries Persian Gulf[b] Total OPEC[c] Non OPEC Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1996 20.71 21.33 19.14 21.27 19.28 19.43 17.73 19.22 18.94 19.65 1997 18.81 18.85 16.72 19.43 15.16 18.59 15.33 15.24 16.26 17.51 1998 12.11 12.56 10.49 12.97 8.87 12.52 9.31 9.09 10.20 11.21 1999 17.46 17.20 15.89 17.32 17.65 19.14 14.33 17.15 15.90 16.84 2000 27.90 29.04 25.39 28.70

  3. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Landed costs of imported crude oil by selected country dollars per barrel Year month Selected countries Persian Gulf[a] Total OPEC[b] Non OPEC Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1996 21.86 19.94 22.02 19.64 21.95 20.49 20.88 18.59 20.45 20.14 20.47 1997 20.24 17.63 19.71 17.30 20.64 17.52 20.64 16.35 17.44 17.73 18.45 1998 13.37 11.62 13.26 11.04 14.14 11.16 13.55 10.16 11.18 11.46 12.22 1999 18.37 17.54 18.09 16.12 17.63 17.48 18.26 15.58 17.37 16.94

  4. U.S. and Colombia to Collaborate on First Solar Decathlon in Latin America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Colombia to Collaborate on First Solar Decathlon in Latin America U.S. and Colombia to Collaborate on First Solar Decathlon in Latin America March 11, 2014 - 8:30am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - This week, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman, Colombia's Minister of Energy and Mines Amylkar Acosta, Mayor of Santiago de Calí Rodrigo Guerrero, and Director of Planning of Colombia Tatyana Orozco signed a Memorandum of Understanding

  5. Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Imports by Country Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Gabon Indonesia Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman

  6. U.S. Imports from All Countries

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Imports by Country of Origin Import Area: U.S. Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Gabon Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3b : Non-OPEC Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply (Million Barrels per Day) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available OPEC = Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries: Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Gabon, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Venezuela. Notes: The

  8. Petroleum Supply Annual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8.PDF Table 28. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 989 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola

  9. Petroleum Supply Annual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9.PDF Table 29. PAD District 3 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 46,922 149 - 782 - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - 782 - - - - - - Angola

  10. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 1,042 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 38,164 55 4,512 0 0 94 94 Angola 950 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  11. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    32,182 276 57 993 905 708 1,613 Non OPEC 146,826 378 6,754 20,047 7,776 10,220 17,996 Angola 13,518 0 0 374 0 0 0 Argentina 1,437 0 0 202 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 3,914 0 0 0 Australia...

  12. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Emirates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 1,098 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 36,529 43 2,659 0 0 22 22 Angola 479 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

  13. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    36,670 267 595 1,098 240 942 1,182 Non OPEC 163,069 81 8,967 13,895 5,736 9,208 14,944 Angola 13,189 0 0 300 0 0 0 Argentina 1,101 0 91 0 0 165 165 Aruba 0 0 0 3,407 0 0 0...

  14. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 33,726 267 595 724 0 0 0 Non OPEC 76,663 0 1,458 10,669 0 710 710 Angola 7,241 0 0 300 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 91 0 0 3 3 Aruba 0 0 0 2,659 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0...

  15. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 25,725 276 0 993 0 0 0 Non OPEC 59,194 322 2,858 14,288 60 540 600 Angola 5,113 0 0 374 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 21 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 1,846 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0...

  16. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 10,326 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 319,072 328 25,168 627 0 316 316 Angola 12,287 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

  17. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 Venezuela 5,359 0 57 0 905 708 1,613 Non OPEC 24,214 0 822 2,623 7,716 8,966 16,682 Angola 6,120 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 181 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 882 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0...

  18. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 13,880 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 435,408 483 39,774 627 0 877 877 Angola 14,731 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

  19. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela 13,730 0 0 0 0 0 0 Non OPEC 428,008 483 36,692 627 0 877 877 Angola 14,726 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 294 0 0 0 Australia 314 0 0 0...

  20. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 12,557 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola ................................

  1. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 August 2016 Table 42. PAD District 2 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 804 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - - - - - - Angola

  2. Environmental impact assessment in Colombia: Critical analysis and proposals for improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Toro, Javier; Requena, Ignacio; Zamorano, Montserrat

    2010-07-15

    The evaluation of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) systems is a highly recommended strategy for enhancing their effectiveness and quality. This paper describes an evaluation of EIA in Colombia, using the model and the control mechanisms proposed and applied in other countries by Christopher Wood and Ortolano. The evaluation criteria used are based on Principles of Environmental Impact Assessment Best Practice, such as effectiveness and control features, and they were contrasted with the opinions of a panel of Colombian EIA experts as a means of validating the results of the study. The results found that EIA regulations in Colombia were ineffective because of limited scope, inadequate administrative support and the inexistence of effective control mechanisms and public participation. This analysis resulted in a series of recommendations regarding the further development of the EIA system in Colombia with a view to improving its quality and effectiveness.

  3. Mercury levels in muscle of some fish species from the Dique Channel, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Olivero, J.; Navas, V.; Perez, A.

    1997-06-01

    Gold mining is an activity that has been increasing during the last ten years in Colombia. Most mining activities are carried out using mercury for gold amalgamation. In a recent publication we stated that in the Sur de Bolivar, the main gold mining zone in Colombia, the highest mercury concentration in hair was observed in fishermen. The Magdalena River, the largest and most important river in Colombia, receives all this contamination and carries it to the Atlantic Ocean through two means: The main river course and the Dique Channel. The Dique Channel is surrounded by many marshes, which are a major source of fish for nearly two hundred thousands people in northwestern Colombia. The goal of the present study was to determine, for the first time, the content of mercury in muscle tissue of the four most popular fish species purchased in some towns along the Dique Channel, to establish whether these concentrations fall within the WHO guidelines, and to identify those species which can be consumed with less risk. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Achieving CO2 reductions in Colombia: Effects of carbon taxes and abatement targets

    SciTech Connect

    Calderón, Silvia; Alvarez, Andres Camilo; Loboguerrero, Ana Maria; Arango, Santiago; Calvin, Katherine; Kober, Tom; Daenzer, Kathryn; Fisher-Vanden, Karen

    2015-06-03

    In this paper we investigate CO2 emission scenarios for Colombia and the effects of implementing carbon taxes and abatement targets on the energy system. By comparing baseline and policy scenario results from two integrated assessment partial equilibrium models TIAM-ECN and GCAM and two general equilibrium models Phoenix and MEG4C, we provide an indication of future developments and dynamics in the Colombian energy system. Currently, the carbon intensity of the energy system in Colombia is low compared to other countries in Latin America. However, this trend may change given the projected rapid growth of the economy and the potential increase in the use of carbon-based technologies. Climate policy in Colombia is under development and has yet to consider economic instruments such as taxes and abatement targets. This paper shows how taxes or abatement targets can achieve significant CO2 reductions in Colombia. Though abatement may be achieved through different pathways, taxes and targets promote the entry of cleaner energy sources into the market and reduce final energy demand through energy efficiency improvements and other demand-side responses. The electric power sector plays an important role in achieving CO2 emission reductions in Colombia, through the increase of hydropower, the introduction of wind technologies, and the deployment of biomass, coal and natural gas with CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Uncertainty over the prevailing mitigation pathway reinforces the importance of climate policy to guide sectors toward low-carbon technologies. This paper also assesses the economy-wide implications of mitigation policies such as potential losses in GDP and consumption. As a result, an assessment of the legal, institutional, social and environmental barriers to economy-wide mitigation policies is critical yet beyond the scope of this paper.

  5. Achieving CO2 reductions in Colombia: Effects of carbon taxes and abatement targets

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Calderón, Silvia; Alvarez, Andres Camilo; Loboguerrero, Ana Maria; Arango, Santiago; Calvin, Katherine; Kober, Tom; Daenzer, Kathryn; Fisher-Vanden, Karen

    2015-06-03

    In this paper we investigate CO2 emission scenarios for Colombia and the effects of implementing carbon taxes and abatement targets on the energy system. By comparing baseline and policy scenario results from two integrated assessment partial equilibrium models TIAM-ECN and GCAM and two general equilibrium models Phoenix and MEG4C, we provide an indication of future developments and dynamics in the Colombian energy system. Currently, the carbon intensity of the energy system in Colombia is low compared to other countries in Latin America. However, this trend may change given the projected rapid growth of the economy and the potential increase inmore » the use of carbon-based technologies. Climate policy in Colombia is under development and has yet to consider economic instruments such as taxes and abatement targets. This paper shows how taxes or abatement targets can achieve significant CO2 reductions in Colombia. Though abatement may be achieved through different pathways, taxes and targets promote the entry of cleaner energy sources into the market and reduce final energy demand through energy efficiency improvements and other demand-side responses. The electric power sector plays an important role in achieving CO2 emission reductions in Colombia, through the increase of hydropower, the introduction of wind technologies, and the deployment of biomass, coal and natural gas with CO2 capture and storage (CCS). Uncertainty over the prevailing mitigation pathway reinforces the importance of climate policy to guide sectors toward low-carbon technologies. This paper also assesses the economy-wide implications of mitigation policies such as potential losses in GDP and consumption. As a result, an assessment of the legal, institutional, social and environmental barriers to economy-wide mitigation policies is critical yet beyond the scope of this paper.« less

  6. Electrical power systems (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, Panama and Peru)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This 12-part set of reports contains market information on the following countries and topics: Brazil - potentiometers, steam turbines, gas turbines, electric generators; Chile - power systems; Colombia - electric generators; Dominican Republic - electric generators; Guatemala - power generation and distribution equipment, non-current carriers, electric generators, and turbines; Jamaica - power systems; Panama - power generation and control equipment; and Peru - power generation equipment. These reports have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. Word Pro - S3

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 3.3c Petroleum Trade: Imports From OPEC Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria a Angola b Ecuador c Iraq Kuwait d Libya e Nigeria f Saudi Arabia d Vene- zuela Other g Total OPEC 1960 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 22 182 e ( ) f ( ) 84 911 34 1,233 1965 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 16 74 42 f ( ) 158 994 155 1,439 1970 Average ...................... 8 b ( ) c ( ) - 48

  8. Petroleum Supply Annual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7.PDF Table 27. PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 1,961 - - 381 - - - - 1,656 1,656 Algeria ................................ - - - 381 - - - - - - Angola

  9. Petroleum Supply Annual

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3.PDF Table 33. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, January 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 2,316 5 -13 54 - -47 -47 - 53 53 Algeria ................................ - - - 68 - - - - - - Angola

  10. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    949 6,731 1,029 508 1,537 Non OPEC 926,975 3,672 21,367 123,756 710 10,270 10,980 Angola 79,399 10 1,979 1,426 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,703 167 0 248 248 Aruba 0 0 0 23,145 0...

  11. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8,039 6,921 14,960 Non OPEC 1,932,132 4,376 78,202 165,474 79,551 123,093 202,644 Angola 164,183 10 1,979 1,526 0 0 0 Argentina 20,608 1 2,831 788 0 2,955 2,955 Aruba 0 0 0...

  12. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Venezuela 1,902 0 0 374 240 942 1,182 Non OPEC 19,630 0 2,479 1,958 5,736 8,371 14,107 Angola 4,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 0 0 0 162 162 Aruba 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Australia 0 0 0 0 0...

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 57 0 5,851 5,134 10,985 Non OPEC 197,938 0 10,786 17,578 59,937 74,447 134,384 Angola 35,359 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 553 0 2,213 2,213 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

  14. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4,528 5,851 5,134 10,985 Non OPEC 1,444,745 3,761 54,586 121,039 60,051 87,331 147,382 Angola 116,243 6 347 1,126 0 0 0 Argentina 16,136 1 2,740 574 0 2,213 2,213 Aruba 0 0 0...

  15. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0 175 374 7,010 6,413 13,423 Non OPEC 258,924 0 16,230 23,572 78,841 103,992 182,833 Angola 53,254 0 0 100 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 621 0 2,707 2,707 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

  16. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook

    4,395 949 6,731 1,029 744 1,773 Non OPEC 928,991 3,672 19,941 130,776 874 9,600 10,474 Angola 81,615 10 1,979 1,923 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,703 167 0 646 646 Aruba 0 0 0 23,145 0...

  17. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 175 374 7,010 6,188 13,198 Non OPEC 259,980 0 17,385 23,792 78,059 104,593 182,652 Angola 53,254 0 0 100 0 0 0 Argentina 0 0 128 621 0 2,707 2,707 Aruba 0 0 0 1,163 0 0 0...

  18. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    297,683 3,346 243 4,528 0 0 0 Non OPEC 696,402 3,302 16,063 89,085 114 5,161 5,275 Angola 55,477 6 347 1,126 0 0 0 Argentina 2,486 1 2,612 21 0 0 0 Aruba 0 0 0 16,193 0 0 0...

  19. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8,039 6,932 14,971 Non OPEC 1,938,257 4,376 81,256 172,714 78,933 123,273 202,206 Angola 166,404 10 1,979 2,023 0 0 0 Argentina 20,608 1 2,831 788 0 3,353 3,353 Aruba 0 0 0...

  20. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 62,151 - - 3,602 - 1,051 1,051 280 15,140 15,420 Algeria ................................ - - - 2,793 - - - - - - Angola

  1. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. PAD District 3 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 663,981 789 - 35,639 - - - - 421 421 Algeria ................................ 1,060 640 - 29,968 - - - - - - Angola

  2. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, 2015 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 2,673 2 -34 89 - -38 -38 1 34 35 Algeria ................................ 3 2 - 98 - -1 -1 - - - Angola

  3. Household energy use in non-OPEC developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.

    1980-05-01

    Energy use in the residential sector in India, Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, the Sudan, Pakistan, Malaysia, and Guatemala is presented. Whenever possible, information is included on the commercial fuels (oil, gas, coal, and electricity) and on what are termed noncommercial fuels (firewood, animal dung, and crop residues). Of special interest are the differences in the consumption patterns of urban and rural areas, and of households at different income levels. Where the data allow, the effect of household size on energy consumption is discussed. Section II is an overview of the data for all eight countries. Section III examines those areas (India, Brazil, Mexico City) for which data exist on the actual quantity of energy consumed by households. Korea, the Sudan, and Pakistan, which collect data on household expenditures on fuels, are discussed in Section IV. The patterns of ownership of energy-using durables in Malaysia and Guatemala are discussed in Section V. (MCW)

  4. CENTRAL STORAGE FACILITY PROJECT IN COLOMBIA TO PROVIDE THE SAFE STORAGE AND PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Raymond; Wright, Kyle A.; McCaw, Erica E.; Vallejo, Jorge

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 40 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance the security of these materials. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials, including orphaned and disused high-activity sources. GTRI began cooperation with the Republic of Colombia in April 2004. This cooperation has been a resounding success by securing forty high-risk sites, consolidating disused/orphan sources at an interim secure national storage facility, and developing a comprehensive approach to security, training, and sustainability. In 2005 the Colombian Ministry of Mines and Energy requested the Department of Energys support in the construction of a new Central Storage Facility (CSF). In December 2005, the Ministry selected to construct this facility at the Institute of Geology and Mining (Ingeominas) site in Bogota. This site already served as Colombias national repository, where disused sources were housed in various buildings around the complex. The CSF project was placed under contract in May 2006, but environmental issues and public protests, which led to a class action lawsuit against the Colombian Government, forced the Ministry to quickly suspend activities, thereby placing the project in jeopardy. Despite these challenges, however, the Ministry of Mines and Energy worked closely with public and environmental authorities to resolve these issues, and continued to be a strong advocate of the GTRI program. In June 2008, the Ministry of Mines and Energy was granted the construction and environmental licenses. As a result, construction immediately resumed and the CSF was completed by December 2008. A commissioning ceremony was held for the new facility in January 2009, which was attended by representatives from the Department of Energy, U.S. Embassy, and

  5. Petroleum resources of South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program series

    SciTech Connect

    Dietzman, W.D.; Rafidi, N.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report is an analysis of discovered crude oil reserves, undiscovered recoverable crude oil resources, and estimated annual oil field production. The countries analyzed are Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. All of the countries in this report have a history of petroleum exploration and development. Also, they maintain policies which support the search for, and exploitation of, petroleum resources. This systematic assessment provides estimates of the quantities of remaining known petroleum reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources. The future feasible production rates from the respective countries are also discussed. The FESAP assessments are limited to petroleum resources recoverable by conventional primary and secondary extraction technology. It is estimated that over 29.4 billion barrels of recoverable oil (both discovered and undiscovered) originally existed within the sedimentary basins of these countries, as follows: Argentina (9.4 billion barrels); Brazil (6.5 billion barrels); Colombia (5.0 billion barrels); Peru (3.6 billion barrels); Ecuador (over 3.0 billion barrels); Chile (1.1 billion barrels); and Bolivia (over 0.8 billion barrels). Through 1982, about 10.2 billion barrels of the oil had been produced. Thus, some 19.2 billion barrels constitute the remaining recoverable petroleum resource base. It is estimated that the most likely volume of crude oil remaining to be found in the seven countries is 12 billion barrels. 91 refs., 59 figs., 82 tabs.

  6. Mining machinery/equipment/parts/services. Oil and Gas field equipment/machinery/parts/supplies (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Trinidad and Tobago)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This 7-part set includes separate reports on market possibilities for field production equipment, drilling equipment, refinery equipment, and auxiliary equipment in the following countries: Argentina, Brazil (2 reports), Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Destination Exports by Destination Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bangladesh Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia

  8. Word Pro - S11

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    70 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 11.1a World Crude Oil Production: Selected OPEC Members (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria Angola Ecuador Indo- nesia Iran Iraq Kuwait a Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia a United Arab Emirates Vene- zuela Total OPEC b 1973 Average ................ 1,097 162 209 1,339 5,861 2,018 3,020 2,175 2,054 570 7,596 1,533 3,366 R 31,150 1975 Average ................ 983 165 161 1,307 5,350 2,262 2,084 1,480 1,783 438

  9. Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History All Countries 74,799 65,198 63,812 59,575 64,573 71,666 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 1,199 2,627 1,100 802 1,120 804 1993-2016 OPEC* 1,199 2,627 1,100 802 1,120 804 1993-2016 Algeria 1993-2015 Angola 1993-2011 Ecuador 1993-2007 Gabon 1995-2012 Iraq 1995-2011 Kuwait 1995-2013 Libya 2005-2009 Nigeria 1993-2010 Qatar 1 1 1 1995-2016 Saudi Arabia 1,199 2,626 1,100 801 1,119 804 1993-2016 Venezuela 1993-2013 Non OPEC* 73,600 62,571 62,712 58,773 63,453

  10. Word Pro - S3

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Table 3.3d Petroleum Trade: Imports From Non-OPEC Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Brazil Canada Colombia Mexico Nether- lands Norway Russia a United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands Other Total Non-OPEC 1960 Average ...................... 1 120 42 16 NA NA - (s) NA NA 581 1965 Average ...................... - 323 51 48 1 - - (s) - 606 1,029 1970 Average ...................... 2 766 46 42 39 - 3 11 189 1,027 2,126 1975 Average ...................... 5 846 9 71 19 17 14 14 406 1,052 2,454 1980

  11. Multiple plates subducting beneath Colombia, as illuminated by seismicity and velocity from the joint inversion of seismic and gravity data

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Syracuse, Ellen M.; Maceira, Monica; Prieto, German A.; Zhang, Haijiang; Ammon, Charles J.

    2016-06-15

    Subduction beneath the northernmost Andes in Colombia is complex. Based on seismicity distributions, multiple segments of slab appear to be subducting, and arc volcanism ceases north of 5° N. Here, we illuminate the subduction system through hypocentral relocations and Vp and Vs models resulting from the joint inversion of local body wave arrivals, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data. The simultaneous use of multiple data types takes advantage of the differing sensitivities of each data type, resulting in velocity models that have improved resolution at both shallower and deeper depths than would result from traditional travel time tomography alone.more » The relocated earthquake dataset and velocity model clearly indicate a tear in the Nazca slab at 5° N, corresponding to a 250-km shift in slab seismicity and the termination of arc volcanism. North of this tear, the slab is flat, and it comprises slabs of two sources: the Nazca and Caribbean plates. The Bucaramanga nest, a small region of among the most intense intermediate-depth seismicity globally, is associated with the boundary between these two plates and possibly with a zone of melting or elevated water content, based on reduced Vp and increased Vp/Vs. As a result, we also use relocated seismicity to identify two new faults in the South American plate, one related to plate convergence and one highlighted by induced seismicity.« less

  12. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | ||||...

  13. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |||...

  14. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |||||...

  15. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | ||||| 1978...

  16. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    | | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | |||...

  17. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    | | | || | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |...

  18. FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF MEXICO, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nicholas; Watson, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Mexico, GTRI first made contact in 2005. The project then lost momentum and stalled. At the same time, GTRIs cooperation with the Republic of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRIs interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Mexico and to facilitate this cooperation, they offered to invite their Mexican counterparts to Colombia to observe its successful cooperation with GTRI. Shortly after that visit, the Government of Mexico agreed to move forward and requested that the cooperative efforts in Mexico be performed in a tripartite manner, leveraging the skills, experience, and resources of the Colombians. As a result, 22 of Mexicos largest radioactive sites have had security upgrades in place within 18 months of cooperation.

  19. FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nicholas; McCaw, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.; Medina, Maximo

    2009-10-06

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Dominican Republic, the GTRI first received contact in 2008 from the Government of Dominican Republic. They requested cooperation that was similar to the tri-partite cooperation between Colombia, Mexico and the United States. Throughout the region it was widely known that the GTRIs cooperation with the Government of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The Government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. In 2007, Colombia was an integral component of GTRI multi-lateral cooperation initiation in Mexico. As a result, twenty two of Mexicos largest radioactive sites have been upgraded in the past eighteen months. These two endeavors served as catalysts for cooperation opportunities in the Dominican Republic. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRIs interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Dominican Republic and to facilitate this cooperation, they

  20. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Microsoft Word - STEO supplement non-OPEC supply Final-2.doc

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... The number, scope, and technical difficulty of the deepwater projects in the Campos Basin could lead to substantial delays in the startup of production, though the projects are ...

  2. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    We welcome your feedback and insights on this article. Country United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia

  3. NREL: International Activities - Bilateral Partnerships

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Printable Version Bilateral Partnerships NREL partners with more than 50 countries around the world to advance development and use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies: Angola Argentina Australia Bangladesh Brazil Canada Chile China Colombia Costa Rica Gabon Haiti India Indonesia Japan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea Mexico North America Philippines Saudi Arabia U.S. Pacific Territories United Arab Emirates Vietnam Asia Bangladesh Under sponsorship from the U.S. Agency for International

  4. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Billion Dollars 1 ) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Colombia Mexico Norway United Kingdom Total Non-OPEC 4 1973 1.7 W 1.5 0.9 0.8 5.2 1.9 W - 0.0 0.0 2.4 7.6 1974 4.4 W 3.3 1.9 1.3 11.6 3.3 .0 W - .0 4.1 15.6 1975 5.2 W 3.5 3.2 1.8 14.9 2.8 .0 .3 .1 - 4.1 19.0 1976 8.7 W 5.1 5.8 1.0 22.2 1.8 - .4 .2 W 3.6 25.8

  5. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9,213 8,935 8,527 7,730 7,344 7,363 1910-2015 Persian Gulf 1,694 1,849 2,140 1,994 1,851 1,487 1973-2015 OPEC* 4,553 4,209 4,031 3,493 3,005 2,673 1973-2015 Algeria 328 178 120 29 6 3 1973-2015 Angola 383 335 222 201 139 124 1973-2015 Ecuador 210 203 177 232 213 225 1973-2015 Gabon 47 34 42 24 16 10 1993-2015 Indonesia 33 20 6 18 20 36 1973-2015 Iran 1973-2001 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1973-2015 Kuwait 195 191 303 326 309 204 1973-2015 Libya 43 9 56 43 5 3 1973-2015 Nigeria 983 767 406 239 58

  6. U.S. Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,580 2,501 2,071 2,129 1,897 2,086 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 17 13 16 15 24 19 1993-2015 OPEC* 354 347 240 227 232 221 1993-2015 Algeria 182 181 122 86 104 105 1993-2015 Angola 10 11 11 14 15 13 1994-2015 Ecuador 2 2 4 4 2 5 1993-2015 Gabon 0 1 1 2 2 1993-2015 Indonesia 4 1 2 5 5 5 1993-2015 Iraq 0 0 2004-2013 Kuwait 1 1 2 2 2 0 1993-2015 Libya 27 6 5 15 2 4 2004-2015 Nigeria 39 51 36 42 34 26 1993-2015 Qatar 1 1 5 7 9 8 1995-2015 Saudi Arabia 14 8 4 4 7 7 1993-2015 United Arab Emirates 1 3 3 1 0

  7. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    11,793 11,436 10,598 9,859 9,241 9,449 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 1,711 1,861 2,156 2,009 1,875 1,507 1973-2015 OPEC* 4,906 4,555 4,271 3,720 3,237 2,894 1973-2015 Algeria 510 358 242 115 110 108 1973-2015 Angola 393 346 233 216 154 136 1973-2015 Ecuador 212 206 180 236 215 231 1993-2015 Gabon 47 34 43 25 18 12 1973-2015 Indonesia 37 21 7 24 25 41 1973-2015 Iran 1973-2001 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1973-2015 Kuwait 197 191 305 328 311 204 1973-2015 Libya 70 15 61 59 6 7 1973-2015 Nigeria 1,023 818

  8. Weekly Petroleum Status Report

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Table 10. U.S. World Crude Oil Prices (Dollars per Barrel) Country Type/API Gravity 11/11/2011 11/4/2011 1/7/2011 1/1/2010 1/2/2009 1/4/2008 1/5/2007 1/6/1978 OPEC Abu Dhabi Murban 39° ................................ 113.19 109.59 93.29 77.70 38.97 94.85 61.39 13.26 Algeria Saharan Blend 44° .................... 114.75 110.30 94.53 76.72 37.44 98.28 59.77 14.10 Angola 1 Cabinda 32° ............................... 114.10 109.68 91.79 75.82 35.04 92.29 54.93 - Dubai Fateh 32°

  9. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History All Countries 52,343 59,570 56,245 63,583 62,424 59,566 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 3,951 2,738 3,343 3,487 3,820 3,752 1993-2016 OPEC* 12,417 15,062 14,321 14,771 18,757 15,181 1993-2016 Algeria 421 66 577 1,489 994 1993-2016 Angola 1,276 2,971 1,458 1,671 4,308 2,956 1993-2016 Ecuador 174 171 176 1995-2016 Gabon 156 1993-2016 Indonesia 26 165 138 56 54 1995-2016 Iraq 1,705 584 3,343 1,493 1,800 2,753 1995-2016 Kuwait 90 1995-2016 Libya

  10. Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 541,439 604,817 670,834 718,478 764,835 812,181 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 20,913 18,297 11,397 14,291 12,302 12,559 1993-2015 OPEC* 59,140 28,181 15,713 14,841 12,302 12,559 1993-2015 Algeria 29,969 8,429 4,074 380 1993-2015 Angola 4,619 1,012 1993-2011 Ecuador 1993-2007 Gabon 72 1995-2012 Iraq 101 2,654 1995-2011 Kuwait 949 1995-2013 Libya 2005-2009 Nigeria 3,401 1993-2010 Qatar 2 1995-2015 Saudi Arabia 20,812 15,643 11,397 13,342 12,302

  11. Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total All Countries 9,441 8,450 7,393 6,237 5,065 4,711 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 1,705 1,842 2,149 1,988 1,861 1,494 1993-2015 OPEC* 4,787 4,429 4,093 3,483 2,996 2,654 1993-2015 Algeria 510 355 241 108 109 105 1993-2015 Angola 393 346 233 215 154 136 1993-2015 Ecuador 135 147 117 153 116 108 1993-2015 Gabon 46 34 43 23 18 12 1993-2015 Indonesia 37 20 6 23 24 38 1993-2015 Iran 0 0 1993-2014 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1996-2015 Kuwait 197 191 305 328 311

  12. Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Total All Countries 5,000 4,674 4,525 4,836 5,298 5,196 1973-2016 Persian Gulf 1,805 1,707 1,923 1,712 1,751 1,808 1993-2016 OPEC* 3,423 3,179 3,420 3,154 3,563 3,220 1993-2016 Algeria 147 130 91 171 191 169 1993-2016 Angola 172 242 161 128 299 159 1993-2016 Ecuador 175 95 144 124 134 143 1993-2016 Gabon 6 0 5 1993-2016 Indonesia 38 43 43 53 48 51 1993-2016 Iran 1993-2014 Iraq 365 349 555 434 390 488 1996-2016 Kuwait 123 199 177 135 323 156

  13. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8,042 7,637 7,946 7,611 8,092 8,035 1920-2016 Persian Gulf 1,753 1,684 1,917 1,690 1,743 1,792 1993-2016 OPEC* 3,271 3,091 3,406 3,024 3,502 3,118 1973-2016 Algeria 19 20 42 79 1973-2016 Angola 160 217 161 128 287 137 1973-2016 Ecuador 264 176 225 223 228 253 1993-2016 Gabon 1993-2015 Indonesia 33 34 53 34 42 44 1973-2016 Iran 1973-2002 Iraq 365 349 555 434 369 477 1973-2016 Kuwait 123 196 177 135 323 156 1973-2016 Libya 59 17 1973-2016 Nigeria 269 218 241 234 272 160 1973-2016 Qatar 1973-2011

  14. South America: Producers brace for hard times

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The outlook for South American petroleum development is the topic of this review. Observations include: Brazil confirms giant discovery, continues drive for deepwater production; Eastern Llanos fields propel Colombia into ranks of oil-exporting nations; Venezuela's PdVSA revamps, goes overseas in search of downstream integration; Production downturn in Argentina while YPF staggers under debt load, mismanagement; Peru renegotiates contracts, nationalizes one operator and asks others to join search; Sharp drilling decline in Trinidad, but production rises because of tax incentives; Ecuador breaks with Opec, adopts wide-open production strategy, flexible prices; Drilling, oil output increase in Bolivia, government moves to rein in YPFB.

  15. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    OPEC Algeria Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC b Total OPEC c 1978 ... 14.12 13.61 13.24 14.05...

  16. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    OPEC Algeria Canada Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC a Total OPEC b 1978 ... 14.93 14.41 14.65...

  17. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    OPEC would increase production quotas (and thus production) when they meet in Osaka, Japan on September 19, statements from some OPEC oil ministers are adding doubt into the...

  18. Gulf Stream Locale P. Michael and M. L. Daum Brookhaven National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 2,254,145 2,129,181 1,905,552 1,650,598 1,438,615 1,385,579 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 429,791 482,680 576,149 524,793 449,578 353,894 1993-2015 OPEC* 1,194,872 1,113,798 1,079,695 892,754 783,979 706,394 1993-2015 Algeria 120,394 86,197 46,013 25,935 25,923 32,058 1993-2015 Angola 74,435 61,935 31,366 26,107 14,170 17,596 1993-2015 Ecuador 10,659 4,645 8,261 19,213 25,737 18,597 1993-2015 Gabon 4,213 11,299 8,112 3,643 1,841 687 1993-2015

  19. U.S. mine production of uranium, 1993-2011

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 4,304,533 4,174,210 3,878,852 3,598,454 3,372,904 3,448,734 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 624,638 679,403 789,082 733,325 684,235 549,906 1993-2015 OPEC* 1,790,811 1,662,720 1,563,273 1,357,907 1,181,458 1,056,471 1993-2015 Algeria 186,019 130,723 88,487 42,014 40,193 39,478 1993-2015 Angola 143,512 126,259 85,335 78,672 56,343 49,767 1993-2015 Ecuador 77,224 75,072 65,913 86,278 78,413 84,176 1993-2015 Gabon 17,022 12,557 15,886 8,993 6,531

  20. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 922,432 859,818 727,383 661,835 605,839 632,218 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 32,645 36,655 49,578 36,276 39,750 28,276 1993-2015 OPEC* 297,725 276,478 216,695 191,739 122,057 95,156 1993-2015 Algeria 28,538 27,871 29,164 9,781 6,440 4,234 1993-2015 Angola 44,554 45,631 30,832 30,371 25,299 17,880 1993-2015 Ecuador 550 347 1,813 1,223 411 931 1995-2015 Gabon 12,809 1,258 6,179 4,800 2,700 3,792 1993-2015 Indonesia 2 1 356 474 526 1995-2015 Iraq

  1. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 2,254,145 2,129,181 1,905,552 1,650,598 1,438,615 1,385,579 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 429,791 482,680 576,149 524,793 449,578 353,894 1993-2015 OPEC* 1,194,872 1,113,798 1,079,695 892,754 783,979 706,394 1993-2015 Algeria 120,394 86,197 46,013 25,935 25,923 32,058 1993-2015 Angola 74,435 61,935 31,366 26,107 14,170 17,596 1993-2015 Ecuador 10,659 4,645 8,261 19,213 25,737 18,597 1993-2015 Gabon 4,213 11,299 8,112 3,643 1,841 687 1993-2015

  2. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History All Countries 132,706 119,378 133,764 123,081 136,820 131,239 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 39,280 33,162 39,719 33,356 38,013 37,251 1993-2016 OPEC* 75,496 63,072 70,225 61,684 75,572 64,823 1993-2016 Algeria 3,755 4,047 2,788 4,493 3,973 3,503 1993-2016 Angola 2,810 3,248 2,140 1,804 3,320 1,321 1993-2016 Ecuador 1,074 352 684 523 854 990 1993-2016 Gabon 200 2 1993-2016 Indonesia 152 244 107 401 126 196 1993-2016 Iraq 8,980 8,284 11,984 8,958

  3. West Virginia Native Selected to Present at the Council for Chemical Research Me

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 496,881 498,326 483,396 472,244 467,890 511,732 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 141,289 141,771 151,958 157,965 182,605 155,177 1993-2015 OPEC* 239,068 244,263 251,163 258,573 263,120 242,362 1993-2015 Algeria 7,112 8,226 9,236 6,298 7,830 3,186 1995-2015 Angola 19,904 17,681 23,137 22,194 16,874 14,291 1995-2015 Ecuador 66,015 70,080 55,839 65,842 52,265 64,648 1993-2015 Gabon 1,523 550 1,990 1995-2014 Indonesia 12,986 7,168 2,194 6,950 7,220

  4. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    249,300 229,100 246,323 228,320 250,845 249,099 1920-2016 Persian Gulf 54,342 50,533 59,425 50,705 54,047 55,543 1993-2016 OPEC* 101,402 92,723 105,585 90,723 108,568 96,653 1993-2016 Algeria 604 599 1,253 2,449 1993-2016 Angola 4,951 6,516 4,995 3,837 8,892 4,248 1993-2016 Ecuador 8,188 5,292 6,962 6,702 7,069 7,854 1993-2016 Gabon 1993-2015 Indonesia 1,020 1,021 1,632 1,013 1,311 1,351 1993-2016 Iraq 11,326 10,480 17,213 13,011 11,429 14,792 1996-2016 Kuwait 3,812 5,881 5,478 4,052 10,025

  5. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 4,304,533 4,174,210 3,878,852 3,598,454 3,372,904 3,448,734 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 624,638 679,403 789,082 733,325 684,235 549,906 1993-2015 OPEC* 1,790,811 1,662,720 1,563,273 1,357,907 1,181,458 1,056,471 1993-2015 Algeria 186,019 130,723 88,487 42,014 40,193 39,478 1993-2015 Angola 143,512 126,259 85,335 78,672 56,343 49,767 1993-2015 Ecuador 77,224 75,072 65,913 86,278 78,413 84,176 1993-2015 Gabon 17,022 12,557 15,886 8,993 6,531

  6. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    310,060 294,858 315,660 302,286 325,716 319,629 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 56,422 51,276 59,920 51,466 55,597 56,261 1993-2016 OPEC* 110,857 100,517 112,899 99,098 117,900 106,087 1993-2016 Algeria 4,558 4,113 3,161 5,487 5,926 5,240 1993-2016 Angola 5,323 7,265 4,995 3,837 9,277 4,942 1993-2016 Ecuador 8,188 5,466 7,133 6,702 7,245 7,854 1993-2016 Gabon 200 158 1993-2016 Indonesia 1,172 1,291 1,904 1,601 1,493 1,601 1993-2016 Iraq 11,326 10,480 17,213 13,011 12,094 15,120 1996-2016 Kuwait 3,812

  7. West Coast (PADD 5) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 496,881 498,326 483,396 472,244 467,890 511,732 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 141,289 141,771 151,958 157,965 182,605 155,177 1993-2015 OPEC* 239,068 244,263 251,163 258,573 263,120 242,362 1993-2015 Algeria 7,112 8,226 9,236 6,298 7,830 3,186 1995-2015 Angola 19,904 17,681 23,137 22,194 16,874 14,291 1995-2015 Ecuador 66,015 70,080 55,839 65,842 52,265 64,648 1993-2015 Gabon 1,523 550 1,990 1995-2014 Indonesia 12,986 7,168 2,194 6,950 7,220

  8. Energy & Financial Markets - Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration (EIA) OPEC Crude oil production by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is an important factor that affects oil prices. This organization seeks to actively manage oil production in its member countries by setting production targets. Historically, crude oil prices have seen increases in times when OPEC production targets are reduced. OPEC member countries produce about 40 percent of the world's crude oil. Equally important to global prices, OPEC's oil

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Total, OPEC, and Non-OPEC By Selected Country Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption Net Imports From OPEC 132 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: OPEC=Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Source: Table 5.7. OPEC Non-OPEC Saudi Arabia Canada and Mexico 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Million Barrels per Day 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995

  10. Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars 1) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait ...

  11. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    over the coming year. EIA projections regarding the call on OPEC reflect our assessment of world oil demand and net supply changes from non-OPEC producers. Projected world...

  12. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2002 Overview World Oil ... lower end of OPEC's target range for the OPEC basket price. ... levels of imports of this fuel are two primary factors ...

  13. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    in 2016 is expected to be in the United States. Non-OPEC production is forecast to decrease by an additional 0.1 million bd in 2017. Changes in non-OPEC production are...

  14. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    outside of the OPEC accounts for most of the world's production (59 percent in 2011), making prospects for non-OPEC production critical to the outlook for world oil markets....

  15. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    moderately in 2009. EIA projects that world oil demand will continue to grow faster than ... In 2009, higher non-OPEC production and planned additions to OPEC capacity should ...

  16. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2014 Expected growth in non-OPEC production reduces the call on OPEC crude required to balance the market On June 11, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries...

  17. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    OPEC production capacity remains about 0.5-1.0 million barrels per day above current OPEC crude oil production levels. Overall oil inventories in the United States and the rest of ...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    in non-OPEC production in recent years as a key cause of the current high oil price environment. The imbalance between growth in world oil consumption and non-OPEC oil...

  19. Word Pro - S3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Overview, 1949-2015 OPEC and Non-OPEC, 1960-2015 From Selected Countries, May 2016 Note: OPECOrganization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Web Page: http http:www.eia.gov...

  20. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) OPEC Crude oil production by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is an important factor that affects oil prices. This organization seeks to actively manage oil production in its member countries by setting production targets. Historically, crude oil prices have seen increases in times when OPEC production targets are reduced. OPEC member countries produce about 40 percent of the world's crude oil. Equally important to

  1. Erie County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Places in Erie County, New York Akron, New York Alden, New York Amherst, New York Angola on the Lake, New York Angola, New York Billington Heights, New York Blasdell, New York...

  2. Property:KML URL | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    + Andover, Massachusetts + http:finder.geocommons.comoverlaysdownload13475.kml + Angola + http:finder.geocommons.comoverlaysdownload7784.kml + Anguilla + http:...

  3. Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels Percent 1960 NA [8] [9] 30,786 333,046 450,799 31,454 -620 -4,267 12,553 139,406

  4. Energy & Financial Markets - Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration (EIA) Non-OPEC Oil production from countries outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) currently represents about 60 percent of world oil production. Key centers of non-OPEC production include North America, regions of the former Soviet Union, and the North Sea. Changes in non-OPEC production can affect oil prices Updated: Monthly | Last Updated: 11/08/2016 This chart shows that net increases in non-OPEC production were very small from 2005 to 2008.

  5. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Non-OPEC Oil production from countries outside the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) currently represents about 60 percent of world oil production. Key centers of non-OPEC production include North America, regions of the former Soviet Union, and the North Sea. Changes in non-OPEC production can affect oil prices Download Data in CSV This chart shows that net increases in non-OPEC production were very small from 2005 to 2008.

  6. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, Selected Years, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels per Day Percent 1960 NA 8 ( ) 9 ( ) 84 910 1,232 86

  7. Colombia-Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    illustrates the U.S. perspective on LEDS: Integrated development goals and objectives, national greenhouse gas inventory, and economic and resource data Long-term projections of...

  8. Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE),...

  9. Colombia-Climate Finance Readiness Programme | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    support from the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU). The Programme will prepare developing countries to effectively and...

  10. Colombia-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN)...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  11. Colombia-The World Bank Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Morocco Implement climate change mitigation policy as part of National Plan against Global Warming. PMR Support: Establish MRV framework. Identify and develop crediting NAMAs...

  12. Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in an effort to build best practice, share tools and research and to create a growing body of knowledge, from a developing country perspective, that is accessible to the...

  13. MHK Projects/Salvajina Colombia SHP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    with other forms of energy production is being tested. These sources include a 1 kW solar panel, the public grid and a diesel generator. Along with the integration of...

  14. Colombia-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    and Development, Inter-American Development Bank, World Bank Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Geothermal, Transportation Topics Background analysis,...

  15. Colombia-Measurement and Performance Tracking (MAPT) Initiative...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    emission development planning, -NAMA Resource Type Case studiesexamples, Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices, Training materials, Workshop Website http:www.wri.org...

  16. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. OPEC Organization of the Petroleum...

  17. Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. OPEC Organization of the Petroleum...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) met and released their oil market assessment, indicating that the world is currently well supplied through the first quarter of...

  19. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    weaker-than-expected demand in Russia, China, or elsewhere would put further downward pressure on prices. EIA estimates that non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting...

  20. highlights.html

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    However, our price forecast is based on OPEC complying with ... Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy ... As in the last Outlook, residual fuel prices to electric ...

  1. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and Motor oc- tane numbers, was developed. OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries): An intergovernmental organization whose stated objective is to...

  2. Glossary

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Excludes ram-jet and petroleum rocket fuels. OPEC: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Coun- tries, oil-producing and exporting countries that have organized for the...

  3. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total OPEC Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Venezuela. In addition, it included Ecuador in 1978-1992 ...

  4. ECUADOR: counting down the barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-09

    Within the world oil market, OPEC faces a reduced role as supplier and production/price dilemmas. One of its members, Ecuador, faces rapid drawdown of its reserves and ultimate loss of membership in the cartel. But Ecuador is tackling the problem by a variety of means and is still defending OPEC prices, as its OPEC Governor tells Energy Detente. The complete interview with Cesar Guerra Navarrete, the OPEC Governor is presented. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices as of February 1983 are included for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  5. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Release: June 15, 2011 A real downturn or just a pause? Projected increases in world oil consumption may require higher production from OPEC countries World benchmark crude...

  6. HIGHLLIGHTS

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. World oil prices for the remainder of 1999 and ... through the winter, but that OPEC production increases after March 2000, either by ...

  7. Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Energy Outlook August 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Oil prices remained relatively ... International Oil Supply and Demand. OPEC 10 production in July is estimated to have ...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - Saudi Arabia 2-22-10 final for distribution...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    IEA: World Energy Outlook 2009 Change in primary oil demand 2007 - 2030 15 20 25 Energy Information ... Oil Prices decisions OPEC production decisions Domestic politics ...

  9. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    pressure on prices. In November of 1997, OPEC, rather than cutting oil production in this environment of declining consumption, increased production. The result: an unanticipated...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    current projections. Chief among these is the responsiveness of supply to the lower price environment. Despite OPEC's recent decision to leave its crude oil production target at 30...

  11. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Annual Energy Outlook

    October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: ... Energy Information AdministrationShort-Term Energy Outlook -- October 2002 2 The OPEC ...

  12. Highlights.doc

    Annual Energy Outlook

    (Energy Information AdministrationShort-Term Energy Outlook -- February 2002) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2002 Overview World Oil Markets. OPEC's stated intention to ...

  13. jan02

    Annual Energy Outlook

    (Energy Information AdministrationShort-Term Energy Outlook -- January 2002) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2002 Overview World Oil Markets. OPEC's decision to go forward ...

  14. World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications

    2005-01-01

    World oil prices in Annual Energy Outlook 2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

  15. Microsoft Word - TOC Section I Conformed thru Mod 274.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua, or Singapore); (3) A least developed country (Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African...

  16. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook

    It was created at the Baghdad Conference on September 1014, 1960. Current members (with years of membership) include Algeria (1969present), Angola (2007present), Ecuador ...

  17. Property:Iso3166Alpha2 | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Afghanistan + AF + Albania + AL + Algeria + DZ + American Samoa + AS + Andorra + AD + Angola + AO + Anguilla + AI + Antigua and Barbuda + AG + Argentina + AR + Armenia + AM +...

  18. Property:NumberOfPrograms | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 5 + Albania + 5 + Algeria + 6 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 1 + Antigua and Barbuda + 6 + Argentina + 12 + Armenia + 6 + Aruba +...

  19. Property:NumberOfDOELabPrograms | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 3 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 1 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 1 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 1...

  20. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    attention. Arresting earlier declines, the region's top two producers, Nigeria and Angola, have each managed relatively robust production and export performances, helping...

  1. Property:Iso3166Numeric | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    + 004 + Albania + 008 + Algeria + 012 + American Samoa + 016 + Andorra + 020 + Angola + 024 + Anguilla + 660 + Antigua and Barbuda + 028 + Argentina + 032 + Armenia + 051 +...

  2. African Development Bank | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    field and country offices across the continent." Shareholders Regional Members Algeria Angola Benin Botswana Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad...

  3. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningPrograms | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 1 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 2 + Argentina + 5 + Armenia + 2 + Aruba + 0...

  4. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsEnergy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 1 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 1 + Aruba + 0...

  5. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsLand | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  6. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPrograms | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  7. Property:NumberOfCLEANPrograms | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 0 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  8. Property:AdvancedEconomy | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    false + Albania + false + Algeria + false + American Samoa + false + Andorra + false + Angola + false + Anguilla + false + Antigua and Barbuda + false + Argentina + false + Armenia...

  9. Steuben County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Steuben County, Indiana Steuben County Rural E M C Places in Steuben County, Indiana Angola, Indiana Ashley, Indiana Clear Lake, Indiana Fremont, Indiana Hamilton, Indiana...

  10. Property:NumberOfLowCarbonPlanningProgramsAgriculture | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 0 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 0 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 1 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 1 + Argentina + 4 + Armenia + 2 + Aruba + 0...

  11. Property:Iso3166Alpha3 | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    + AFG + Albania + ALB + Algeria + DZA + American Samoa + ASM + Andorra + AND + Angola + AGO + Anguilla + AIA + Antigua and Barbuda + ATG + Argentina + ARG + Armenia + ARM +...

  12. MHK Projects/Raccourci Cut Off | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Label":"","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112009 Project City Angola, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  13. Property:NumberOfSolarResources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25) A Afghanistan + 1 + Albania + 0 + Algeria + 1 + American Samoa + 0 + Andorra + 0 + Angola + 0 + Anguilla + 0 + Antigua and Barbuda + 0 + Argentina + 1 + Armenia + 0 + Aruba + 0...

  14. The Pathway to Energy Security

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Canada 2.04 (16.4%) US Domestic 7.38 Venezuela 1.54 (12.4%) Mexico 1.56 (12.5%) Other OPEC 0.78 (6.3%) Iraq 0.77 (6.2%) Nigeria 1.07 (8.6%) Other Non-OPEC 3.0 (24.1%) Saudi Arabia ...

  15. Country Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications

    2028-01-01

    An ongoing compilation of country energy profiles. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries that are important to world energy markets, including members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers, major energy transit countries, major energy consumers, and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers.

  16. Stratigraphic controls on the source rock distribution, Llanos Orientales Basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Ramon, J.C.; Fajardo, A.; Rubiano, J.; Reyes, A. )

    1996-01-01

    All available rock and oil geochemistry analyses were tied to a high-resolution stratigraphic framework for more than 50 wells in the Central Llanos Orientates Basin. New Tertiary generation input is proposed. The best source rock intervals are at the base and top of the Gacheta Formation (Upper Cretaceous) and in the middle of the Barco-Cuervos (Paleocene) and Mirador (Eocene) formations. These organic-rich zones contain type II and III kerogen. TOC contents range from about 1% up to 15%. The four source rock intervals occur within marine shales near condensed sections, at the position maximum accommodation/sediment-supply (A/S) ratios. The development of conditions that allow accumulation and preservation of anomalously high fractions of organic matter might be explained by two mechanisms. Increased A/S ratio results in retention of more sediment in the coastal plain, thus reducing the tendency for siliciclastic sediment to dilute the organic matter accumulating on the shelf. Also, deeper water might restrict circulation, enhancing bottom anoxic conditions. In the more transitional and continental sequences, increased A/S ratio is associated with higher phreatic water level. A high ground water table enhances preservation of coaly intervals. The sea-level rise brings marine water into valleys and low-gradient coastal plains. The resulting embayments, marsh and swampy areas are organic-prone, contributing to the source rock potential of strata associated with high conditions and base-level rise-to-fall turnaround positions.

  17. 4-D stratigraphic architecture and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirado Formation, Cusiana Field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo, A.A. ); Cross, T.A. )

    1996-01-01

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic study using 2300 feet of core calibrated with geophysical logs from 14 wells and 1800 measurements of porosity and permeability established the 4-D stratigraphy and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirador. Virtually all reservoir-quality facies are through cross-stratified sandstones which occur in channel facies successions in the lower Mirador, but in bay-head delta and estuarine channel facies successions in the upper Mirador. Petrophysical properties and the geometry, continuity and volume of reservoir-quality sandstones change regularly as function of their stratigraphic position. These vertical facies successions reflect increasing accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio through each intermediate-term cycle. The upper long-term cycle comprises four intermediate-term, landward-stepping, symmetrical base-level cycles. These cycles consist of estuarine channel, bay-head to bay-fill facies successions. The transition from channel to bay-head to bay-fill facies successions represents an increase in A/S ratio, and the reverse transition indicates a decrease in A/S ratio. Sixteen reservoir zones were defined within the Cusiana field. Reservoirs within the upper and lower long-term cycles are separated by a continuous middle Mirador mudstone which creates two large reservoir divisions. At the second level of zonation, the reservoir compartments and fluid-flow retardants coincide with the intermediate-term stratigraphic cycles. A third level of reservoir compartmentalization follows the distribution of facies successions within the intermediate-term cycles. A strong stratigraphic control on reservoir properties occurs at the three scales of stratigraphic cyclicity. In all cases as A/S ratio increases, porosity and permeability decrease.

  18. 4-D stratigraphic architecture and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirado Formation, Cusiana Field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo, A.A.; Cross, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic study using 2300 feet of core calibrated with geophysical logs from 14 wells and 1800 measurements of porosity and permeability established the 4-D stratigraphy and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirador. Virtually all reservoir-quality facies are through cross-stratified sandstones which occur in channel facies successions in the lower Mirador, but in bay-head delta and estuarine channel facies successions in the upper Mirador. Petrophysical properties and the geometry, continuity and volume of reservoir-quality sandstones change regularly as function of their stratigraphic position. These vertical facies successions reflect increasing accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio through each intermediate-term cycle. The upper long-term cycle comprises four intermediate-term, landward-stepping, symmetrical base-level cycles. These cycles consist of estuarine channel, bay-head to bay-fill facies successions. The transition from channel to bay-head to bay-fill facies successions represents an increase in A/S ratio, and the reverse transition indicates a decrease in A/S ratio. Sixteen reservoir zones were defined within the Cusiana field. Reservoirs within the upper and lower long-term cycles are separated by a continuous middle Mirador mudstone which creates two large reservoir divisions. At the second level of zonation, the reservoir compartments and fluid-flow retardants coincide with the intermediate-term stratigraphic cycles. A third level of reservoir compartmentalization follows the distribution of facies successions within the intermediate-term cycles. A strong stratigraphic control on reservoir properties occurs at the three scales of stratigraphic cyclicity. In all cases as A/S ratio increases, porosity and permeability decrease.

  19. Stratigraphic controls on the source rock distribution, Llanos Orientales Basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Ramon, J.C.; Fajardo, A.; Rubiano, J.; Reyes, A.

    1996-12-31

    All available rock and oil geochemistry analyses were tied to a high-resolution stratigraphic framework for more than 50 wells in the Central Llanos Orientates Basin. New Tertiary generation input is proposed. The best source rock intervals are at the base and top of the Gacheta Formation (Upper Cretaceous) and in the middle of the Barco-Cuervos (Paleocene) and Mirador (Eocene) formations. These organic-rich zones contain type II and III kerogen. TOC contents range from about 1% up to 15%. The four source rock intervals occur within marine shales near condensed sections, at the position maximum accommodation/sediment-supply (A/S) ratios. The development of conditions that allow accumulation and preservation of anomalously high fractions of organic matter might be explained by two mechanisms. Increased A/S ratio results in retention of more sediment in the coastal plain, thus reducing the tendency for siliciclastic sediment to dilute the organic matter accumulating on the shelf. Also, deeper water might restrict circulation, enhancing bottom anoxic conditions. In the more transitional and continental sequences, increased A/S ratio is associated with higher phreatic water level. A high ground water table enhances preservation of coaly intervals. The sea-level rise brings marine water into valleys and low-gradient coastal plains. The resulting embayments, marsh and swampy areas are organic-prone, contributing to the source rock potential of strata associated with high conditions and base-level rise-to-fall turnaround positions.

  20. Flow of formation waters in the cretaceous-miocene succession of the Llanos basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas, M.E.; Ramon, J.C.; Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This study presents the hydrogeological characteristics and flow of formation waters in the post-Paleozoic succession of the Llanos basin, a mainly siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyanan Precambrian shield. The porosity of the sandy formations is generally high, in the range of 16-20% on average, with a trend of decreasing values with depth. Permeabilities are also relatively high, in the 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} md range. THe salinity (total dissolved solids) of formation waters is generally low, in the 10,000-20,000 mg/L range, suggesting that at least some strata in the basin have been flushed by metoeoric water. The shaly units in the sedimentary succession are weak aquitards in the eastern and southern parts of the basin, but are strong in the central-western part. The pressure in the basin is close to or slightly subdepth, particularly in the central-western area. The flow of formation waters in the upper units is driven mainly by topography from highs in the southwest to lows in the northeast. Local systems from the foothills and from local topographic highs in the east feed into this flow system. The flow of formation waters in the lower units is driven by topography only in the southern, eastern, and northern parts of the basin. In the central-western part, the flow is downdip toward the thrust-fold belt, driven probably by pore-space rebound induced by erosional unloading, which also is the cause of underpressuring. Hydrocarbons generated in the Cretaceous organic-rich, shaly Gacheta Formation probably have migrated updip and to the north-northeast, driven by buoyancy and entrained by the topography-driven flow of formation waters in Cretaceous-Oligocene strata in the central-western part of the basin could have created conditions for hydrodynamic entrapment of hydrocarbons.

  1. The palynology of the Cerrejon Formation (upper Paleocene) of northern Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, C.A.; Pardo-Trujillo, A.; Rueda, M.; Torres, V.; Harrington, G.J.; Mora, G.

    2007-07-01

    A palynological study of the Cerrejon Formation was conducted in order to date the formation and understand the floristic composition and diversity of a Paleocene tropical site. The Cerrejon Formation outcrops in the Cerrejon Coal Mine, the largest open cast coal mine in the world. Two cores (725 m) were provided by Carbones del Cerrejon LLC for study. Two hundred samples were prepared for palynology, and at least 150 palynomorphs were counted per sample where possible. Several statistical techniques including rarefaction, species accumulation curves, detrended correspondence analysis, and Anosim were used to analyze the floristic composition and diversity of the palynofloras. Palynomorph assemblages indicate that the age of the Cerrejon Formation and the overlying Tabaco Formation is Middle to Late Paleocene (ca. 60-58 Ma). Major structural repetitions were not found in the Cerrejon Formation in the Cerrejon coal mine, and there is little floral variation throughout. The floral composition, diversity, and lithofacies do not change significantly. Lithofacies associations and floral composition indicate deposition fluctuating from an estuarine-influenced coastal plain at the base to a fluvial-influenced coastal plain at the top. There are, however, significant differences in the composition and diversity of coal and siliciclastic samples. Coal palynofloras have fewer morphospecies, and a distinct and more homogeneous floral assemblage compared to assemblages from the intervening sisliciclastic strata, suggesting that tropical swampy environments supported fewer plant species and had a distinct vegetation adapted to permanently wet environments.

  2. Characterization by XRD and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of waste materials from 'Cerro Matoso' Mine (Colombia)

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Y.; Carriazo, J.G.; Almanza, O. . E-mail: oaalmanzam@unal.edu.co

    2006-07-15

    Materials from a mining process, in which ferronickel metal extraction is the principal aim, were studied. The residual solid (scum) obtained in this process leads to large-scale accumulation of a vitreous material (pollutant) which creates an environmental problem. These materials were characterized by EPR, X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence. The results indicate that the analyzed solids are rich in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO among other oxides. The scum material shows diffraction signals corresponding to the minerals enstatite (pyroxene) and {alpha}-alumina. Moreover, the scum EPR analysis showed a broad line around g = 2.1 corresponding to Fe{sup 3+} clusters in a complex glassy matrix. An analysis of EPR at different temperatures was also performed. The objective of this work, as a first exploratory stage, is to develop a better understanding of the residual solids in order to identify potential applications.

  3. An Enabling Framework for Wind Power in Colombia: What are the...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy, Wind Topics: Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices, Case studiesexamples Website: tech-action.org...

  4. Sedimentary structures and textures of Rio Orinoco channel sands, Venezuela and Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    The majority of the sedimentary structures in the channel sands of the Orinoco River are planar cross-strata that are products of sand-wave deposition. Sands in these deposits are mostly medium-grained. Eolian dunes form on top of the sand waves when they are exposed to the trade winds at low river stages. The windblown sands are typically fine-grained.

  5. U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for the first time since 1988

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    World oil supply more than adequate to meet demand over next 2 years Rising U.S. crude oil production will help non-OPEC supply growth exceed global demand growth for the next two years. Non-OPEC petroleum and other liquids supply is expected to increase 1.9 million barrels per day this year, while oil consumption will grow just 1.3 million barrels per day, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new monthly forecast. Next year....non-OPEC supply is expected to rise another 1.5

  6. Word Pro - S11

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Table 11.1b World Crude Oil Production: Persian Gulf Nations, Non-OPEC, and World (Thousand Barrels per Day) Persian Gulf Nations b Selected Non-OPEC a Producers Total Non- OPEC a World Canada China Egypt Mexico Norway Former U.S.S.R. Russia United Kingdom United States 1973 Average .................... 20,668 1,798 1,090 165 465 32 8,324 NA 2 9,208 R 24,529 55,679 1975 Average .................... 18,934 1,430 1,490 235 705 189 9,523 NA 12 8,375 R 25,509 52,828 1980 Average

  7. Word Pro - S3

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 53 Table 3.3a Petroleum Trade: Overview Imports From Persian Gulf a Imports From OPEC b Imports Exports Net Imports Products Supplied As Share of Products Supplied As Share of Total Imports Imports From Persian Gulf a Imports From OPEC b Imports Net Imports Imports From Persian Gulf a Imports From OPEC b Thousand Barrels per Day Percent 1950 Average .................... NA NA 850 305 545 6,458 NA NA 13.2 8.4 NA NA 1955

  8. dec01

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    December 2001) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2001 Overview World Oil Markets. As major producing countries have jockeyed over the issue of production cutbacks, world oil prices have languished below the stated range preferred by OPEC ($22-$28 for the OPEC basket). OPEC has reported that their basket price averaged about $17.60 per barrel in November, following a $19.60 average in October and $24.30 in September. Spot prices for West Texas Intermediate averaged about $19.60 per barrel in

  9. jul01

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    July 2001) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2001 Overview OPEC and World Oil Prices Since it is clear that OPEC does not intend to increase production quotas at this time, we presume that the weakening in oil prices that has developed since mid-June is likely to diminish and that prices may strengthen over the course of the rest of the summer. Such a development seems likely even though Iraq has agreed to resume U.N.-supervised exports. We assume for the base case projection that total OPEC

  10. Non-contact Nondestructive Probing of Charge Carrier Conductivity in

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-OPEC oil production set to decline for the first time since 2008 Total oil production from countries outside of OPEC, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, is expected to decline next year for the first time since 2008. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said it expects non- OPEC oil production to grow by 1.1 million barrels per day this year....and then decline by 300,000 barrels per day next year. As a result, the rate of growth in

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports Total, 1973-2011 Totals, 2011 By Selected Country, 2011 164 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: OPEC=Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries. Source: Table 5.20. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 Billion Dollars¹ 335 170 165 73 Total Non-OPEC OPEC Persian Gulf 0 60 120 180 240 300 360 Billion Dollars¹

  12. Filling the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Established in 1975 in the aftermath of the OPEC oil embargo, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve was originally intended to hold at least 750 million barrels of crude oil as an insurance policy...

  13. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    week even more interesting is that OPEC oil ministers are currently gathering in Osaka, Japan to discuss whether to increase production quotas for the first time in nearly two...

  14. highllights

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... to bring the OPEC basket price down to 25 per barrel. ... per day of crude oil on world markets in the near term. ... The market there (for diesel fuel as well as motor gasoline) ...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    20. An OPEC agreement to reduce production quotas by 1 million barrels per day helped prop-up crude oil prices. As of Friday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate was...

  17. The outlook for US oil dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.N.

    1995-05-11

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The U.S. economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the U.S. economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the U.S. economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the U.S. and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  18. The Outlook for U.S. Oil Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Market share OPEC lost in defending higher prices from 1979-1985 is being steadily regained and is projected to exceed 50% by 2000. World oil markets are likely to be as vulnerable to monopoly influence as they were 20 years ago, as OPEC regains lost market share. The US economy appears to be as exposed as it was in the early 1970s to losses from monopoly oil pricing. A simulated 2-year supply reduction in 2005-6 boosts OPEC revenues by roughly half a trillion dollars and costs the US economy an approximately equal amount. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve appears to be of little benefit against such a determined, multi-year supply curtailment either in reducing OPEC revenues or protecting the US economy. Increasing the price elasticity of oil demand and supply in the US and the rest of the world, however, would be an effective strategy.

  19. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    lower crude oil output from OPEC countries (Tables 2 and 3). * Global surplus crude oil production capacity averaged 1.8 million bbld in July and August, 0.3 million bbld...

  20. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    was more than offset by the decrease in total OPEC output (Table 4). Global surplus crude oil production capacity in September and October 2013 averaged 1.8 million bbld, which...

  1. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    boosted global liquid fuels production relative to year-ago levels. However, OPEC crude oil production decreased slightly from year-ago levels, as production gains in Libya and...

  2. Fact #664: February 28, 2011 2010 U.S. Petroleum Imports by Country

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. imported almost 12 million barrels per day in 2010, according to data for the first ten months of the year. Canada, Mexico and other non-OPEC countries are the top three places from which...

  3. X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    resolution 1447, renewing the "oil-for-food" deal with Iraq for the thirteenth 180-day phase of the program, and OPEC announced new pro- duction levels, the most significant issue...

  4. Bahattin Buyuksahin

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Saudi Arabia other OPEC Effective Spare Capacity (wS.A.) VenNig Iraq Libya OECDIEA 2010 Demand to Reach 91.0 mbd in 2012 3 Source: IEA Oil Market Report 89.5 mbd in ...

  5. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    in position may enable OPEC to reap a higher price than might be indicated based on fundamentals alone. Of course, ultimately, these positions will be liquidated; it is just a...

  6. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Oils, It Now Only Holds a Premium Over the OPEC Basket In short, tightening global fundamentals have already propelled oil prices relatively close to year-ago levels, with the...

  7. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook

    PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC ...... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ...... 3,980 424 0 0 13 ...

  8. Chapter 1: Energy Challenges | Additional information on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... compromise of computer-based systems in their various ... OPEC b Residen'al Space Hea'ng & Hot Water 2% Commercial Space ... that enable extraction of gas and oil at ...

  9. Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    May 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: World oil prices ... OPEC countries increase their production significantly in the latter half of this year. ...

  10. Microsoft Word - Highlights Bullets.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    OPEC production capacity (and, thus, world oil production capacity) remains about 0.5-1.0 million barrels per day above current output levels, an implied global utilization rate of ...

  11. Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices ... A stronger sentiment on the side of OPEC production discipline, a growing sense by the ...

  12. DOE Hydrogen Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Petroleum (MMBDay Oil Equivalent) Actual Projection U.S. Oil Production EIA 2003 Base Case ... Rest of World OPEC US Percentage of Total Consumption Production Reserves 2% 12% 26% ...

  13. No Slide Title

    Annual Energy Outlook

    DC EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2008 1) Rising world oil consumption 2) Low global surplus oil production capacity 3) Insufficient non-OPEC oil supply growth ...

  14. Microsoft Word - nonopec_supplement.doc

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Based on past experience, the forecast slowdown in non-OPEC production growth in 2010 and the projected decline in 2011 could have important implications for world oil markets. ...

  15. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    had to rely more heavily on stock draws and production from other OPEC suppliers to balance demand. Thanks to easing market conditions, the EIA now expects the average cost...

  16. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    in 2011 and 2012 Leading projected increases in non-OPEC oil production are China, Brazil, and Canada, each of which EIA expects to show average production growth of 120,000 to...

  17. 2015_05_04_Columbia University_FINAL[2].pptx (Read-Only)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 May 2015 Most significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico...

  18. International Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico Brazil Kazakhstan...

  19. International Energy Outlook 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2015 Most significant contributors to non-OPEC crude and lease condensate production: Canada, Brazil, U.S., Kazakhstan, Russia 0 6 12 18 24 Canada United States Mexico...

  20. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    in July, down from 1.5 million bbld in April. Additional deterioration in the security environment in Iraq or Libya could further reduce OPEC production in the short term. In...

  1. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    of global economic growth, the responsiveness of non-OPEC oil production to the low price environment, and any unplanned production outages. As the price of crude oil changes,...

  2. high

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    February 2000 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    c : OPEC Crude Oil (excluding condensates) Supply (Million Barrels per Day) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Includes lease condensate, natural gas plant liquids, other liquids, and refinery processing gain. Includes other unaccounted-for liquids. - = no data available Only regional projections are available for OPEC production,

  4. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    consumers of African crude oil, primarily light sweet crude from Nigeria, Algeria, and Angola, with the United States taking 2 million bbld, or about one-quarter, of African crude...

  5. TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 160,260 4,335 13,631 15,344 16,656 2,431 7,861 9,379 5 217 Angola ... 11,020 0 80 0 0 0 0 383 0 0 Argentina...

  6. Steuben County Rural E M C | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Steuben County Rural E M C Address: 1212 S. Wayne Street Place: Angola, Indiana Zip: 46703 Phone Number: 260.665.3563 Website: www.remcsteuben.com Twitter: @steubencoremc...

  7. TABLE41.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 182,217 6,992 9,071 75,369 86,125 7,090 53,663 46,617 402 911 Angola ... 33,919 0 0 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Argentina...

  8. ETH Bioenergia | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ethanol, sugar and power plant developer and producer, with projects in Brazil and Angola. References: ETH Bioenergia1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  9. TABLE44.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 89,852 349 4,995 9,344 4,244 10,635 2,403 6,068 0 0 Angola ... 2,803 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina...

  10. TABLE36.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... 25,055 559 3,328 12,017 15,173 1,142 6,883 7,565 5 117 Angola ... 5,371 0 0 0 0 0 0 383 0 0 Argentina...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Session2_Rogers.pptx

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... Equatorial Guinea Egypt B i Malaysia Nigeria ORD INSTITUT 200 Brunei Australia Angola Algeria Malaysia Indonesia Australia OXFO - Jan-08 Apr-08 Jul-08 Oct-08 Jan-09 Apr-09 Jul-09 ...

  12. Energia Integral Andina | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Integral Andina Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energia Integral Andina Place: Bogota, Colombia Product: Colombia based company, focused on engineering and equipment supply....

  13. Word Pro - S11

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . International Petroleum Figure 11.1a World Crude Oil Production Overview (Million Barrels per Day) World Production, 1973-2015 World Production, Monthly Selected Producers, 1973-2015 Selected Producers, Monthly 168 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 United States 2014 2015 2016 2014 2015 2016 Non-OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 30 60 90 Non-OPEC

  14. Word Pro - S11

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a World Crude Oil Production Overview (Million Barrels per Day) World Production, 1973-2015 World Production, Monthly Selected Producers, 1973-2015 Selected Producers, Monthly 168 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 United States 2014 2015 2016 2014 2015 2016 Non-OPEC J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D J F MA M J J A S O N D 0 20 40 60 80 100 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 30 60 90 Non-OPEC World 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000

  15. highlightsx.PDF

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    August 6, 1999 Highlights World Oil Markets/Prices Prices. World oil prices for the remainder of 1999 and all of 2000 are now forecasted to be $2-$3 per barrel higher than they were in last month's forecast (Figure 1). This reflects a change in our assumptions concerning OPEC crude oil production. Previously, we had expected compliance with OPEC agreed cuts to peak in May or June 1999, before falling as higher prices triggered more production. Although we still expect this to occur, we have

  16. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2. PAD District I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 845 0 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 6,171 0 0 0 625 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 13,975 0 280 588 1,644 776 715 2,024 3 0 Nigeria ....................................... 8,825 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 0 0 Venezuela

  17. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,253 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 4,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 4,136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 540 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 3,596 0 0

  18. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4. PAD District III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 294 1,174 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ........................................ 5,270 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 33,431 0 1,084 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 41,555 0 1,652 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria

  19. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC .................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Total .............................................. 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Arab OPEC .................................. 2,409 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,299 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia

  20. Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History All Countries 9,114 7,678 8,211 7,785 7,534 8,487 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 1995-2003 OPEC* 2003-2012 Algeria 2007-2010 Nigeria ...

  1. A methodology for assessing the market benefits of alternative motor fuels: The Alternative Fuels Trade Model

    SciTech Connect

    Leiby, P.N.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes a modeling methodology for examining the prospective economic benefits of displacing motor gasoline use by alternative fuels. The approach is based on the Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). AFTM development was undertaken by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a longer term study of alternative fuels issues. The AFTM is intended to assist with evaluating how alternative fuels may be promoted effectively, and what the consequences of substantial alternative fuels use might be. Such an evaluation of policies and consequences of an alternative fuels program is being undertaken by DOE as required by Section 502(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Interest in alternative fuels is based on the prospective economic, environmental and energy security benefits from the substitution of these fuels for conventional transportation fuels. The transportation sector is heavily dependent on oil. Increased oil use implies increased petroleum imports, with much of the increase coming from OPEC countries. Conversely, displacement of gasoline has the potential to reduce US petroleum imports, thereby reducing reliance on OPEC oil and possibly weakening OPEC`s ability to extract monopoly profits. The magnitude of US petroleum import reduction, the attendant fuel price changes, and the resulting US benefits, depend upon the nature of oil-gas substitution and the supply and demand behavior of other world regions. The methodology applies an integrated model of fuel market interactions to characterize these effects.

  2. F.O.B. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Area

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Average 57.78 74.19 101.66 99.78 96.56 85.65 1973-2014 Persian Gulf 59.53 75.65 106.47 105.45 100.62 94.03 1973-2014 Total OPEC 58.53...

  3. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  4. Energy watchers 2

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    This book covers topics of concern to the oil and natural gas industry. Topics include: OPEC in the '90s, investment in the Western hemisphere energy market, the oil industry in Mexico and the Yemen, the future of Soviet oil and gas in global energy markets, natural gas and oil in Norway and Canada, environmental regulations, and the greenhouse effect.

  5. Iraq cracks a few heads in the Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J.

    1990-08-20

    Last month Saddam Hussein charged that oil overproduction by his neighbors was costing Iraq dearly. When an OPEC meeting collapsed last week, he sent 100,000 troops to seize Kuwait, which he had accused of stealing oil. The US is scrambling to organize a Western boycott, but some analysts question just how effective such a more would be.

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    World other liquids by fuel type, 2010-40 million barrels per day Source 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-40 OPEC NGPL 3.27 3.97 4.25 4.51 4.89 5.43...

  7. Proceedings of symposium on energy, finance and taxation policies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which examined the financial, tax and energy policy issues of the oil and gas industries. Topics considered at the conference included the political aspects of Middle East oil, OPEC, oil in the Soviet Union and China, cogeneration financing issues, tax reform, and the politics of energy policy.

  8. DOE to Participate in Colombian Regional Energy Meeting Ahead...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    a regional energy meeting hosted by the Colombian Ministry of Energy in Bogot, Colombia. ... of American States and the U.S.-Colombia Chamber of Commerce, to discuss the ...

  9. Connecting the Americas 2022 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    April 16, 2012 - 8:42am Addthis At the Sixth Summit of the Americas in Cartagena, Colombia, the United States joined Colombia and other leaders of the Western Hemisphere in ...

  10. TABLE43.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 484,763 6,867 55,661 7,548 1,560 117 3,523 6,432 0 1,005 Angola ... 20,829 285 1,577 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Argentina...

  11. TABLE40.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook

    1,064,030 35,714 70,087 92,261 92,427 18,179 62,792 59,916 402 1,986 Angola ... 63,341 285 1,577 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Argentina...

  12. Slide 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Antonio, TX Agreements for Peaceful Nuclear Cooperation * Argentina * Australia * Bangladesh * Brazil * Canada * China * Colombia * Egypt * EURATOM * IAEA * Indonesia * Japan *...

  13. OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  14. Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  15. OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  16. Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  17. Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union,...

  18. Energy Technology Systems Analysis Program (MARKAL) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Switzerland, Albania, Australia, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Colombia, Croatia, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, New Zealand, China, Philippines,...

  19. Rocky Mountain Research Station and LANL build

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 89,636 82,068 91,687 95,299 95,725 107,024 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 1995-2002 OPEC* 6 7 2005-2012 Algeria 6 2007-2010 Nigeria 1995-2002 United Arab Emirates 1995-2002 Venezuela 7 2005-2012 Non OPEC* 89,630 82,068 91,680 95,299 95,725 107,024 1993-2015 Brazil 8 2006-2010 Canada 89,615 82,068 91,662 95,299 95,725 107,024 1993-2015 Egypt 18 2012-2012 Mexico 1995-2006 Norway 2007-2007 Russia 7 2010-2010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  20. International energy indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.K.

    1980-09-01

    Data are compiled and graphs are presented for Iran: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Saudi Arabia: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, 1973-1980; Oil Stocks: Free World, US, Japan and Europe (landed), 1973-1980; Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, 1973-1980; USSR Crude Oil Production, 1974-1980; Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, 1973-1980; US Imports of Crude Oil and Products, 1973-1980; Landed Cost of Saudi Crude in Current and 1974 Dollars; US Trade in Bituminous Coal, 1973-1980; Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-1980; and Energy/GNP Ratio.

  1. How might North American oil and gas markets have performed with a Free Trade Agreement in 1970?

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, G.C.; Waverman, L.

    1993-12-31

    Deregulation on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border has made certain aspects of trade agreements largely superfluous in the near term. It is over the longer term that the impact of the NAFTA will become apparent. To grapple with this issue, simulations are attempted of oil and gas trade between the United States and Canada as if the NAFTA had been in place before the first oil price shock of 1973. The simulations suggest substantial additional exports of Canadian oil and gas would have enabled the United States to back out volumes of OPEC oil during the critical years of the late 1970s and early 1980s. This would have served to dampen world oil markets during the years of OPEC ascendancy-not dramatically, but not negligibly either. By promoting closer integration of energy markets, the NAFTA should lead to more cohesive North American responses to any future world oil shocks. 13 refs., 8 tabs.

  2. STFC PowerPoint template

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2000 Overview Oil prices are defying gravity, remaining well above $30.00 per barrel ($33.10 for WTI in October and similar levels for the first week of November). This situation persists despite estimates of significant world production above demand requirements and despite another round of announced OPEC increases. Israeli/Palestinian tensions notwithstanding, we do not see how prices can remain detached from the corrective forces of the world market if production is as high as is

  3. Winners and losers from cheaper oil

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, E.

    1984-11-26

    Oil prices are slipping despite OPEC's efforts to prop them up by cutting production. Abundant oil and slack demand will press prices into a substantial drop. That portends more growth, less inflation, and good news for industries, especially the airline and automobile industries. Banks and some oil companies could be hurt, but chemical and steel companies will benefit. Concerns that the country will drop conservation efforts overlook the efficiency improvements already embedded in new machinery and automobiles and the insulation installed in buildings.

  4. No Slide Title

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    08 Summer Transportation 2008 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook Fuels Outlook Guy Caruso Administrator Energy Information Administration EIA 2008 Energy Conference 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis April 8, 2008 Washington, DC EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2008 1) Rising world oil consumption 2) Low global surplus oil production capacity 3) Insufficient non-OPEC oil supply growth relative to demand 4) Supply concerns in international oil markets Together these factors

  5. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2007 | Department of Energy 8: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2007. The Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) held 69% of the world's crude oil reserves and produced 41% of world

  6. Mideast stays quiet but has vigor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    New drilling activity in the Middle East comes in the Egyptian Red Sea and at both Yemen and Qatar. The last in the scene of the giant North Dome gas development. Otherwise the Mideast sector is quiet with hard production ceilings demanded by OPEC and a war on the east coast of the gulf causing more confusion. A review of the current activity is presented.

  7. jasongoh | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook -- January 2002) 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2002 Overview World Oil Markets. OPEC's decision to go forward with an additional oil production quota cut of 1.5 million barrels per day beginning January 1 revealed the Cartel's preference for price support over market share maintenance in the face of weak near-term world oil demand conditions. The strategy, ostensibly to be reviewed at the next ministerial meeting in March, may

  8. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, 2015 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 975,663 789 - 44,168 - 1,051 1,051 280 15,561 15,841 Algeria ................................ 1,060 640 - 35,947 - - - - -

  9. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 August 2016 Table 39. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 96,653 - 577 4,569 - - - 5 1,087 1,092 Algeria ................................ - - 577

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 August 2016 Table 40. Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, January-August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 768,818 - 577 35,698 - 2 2 5 10,971 10,976 Algeria

  11. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 August 2016 Table 41. PAD District 1 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 12,235 - 577 - - - - - 891 891 Algeria ................................ - - 577 - - - - - - -

  12. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 August 2016 Table 43. PAD District 3 - Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 59,416 - - 3,826 - - - - 196 196 Algeria ................................ - - - 3,307 - - - - 196

  13. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 August 2016 Table 45. PAD District 1 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 97,615 - 577 468 - 2 2 - 8,939 8,939 Algeria ................................

  14. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 August 2016 Table 46. PAD District 2 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 9,947 - - - - - - - - - Algeria ................................ - - - - - -

  15. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 August 2016 Table 47. PAD District 3 - Year-to-Date Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, January-August 2016 (Thousand Barrels) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1,2 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils 1 Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 479,044 - - 32,540 - - - - 2,032 2,032 Algeria

  16. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 August 2016 Table 53. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, August 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,118 0 -14 130 - -51 -51 0 35 35 Algeria ................................ - - 19 131 - - - -

  17. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 August 2016 Table 54. Year-to-Date Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, January-August 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Country of Origin Crude Oil 1 Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total Reform- ulated Conven- tional Total OPEC ..................................... 3,151 0 -23 120 - -44 -44 0 38 38 Algeria

  18. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8, 2014 2014 Summer Fuels Outlook Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption growth and contribute to modest declines in world crude oil prices. * Brent crude oil prices fall gradually over the forecast, averaging, from $109 per barrel in 2013 to $105 per

  19. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    March 2007 1 March 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 6, 2007 Release (Next Update: April 10, 2007) Highlights * World oil markets tightened in recent weeks in response to production cuts by members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the return of cold winter weather in North America. February's cold weather and higher demand for heating fuels reduced petroleum inventories (both crude and product) more than expected and raised spot prices for crude oil and natural

  20. A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Arnold Barry

    2006-04-01

    What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

  1. TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 1,726 37 20 0 (s) 41 -3 (s) 296 391 2,116 Algeria ...................................... 0 37 0 0 0 27 0 0 252 316 316 Iraq ........................................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 Kuwait ....................................... 252 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) (s) (s) 252 Qatar ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0

  2. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications

    2008-01-01

    Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both "above ground" and "below ground" factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. The Energy Information Administration will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

  3. International Services | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The

  4. Eia.gov BETA - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Information Administration (EIA) Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia

  5. Mega borg oil spill: Fate and effect studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-28

    The Mega Borg, a Norwegian tanker, released an estimated 5.1 million gallons (gal) of Palanca Angola crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico during a lightering accident and subsequent fire. The collection of reports was designed to provide a comprehensive overview of the spill chronology, the fate of the oil released, and subsequent studies that were conducted to assess the impacts of the oil spill on the environment and its biota.

  6. Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    107.07 103.00 88.29 1973-2014 Angola 61.32 80.61 114.05 114.95 110.81 99.25 1973-2014 Mexico 57.35 72.86 101.21 102.45 99.06 87.48 1973-2014 Nigeria 68.01 83.14 116.43 116.88...

  7. Eight Projects Selected for NERSC's Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Administration (EIA) Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia

  8. Stump the Scientist Question Form | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Please Help Us Stump the Scientist Ask Your Question *Required fields Name* Email* School/Company* Twitter Handle Country* Select Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad

  9. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Projects published on Beta are not final and may contain programming errors. They are for public testing and comment only. We welcome your feedback. For final products, please visit www.eia.gov. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Rea Give Us Your Feedback We welcome your feedback and insights on this project. Your Country: United States Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Angola Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas, The

  10. U

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... AS - Australia; CN - Canada; CL - Colombia; ID - Indonesia; PL - Poland; RS - Russia; VZ - Venezuela; OT - Other. | || |INSTRUCTIONS continued|For Column 'f' Coal Mine County Code, ...

  11. U

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... AS - Australia; CN - Canada; CL - Colombia; ID - Indonesia; PL - Poland; RS - Russia; VZ - Venezuela; OT - Other. 4 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Form ...

  12. Observatory of Renewable Energy for Latin America and the Caribbean...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay UN Region Caribbean, Central America, South America References...

  13. Andean Development Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Bolivia Chile Colombia Costa Rica Dominican Republic Ecuador Jamaica Mexico Panama Paraguay Peru Spain Trinidad & Tobago Uruguay Venezuela and 14 private banks in the region....

  14. Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas Western Hemisphere Clean Energy Initiative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Ministers of Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru, Panama and the United States announced the creation of a new Western Hemisphere Clean Energy Initiative.

  15. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States) Univ. of Los Andes, Bogota (Colombia) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States) Georgia Inst. ...

  16. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Imports by PADD of Processing from Colombia of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) ...

  17. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    national treatment for trade in natural gas with Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco,...

  18. Press Pass - Press Releases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    University and Californias Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; John Ellis (Colombia), of CERN, the European Particle Physics Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland; Belen...

  19. The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Chile-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Colombia-Mitigation Action Plans and Scenarios (MAPS) Peru-Mitigation Action Plans and...

  20. Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Ci:grasp Colombia-Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer)...

  1. Natural Ventilation in California Offices: Estimated Health Effects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: ASHRAE IAQ 2013: Environmental Health in Low Energy Buildings, Vancouver, British Colombia, October 15-18, 2013 Research Org: Ernest Orlando Lawrence ...

  2. Fire In The Ice

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Gas Hydrate Reservoirs in the Offshore Caribbean Region of Colombia Andrs Eduardo Calle Ochoa, Instituto Colombiano del Petrleo CSEM Survey of a Methane Vent Site, Offshore ...

  3. Energy News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Clean Energy Initiative Energy Ministers of Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru, Panama and the United States announced the creation of a new Western Hemisphere Clean...

  4. DOE/EA-1976 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR PROPOSED CNG...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. ...

  5. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. ...

  6. Microsoft Word - DE-SOL-0006851 FINAL Amended 9-5-14.rtf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, or ...

  7. downloadForm.asp

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, or ...

  8. Climate-Smart Agriculture Country Profiles | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    featuredproductscsa-country-profiles Country: Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Grenada, Mexico, Peru Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Agriculture, country profiles,...

  9. How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    natural gas with Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru,...

  10. Frequently Asked Questions About the Higgs Boson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... DZero: Brazil, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Ecuador, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, the United Kingdom and the ...

  11. New Zealand Joins International Carbon Storage Group | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forum include: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Denmark, European Commission, ... Carbon Sequestration Forum U.S. - China Energy Cooperation 6th Carbon ...

  12. Velarde students score in RoboRAVE International at first try

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Competitors came from as far away as China and the Czech Republic June 1, 2015 Dylan ... and visiting competitors from China, Colombia, the Czech Republic and Mexico. ...

  13. Bogot Building A Sustainable City (Part 1 of 3) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    mayor of Bogota, Colombia, Enrique Penalosa was both revered and scorned for his urban planning and transportation policies. His public works projects, which largely favored the...

  14. Bogot Building A Sustainable City (Part 3 of 3) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    mayor of Bogota, Colombia, Enrique Penalosa was both revered and scorned for his urban planning and transportation policies. His public works projects, which largely favored the...

  15. Bogot Building A Sustainable City (Part 2 of 3) | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    mayor of Bogota, Colombia, Enrique Penalosa was both revered and scorned for his urban planning and transportation policies. His public works projects, which largely favored the...

  16. Incubar del Caribe | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Incubar del Caribe Jump to: navigation, search Name: Incubar del Caribe Place: Colombia Sector: Services Product: General Financial & Legal Services ( Charity Non-profit ...

  17. Fast Start Financing | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    the government of the Netherlands, with support from the governments of Costa Rica, Colombia, Denmark, Germany, Indonesia, the Marshall Islands, Mexico, Norway, the United...

  18. Property:Project Status | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    SHP + Active + MHK ProjectsSadap Indonesia SHP + Inactive + MHK ProjectsSalvajina Colombia SHP + Active + Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Projec...

  19. Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    www.ecpamericas.org Program Start 2010 Country Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, United States South...

  20. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote...

  1. Gateway:Amrica Latina/Centros Latinoamericanos | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    do Biodiesel- Privado BColombia.jpg Colombia Ministerio de Minas y Energas- Pblico Red Energas Alternativas- Privado BCuba.jpg Cuba Centro de Gestin de la Informacin y...

  2. Federal Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 59

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    I. Prohibition on Contracting With Inverted Domestic Corporations 2012-013 II. Free Trade Agreement--Colombia 2012-012 III. Revision of Cost Accounting Standards Threshold...

  3. Microsoft Word - 91180786_2.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Australia, Bahrain, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Chile, Morocco, Canada, Mexico, Oman, Peru, Singapore, Republic of Korea, Jordan, ...

  4. Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    part of the MAPS program, a collaboration between developing countries (South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Peru) to support the establishment of an evidence base...

  5. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - San Andres and Providencia (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Archipelago of San Andres, Providencia, and Santa Catalina (unpopulated), also known as San Andres and Providencia, which is equidistant between Costa Rica and Jamaica and 775 kilometers northwest of Colombia. The archipelago is part of Colombia, though Nicaragua has also laid claim to it.

  6. The Social Costs to the U.S. of Monopolization of the World Oil Market, 1972-1991

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the U.S. over the period 1972-1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the U.S. and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972-1991 period to a hypothetical ''more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing U.S. oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US. oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing the economic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC Cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972-1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$ ($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  7. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  8. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  9. Global production through 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, N.E.

    1996-12-01

    Two companion studies released recently should provide great food for thought among geo-political strategists and various national governments. If predictions contained in these Petroconsultants studies of oil and gas production trends for the next 10 years are realized, there will be great repercussions for net exporters and importers, alike. After analyzing and predicting trends within each of the world`s significant producing nations for the 1996--2005 period, the crude oil and condensate report concludes tat global production will jump nearly 24%. By contrast, worldwide gas output will leap 40%. The cast of characters among producers and exporters that will benefit from these increases varies considerably for each fuel. On the oil side, Russia and the OPEC members, particularly the Persian Gulf nations, will be back in the driver`s seat in terms of affecting export and pricing patterns. On the gas side, the leading producers will be an interesting mix of mostly non-OPEC countries. The reemergence of Persian Gulf oil producers, coupled with an anticipated long-term decline among top non-OPEC producing nations should present a sobering picture to government planners within large net importers, such as the US. They are likely to find themselves in much the same supply trap as was experienced in the 1970s, only this time the dependence on foreign oil supplies will be much worse. Gas supplies will not be similarly constrained, and some substitution for oil is probable. Here, two articles, ``World oil industry is set for transition`` and ``Worldwide gas surges forward in next decade,`` present a summary of the findings detailed in Petroconsultants` recent studies.

  10. Oil prices in a new light

    SciTech Connect

    Fesharaki, F. )

    1994-05-01

    For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

  11. wipp _vents.png

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1) 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2001/2002 Introduction Tension in world oil markets, due to anticipated U.S. military action in response to the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, has added an obvious dimension of uncertainty to any particular view of winter oil prices. We assume that expressed levels of support and cooperation for U.S. actions by the international community, including members of OPEC, include a willingness to at least maintain the level of oil supply that

  12. Fact #632: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence Fact #632: July 19, 2010 The Costs of Oil Dependence The United States has long recognized the problem of oil dependence and the economic problems that arise from it. According to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers Greene and Hopson, oil dependence is a combination of four factors: (1) a noncompetitive world oil market strongly influenced by the OPEC cartel, (2) high levels of U.S. imports, (3) the importance of oil to the U.S. economy,

  13. Petroleum coke supply: present problems and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, H.H.

    1982-08-01

    Since the 1973 OPEC oil embargo, the coke market's strength has gradually shifted, for the most part, from the buyer to the seller. This general assessment is subject to localized exceptions and temporary reversals (such as the present market weakness due to the low level of primary aluminum production). However, there are two major factors which will influence the trend toward higher coke prices for anode use by aluminum producers: decreasing supplies of high-quality coke, and revised marketing strategies of coke producers.

  14. Energy: elusive solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Velocci, T.

    1980-08-01

    The author states that America's seven-year search for answers to the energy crisis has produced more promise than substance. In fact, the US is even more dependent on imported oil today than it was in 1973 when the Arabs slapped on their economy-busting embargo. US imports have risen from 35% then to 40% now of daily oil consumption. The price of a barrel has doubled since last year and US product is sagging. Synthetic fuels from oil shale and coal deposits and conservation are still seen as the only solution to US independence from OPEC nations. (PSB)

  15. highlights

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    00 Highlights International Oil Markets International Oil Supply: This forecast assumes that OPEC 10 (Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries excluding Iraq) crude oil production will be 25.2 million barrels per day in the second quarter, 0.9 million barrels per day above first quarter production levels (Figure 1). This is about 0.5 million barrels per day above their production target of 24.69 million barrels per day. The forecast then assumes another 0.1 million barrels per day increase

  16. master.PDF

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1998 ES1 April 1998 Highlights World Oil Prices: Weak Fundamentals May be Difficult to Counteract Proposals by major producers inside and outside of OPEC to reduce the burgeoning surplus may keep oil prices from sliding to new record lows this year, but, compared to 1997, price levels are still expected to be down throughout 1998, with corresponding impacts on petroleum product prices. U.S. refiner costs for imported oil are now expected to average about $14.70 per barrel this year, compared to

  17. win0102

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1) 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2001/2002 Introduction Tension in world oil markets, due to anticipated U.S. military action in response to the September 11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, has added an obvious dimension of uncertainty to any particular view of winter oil prices. We assume that expressed levels of support and cooperation for U.S. actions by the international community, including members of OPEC, include a willingness to at least maintain the level of oil supply that

  18. highlight.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Highlights International Oil Markets World Oil Prices - How High Will They Go? Our forecast this month is that the world oil price should remain high for most of the year as inventories are expected to remain low, even with an assumed increase in OPEC production of 1 million barrels per day beginning in April. The average cost per barrel of crude oil imported into the United States and delivered to U.S. refiners (the benchmark price used in this forecast) is expected to increase from $26.65

  19. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7, 2015 2015 Summer Fuels Outlook Key factors driving the short-term outlook * Global oil supply is expected to remain higher than global consumption in 2015, keeping oil prices at relatively low levels this summer compared with previous years. * Growth in non-OPEC crude oil and other liquids production slows from 2.2 million bbl/d in 2014 to 0.7 million bbl/d in 2015. * World liquid fuels consumption increases by an average 1.0 million bbl/d in 2015, driven largely by emerging economies. *

  20. Microsoft Word - housing-certification-for-term-employees.docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Short Term Energy Outlook 1 STEO Supplement: Why are oil prices so high? During most of the 1990s, the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price averaged close to $20 per barrel, before plunging to almost $10 per barrel in late 1998 as a result of the Asian financial crisis slowing demand growth while extra supply from Iraq was entering the market for the first time since the Gulf War. Subsequently, as Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) producers more closely adhered to a

  1. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0 1,267 0 0 Algeria ...................................... 0 1,139 1,174 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 7,822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 44,568 0 1,084 0 625 0 0 443 0 0 Other

  2. U.S. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 3 1 250 314 255 1993-2016 Ecuador 2007-2007 Non OPEC* 2 3 1 250 314 255 2004-2016 Argentina 2006-2006 Belgium 2012-2012 Brazil 250 314 255 2004-2016 Canada 2 3 1 2004-2016 China 2006-2006 Congo (Brazzaville) 2006-2006 Costa Rica 2004-2013 El Salvador 2004-2013 Guatemala 2012-2014 Jamaica 2004-2013 Netherlands 2006-2014 Nicaragua 2012-2014 Pakistan 2006-2006 Singapore 2014-2014 Trinidad and Tobago 2005-2011 Virgin Islands (U.S.) 2007-2009

  3. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G1. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 39.2 41.4 44.6 48.7 52.2 1.2 Middle East 26.2 26.6 29.8

  4. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G3. International other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.6 4.8 5.2 5.6 1.3 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7

  5. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G7. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 43.2 45.6 49.9 54.7 59.4 1.7 Middle East 26.2 26.6 31.1

  6. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G9. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.9 4.8 0.8 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7 4.0

  7. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Sarah Emerson ESAI Energy, LLC EIA Conference June 2015 The Geopolitics of Lower Oil Prices 1 Impact of Lower Oil Prices - 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 000 b/d Lower Prices Encourage Demand and Discourage Supply Cumulative Growth in Global Oil Demand Cumulative growth in non-OPEC Crude Supply Generally: * Stimulates Economic Activity in Net Importing Countries * Hampers Economic Activity Net Exporting Countries Country Impact may

  8. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications

    2006-01-01

    There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

  9. Africa: Unrest and restrictive terms limit abundant potential. [Oil and gas exploration and development in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes the drilling and exploration activity of the oil and gas industries of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Cameroon, Gabon, the Congo, Angola, and South Africa. Information is provided on current and predicted trends in well drilling activities (both onshore and offshore), numbers of new wells, footage information, production statistics and what fields accounted for this production, and planned new exploration activities. The paper also describes the current status of government policies and political problems affecting the oil and gas industry.

  10. International petroleum encyclopedia, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Highlights of the 1987 edition include: a completely updated atlas section featuring new maps of Guatemala, the North Slope, Angola, South China Sea, Oman Offshore, Bohai Gulf, and Offshore Santa Maria Basin; a 25-page look at activity, prospects and operations in North Sea; a commentary on ''Oil After The Crash'' the current OGJ 400 Report; a look at the worldwide refining industry; a survey of refining and petrochemical catalysts; a special feature detailing EOR projects in the U.S. and worldwide; an update on activity in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico; and a current report on drilling technology.

  11. Energy resources in southern Africa: a select bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Cavan, A.

    1981-01-01

    The aims, progress, and possibilities involved in Southern Africa's energy development are the subject of this 473-item bibliography. The primary items of information described in this document are relatively recent (1975-81), originate from both indigenous and international sources, and are mostly in English, although a few are in French and Portuguese. The presented information focuses on the African continent, the Southern African region, and the nations of Angola, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The energy source topics include alcohol, coal, gas, oil, solar, uranium, water, wind, and wood; as well as a general energy-development category.

  12. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  13. 3ctab.xlsx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Algeria .............................................................. 1.10 1.10 1.10 1.10 1.05 1.04 1.05 - - - - - 1.10 - - Angola .............................................................. 1.75 1.77 1.82 1.78 1.78 1.79 1.80 - - - - - 1.78 - - Ecudaor ........................................................... 0.55 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.54 0.55 0.56 - - - - - 0.54 - - Gabon .............................................................. 0.22 0.21 0.22 0.22 0.21 0.21 0.21 - - - - - 0.21 - -

  14. Dynamics of intermaterial competition in the automotive industry. Part I. A framework for analysing the dynamics of intermaterial competition

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.P.; Kenney, G.B.

    1981-01-01

    Increased consumer interest in vehicle fuel economy was initially sparked by the 1973 to 1974 OPEC oil embargo and the subsequent domestic fuel shortage that resulted in rapidly increasing fuel prices. This initial consumer interest became a federal mandate with the establishment of a national fuel economy standard of 27.5 miles/gallon by 1985. More recently, the OPEC price escalations of 1979 to 1980 have resulted in even greater demand for fuel-efficient vehicles. A dynamic simulation model of intermaterial competition is presented, with special reference to the automotive industry. The structure of the model consists of three major components: (1) the demand for structural materials, (2) the production capacity and the availability of materials, and (3) the market split for competing materials. It is expected that the simulation model will be useful for analyzing the substitution dynamics and the associated demand for either two substitute materials in a specific fabricated form in a particular end use or, more generally, for all substitute materials in any form for all applications within a specific end-use sector. 4 figures.

  15. Limit on Saudi Arabia's oil pricing policy: a short-run econometric-simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bagour, O.S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Absence of a unified OPEC policy is largely attributed to frequent Saudi Arabian pricing/production decisions to influence oil price changes. Such demonstrated ability in the past prompted many to attribute oil price current downward rigidity to Saudi Arabian unwillingness to increase production. Empirically, this study presents a simultaneous equations oil market model in a simulation setting to test this hypothesis and to predict future oil prices under specific assumptions. Major conclusions are: (1) contrary to popular belief the international oil industry rarely, if ever, operated competitively; (2) the sole association of oil price increases to the embargo of 1973 is an outright distortion of facts; (3) the roots of the so-called energy crisis lie in: (a) post-World War II West European reconstruction, (b) US industrial adjustments from a war to a consumer-oriented economy, (c) the continuously dwindling oil reserves in major industrial countries, and (d) the comparative advantage of location and cost-per-unit of the Middle Eastern oil; (4) barring further market institutionalizations, a per barrel price below $15 by the end of 1990 (in constant 1984 prices) is not unlikely; and (5) future Saudi Arabian pricing/production policies to exert downward pressures on prices could lead to price increases, if perceived to be permanent by the OPEC group excluding Saudi Arabia.

  16. World oil - An essay on its spectacular 120-year rise (1859-1979), recent decline, and uncertain future

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the evolution of the oil security problems of import-dependent industrialized countries and of the rise and recent erosion of the market power of the major oil exporting countries, particularly those located in the Persian Gulf area. The counterproductive reaction of the United States and other large oil importers to the resulting oil supply and price instability, especially since the 1973-74 oil embargo, is critiqued. In addition, the synergism between the early commercialization of crude oil production and refining in the United States and the development of the automobile industry is discussed, and the long-term outlook for oil-base transportation fuels is assessed. OPEC's role in destabilizing the world oil market during the 1970s and its current efforts to restabilize it are evaluated, as is the likely future course of world oil prices and of U.S. and other non-OPEC production. An important finding of this study is that the share of oil in the world energy mix has peaked and will continue its downward trend and that recurring expectations for a sharp escalation of world oil prices and shortages are based on erroneous assessments of the fundamentals governing the oil business.

  17. Ecuador still grappling over privatization as oil flow rises

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-08

    Ecuador continues to grapple with efforts to privatize its petroleum sector a year after disclosing its plans to withdraw from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. One of OPEC's smallest members, Ecuador last year said it would leave the group in March 1993, citing high membership costs and minimal benefits. Industry observers also noted at the time Ecuador's plans to sharply boost production this century might run afoul of its OPEC quota. Political controversy is stalling efforts to implement a new reform oriented hydrocarbon law in Ecuador that would open the country's petroleum sector to greater participation by foreign companies and privatize state petroleum companies, including Petroleos del Ecuador (Petroecuador). That comes even as foreign contractors' participation in Ecuador's upstream sector are making a significant contribution to boosting the country's oil production, which had remained flat for a number of years. The paper discusses the status of the new law, the controversy surrounding reforms, the master plan, environmental concerns, reserves and production, Petroecuador activity, planned pipeline work, service contracts, start-up of Oxy, details of Oxy development, and Elf's start-up.

  18. Oil and the American Way of Life: Don't Ask, Don't Tell

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Robert

    2005-06-01

    In the coming decades, US consumers will face a series of important decisions about oil. To make effective decisions, consumers must confront some disturbing answers to questions they would rather not ask. These questions include: is the US running out of oil, is the world running out of oil, is OPEC increasing its grip on prices, is the US economy reducing its dependence on energy, and will the competitive market address these issues in a timely fashion? Answers to these questions indicate that the market will not address these issues: the US has already run out of inexpensive sources of oil such that rising prices no longer elicit significant increases in supply. The US experience implies that within a couple of decades, the world oil market will change from increasing supply at low prices to decreasing supply at higher prices. As the world approaches this important turning point, OPEC will strengthen its grip on world oil prices. Contrary to popular belief, the US economy continues to be highly dependent on energy, especially inexpensive sources of energy. Together, these trends threaten to undermine the basic way in which the US economy generates a high standard of living.

  19. Oil and the American Way of Life: Don't Ask, Don't Tell

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Robert

    2009-04-22

    In the coming decades, US consumers will face a series of important decisions about oil. To make effective decisions, consumers must confront some disturbing answers to questions they would rather not ask. These questions include: is the US running out of oil, is the world running out of oil, is OPEC increasing its grip on prices, is the US economy reducing its dependence on energy, and will the competitive market address these issues in a timely fashion? Answers to these questions indicate that the market will not address these issues: the US has already run out of inexpensive sources of oil such that rising prices no longer elicit significant increases in supply. The US experience implies that within a couple of decades, the world oil market will change from increasing supply at low prices to decreasing supply at higher prices. As the world approaches this important turning point, OPEC will strengthen its grip on world oil prices. Contrary to popular belief, the US economy continues to be highly dependent on energy, especially inexpensive sources of energy. Together, these trends threaten to undermine the basic way in which the US economy generates a high standard of living.

  20. Country analysis briefs: 1994. Profiles of major world energy producers, consumers, and transport centers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Country Analysis Briefs: 1994 is a compilation of country profiles prepared by the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use. EMCID maintains Country Analysis Briefs (CABs) for specific countries or geographical areas that are important to world energy markets. As a general rule, CABs are prepared for all members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), major non-OPEC oil producers (i.e., the North Sea, Russia), major energy transit areas (i.e., Ukraine), and other areas of current interest to energy analysts and policy makers. As of January 1995, EMCID maintained over 40 CABs, updated on an annual schedule and subject to revision as events warrant. This report includes 25 CABs updated during 1994. All CABs contain a profile section, a map showing the country`s location, and a narrative section. The profile section includes outlines of the country`s economy, energy sector, and environment. The narrative provides further information and discussion of these topics. Some CABs also include a detailed map displaying locations of major oil and gas fields, pipelines, ports, etc. These maps were created as a result of special individual requests and so are not typically a standard feature of the CABs. They are presented here wherever available as a supplement to the information contained in the CABs.

  1. International energy indicators. [International and US statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.K.

    1980-03-01

    For the international sector, a table of data is first presented followed by corresponding graph of the data for the following: (1) Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to February 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia (same as Iran); (3) OPEC (ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia); capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974 to January 1980; (4) non-OPEC Free World and US production of crude oil, 1973 to January 1980; (5) oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973 to 1979; (6) petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973 to October 1979; (7) USSR crude oil production, 1974 to February 1980; (8) Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973 to January 1980. For the United States, the same data format is used for the following: (a) US imports of crude oil and products 1973 to January 1980; (b) landed cost of Saudi Arabia crude oil in current and 1974 dollars, 1974 to October 1979; (c) US trade in coal, 1973 to 1979; (d) summary of US merchandise trade, 1976 to January 1980; and (e) US energy/GNP ratio (in 1972 dollars), 1947 to 1979.

  2. International energy indicators. [Statistical tables and graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.K.

    1980-05-01

    International statistical tables and graphs are given for the following: (1) Iran - Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-April 1980; (2) Saudi Arabia - Crude Oil Capacity, Production, and Shut-in, March 1974-Apr 1980; (3) OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia) - Capacity, Production and Shut-in, June 1974-March 1980; (4) Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, January 1973-February 1980; (5) Oil Stocks - Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (Landed, 1973-1st Quarter, 1980); (6) Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, January 1973-December 1979; (7) USSR Crude Oil Production and Exports, January 1974-April 1980; and (8) Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, January 1973-March 1980. Similar statistical tables and graphs included for the United States include: (1) Imports of Crude Oil and Products, January 1973-April 1980; (2) Landed Cost of Saudi Oil in Current and 1974 Dollars, April 1974-January 1980; (3) US Trade in Coal, January 1973-March 1980; (4) Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-March 1980; and (5) US Energy/GNP Ratio, 1947 to 1979.

  3. Muslim oil and gas periphery; the future of hydrocarbons in Africa, southeast Asia and the Caspian. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, B.D.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis is a study of the contemporary political, economic, and technical developments and future prospects of the Muslim hydrocarbon exporters of Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Caspian. The established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia has four members in the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and is systemically increasing its production of natural gas. I analyze US government and corporate policies regarding the countries and the major dilemmas of the Muslim hydrocarbon periphery. The first chapter provides a selective overview of global energy source statistics; the policies, disposition and composition of the major hydrocarbon production and consumption players and communities; a selective background of OPEC and its impact on the globe; and a general portrait of how the Muslim periphery piece fits into the overall Muslim oil and gas puzzle. Chapter two analyzes the established Muslim oil and gas periphery of Africa and Southeast Asia asking the following questions: What are the major political, economic, and technical trends and dilemmas affecting these producer nations. And what are the United States` policies and relationships with these producers. Chapter three asks the same questions as chapter two, but with regard to the newly independent states of the Caspian Sea. I probe the regional petroleum exploration and transportation dilemmas in some detail.

  4. US imports. Part II. Refined product market shares, then and now

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-08

    Unlike imports of crude oil to the US, which were up 45.7% between 1977 and 1986, imports of petroleum products have fallen by about 8.6% during the same period. The crude oil price crash of 1986 deepened US dependency on imports of crude, from 21.4% in 1977 to 25.4% in 1986, but reduced the dependency in the case of total refined products from 11.32% in 1977 to 11.13% in 1986. Comparing the first four months of 1987 with 1986, US dependency on imported petroleum products is down 2.73 percentage points; import dependency on OPEC petroleum products is down 4.60 percentage points; dependency on Arab OPEC countries product imports is down 1.88 percentage points; and for Eastern Hemisphere exporters, that dependency has fallen 2.17 percentage points. This issue also contains: (1) ED refining netback data from the US Gulf and West coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for early July 1987; and (2) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, July 1987 edition. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  5. Oil and the American Way of Life: Don't Ask, Don't Tell

    ScienceCinema

    Kaufmann, Robert [Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    In the coming decades, US consumers will face a series of important decisions about oil. To make effective decisions, consumers must confront some disturbing answers to questions they would rather not ask. These questions include: is the US running out of oil, is the world running out of oil, is OPEC increasing its grip on prices, is the US economy reducing its dependence on energy, and will the competitive market address these issues in a timely fashion? Answers to these questions indicate that the market will not address these issues: the US has already run out of inexpensive sources of oil such that rising prices no longer elicit significant increases in supply. The US experience implies that within a couple of decades, the world oil market will change from increasing supply at low prices to decreasing supply at higher prices. As the world approaches this important turning point, OPEC will strengthen its grip on world oil prices. Contrary to popular belief, the US economy continues to be highly dependent on energy, especially inexpensive sources of energy. Together, these trends threaten to undermine the basic way in which the US economy generates a high standard of living.

  6. 105(scaled land 215%)7-22-05

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cntrl African Rep. Chad Chile China Colombia Dem. Rep. Congo Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia Cyprus Czech Rep. Denmark ...

  7. INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF PAPERS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ***Universidad del Valle Calle 13 No 100-00 Cali, Colombia Phone: +57 2 3212100 Fax: +57 2 3212151 cesar.urrego@correounivalle.edu.co **** Tecnalia Research & Innovation C Geldo. ...

  8. Oil and gas developments in South Africa, Central America, Caribbean Area, and Mexico in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Tappmeyer, D.M.

    1985-10-01

    For the 25 countries described in the region, exploration activity continued to be centered in proven petroleum provinces in 1984. Exploration activity increased in Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela. Important, successful exploration efforts continued in areas around Cano Limon field in Colombia, and Guafita and La Victoria fields in Venezuela. Notable discoveries in South America included the 42-46-1X San Martin Cretaceous discovery by Shell in the Ucayali basin in Peru, the significant oil and gas discovery at Palmar Largo ES-1 by YPF in Argentina, and the first offshore gas discovery, the Pecten 1-SPS-20 wildcat in the Santo basin in Brazil. Oil production increased in Barbados, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. A notable increase (40%) in oil production occurred in Brazil. Gas production increased in Argentina, Barbados, Colombia, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago. 8 figures, 8 tables.

  9. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Tappmeyer, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    Petroleum exploration in the region was generally less in 1983 than in 1982. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Barbados increased crude production, whereas Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, and Trinidad-Tobago reported increases in gas production. Although drilling activities remained low compared to past years, significant oil discoveries were reported in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil. In Colombia, Cano Limon field is reported to be the largest field found in the Llanos region. In Brazil, important oil discoveries were made offshore in the Para, Potiquas, and Ampos basins. In Mexico, discoveries were reported in the Cerro Azul, Poza Rica (Chicontepec, Villahermosa, and Tabasco) areas onshore and in the Bay of Campeche offshore. In Argentina, discoveries were made in the San Jorge basin and the Noreste Tarija basin. 10 figures, 11 tables.

  10. GREENING YOUR BUSINESS

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    ... * 12 Canada * 5 India * 3 Australia * 3 Ireland * 2 Spain * 2 United Kingdom * 2 Tunisia * 1 Belgium * 1 Chile * 1 Colombia * 1 Argentina * 1 Fiji * 1 Israel * 1 Indonesia * 1 St. ...

  11. BPA-2014-00717-FOIA Request

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 'WSP Colombia City: Phone: State: Zip: Ex. xxx-xxx-xxxx Please type your request here Hello I would like to ask You, if and where is possible to download a copy of Corona and...

  12. BPA-2014-00617-FOIA Response

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 In reply refer to: NN-1 Jorge Hernan Jaramillo Restrepo Interconexion Electrica Colombia-Panama S.A. Av. Aquilino de la Guardia, Torre Banesco Piso 11 Officina 1111 Ciudad de...

  13. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  14. Coordinating Low Emission Development in Columbia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.; Butheau, M.; Sandor, D.

    2013-11-01

    Colombia's economy has grown more than 4 percent per year for a decade, but climate change is posing new risks to sustaining that development. With the nation's coastal areas, mountain ranges, rain forests, plains, and river basins vulnerable to changing weather patterns and growing seasons, Colombia is building resilience to climate change while working to curb emissions and pursue new options for low emission development.

  15. Energy Independence for North America - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhardt, J.

    2003-08-24

    The U.S. transportation sector is almost totally dependent on liquid hydrocarbon fuels, primarily gasoline and diesel fuel from conventional oil. In 2002, the transportation sector accounted for 69 percent of the U.S. oil use; highway vehicles accounted for 54 percent of the U.S. oil use. Of the total energy consumed in the U.S., more than 40 percent came from oil. More significantly, more than half of this oil is imported and is projected by the Energy Information Agency (EIA) to increase to 68 percent by 2025 [1]. The supply and price of oil have been dictated by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In 2002, OPEC accounted for 39 percent of world oil production and this is projected by the EIA to increase to 50 percent in 2025. Of the world's oil reserves, about 80 percent is owned by OPEC members. Major oil price shocks have disrupted world energy markets four times in the past 30 years (1973-74, 1979-80, 1990-1991, and 1999- 2000) and with each came either a recession or slowdown in the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) of the United States. In addition, these market upheavals have cost the U.S. approximately $7 trillion (in 1998 dollars) in total economic costs [2]. Finally, it is estimated that military expenditures for defending oil supplies in the Middle East range from $6 billion to $60 billion per year [3] and do not take into account the costs of recent military operations in Iraq (i.e., Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2003). At the outset of his administration in 2001, President George W. Bush established the National Energy Policy Development (NEPD) Group to develop a national energy policy to promote dependable, affordable, and environmentally sound energy for the future in order to avert potential energy crises. In the National Energy Policy report [4], the NEPD Group urges action by the President to meet five specific national goals that America must meet--''modernize conservation, modernize our energy infrastructure, increase energy

  16. Market balances Mideast capacity

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, L.; Redden, J.; Cornitius, T.; Tanner, R.

    1984-12-01

    Market forces will play a substantial role in energy pricing through the end of the century, but the Mideast countries are still in a commanding position in world energy supplies. The Mideast, with 55% of the world's proven crude reserves, is providing only 21% of worldwide production. This situation, brought about by political pricing in the face of sharply reduced consumption worldwide, will prolong the life of Mideast reserves. Energy importing nations, chiefly the United States, are supporting domestic production with reserves discovered during the 1979-82 period. A commanding position in this production should last through the end of this decase, after which OPEC, led by the Mideast countries, will increasingly influence energy pricing.

  17. An Analysis of the Impact of Sport Utility Vehicles in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.C.; Truett, L.F.

    2000-08-01

    It may be labeled sport utility vehicle, SUV, sport-ute, suburban assault vehicle, or a friend of OPEC (Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries). It has been the subject of comics, the object of high-finance marketing ploys, and the theme of Dateline. Whatever the label or the occasion, this vehicle is in great demand. The popularity of sport utility vehicles (SUVs) has increased dramatically since the late 1970s, and SUVs are currently the fastest growing segment of the motor vehicle industry. Hoping to gain market share due to the popularity of the expanding SUV market, more and more manufacturers are adding SUVs to their vehicle lineup. One purpose of this study is to analyze the world of the SUV to determine why this vehicle has seen such a rapid increase in popularity. Another purpose is to examine the impact of SUVs on energy consumption, emissions, and highway safety.

  18. Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) World Oil Model (WOM)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-08-07

    The function of the World Oil Market Model (WOMM) is to calculate a world oil price. SEDS will set start and end dates for the forecast period, and a time increment (assumed to be 1 year in the initial version). The WOMM will then randomly select an Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) oil price case and calibrate itself to that case. As it steps through each year, the WOMM will generate a stochastic supply shock to OPEC output and accept a new estimate of U.S. petroleum demand from SEDS. The WOMM will then calculate a new oil market equilibrium for the current year. The world oil price at the new equilibrium will be sent back to SEDS. When the end year is reached, the process will begin again with the selection of a new AEO forecast. Iterations over forecasts will continue until SEDS has completed all its simulation runs.

  19. Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries: history, policies, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Tetreault, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis begins with OAPEC's formation in 1968, as a means of resisting pressure to embargo oil importers who supported Israel. The origins of the 1973 boycott during the Yom Kippur War are examined, showing how that step affected subsequent OAPEC policy. OAPEC's relationship to the rest of the international petroleum community is explored, focusing on the interaction between OAPEC and OPEC in the making of petroleum pricing policy. The expulsion of Egypt for trading with Israel is discussed. Huge profits from the oil industry are the key to the region's economic development. Successes and failures of OAPEC investments, joint ventures with various nations as partners in fostering the economic progress of the Arab world are examined. This study provides a useful tool for the understanding of the international petroleum industry.

  20. Searching history and looking beyond next week: the nuclear imperative. [Pamphlet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Oil dependence, which made the US vulnerable to OPEC export decisions, is both an economic and a security liability. Nearly a decade after the 1973 oil embargo, an economic-energy policy still eludes the US. Energy self-sufficiency and peaceful nuclear programs were sidetracked in the late 1960s as the environmental and consumer movements created a new vision of America's future that would dump the nuclear option. A growing workforce requiring more, not less, energy was not served by the new policy. Coal and nuclear power are the only two options able to produce the bulk of energy required for US industry until alternative sources are available. Future planning must question whether electricity capacity will be sufficient, what kind of capacity is needed, and what steps to take to ensure electric supplies that meet economic and security as well as environmental goals. We can profit from a review of history to avoid past errors and exploit past successes. (DCK)

  1. State of Maine Office of Energy Resources Weekly Price Monitoring System end of survey of report. 2nd annual report to Region I DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The OPEC oil embargo of 1973-1974 brought the nation to a realization of the importance and necessity for collection and analysis of energy data. The Maine Office of Energy Resources, (OER), has the responsibility to establish and implement energy policies in Maine. The Weekly Price Monitoring System, (PMS), has been developed and implemented to assist energy planners in Maine. This survey is used to analyze home heating oil price trends and as a public relations tool in response to inquiries from citizens, other federal, state and local agencies and the Governors Office. This report will describe the PMS and results obtained from this system during the period starting December 12, 1978 and ending June 4, 1979, (26 weeks). Also the price of home heating oil on November 1, 1978 is given as required in agreement number DE-FC01-79EI10157 between the US Department of Energy and the Maine Office of Energy Resources.

  2. Energy reference handbook. Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The energy field has exploded since the OPEC oil embargo of 1973. Terms that did not even exist several years ago are now being used. In addition, many words have developed interpretations somewhat different from their commonly accepted meanings. The 3rd Edition of the Energy Reference Handbook records and standardizes these terms in a comprehensive glossary. Special emphasis is placed on providing terms and definitions in the area of alternative fuels-synthetics from coal and oil shale; solar; wind; biomass; geothermal; and more - as well as traditional fossil fuels. In total, more than 3,500 terms, key words, and phrases used daily in energy literature are referenced. In addition to these definitions, conversion tables, diagrams, maps, tables, and charts on various aspects of energy which forecast the reserves of fuel resources, plus other information relevant to energy resources and technologies are found in this reference.

  3. Consumption trend analysis in the industrial sector: Regional historical trends. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Data on the use of natural gas, electricity, distillate and residual fuel oil, coal, and purchased coke were collected from the United States Bureau of the Census and aggregated nationally and by Census Region. Trend profiles for each fuel and industry were developed and economic, regulatory, and regional factors contributing to these trends were examined. The recession that followed the OPEC embargo in 1973 affected the industrial sector and the heavily industrialized regions of the country most severely. Both industrial production and fuel consumption fell significantly in 1975. As production recovered, spiraling fuel prices promoted conservation efforts, and overall fuel consumption remained at pre-recession levels. From 1975 to 1977 natural gas consumption decreased in almost all the industries examined with curtailments of gas supplies contributing to this trend.

  4. EIA Report 9/1/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Markets , 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) (2pm) 9/1/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/25/2008 Year Ago 8/31/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 111.16 115.46 -4.30 115.11 73.98 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 275.10 285.42 -10.32 280.69 196.45 Heating Oil (c/gal) 309.24 319.19 -9.95 317.90 205.74 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.98 8.36 -0.38 7.94 6.46 OPEC Basket ($Bbl) NA 111.23 NA 110.61 69.60 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate

  5. EIA Report 9/2/08 - Hurricane Impacts on U.S. Oil & Natural Gas Energy

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Markets , 4:00 pm See current U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Market Impacts Prices NYMEX Futures Prices (for October delivery) 9/2/2008 8/29/2008 change Week Ago 8/26/2008 Year Ago 9/4/2007 WTI Crude Oil ($/Bbl) 109.71 115.46 -5.75 116.27 75.08 Gasoline RBOB* (c/gal) 273.37 285.42 -12.05 285.97 199.10 Heating Oil (c/gal) 307.36 319.19 -11.83 323.44 207.95 Natural Gas ($/MMBtu) 7.26 7.94 -0.68 8.39 5.63 OPEC Basket ($Bbl) NA 111.23 NA 110.51 70.88 *RBOB = Reformulated Blendstock for Oxygenate

  6. War curbs oil exports by Iran and Iraq

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-29

    A discussion of the effects of the war between Iran and Iraq on oil exports from the area covers damage (extent unknown) to the Abadan, Iran, and Basra, Iraq, oil refineries, to the Iraqi petrochemical complex under construction at Basra, to oil export terminals at Kharg Island and Mina-al-Bakr, and to other oil facilities; war-caused reductions in oil production, refining, shipping, and export, estimated at 2.05-3.35 million bbl/day; the possible effects of the war on OPEC's decisions concerning oil production and pricing; the significance of the Strait of Hormuz for the export of oil by several countries in addition to the belligerents; the U.S. and non-Communist oil stocks which might enable the world to avoid an oil shortage if the war is ended in the near future; and the long-term effects of the war on Iran's and Iraq's oil industries.

  7. Modeling the Oil Transition: A Summary of the Proceedings of the DOE/EPA Workshop on the Economic and Environmental Implications of Global Energy Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L

    2007-02-01

    The global energy system faces sweeping changes in the next few decades, with potentially critical implications for the global economy and the global environment. It is important that global institutions have the tools necessary to predict, analyze and plan for such massive change. This report summarizes the proceedings of an international workshop concerning methods of forecasting, analyzing, and planning for global energy transitions and their economic and environmental consequences. A specific case, it focused on the transition from conventional to unconventional oil and other energy sources likely to result from a peak in non-OPEC and/or global production of conventional oil. Leading energy models from around the world in government, academia and the private sector met, reviewed the state-of-the-art of global energy modeling and evaluated its ability to analyze and predict large-scale energy transitions.

  8. Demand for oil and energy in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, C. Jr.; Relles, D.A.; Navarro, J.

    1980-05-01

    How much of the world's oil and energy supply will the non-OPEC less-developed countries (NOLDCs) demand in the next decade. Will their requirements be small and thus fairly insignificant compared with world demand, or large and relatively important. How will world demand be affected by the economic growth of the NOLDCs. In this report, we try to develop some reasonable forecasts of NOLDC energy demands in the next 10 years. Our focus is mainly on the demand for oil, but we also give some attention to the total commercial energy requirements of these countries. We have tried to be explicit about the uncertainties associated with our forecasts, and with the income and price elasticities on which they are based. Finally, we consider the forecasts in terms of their implications for US policies concerning the NOLDCs and suggest areas of future research on NOLDC energy issues.

  9. An assessment of energy and environmental issues related to the use of gas-to-liquid fuels in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    1999-11-01

    Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the conversion process.

  10. An Assessment of Energy and Environmental Issues Related to the Use of Gas-to-Liquid Fuels in Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.

    1999-11-01

    Recent technological advances in processes for converting natural gas into liquid fuels, combined with a growing need for cleaner, low-sulfur distillate fuel to mitigate the environmental impacts of diesel engines have raised the possibility of a substantial global gas-to-liquids (G-T-L) industry. This report examines the implications of G-T-L supply for U.S. energy security and the environment. It appears that a G-T-L industry would increase competitiveness in world liquid fuels markets, even if OPEC states are major producers of G-T-L's. Cleaner G-T-L distillates would help reduce air pollution from diesel engines. Implications for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could be positive or negative, depending on the sources of natural gas, their alternative uses, and the degree of sequestration that can be achieved for CO2 emissions produced during the conversion process.

  11. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix G Table G4. World petroleum and other liquids production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC a 36.0 37.4 35.3 35.8 37.7 39.3 40.4 0.3 Middle East 26.2 26.6 26.5 27.0 28.6 29.8 30.6 0.5 North Africa 2.4 3.3 2.1 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.3 -1.4 West Africa 4.3 4.3 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 -0.2 South America 3.2 3.2

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Projections of petroleum and other liquid fuels production in three cases Table G5. World crude oil a production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 32.2 33.4 30.7 30.9 32.4 33.4 34.4 0.1 Middle East 22.9 23.2 22.7 23.0 24.4 25.2

  13. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 Appendix G Table G6. World other liquid fuels a production by region and country, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 3.7 3.8 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.8 5.9 1.6 Natural gas plant liquids 3.6 3.7 4.3 4.6 4.9 5.3 5.3 1.3 Liquids from renewable sources c 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - Liquids from coal 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - Liquids

  14. Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) World Oil Model (WOM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2009-08-07

    The function of the World Oil Market Model (WOMM) is to calculate a world oil price. SEDS will set start and end dates for the forecast period, and a time increment (assumed to be 1 year in the initial version). The WOMM will then randomly select an Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) oil price case and calibrate itself to that case. As it steps through each year, the WOMM will generate a stochastic supply shock tomore » OPEC output and accept a new estimate of U.S. petroleum demand from SEDS. The WOMM will then calculate a new oil market equilibrium for the current year. The world oil price at the new equilibrium will be sent back to SEDS. When the end year is reached, the process will begin again with the selection of a new AEO forecast. Iterations over forecasts will continue until SEDS has completed all its simulation runs.« less

  15. The commanding heights of oil: Control over the International oil market

    SciTech Connect

    Krapels, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Commanding Heights of Oil is an analysis of oil's role in the international environment. It identifies the degree of control over oil in terms of what is asserted as the most important processes and factors that determine the condition of international affairs: (1) The state of oil demand in relation to the capacity to supply, with special emphasis on the amount of spare production capacity; (2) The nature of the business, and how the structure of the industry changes over time as companies cope with the risks peculiar to an extremely capital intensive enterprise; (3) The financial strength of the parties contending for control, including their ability to outlast their opponents in contests for influence over oil affairs; and (4) The nature of the mechanisms whereby the governments and companies strive to create a situation in which they do not have to rely on price to balance supply and demand. Each of the four central factors was prominent at every major turn of the international oil market over the decades. The dissertation argues that the international oil market was controlled in the past by first a group of companies, and, later, a group of countries, for a combination of reasons that is unlikely to be repeated. That does not mean that the 1990s will be spared oil price shocks such as occurred in the 1970s and 1980s. It does suggest that those shocks are unlikely to last long, that OPEC members are unlikely to be able to leverage their position in oil into larger positions in world affairs. It means that oil is unlikely to play as prominent a role in world affairs in the 1990s as it has in the past, even if oil demand, and along with it dependence on OPEC oil, rises.

  16. Competitiveness of Mexican crude

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-28

    Mexico is under great pressure to maintain oil export revenue levels if it is to avoid a reversal in its economic recovery program. While the country's vulnerability to a price plunge is also applicable to OPEC countries, the North Sea producers, and others, Mexico does have an ace. The ace is that its heavier, metals-ridden and sulfur-laden Maya crude, which had to be pushed on customers until about 1981, is now in strong demand. Comparisons are presented of the market value of five crude oils refined in the US Gulf Coast: West Texas Intermediate (or WTI, a 40/sup 0/ API, light), Arabian Light and Isthmus (both 34/sup 0/ medium-light), Alaska North Slope (or ANS, a 27/sup 0/ API, a medium), and Maya (22/sup 0/ API, medium-heavy). In this mix, the heavier the crude, the greater is the refining margin (except for Arabian Light, for which freight cost and product yield provide lower margins than those derived from WTI). The sacrifice by OPEC and other producers cutting crude oil prices was to the benefit to refiners' improved margins during the first half of 1983. Those cuts were on the lighter-quality oils. But prices for heavier Venezuelan, Californian, and Mexican crudes increased during the second half of 1983, due to developing refinery technologies in extracting favorable product yields from them. This issue of Energy Detente presents their fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for December 1983 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  17. Search for a bridge to the energy future: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Saluja, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The alarming effects, concerns, and even the insights into long-range energy planning that grew out of the OPEC oil embargo of 1973 are fading from the view of a shortsighted public. The enthusiastic initiatives taken in many countries for the development of alternative energy sources have withered due to lack of economic and/or ideological incentive. The events since December 1985, when the members of OPEC decided to increase production in an effort to capture their share of market, have brought down the prices of a barrel of crude to less than US $11 and have made any rational analysis very complex. This has made even the proponents of the alternative energy sources pause and think. The US has, as usual, oscillated from panic to complacency. The Libyan crisis, however, has brought the dangers of complacency into sharp focus. The first commercial coal gasification plant, constructed with a capital investment of over US $2 billion, was abandoned by the owners and is being operated by the US Department of Energy temporarily. In their effort to find a private owner, the US Department of Energy has set the date of auction of this prestigious plant for May 28, 1986. And if an appropriate bid is not forthcoming, the plant faces a very uncertain future. Coal, considered by the World Coal Study (WOCOL) at MIT in 1980, to be a bridge to a global energy future, seems to have lost its luster due to the oil glut which we all know is temporary. This was evident when the bill to grant the Right of Eminent Domain for transportation of coal was defeated. This conference was organized to bring together experts in different areas from various countries to discuss the state of the art and the rate of progress in different alternative energy forms. The recent accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in USSR has brought home the need of diversification of the alternative energy sources.

  18. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Wiman, W.D.

    1988-10-01

    Exploration activity in South America, Central America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1987 showed significant increases in seismic acquisition in Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, Paraguay, and Peru, and a decrease in Chile and Venezuela. Exploratory drilling increased in most major producing countries but was accompanied by a decline in development drilling. Most of the increase could be attributed to private companies fulfilling obligations under risk contracts; however, state oil companies in Bolivia, Chile, and Colombia showed significant increased activity, with only Mexico showing a decrease. Colombia again had a dramatic increase in production (29% from 1986). Noteworthy discoveries were made in Bolivia (Villamontes-1); Brazil, in the Solimoes basin (1-RUC-1-AM); Chile (Rio Honda-1); Colombia, in the Llanos basin (Austral-1, La Reforma-1, Libertad Norte-1, Cravo Este-1, and Cano Yarumal-1), in the Upper Magdalena basin (Toldado-1 and Los Mangos-1); Ecuador (Frontera-1, a joint-exploration venture with Colombia); Mexico, in the Chiapas-Tabasco region (Guacho-1 and Iridi-1), in the Frontera Norte area (Huatempo-1); Peru, in the Madre de Dios basin (Armihuari-4X); Trinidad (West East Queen's Beach-1); and Venezuela (Musipan-1X). Brazil's upper Amazon (Solimoes basin) discovery, Colombia's Upper Magdalena basin discoveries Toldado-1 and Los Mangos-1, Mexico's Chiapas-Tabasco discoveries, Peru's confirmation of the giant Cashiriari discovery of 1986, and Venezuela's success in Monagas state were the highlights of 1987. 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Oil discoveries and basin resource prediction in Latin America: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    Kronman, G.E.; Aleman, A.M.; Rushworth, S.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Over 350 oil discoveries were made in Latin America during the 1980s. About 12% are estimated to contain reserves greater than 100 MMBO. Several of the larger finds (>500 MMBO), such as Cusiana (Colombia), Furrial/Musipan (Venezuela), Cano Lima (Colombia) and Marlim (Brazil) represent an important part of the giant field found worldwide since 1980. Most of the larger discoveries were made by national oil companies in Venezuela, Mexico and Brazil. Undiscovered oil resources of 40-80 BBO are estimated to remain in the highest potential Latin American basins, including those in Mexico, based on historical field size data and current geological knowledge. Over 150 BBO of produced oil and proven reserves has been found in the same group of basins. The probability of finding large undiscovered oil and gas fields (>100 MMBOE) in selected established and mature Latin American basins is high. The Campos (Brazil), Llanos (Colombia), Magadalena (Colombia), Maracaibo (Venezuela), Marahon-Oriente-Putomayo (Peru-Ecuador-Colombia), Maturin (Venezuela), Reforma-Campeche (Mexico) and Ucayali (Peru) basins have the best possibility for such accumulations. Another tier of frontier and emerging basins may also contain significant resources, but limited data makes it difficult to estimate their undiscovered resources. Some of the higher potential basins in this group include the Sierra de Chiapas (Mexico/Guatemala), Huallaga (Peru), Yucatan (Mexico), Sabinas, and Burgos (Mexico) basins.

  20. Word Pro - S11

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    b World Crude Oil Production by Selected Countries (Million Barrels per Day) U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 169 3.652 3.938 0.482 2.193 1.763 10.254 0.970 8.685 1.320 1.876 0.545 0.845 4.130 4.415 2.570 0.310 1.880 1.537 10.670 2.840 2.220 3.821 4.263 0.524 2.308 1.611 10.213 0.839 9.418 1.370 1.890 0.538 0.772 3.300 4.325 2.550 0.400 2.245 1.537 10.400 2.820 2.500 Canada China Egypt Mexico Norway Russia United Kingdom United States Algeria Angola

  1. Pfutzner_1987.pdf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    163,868 182,222 184,167 191,219 197,491 196,482 1981-2015 Albania 165 220 467 267 2012-2015 Algeria 0 0 0 2001-2012 Angola 0 2001-2011 Argentina 0 412 1 1 201 3 1993-2015 Aruba 0 2014-2014 Australia 3,167 3,229 2,841 2,715 2,560 2,466 1993-2015 Austria 1995-2007 Azerbaijan 0 5 2 2010-2015 Bangladesh 0 2014-2014 Bahama Islands 0 2000-2010 Bahrain 116 713 299 563 0 1993-2014 Barbados 33 169 179 121 163 158 2007-2015 Belarus 2004-2004 Belgium 3,295 3,337 2,463 2,098 2,572 1,957 1993-2015 Belize 4 2

  2. Petroleum Coke Exports by Destination

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    163,868 182,222 184,167 191,219 197,491 196,482 1981-2015 Albania 165 220 467 267 2012-2015 Algeria 0 0 0 2001-2012 Angola 0 2001-2011 Argentina 0 412 1 1 201 3 1993-2015 Aruba 0 2014-2014 Australia 3,167 3,229 2,841 2,715 2,560 2,466 1993-2015 Austria 1995-2007 Azerbaijan 0 5 2 2010-2015 Bangladesh 0 2014-2014 Bahama Islands 0 2000-2010 Bahrain 116 713 299 563 0 1993-2014 Barbados 33 169 179 121 163 158 2007-2015 Belarus 2004-2004 Belgium 3,295 3,337 2,463 2,098 2,572 1,957 1993-2015 Belize 4 2

  3. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  4. U.S. Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Total All Countries 155,073 154,624 175,388 157,194 161,473 158,545 1981-2016 Afghanistan 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2016 Albania 55 1998-2016 Algeria 0 221 331 349 0 1996-2016 Andora 2005-2015 Angola 0 0 1 0 1 0 1995-2016 Anguilla 0 0 0 1 0 0 2005-2016 Antigua and Barbuda 66 112 187 129 1 207 1995-2016 Argentina 1,203 2,112 2,723 4,089 1,868 1,663 1993-2016 Armenia 0 2005-2016 Aruba 1,615 758 678 285 850 1,113 2005-2016 Australia 1,041 515 614 633

  5. Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Total All Countries 155,073 154,624 175,388 157,194 161,473 158,545 1981-2016 Afghanistan 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2016 Albania 55 1998-2016 Algeria 0 221 331 349 0 1996-2016 Andora 2005-2015 Angola 0 0 1 0 1 0 1995-2016 Anguilla 0 0 0 1 0 0 2005-2016 Antigua and Barbuda 66 112 187 129 1 207 1995-2016 Argentina 1,203 2,112 2,723 4,089 1,868 1,663 1993-2016 Armenia 0 2005-2016 Aruba 1,615 758 678 285 850 1,113 2005-2016 Australia 1,041 515 614 633

  6. Tectonic significance of Synrift sediment packages across the Congo continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P.; Karner, G.D.; Driscoll, N.W. ); Brumbaugh, W.D. ); Cameron, N. )

    1993-09-01

    The tectonic and stratigraphic development of the Congo continental margin reflects the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension responsible for its formation. Details of the lithospheric extension process are recorded in the stratigraphic successions preserved along and across the margin. By using the stratal relationships (e.g., onlap, downlap, and truncation) and lithofacies determined from seismic reflection and exploratory well data as input into our basin-modeling strategy, we have developed an integrated approach to determine the relationship between the timing, magnitude, and distribution of lithospheric extension across the margin. Two hinge zones, an eastern and Atlantic hinge formed along the Congo margin in response to discrete extensional events occurring from the Berriasian to the Aptian. The eastern hinge zone demarcates the eastern limit of the broadly distributed Berriasian extension. This extension resulted in the formation of deep anoxic, lacustrine systems. In contrast, the Atlantic hinge, located [approximately]90 km west of the eastern hinge, marks the eastern limit of a second phase of extension, which began in the Hauterivian. Consequent footwall uplift and rotation exposed the earlier synrift and prerift stratigraphy to at least wave base causing varying amounts of erosional truncation across the Atlantic hinge zone along much of the Gabon, Congo, and Angola margins. The absence of the Melania Formation across the Congo margin implies that uplift of the Atlantic hinge was relatively minor compared to that across the Angola and Gabon margins. In addition, material eroded from the adjacent and topographically higher hinge zones may in part account for the thick wedge of sediment deposited seaward of the Congo Atlantic hinge. A third phase of extension reactivated both the eastern and Atlantic hinge zones and was responsible for creating the accommodation space for Marnes Noires source rock deposition.

  7. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Wiman, W.D.

    1987-10-01

    Exploration activity in South America, Central America, the Caribbean area, and Mexico in 1986 was considerably reduced compared to 1985. Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Venezuela had increased oil production, with Colombia showing a dramatic 71% increase attributed mainly to bringing on-stream the pipeline connecting Occidental-Shell-Ecopetrol's Cano Limon complex to the port of Covenas. Significant discoveries were reported from Argentina in the Olmedo, Oran, and San Jorge basins; Brazil in the offshore Campos and Amazon basins; Colombia in the Llanos basin; Ecuador in the Oriente basin; Mexico in the Bay of Campeche; Peru in the Ucayali basin; and Venezuela in the Eastern Venezuela basin. Eastern Venezuela's Furrial discovery is reported to have recoverable reserves of more than 1 million bbl of oil, and Shell's Ucayali basin discovery is reported to hold more than 7 tcf of gas. 7 figures, 10 tables.

  8. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Imports by Country of Origin Total, 2000-2011 By Country, 2011 By Selected Country, 2000-2011 204 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Note: Sum of components may not equal 100 percent due to independent rounding. Source: Table 7.4. 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 0 10 20 30 40 Million Short Tons Indonesia 10% Canada 9% Total 13.1 million short tons Canada 13% Colombia 73% Venezuela 6% Other 2% Indonesia 7% Colombia 2000 2001 2002

  10. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rien, Thomas A.; Beiningen, Kirk T.

    1997-07-01

    This project began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state, and tribal fisheries entities to determine (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Colombia and Snake rivers.

  11. Domestic petroleum-product prices around the world. Survey: free market or government price controls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-27

    In this issue, Energy Detente draws from their regular Western and Eastern Hemisphere Fuel Price/Tax Series, each produced monthly, and adds other survey data and analysis for a broad view of 48 countries around the world. They find that seven Latin American nations, including OPEC members Venezuela and Ecuador, are among the ten countries with lowest gasoline prices. In this Fourth Special Price Report, Energy Detente provides a first-time presentation of which prices are government-controlled, and which are free to respond to market forces. South Korea, with fixed prices since 1964, has the highest premium-grade gasoline price in our survey, US $5.38 per gallon. Paraguay, with prices fixed by PETROPAR, the national oil company, has the second highest premium gasoline price, US $4.21 per gallon. Nicaragua, also with government price controls, ranks third highest in the survey, with US $3.38 per gallon for premium gasoline. Kuwait shows the lowest price at US $0.55 per gallon. Several price changes from the previous survey reflect changes in currency exchange as all prices are converted to US dollars. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series is presented for Western Hemisphere countries.

  12. Development of reduced crude cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hettinger, W.P. Jr. )

    1987-08-01

    In 1974 OPEC imposed an embargo on oil to the United States and caused a rapid rise in the price of a barrel of oil. At the time of the embargo, Ashland imported a considerable portion of its oil from the Middle East, thus raising the question of oil availability. As the problem increased in severity, Messrs. George Meyer, Oliver Zandona and Llyod Busch, began to explore alternative ways of squeezing more product from a given barrel of crude. After considering many alternatives, they arrived at the innovative thought that it might be possible to catalytically crack the 1050{degree}F plus fraction of the barrel directly to gasoline which would in effect, give them an additional volume of crude oil. Also, if vacuum fractionation were eliminated and if the entire 650{degree}F plus (reduced crude) portion of the barrel processed, this would further reduce operating costs. With these objectives and some new process innovations in mind, they began reduced crude cracking experimentation in a small 12,000 B/D FCC operating unit at Louisville. It was from these goals, concepts and a small operating unit, that the RCC process was born.

  13. Everything depends on the Saudis

    SciTech Connect

    Sauer, J.W. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports that oil markets are at their lowest level in 18 months, since before the Persian Gulf crisis. What is remarkable is that the world oil industry is producing essentially at capacity, yet OPEC shows no sign of taking advantage of this situation to drive up prices. Rather, commodity market forces are quickly exploiting any short-term surplus or shortage, and the oil market is exposed to continuing price volatility. Oil market uncertainties - the return of Iraqi and Kuwaiti production, prospects for exports from former Soviet republics, and the fragility of economic recovery - appear bigger than normal and threaten to oversupply markets in the spring when oil demand declines seasonally. The downward trend in world oil prices that began in November may continue into the second quarter of 1992. However, by the second half an economic recovery may be underway. If that happens, demand should grow and the market firm. At any rate, prices in 1992 may be more stable than commonly expected, because Saudi Arabia does not seem to want prices much above or below 1991 levels. That would be a range of $20 - $21 for WTI.

  14. Soviet Union oil sector outlook grows bleaker still

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on the outlook for the U.S.S.R's oil sector which grows increasingly bleak and with it prospects for the Soviet economy. Plunging Soviet oil production and exports have analysts revising near term oil price outlooks, referring to the Soviet oil sector's self-destructing and Soviet oil production in a freefall. County NatWest, Washington, citing likely drops in Soviet oil production and exports (OGJ, Aug. 5, p. 16), has jumped its projected second half spot price for West Texas intermediate crude by about $2 to $22-23/bbl. Smith Barney, New York, forecasts WTI postings at $24-25/bbl this winter, largely because of seasonally strong world oil demand and the continued collapse in Soviet oil production. It estimates the call on oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries at more than 25 million b/d in first quarter 1992. That would be the highest level of demand for OPEC oil since 1980, Smith Barney noted.

  15. Differential impact of rising energy prices upon developed and developing countries: 1970-1977

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    This study examines the impact of this era of restricted energy upon continued growth and development of poor, middle-income, and rich countries in the world society. The research objective is to ascertain if increased prices more adversely affected low-income countries (many of whom morally supported the behavior of th OPEC nations) than middle-income and rich countries. A 116-country sample is used and subdivided into five country groupings: poor, middle-income, industrialized, capital surplus oil-exporting, and centrally-planned countries. Data on the energy variables indicated that low-income countries continued to have access to energy during the post-embargo period in spite of higher prices. The average increase in energy consumption was greater for the poorer Lesser Developed Countries (LDC) in the post-1973 than in the pre-1973 years. In contrast, industrialized countries significantly reduced their mean rate of energy consumption. Thus, a slight redistribution of energy resources occurred from the industrialized countries to the rest of the world. Data analysis also revealed that while economic growth declined for all country groupings in the post-embargo years, industrialized countries experienced a greater percentage decrease in growth rates than did developing countries.

  16. World Energy Resources program U. S. Geological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, C.D.

    1986-05-01

    In 1973, with the OPEC embargo, the US was jarred into the world of insecure energy supplies - a harsh reality considering that throughout much of our history we had sufficient domestic supplies of oil and gas to meet all of our requirements. The US Government's response in 1973 was to assess domestic oil and gas potential, which was found to be substantial but nonetheless short of long-term requirements. Born of the need to become more certain about foreign as well has domestic resources, and working in conjunction with the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program of the US Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey undertook a program to develop a technical understanding of the reserves and undiscovered recoverable resources of petroleum in every basin in the world with petroleum potential. The World Energy Resources Program prepared an assessment of ultimate resources of crude oil for the World Petroleum Congress (WPC) in 1983, and a revision and update (including nature gas, crude oil, extra heavy oil, and tar sands) are planned for WPC in 1987. This poster session attempts to engender awareness of our scenario of world ultimate petroleum occurrence and to show some elements of the geology that guided our thinking.

  17. Update: US oil-import market. 1982 top 7 suppliers to US import market: how their shares changed since 1973

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-09

    This issue updates the Energy Detente 7/09/82, which tracked US oil imports since the Arab Oil Embargo. Since then, the phrase oil glut became common even among cautious market analysts as many exporters, hard-pressed for petrodollars, produced much more than the market was prepared to absorb. To examine how the US import market has adjusted to this continued buyers market, the top seven suppliers of 1982 are tracked backwards through time. A graph shows the 1982 reversal of Mexico's and Saudi Arabia's positions in this market. The three main reasons for Mexico's strong present position in the US market are: crude costs and corresponding refined value; proximity to US refining centers; and strategic importance of Mexico's economic stability through oil sales. Interviews with various US refiners and other market observers confirm that these elements will persist during 1983, regardless of significant price cuts among OPEC and other producers. It is believed that the profitability of running heavy Maya crude in sophisticated plants will continue to look optimistic, and that Mexican crude sales to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve implies US government interest in Mexico's economic recovery, and in its stability in the light of civil wars being waged in Central America. This issue presents the Energy Detente (1) fuel price/tax series and (2) industrial fuel prices for March 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere. 6 figures, 8 tables.

  18. Energy security and strategic petroleum reserve

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, C.L.

    1984-06-01

    The embargo by the OPEC nations during the winter of 1973-74 caused the United States substantial losses in Gross National Product. In 1975, Congress authorized the establishment of a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Underground salt domes were chosen due to lower development costs, the capability to withdraw oil at high flow rates, and the maximum security they provided. The Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast was selected because of the large concentration of salt domes, proximity to major U.S. refineries, and access to major U.S. oil distribution facilities. In the case of an emergency, SPR oil can be fed directly to Gulf Coast refineries or sent by pipeline to refineries in the interior of the country. Storage was created by converting an existing ''room and pillar'' salt mine, use of existing caverns, and by leaching out new caverns. Importation of crude oil has currently decreased by half from its peak as the volume of crude oil in the SPR increases and the United States moves closer to energy independence.

  19. Oil and gas potential of Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Durkee, E.F.; Stewart, W.D.; Sandy, M.J.; Francis, G.; Shaw, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) lies at the eastern end of the Indonesian Archipelago. Its coincidence with the collision zone between the Australian continental plate and the Pacific plate has influenced the geologic evolution of the country. These two major features have rubbed, abraded, overridden, penetrated, and slid by each other to form the geologic complex of basins, uplifts, foundered blocks, and volcanic zones known today as PNG. Since the turn of the century, exploration for oil and gas has produced a melange of data, ideas, and theories, which perhaps are more complex than the physical geology of the region itself. In 1982, the PNG Department of Minerals and Energy initiated a comprehensive study of the hydrocarbon potential of the country through its Geological Survey. The study was financed through International Monetary Fund (World Bank) and OPEC funds. As a result of this work, exploration potential was demonstrated, new play concepts were proposed, and new exploration efforts were introduced following a call for international tenders. These results will be outlined and illustrated.

  20. War without end. Michel T. Halbouty's fight for American energy security

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, J.

    1987-01-01

    In these pages are the drama and tension of Halbouty's role as ''Ronald Reagan's Energy Guru'' - his leadership of Candidate Reagan's Energy Policy Advisory group and President-Elect Reagan's Transition Team on Energy. His creation and direction of the Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources, an organization that has advanced exploration and development of the total energy and mineral wealth of the nations fronting the Pacific, and is credited with creating a rapport between them that the U.S. State Department could not have established. His work on behalf of Indian tribes whose oil lands had been systematically plundered for 20 years. His fight against oil companies' ''Retrenchment'' programs and the so-called ''Corporate Raiders.'' His struggle against an ''Oil Import Tax,'' which he reasoned would be detrimental to America's economy and security. His strong advocacy of his plan to make America energy self-sufficient and free her from OPEC bondage. His enduring affection for and the benefactions of his Alma Mater, Texas A and M University, and students he found worthy of support. His confrontations with and his opinions of the world's ''movers and shakers'' and their varying philosophies. And a potpourri of thoughts, ideas and sentiments of an American original who became a legend in his own time.

  1. Vulnerability to closing of Hormuz

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-07

    Tankers carrying roughly 8-million barrels per day (mmb/d) of crude oil, or some 16% of the non-communist world's oil supply, pass through the Strait of Hormuz. Experts agree that just 3-mmb/d of that could be exported through alternate routes. If the war between Iran and Iraq should result in their completely halting each other's production, this relatively limited supply curtailment would reduce world oil production by over 3.4-mmb/d. Since the two have not caused such mutual disaster during four years of war, many observers believe there has been a deliberate avoidance of the jugular squeeze. Nevertheless, the two combatants appear capable not only of cutting off their oil production, but escalating fighting to the point where Gulf traffic would be impeded. Potential results from a prolonged Iran-Iraq crisis are viewed in three scenarios. Also included in this issue are brief summaries of: (1) Mexico's new energy plan, internationalism, and OPEC; (2) update on Argentina's energy resource developments; (3) Venezuela: belt tightening; (4) Western Hemisphere oil production declines; (5) (6) days of oil supply for Canada, USA, Japan, France, Italy, and UK; and (6) US Department of Defense fuel consumption. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and principal industrial fuel prices are included for March for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  2. Assessing world energy in the wake of the Iran/Iraq war: an oil shortage proves elusive. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Randol, W.L.; Verleger, P.K. Jr.; Clayman, M.

    1981-01-01

    A reassessment of world energy supplies was made in the wake of curtailed exports during the Iran/Iraq war and the corresponding increase in world oil prices, the drop in oil consumption, the widening economic recession, and US decontrol of oil. The report concludes that present worldwide levels of oil production are adequate to satisfy projected levels of consumption through 1981. This leaves the world energy system in balance even if oil exports from Iran and Iraq remain at minimal levels for the year. Past overestimation of demand makes it more likely that this year's consumption will fall short of the projection. The way in which Saudi Arabia's output is cut will be the key to oil pricing in 1981, the authors feel, but the likely approach will be a gradual reduction in production that will allow the Saudis to regain control of OPEC. The effects of a receding demand for oil have been intensified by high US interest rates and the spreading recession. The effect of immediate decontrol of petroleum is likely to compound the trend for reduced consumption and a corresponding increase in efficiency. 2 figures, 2 tables.

  3. International energy indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, E.K.

    1981-02-01

    Extensive data are compiled for energy on the international scene and for the US. Data are indicated from the date given and into 1980 as far as available. Data are given for the international scene on: world crude oil production, 1975-to date; Iran: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; Saudi Arabia: crude oil capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): capacity, production, and shut-in, 1974-to date; oil stocks: Free World, US, Japan, and Europe (landed), 1973-to date; petroleum consumption by industrial countries, 1973-to date; USSR crude oil production, 1974-to date; Free World and US nuclear generation capacity, 1973-to date. Data are supplied specifically for the US on US gross imports of crude oil and products, 1973-to date; landed cost of Saudi crude in current and 1974 dollars; US trade in bituminous coal, 1973-to date; summary of US merchandise trade, 1976-to date; and energy/GNP ratio.

  4. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  5. Worry grows as Iran/Iraq war lingers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-03

    Despite the Iran/Iraq war and the prospect of greater disruption of Persian Gulf oil deliveries, the international crude market has adjusted to the loss of supplies and remains stable, partly because some nonwarring members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries have boosted production to make up losses and partly because the industrialized nations have maintained high levels of crude and product stocks. These stocks would be draw-depleted in nine months if used at the rate of 1.8 million bbl/day; this and a 2 million bbl/day increase in OPEC production would make up for the entire war-caused shortfall. If the Strait of Hormuz were closed, the shortfall would be 17 million bbl/day, which would deplete stocks in less than one month. Patterns of supply and demand in non-Communist western countries in 1978-79 and 1979-80; the International Energy Agency oil-sharing plan which would go into effect in the case of a major oil shortage; and the prospects for a surge in prices in the international oil markets, are discussed.

  6. U.S. oil dependence 2014: Is energy independence in sight?

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L.; Liu, Changzheng

    2015-06-10

    The importance of reducing U.S. oil dependence may have changed in light of developments in the world oil market over the past two decades. Since 2005, increased domestic production and decreased oil use have cut U.S. import dependence in half. The direct costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy are estimated under four U.S. Energy Information Administration Scenarios to 2040. The key premises of the analysis are that the primary oil market failure is the use of market power by OPEC and that U.S. economic vulnerability is a result of the quantity of oil consumed, the lack of readily available, economical substitutes and the quantity of oil imported. Monte Carlo simulations of future oil market conditions indicate that the costs of U.S. oil dependence are likely to increase in constant dollars but decrease relative to U.S. gross domestic product unless oil resources are larger than estimated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. In conclusion, reducing oil dependence therefore remains a valuable goal for U.S. energy policy and an important co-benefit of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. U.S. oil dependence 2014: Is energy independence in sight?

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Greene, David L.; Liu, Changzheng

    2015-06-10

    The importance of reducing U.S. oil dependence may have changed in light of developments in the world oil market over the past two decades. Since 2005, increased domestic production and decreased oil use have cut U.S. import dependence in half. The direct costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy are estimated under four U.S. Energy Information Administration Scenarios to 2040. The key premises of the analysis are that the primary oil market failure is the use of market power by OPEC and that U.S. economic vulnerability is a result of the quantity of oil consumed, the lack of readilymore » available, economical substitutes and the quantity of oil imported. Monte Carlo simulations of future oil market conditions indicate that the costs of U.S. oil dependence are likely to increase in constant dollars but decrease relative to U.S. gross domestic product unless oil resources are larger than estimated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. In conclusion, reducing oil dependence therefore remains a valuable goal for U.S. energy policy and an important co-benefit of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions.« less

  8. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    86 Appendix G Table G2. World crude oil a production by region and country, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 32.2 33.4 34.9 36.8 39.7 43.4 46.6 1.2 Middle East 22.9 23.2 26.2 27.9 30.3 33.4 35.6 1.5 North Africa 2.0 2.9 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 2.2 -1.0 West Africa 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.7 5.1 0.6 South America 3.0 3.0 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.4 3.6

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Appendix G Table G8. World crude oil a production by region and country, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day, unless otherwise noted) Region/country History (estimates) Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OPEC b 32.2 33.4 38.9 41.1 45.3 49.7 54.5 1.8 Middle East 22.9 23.2 27.8 28.9 32.2 35.6 38.5 1.8 North Africa 2.0 2.9 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.3 0.5 West Africa 4.3 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.9 5.5 6.3 1.3 South America 3.0 3.0 3.8 4.7 5.1 5.6

  10. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Caribbean Area, and Mexico in 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, C.S.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum developments in the region in 1982 had a more varied pattern than in 1981 when all aspects were upbeat with varying degrees of increases. In 1982, Brazil, Mexico, and Guatemala had striking increases in oil production; Bolivia, Chile, and Colombia had moderate increases; and Argentina, Trinidad, and Venezuela reported declines. In exploration, Argentina reported several additional offshore Tierra del Fuego discoveries in the Cretaceous Springhill and 2 more encouraging gas discoveries in the Noroeste basin. Bolivia reported an oil discovery from Silurian rocks more generally considered a gas objective. Brazil extended and confirmed the Western Amazonas gas area with 2 discoveries. Colombia added 2 more spectacular oil discoveries in the Llanos basin to follow up 2 similar finds in 1981. Several countries reported that discoveries have increased the national reserves of hydrocarbons. Considering the social, political, and economic problems in several countries, along with the worldwide depression and petroleum surplus, developments in the region have been on the whole favorable.

  11. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  12. Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Grace C.; Deshmukh, Ranjit; Ndhlukula, Kudakwashe; Radojicic, Tijana; Reilly, Jessica

    2015-07-01

    Multi-criteria Analysis for Planning Renewable Energy (MapRE) is a study approach developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with the support of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The approach combines geospatial, statistical, energy engineering, and economic methods to comprehensively identify and value high-quality wind, solar PV, and solar CSP resources for grid integration based on techno-economic criteria, generation profiles (for wind), and socio-environmental impacts. The Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor study sought to identify and comprehensively value high-quality wind, solar photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) resources in 21 countries in the East and Southern Africa Power Pools to support the prioritization of areas for development through a multi-criteria planning process. These countries include Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The study includes the methodology and the key results including renewable energy potential for each region.

  13. Total Crude Oil and Products Exports by Destination

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    858,685 1,089,848 1,172,965 1,321,787 1,524,170 1,729,378 1981-2015 Afghanistan 4 3 7 3 1 1 1997-2015 Albania 0 0 166 276 467 267 1998-2015 Algeria 4 1,226 219 2,690 430 981 1996-2015 Andora 0 1 0 2005-2015 Angola 7 27 12 157 75 6 1995-2015 Anguilla 1 5 2 2 66 3 2005-2015 Antigua and Barbuda 146 231 634 10 254 6,166 1995-2015 Argentina 6,951 14,632 19,097 18,027 22,407 23,231 1993-2015 Armenia 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2015 Aruba 2,578 2,835 2,969 6,871 11,302 15,132 2005-2015 Australia 3,561 4,022 3,748

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2010 - 2016" "(short tons and dollars per short ton)" "Year and Quarter","Australia","Canada","Colombia","Indonesia","China","Venezuela","Other","Total" ,,,,,,,"Countries" 2010,380404,1766896,14583950,1904040,52869,581700,82828,19352687 2011,61745,1680490,9500387,856038,22128,778887,187931,13087606

  15. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  16. Good prospects overcome domestic politics

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the South American gas and oil industries. Opening ever wider to private investment, the continent is attracting a flood of foreign and local firms, pushing drilling and production rates still higher. This is despite a rash of political problems in many countries, including guerrillas, environmentalists, crooked officials and border disputes. Separate evaluations are given for Venezuela, Argentina, Colombia, Brazil, Bolivia, Ecuador, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, Chile, and briefly for Falkland Islands, Paraguay, Suriname, and Barbados.

  17. South America: Investment target of the world

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The paper discusses investment in the oil and gas industries of South America. For Venezuela, first-round profit sharing, marginal field agreements, and drilling and production activities are described. Exploration, resource development, and production are also described for Argentina, Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Uruguay, and the Falkland Islands. Political problems in Ecuador, licensing in Trinidad and Tobago, and the privatization of Petroperu are also mentioned.

  18. South America: everybody is drilling almost everywhere

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    A group of studies describes accomplishments in 1980 in South America drilling and producing. There may be 3285 wells drilled during 1980, with the majority in Venezuela, Argentina and Peru, compared with a 2934 total for all countries on the continent in 1979. Reserves at the end of 1979 in South America exceeded 27 billion bbl, and production averaged 3.8 million bpd. Individual country reports are given for Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Trinidad, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, Urauguay, and Guyana.

  19. Rural health clinics infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses programs which were directed at the installation of photovoltaic power systems in rural health clinics. The objectives included: vaccine refrigeration; ice pack freezing; lighting; communications; medical appliances; sterilization; water purification; and income generation. The paper discusses two case histories, one in the Dominican Republic and one in Colombia. The author summarizes the results of the programs, both successes and failures, and offers an array of conclusions with regard to the implementation of future programs of this general nature.

  20. NREL: Technology Deployment - Developing Countries Demonstrate Impacts of

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Low Emission Development Strategies Developing Countries Demonstrate Impacts of Low Emission Development Strategies News EC-LEDS Highlights Renewable Energy Resource Data at COP21 Vietnam Makes Strides to Lower Emissions Thru Green Building Code, High-Performance Buildings Colombia Makes Major Strides in Low Emission Development Payments for Forest Environmental Services in Vietnam Preserves Forests, Engages Communities Presidential Engagement on Low Emission Development Strategies in Gabon

  1. Community Connections: April 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2015 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Celebrating and supporting women Technical fields offer lucrative opportunities for female New Mexicans MidSchoolMath conference helps teachers, students and regional economy International participants come to Santa Fe from as far away as Colombia and Dubai In other news Laboratory dramatically reduces water use;

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Ap

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Browse by Tag (alphabetical) Sort by: Alphabetical | Frequency | Tag Cloud 2012 Briefs (2) 2013 Briefs (2) AEO2011 (Annual Energy Outlook 2011) (2) AEO2012 (Annual Energy Outlook 2012) (5) AEO2013 (Annual Energy Outlook 2013) (1) AEO2014 (Annual Energy Outlook 2014) (3) AEO2016 (Annual Energy Outlook 2016) (1) annual (6) Australia (8) barge (3) Canada (1) CAPP (Central Appalachian Coal) (9) China (9) Clean Power Plan (CPP) (1) CO2 (carbon dioxide) (4) coke (2) Colombia (3) Congressional &

  3. Petroleum refining industry of developed capitalist countries in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorova, A.A.

    1994-07-01

    Crude oil is the principal source of energy today and in the immediate future. The increases in the consumption of crude oil (1.7% per year up to 2005) will be offset mainly by additional supplies from the countries of the Near East. Data on the imports of oil by the developed capitalists countries are presented in Table 2. In the United States, according to a projection made by Conoco, by the year 2000 the volume of imports will be twice the volume of domestic production; according to another prediction, the amount of Near East crude will increase from 34% in 1990 to 42% in 2000. Since the mid-1980s, the energy policy of the USA has been based on importing so-called cheap crude. Laws have been passed to mandate not only energy saving, but also cuts in the oil and gas production on U.S. territory. The volume of U.S. oil production will be 20% lower in 2000 than in 1990. Some 90% of the worldwide demand for oil is met by light and medium-density crudes, but such crudes account for only 25% of the oil resources. Projections indicate that the oil supplied to refiners in the future will be heavier and will have higher sulfur contents. The U.S. production of low-sulfur crude will drop off sharply in the next 10-15 years. The drop in oil production of the CIS [former USSR] and the consequent drop in exports from these countries will have a destabilizing effect on the world market. The average price of the {open_quotes}market basket{close_quotes} of OPEC crudes in 1991 was $149/ton (in 1990 $178/ton), in comparison with a 1992 price of $148/ton. This report presents data on refining process capacities and the ratio of secondary capacity to primary distillation capacity.

  4. Energy economists unite. [International Association of Energy Economists findings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-10

    Three years after the Arab Oil Embargo, the International Association of Energy Economists (IAEE) was organized. A non-profit organization operated through a council of 15 elected and appointed members, IAEE has already attracted some 1400 individual members from around the world as well as numerous affiliates among national energy organizations. In this issue, Energy Detente reports various IAEE findings, including: (1) a possible 1% growth during 1983 in total energy demand in capitalist countries to be satisfied by coal, nuclear, gas, and hydro supplies, not petroleum; petroleum is expected to figure in the expected 4% growth in energy demand during 1984; (2) usable commercial inventory of petroleum, having risen to 27 days of forward demand by the second quarter of 1981, now sits at 10 days; (3) the current cushion between oil supply and demand, now 15-million barrels per day (b/d) on the side of surplus production capacity during the first quarter of 1983, is exerting downward pressure on prices; and (4) possibly only half the effect of conservation provoked by the second oil-price shock has yet been manifested. If prices fall below US $25 bbl, the second half might be deferred indefinitely, and some enhanced-recovery and frontier-recovery projects would become uneconomic. Also, with OPEC prices holding through the summer of 1983, there is a good chance prices could stabilize for the next several years. This issue presents the Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for August 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  5. Wireless power transmission: The key to solar power satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Nansen, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    In the years following the OPEC oil embargo of 1973--74, the US aggressively researched alternative energy options. Among those studied was the concept of Solar Power Satellites -- generating electricity in space from solar energy on giant satellites and sending the energy to the earth with wireless power transmission. Much has happened in the fifteen years since the studies were terminated. Maturing of the enabling technologies has provided much of the infrastructure to support the development of a commercial Solar Power Satellite program. All of this will reduce the cost by one to two orders of magnitude so development can now be undertaken by industry instead of relying on a massive government program. Solar Space Industries was formed to accomplish this goal. The basis of their development plan for Solar Power Satellites is to build a Ground Test Installation that will duplicate, in small scale on the earth, all aspects of the power generating and power transmission systems for the Solar Power Satellite concept except for the space environment and the range and size of the energy beam. Space operations issues will be separated from the power generation function and verified by testing using the NASA Space Station and Space Shuttle. Solar Space Industries` concept is to built a Ground Test Installation that couples an existing 100 kW terrestrial solar cell array, furnished by an interested utility, to a phased-array wireless power transmitter based on the subarray developed by William Brown and The Center for Space Power. Power will be transmitted over a 1 1/4 mile range to a receiving antenna (rectenna) and then fed into a commercial utility power grid. The objective is to demonstrate the complete function of the Solar Power Satellites, with the primary issue being the validation of practical wireless power transmission. The key features to demonstrate are; beam control, stability, steering, efficiency, reliability, cost, and safety.

  6. Political dynamics of economic sanctions: a case study of Arab oil embargoes

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The general question is considered of the effectiveness of economic sanctions in international politics, in terms of the Arabs' use of oil as a political weapon in 1956, 1967, and 1973. Chapter 3 focuses on the impact of the interruption of oil supplies to Western Europe throughout the 1956 Suez crisis. By 1967, pressure on the conservative governing elites of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Libya, and the Gulf Sheikdoms obliged these states to join Iraq and Algeria in imposing production cutbacks and an embargo. Yet the conservative regimes' ties to the West, and the control exerted by multinational oil corporations over all phases of their oil industry, insured that the embargo was not enforced. Chapter 4 explains historically how, by the late 1960s, relinquishment of old concessions, nationalization acts, and participation agreements had caused a decline in the multinationals' domination of the oil industry. The rise of OPEC and OAPEC, which by 1970 had united and organized the producing governments, channeled their demands, and created an international forum for their political grievances, is discussed. Chapter 5 considers how by 1973 international and Arab political developments had forced states like Saudi Arabia, which had sought to dissociate oil and politics, to unsheathe the oil weapon and wave it in the faces of their Western allies. The author concludes from analysis of these complex cases that scholarship has exaggerated the inefficacy of sanctions. The effectiveness of sanctions is seen to depend upon how the demands are formulated and presented and to what extent they can be negotiated, as well as upon the sociopolitical, cultural, and psychological characteristics of the target population.

  7. Energy vulnerability relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B.R.; Boesen, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The US consumption of crude oil resources has been a steadily growing indicator of the vitality and strength of the US economy. At the same time import diversity has also been a rapidly developing dimension of the import picture. In the early 1970`s, embargoes of crude oil from Organization of Producing and Exporting Countries (OPEC) created economic and political havoc due to a significant lack of diversity and a unique set of economic, political and domestic regulatory circumstances. The continued rise of imports has again led to concerns over the security of our crude oil resource but threats to this system must be considered in light of the diversity and current setting of imported oil. This report develops several important issues concerning vulnerability to the disruption of oil imports: (1) The Middle East is not the major supplier of oil to the United States, (2) The US is not vulnerable to having its entire import stream disrupted, (3) Even in stable countries, there exist vulnerabilities to disruption of the export stream of oil, (4) Vulnerability reduction requires a focus on international solutions, and (5) DOE program and policy development must reflect the requirements of the diverse supply. Does this increasing proportion of imported oil create a {open_quotes}dependence{close_quotes}? Does this increasing proportion of imported oil present a vulnerability to {open_quotes}price shocks{close_quotes} and the tremendous dislocations experienced during the 1970`s? Finally, what is the vulnerability of supply disruptions from the current sources of imported oil? If oil is considered to be a finite, rapidly depleting resource, then the answers to these questions must be {open_quotes}yes.{close_quotes} However, if the supply of oil is expanding, and not limited, then dependence is relative to regional supply sources.

  8. II international conference on heavy crude and tar sands. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Heavy Crude and Tar Sands clearly demonstrated that the world has abundant heavy and extra heavy crudes that will sustain the petroleum age for decades. Perhaps even more important for many developed and developing countries is that these resources are widely distributed throughout the world, for deposits are known to exist in at least forty-nine countries. Moreover, the rapid expansion over the last two and a half years of knowledge of the magnitude of these resources suggests there is much more to be added to the world's list of useful energy assets. The current ample supply of crude oil does not appear to have lessened the resolve to develop heavy crude and tar sands. Major industrial countries are eager to develop their heavy oil resources to free themselves from dependence on OPEC and the developing nations hope to reduce their cash outflows for imported oil which they can ill afford. Venezuela and Canada, which both have massive heavy crude reserves, are intent on developing their resources to supplement declining supplies of light oil. Despite the weakening international price of oil, the economics for many heavy crude ventures seem favorable. Statistics quoted at the conference suggest considerable heavy crude production can be brought on stream at costs approaching the finding costs of light conventional crude. At the same time, it has to be acknowledged that those large tar sands projects, like Alberta's multi-billion dollar ventures, are sufficiently marginal that they may be held back by current soft oil demand. This summary report covers the following areas: resources; international cooperation; production; environment; technological developments; upgrading and refining; marketing; and future of heavy crude oil and tar sands.

  9. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Li, Jia

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

  10. Major marine source rocks and stratigraphic cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Duval, B.C.

    1995-11-01

    The identification of continental encroachment cycles and subcycles by using sequence stratigraphy can assist explorationists in locating source rocks. The continental encroachment cycles are associated with the breakup of the supercontinents and fit a smooth long-term eustatic curve. They are first order, with a duration greater than 50 m.y., and are composed of transgressive and regressive phases inducing major changes in shoreline. The limit between the transgressive and regressive phases corresponds to a major downlap surface, and major marine source rocks are often found in association with this surface, particularly in the northern hemisphere. Potential {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} source rock intervals can also be sought by sequence stratigraphy because each continental encroachment cycle is composed of several subcycles, and the same configuration of a regressive forestepping phase overlying a transgressive backstepping phase also creates a downlap surface that may correspond with organic-rich intervals. The stratigraphic distribution of source rocks and related reserves fits reasonably well with continental encroachment cycles and subcycles. For instance, source rocks of Silurian, Upper Jurassic, and Middle-Upper Cretaceous are associated with eustatic highs and bear witness to this relationship. The recognition and mapping of such downlap surfaces is therefore a useful step to help map source rocks. The interpretation of sequence stratigraphy from regional seismic lines, properly calibrated with geochernical data whenever possible, can be of considerable help in the process. Several examples from around the world illustrate the power of the method: off-shore of eastern Venezuela, coastal basin of Angola, western Africa, the North Sea, south Algeria, and the North Caucasian trough.

  11. Accounting for social impacts and costs in the forest industry, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, Robert . E-mail: rgale@web.net; Gale, Fred . E-mail: fred.gale@utas.edu.au

    2006-03-15

    Business reviews of the forest industry in British Colombia, Canada, typically portray an unequivocally positive picture of its financial and economic health. In doing so, they fail to consider the following six categories of social impacts and costs: (1) direct and indirect subsidies; (2) government support through investment; (3) community dependence; (4) the maintenance of public order; (5) aboriginal title; and (6) the overestimation of employment. Our findings show that conventional economic and financial accounting methods inflate the industry's net contribution to the economy. We make a number of recommendations to address this shortcoming to improve future accounting and reporting procedures.

  12. A new species of antipatharian coral (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Antipatharia: Schizopathidae) from the Pacific coast of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Opresko, Dennis M; Breedy, Odalisca

    2010-09-01

    A new species of black coral, Aphanipathes colombiana (Cnidaria:Antipatharia) from the Caribbean coast of Colombia is described. The species forms small flabellate colonies with anisomorphic polypar spines. It is morphologically similar to the western Atlantic species A. thyoides (Pourtales) but its hypostomal polypar spines are not reduced in size. The new species also resembles the Indo-Pacific species A. reticulata van Pesch but it has smooth-surfaced polypar spines, whereas in A. reticulata these spines have small tubercles on their surface

  13. Venezuela No. 1 oil import source in S. America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-10

    This paper reports that with the exception of Venezuela, the U.S. is likely to import much oil from South American countries through 2010, the General Accounting Office reports. GAO, a congressional watchdog agency, noted the U.S. imports about 4% of its oil from Colombia, Ecuador, and Trinidad and Tobago and possibly could import from Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Peru in the future. It the the eight countries' crude oil reserves are expected to increase about 30% by 2000, then slide about 2% by 2010. Their oil production is expected to climb about 21% over 1990 by 2000, then level off until 2010.

  14. New sources of debt

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.

    1996-04-01

    Financing of power projects in Latin America is discussed in this article. Financial arrangements for a cogeneration project in Chile and a generating plant in Argentina are outlined. The Chilean project, Petropower Energia Limitada, is a subsidiary of Foster Wheeler Corporation and Chile`s state owned oil company. The Central Termica Patagonia generating plant in Argentina will be built by Amoco Power Resources Corporation in partnership with Camuzzi Argentina. Very brief descriptions of funding for projects in Bolivia, Colombia, Brazil, and Ecuador are also provided.

  15. Infrastructure opportunities in South America: Energy sector. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The report, conducted by CG/LA, Inc., was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report was assembled for the South American Infrastructure Conference held in New Orleans. It contains a regional overview of infrastructure activities in ten countries represented at the conference. Also covered are project listings in five sectors, including Energy, Transportation, Environment, Telecommunications, and Industry. The study covers TDA case studies as well as project financeability. The ten countries covered in the report include the following: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. This volume focuses on the Energy Sector in South America.

  16. Hunt to buy Pacific Enterprises' U. S. production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-19

    This paper reports that Hunt Oil Co., Dallas, has agreed to buy substantially all of the oil and gas assets of Pacific Enterprises Oil Co. (U.S.A.) a subsidiary of Pacific Enterprises, Los Angeles. Hunt will pay $371 million for leases mainly in Texas, Wyoming, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The acquired properties will add oil and gas reserves of about 63 million bbl of oil equivalent and nearly 1.4 million gross leasehold acres to Hunt's exploration and production assets. Included in the assets to be acquired are several oil and gas fields on the Burnett Ranch in King County, Tex., and a subsidiary corporation that has production interests in Colombia.

  17. Seismic acquisition and processing methodologies in overthrust areas: Some examples from Latin America

    SciTech Connect

    Tilander, N.G.; Mitchel, R..

    1996-08-01

    Overthrust areas represent some of the last frontiers in petroleum exploration today. Billion barrel discoveries in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia and the Monagas fold-thrust belt of Venezuela during the past decade have highlighted the potential rewards for overthrust exploration. However the seismic data recorded in many overthrust areas is disappointingly poor. Challenges such as rough topography, complex subsurface structure, presence of high-velocity rocks at the surface, back-scattered energy and severe migration wavefronting continue to lower data quality and reduce interpretability. Lack of well/velocity control also reduces the reliability of depth estimations and migrated images. Failure to obtain satisfactory pre-drill structural images can easily result in costly wildcat failures. Advances in the methodologies used by Chevron for data acquisition, processing and interpretation have produced significant improvements in seismic data quality in Bolivia, Colombia and Trinidad. In this paper, seismic test results showing various swath geometries will be presented. We will also show recent examples of processing methods which have led to improved structural imaging. Rather than focusing on {open_quotes}black box{close_quotes} methodology, we will emphasize the cumulative effect of step-by-step improvements. Finally, the critical significance and interrelation of velocity measurements, modeling and depth migration will be explored. Pre-drill interpretations must ultimately encompass a variety of model solutions, and error bars should be established which realistically reflect the uncertainties in the data.

  18. Oil and gas developments in South America, Central America, Carribbean area, and Mexico in 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, C.S.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum developments in 1981 continued in the pattern of recent years of increasing exploration and exploitation in response to the second catastrophic surge in crude oil prices thrust on the world economy in 1979. Production of crude oil increased in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, and Mexico, whereas Venezuela, Trinidad, Peru, and Bolivia experienced declines. Exploratory surveys, exploratory drilling, and development drilling all increased in most of the countries reporting. Significant successful exploratory drilling is reported for several countries. In Argentina, the producing zone of the Austral basin has been extended farther offshore, and is reportedly productive in what is apparently the upper Malvinas basin. In Brazil, extensions to several producing areas are reported in the Campos basin. Also, the Jurua gas province of western Amazonas reportedly had an encouraging extension. Colombia had several discoveries in the Magdalena basins, but the 2 Llanos discoveries are considered much more significant. For a variety of reasons, several countries have undertaken or are undertaking changes in laws and regulations to attract foreign companies into exploration risk ventures. In some countries, exploitation ventures are also offered.

  19. Table 18. U.S. Coal Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. U.S. Coal Imports (short tons) Year to Date Continent and Country of Origin April - June 2016 January - March 2016 April - June 2015 2016 2015 Percent Change North America Total 241,095 240,168 325,205 481,263 496,903 -3.1 Canada 240,878 239,440 325,205 480,318 496,836 -3.3 Mexico 217 728 - 945 67 NM South America Total 1,987,017 2,196,295 2,111,130 4,183,312 4,458,204 -6.2 Colombia 1,987,017 2,190,869 2,111,040 4,177,886 4,410,756 -5.3 Peru - 5,426 90 5,426 11,751 -53.8 Venezuela - - - -

  20. Table 19. Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports (dollars per short ton) Year to Date Continent and Country of Origin April - June 2016 January - March 2016 April - June 2015 2016 2015 Percent Change North America Total 73.59 71.92 122.71 72.76 117.29 -38.0 Canada 73.61 71.93 122.71 72.77 117.29 -38.0 Mexico 59.08 66.79 - 65.02 113.43 -42.7 South America Total 66.00 64.73 66.89 65.33 68.96 -5.3 Colombia 66.00 64.73 66.89 65.34 68.81 -5.0 Peru - 63.31 92.99 63.31 86.24 -26.6 Venezuela - - - - 81.04 - Europe