National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for oecd europe-austria belgium

  1. Suntechnics Belgium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Belgium Place: Belgium Sector: Solar Product: Belgian manufacturer and installer of solar thermal heating systems. Also sells and installs PV panels and heat pumps....

  2. Belgium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    are pleased to announce that they have jointly completed the removal of a significant amount of excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) and separated plutonium from Belgium. At

  3. OECD | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  4. Brussels, Belgium: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Sustainable Energy Ventures References http:www.geonames.org2800866brussels.html Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBrussels,Belgium&oldid266529...

  5. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change Visualization of World Energy Supply Add Tool OECD Programs Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

  6. Belgium

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    that required the joint team to develop a new glovebox facility for plutonium packaging, to train and certify personnel in specialized packaging operations, to validate...

  7. Belgium's Red Electrical Devils Win $1 Million for Innovative...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Belgium's Red Electrical Devils Win 1 Million for Innovative Inverter Design NREL ... Google and IEEE announced today that Belgium's Red Electrical Devils, a team from CE+T ...

  8. Belgium: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    the existing buildings in Belgium, the potential roof surface that can be used to install solar panel equals around 250 km.Wind EnergyOver the last decade, onshore wind capacity...

  9. OECD-Fostering Innovation for Green Growth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Fostering Innovation for Green Growth Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-Fostering Innovation for Green Growth AgencyCompany Organization:...

  10. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and United States Mission OECD brings together the governments of...

  11. OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

  12. Belgium Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium Removals | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Uranium and Plutonium Removals March 24, 2014 Belgium has been a global leader in nonproliferation, working with the United States since 2006 to minimize highly enriched uranium ...

  13. Energy use and carbon emissions: Non-OECD countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report surveys world energy use and carbon emissions patterns, with particular emphasis on the non-OECD countries. The non OECD is important not only because it currently makes up 84% of world population, but because its energy consumption, carbon emissions, population, and grow domestic product have all been growing faster than OECD`s. This presentation has seven major sections: (1) overview of key trends in non-OECD energy use and carbon emissions since 1970; (2) Comparison and contrasting energy use and carbon emissions for five major non OEDC regions (former Soviet Union and eastern Europe, Pacific Rim including China, Latin America, other Asia; Africa; 3-7) presentation of aggregate and sectoral energy use and carbon emissions data for countries within each of the 5 regions.

  14. Forecasting Crude Oil Spot Price Using OECD Petroleum Inventory Levels

    Reports and Publications

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a short-term monthly forecasting model of West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) petroleum inventory levels.

  15. Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Non-OECD Countries

    Reports and Publications

    1994-01-01

    Presents world energy use and carbon emissions patterns, with particular emphasis on the non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries (including the current and former centrally planned economies).

  16. OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Agency...

  17. Belgium Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet March 27, 2012 As one of the leaders in nuclear technology development, Belgium's nuclear program has covered all aspects of nuclear fuel cycle including reprocessing and operated a reprocessing plant between 1966 and 1974. Belgium signed the NPT in 1975 as a non-weapons state, but has retained a leading nuclear technology research center and derives over 50% of its energy from nuclear power using 7 power reactors. SCK-CEN is one of

  18. OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    A Green Growth Strategy for Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Organisation for...

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of OECD Benchmark Tests in BISON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Gamble, Kyle; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes a NEAMS (Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation) project focused on sensitivity analysis of a fuels performance benchmark problem. The benchmark problem was defined by the Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling working group of the Nuclear Science Committee, part of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD ). The benchmark problem involv ed steady - state behavior of a fuel pin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The problem was created in the BISON Fuels Performance code. Dakota was used to generate and analyze 300 samples of 17 input parameters defining core boundary conditions, manuf acturing tolerances , and fuel properties. There were 24 responses of interest, including fuel centerline temperatures at a variety of locations and burnup levels, fission gas released, axial elongation of the fuel pin, etc. Pearson and Spearman correlatio n coefficients and Sobol' variance - based indices were used to perform the sensitivity analysis. This report summarizes the process and presents results from this study.

  20. OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    -dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory

  1. OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R.

    2012-07-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

  2. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results

  3. Results from the OECD report on international projections of electricity generating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffenbarger, J.A.; Bertel, E.

    1998-07-01

    The International Energy Agency and Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have periodically undertaken a joint study on electricity generating costs in OECD Member countries and selected non-Member countries. This paper presents key results from the 1998 update of this study. Experts from 19 countries drawn from electric utility companies and government provided data on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and fuel costs from which levelized electricity generating costs (US cents/kWh) for baseload power plants were estimated in each country using a common set of economic assumptions. Light water nuclear power plants, pulverized coal plants, and natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbines were the principal options evaluated. five and 10% discount rates, 40-year operating lifetime, and 75% annual load factor were the base assumptions, with sensitivity analyses on operating lifetime and load factor. Fuel costs and fuel escalation were provided individually by country, with a sensitivity case to evaluate costs assuming no real fuel price escalation over plant lifetimes. Of the three principal fuel/technology options, none is predominantly the cheapest option for all economic assumptions. However, fossil-fueled options are generally estimated to be the least expensive option. The study confirms that gas-fired combined cycles have improved their economic performance in most countries in recent years and are strong competitors to nuclear and coal-fired plants. Eleven out of the 18 countries with two or more options show gas-fired plants to be the cheapest option at 10% discount rate. Coal remains a strong competitor to gas when lower discount rates are used. Nuclear is the least expensive at both 5 and 10% discount rate in only two countries. Generally, with gas prices above 5 US$/GJ, nuclear plants constructed at overnight capital costs below 1 650 $/kWe have the potential to be competitive only at lower discount rates.

  4. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  5. RELAP5/MOD2 assessment, OECD-LOFT small break experiment LP-SB-03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guntay, S. )

    1990-04-01

    An analysis of the experimental results and post-test calculations using RELAP5/MOD2 carried out for OECD-LOFT small break experiment LP-SB-3 are presented. Experiment LP-SB-3 was conducted on March 5, 1984 in Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The experiment simulated a small cold leg break, with concurrent loss of high pressure injection system, and cooldown and recovery by feed and bleed of the steam generator secondary side and accumulator injection, respectively. The analysis was under taken as a part of a program at EIR aimed at developing experience in using the latest generation of best estimate Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) analysis computer codes, and to improve understanding of Small Break LOCA transients and as well as a part of a program aimed at assessing the RELAP5/MOD2 code. The latest available version (Cycle 33 to 36.1) of the code was used. The particular test selected for the analysis included several phenomena potentially relevant to any PWR plant operation in Switzerland. This report documents a short post-test analysis of the experiment emphasizing the results of additional analysis performed during the course of this task. RELAP5/MOD2 input model and results of the post-test calculation are documented. Included in the report are the results of a sensitivity analysis which show the predicted thermal-hydraulic response to a different input model. 7 refs., 55 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornet, S.M.; McCarthy, K.; Chauvin, N.

    2013-07-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

  7. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roussel, G.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  8. (OECD Expert Group meeting on reduction of capital costs of nuclear power plants, Paris, France, July 21--26, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudson, C.R. II

    1989-08-09

    The OECD initiated a study of means to reduce the capital costs of nuclear power plants in the latter part of 1988. To accomplish the study, an Expert Group consisting of representatives of OECD member countries was formed. The initial meeting of the Expert Group was held in November 1988. A second meeting, documented in an ORNL trip report by this author, was held in May 1989. This meeting represents the third follow-on meeting with the primary goal of reviewing the draft report written by members of the Expert Group.

  9. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark by the Coupled-Code System ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenbuch, S.; Schmidt, K.-D.; Velkov, K.

    2004-10-15

    The OECD/NRC boiling water reactor (BWR) turbine trip benchmark has been calculated by the coupled thermal-hydraulic neutronics system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX developed by Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit. The results obtained for all three exercises and for the additional four hypothetical cases are presented. The physical phenomena determining the BWR pressure transient are studied and explained. The sensitivity of results to variations of the initial steady-state conditions and of parameters of the two-phase flow model is discussed. A comparison is also performed for exercise 2 between the reactor core model with 33 thermal-hydraulic channels (THCs) as specified and a reactor core model with 764 THCs using a 1:1 mapping scheme.

  10. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability

  11. RELAP5-3D results for phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.

    2012-07-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2. (authors)

  12. Summary of important results and SCDAP/RELAP5 analysis for OECD LOFT experiment LP-FP-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coryell, E.W.

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes significant technical findings from the LP-FP-2 Experiment sponsored by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). It was the second, and final, fission product experiment conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel rod behavior, hydrogen generation, and fission product release, transport, and deposition during a V-sequence accident scenario that resulted in severe core damage. An 11 by 11 test bundle, comprised of 100 prepressurized fuel rods, 11 control rods, and 10 instrumented guide tubes, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a specially designed central fuel module, that was inserted into the LOFT reactor. The simulated transient was a V-sequence loss-of-coolant accident scenario featuring a pipe break in the low pressure injection system line attached to the hot leg of the LOFT broken loop piping. The transient was terminated by reflood of the reactor vessel when the outer wall shroud temperature reached 1517 K. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation and metal-water reactions, elevated temperatures resulted in zircaloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on line instrumentation, analysis of fission product data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented.

  13. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  14. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-02-25

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning.

  15. Cost comparison between private and public collection of residual household waste: Multiple case studies in the Flemish region of Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, R.; Buysse, J.; Gellynck, X.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The goal is to compare collection costs for residual household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have clustered all municipalities in order to find mutual comparable pairs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each pair consists of one private and one public operating waste collection program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All cases show that private service has lower costs than public service. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipalities were contacted to identify the deeper causes for the waste management program. - Abstract: The rising pressure in terms of cost efficiency on public services pushes governments to transfer part of those services to the private sector. A trend towards more privatizing can be noticed in the collection of municipal household waste. This paper reports the findings of a research project aiming to compare the cost between the service of private and public collection of residual household waste. Multiple case studies of municipalities about the Flemish region of Belgium were conducted. Data concerning the year 2009 were gathered through in-depth interviews in 2010. In total 12 municipalities were investigated, divided into three mutual comparable pairs with a weekly and three mutual comparable pairs with a fortnightly residual waste collection. The results give a rough indication that in all cases the cost of private service is lower than public service in the collection of household waste. Albeit that there is an interest in establishing whether there are differences in the costs and service levels between public and private waste collection services, there are clear difficulties in establishing comparisons that can be made without having to rely on a large number of assumptions and corrections. However, given the cost difference, it remains the responsibility of the municipalities to decide upon the service they offer their citizens, regardless the cost efficiency: public or private.

  16. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D ring and block model results for phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 benchmark

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-12-02

    The PHISICS code system has been under development at INL since 2010. It consists of several modules providing improved coupled core simulation capability: INSTANT (3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and modules performing criticality searches, fuel shuffling and generalized perturbation. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D was finalized in 2013, and as part of the verification and validation effort the first phase of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark has now been completed. The theoretical basis and latest development status of the coupled PHISICS/RELAP5-3D tool are described in more detailmore » in a concurrent paper. This paper provides an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark and presents the results of Exercises 2 and 3 defined for Phase I. Exercise 2 required the modelling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution at End of Equilibrium Cycle for the Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR). The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 required a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D code suite was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of results obtained with the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach against a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity that can be obtained by this “block” model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions. Furthermore, it is shown that the ring model leads to significantly lower fuel temperatures (up to 10%) when compared with the higher fidelity block model, and that the additional model development and run-time efforts are worth the gains obtained

  17. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D ring and block model results for phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-12-02

    The PHISICS code system has been under development at INL since 2010. It consists of several modules providing improved coupled core simulation capability: INSTANT (3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and modules performing criticality searches, fuel shuffling and generalized perturbation. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D was finalized in 2013, and as part of the verification and validation effort the first phase of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark has now been completed. The theoretical basis and latest development status of the coupled PHISICS/RELAP5-3D tool are described in more detail in a concurrent paper. This paper provides an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark and presents the results of Exercises 2 and 3 defined for Phase I. Exercise 2 required the modelling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution at End of Equilibrium Cycle for the Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR). The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 required a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D code suite was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of results obtained with the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach against a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity that can be obtained by this “block” model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions. Furthermore, it is shown that the ring model leads to significantly lower fuel temperatures (up to 10%) when compared with the higher fidelity block model, and that the additional model development and run-time efforts are worth the gains obtained in the

  18. Summary of comparison and analysis of results from exercises 1 and 2 of the OECD PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkhabela, P.; Han, J.; Tyobeka, B.; Ivanov, K.; Reitsma, F.; Sartori, E.

    2006-07-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor 400 MW design (PBMR-400) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem as part of their official activities. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given library of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events through a set of multi-dimensional computational test problems. The benchmark includes three steady state exercises and six transient exercises. This paper describes the first two steady state exercises, their objectives and the international participation in terms of organization, country and computer code utilized. This description is followed by a comparison and analysis of the participants' results submitted for these two exercises. The comparison of results from different codes allows for an assessment of the sensitivity of a result to the method employed and can thus help to focus the development efforts on the most critical areas. The two first exercises also allow for removing of user-related modeling errors and prepare core neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the different codes for the rest of the exercises in the benchmark. (authors)

  19. COMMISSIONING AND START-UP TESTS OF ALPHA-CONTAMINATED SOLID WASTE SORTING, CEMENTING, AND INTERIM STORAGE FACILITIES AT BELGOPROCESS (BELGIUM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLIBERT, R.C.; NUYT, G.; LAMOTTE, G.; RENARD, CL.; DE GOEYSE, A.; GOETSCHALCKX, R.; GHYS, B.

    2003-02-27

    The alpha-contaminated solid waste generated in Belgium results from past activities in the fuel cycle (R & D +Reprocessing and MOX fabrication pilot plants) and present operation of BELGONUCLEAIRE's MOX fuel fabrication plant. After the main steps in the management of alpha-contaminated solid waste were established, BELGONUCLEAIRE, with the backing of BELGOPROCESS and ONDRAF/NIRAS, started the design and construction of the T & C and interim-storage facilities for this alpha waste. The accumulated solid alpha radwaste containing a mixture of combustible and non-combustible material will be sorted. After sorting, both the accumulated and recently-generated non-combustible alpha waste will be embedded in a cement matrix. The erection of the sorting and cementing units which include glove-boxes and the interim storage building for conditioned packages was completed at BELGOPROCESS, at the beginning of year 2002. Start-up operations for both facilities have been performed. Operating tests of the sorting and cementing units were completed in July 2002 and inactive operation campaigns were started in August 2002. The results of the tests and inactive campaigns are given. Overall testing of the storage building supervised by the Safety Authorities was successfully performed at the end of 202 after completion of the operating tests on the equipment. The present paper summarizes the main information collected during the tests and campaigns, some of which has led to modifications of the equipment originally installed.

  20. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  1. Status Report on Activities of the Systems Assessment Task Force, OECD-NEA Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon Michelle

    2015-09-01

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development /Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Nuclear Science Committee approved the formation of an Expert Group on Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) for LWRs (EGATFL) in 2014. Chaired by Kemal Pasamehmetoglu, INL Associate Laboratory Director for Nuclear Science and Technology, the mandate for the EGATFL defines work under three task forces: (1) Systems Assessment, (2) Cladding and Core Materials, and (3) Fuel Concepts. Scope for the Systems Assessment task force includes definition of evaluation metrics for ATF, technology readiness level definition, definition of illustrative scenarios for ATF evaluation, parametric studies, and selection of system codes. The Cladding and Core Materials and Fuel Concepts task forces will identify gaps and needs for modeling and experimental demonstration; define key properties of interest; identify the data necessary to perform concept evaluation under normal conditions and illustrative scenarios; identify available infrastructure (internationally) to support experimental needs; and make recommendations on priorities. Where possible, considering proprietary and other export restrictions (e.g., International Traffic in Arms Regulations), the Expert Group will facilitate the sharing of data and lessons learned across the international group membership. The Systems Assessment Task Force is chaired by Shannon Bragg-Sitton (INL), while the Cladding Task Force will be chaired by a representative from France (Marie Moatti, Electricite de France [EdF]) and the Fuels Task Force will be chaired by a representative from Japan (Masaki Kurata, Japan Atomic Energy Agency [JAEA]). This report provides an overview of the Systems Assessment Task Force charter and status of work accomplishment.

  2. Belgium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  3. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  4. The impact of size distribution assumptions in a bulk one-moment microphysics scheme on simulated surface precipitation and storm dynamics during a low-topped supercell case in Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weverberg, K.; VanLipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbe, L.

    2011-04-01

    In this research the impact of modifying the size distribution assumptions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a bulk one-moment microphysics scheme on simulated surface precipitation and storm dynamics has been explored for long-lived low-topped supercells in Belgium. It was shown that weighting the largest precipitating ice species of the microphysics scheme to small graupel results in an increase of surface precipitation because of counteracting effects. On the one hand, the precipitation formation process slowed down, resulting in lower precipitation efficiency. On the other hand, latent heat release associated with freezing favored more intense storms. In contrast to previous studies finding decreased surface precipitation when graupel was present in the microphysics parameterization, storms were rather shallow in the authors simulations. This left little time for graupel sublimation. The impact of size distribution assumptions of snow was found to be small, but more realistic size distribution assumptions of rain led to the strongest effect on surface precipitation. Cold pools shrunk because of weaker rain evaporation at the cold pool boundaries, leading to a decreased surface rain area.

  5. OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    714271111,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India,...

  6. OECD-International Platform on Policy Coherence for Development...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Area: Economic Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices, Technical report User Interface: Website Website:...

  7. Belgium's Red Electrical Devils Win $1 Million for Innovative...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado, for testing. "The overall idea was to test these inverters in a similar fashion to how they would be used out in the field," said Blake Lundstrom, the NREL project lead. ...

  8. Belgium Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium Removals | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This Site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  9. TWENTIES (Smart Grid Project) (Brussels, Belgium) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    share of renewables in its energy mix by 2020 and beyond, while keeping its present reliability. References "EU Smart Grid Projects Map" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.org...

  10. Belgium east loop active network management (Smart Grid Project...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Cancel Submit Categories: Smart Grid Projects Smart Grid Projects in Europe Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Distribution Smart Grid Projects - Grid Automation Transmission...

  11. EUDEEP (Smart Grid Project) (Belgium) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    technical and nontechnical barriers that prevent a massive deployment of distributed energy resources (DER) in Europe. In partnership with manufacturers, research organizations,...

  12. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND ...

  13. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  14. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  15. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI workshop on transient thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, D.

    1997-07-01

    This is a report on the CSNI Workshop on Transient Thermal-Hydraulic and Neutronic Codes Requirements held at Annapolis, Maryland, USA November 5-8, 1996. This experts` meeting consisted of 140 participants from 21 countries; 65 invited papers were presented. The meeting was divided into five areas: (1) current and prospective plans of thermal hydraulic codes development; (2) current and anticipated uses of thermal-hydraulic codes; (3) advances in modeling of thermal-hydraulic phenomena and associated additional experimental needs; (4) numerical methods in multi-phase flows; and (5) programming language, code architectures and user interfaces. The workshop consensus identified the following important action items to be addressed by the international community in order to maintain and improve the calculational capability: (a) preserve current code expertise and institutional memory, (b) preserve the ability to use the existing investment in plant transient analysis codes, (c) maintain essential experimental capabilities, (d) develop advanced measurement capabilities to support future code validation work, (e) integrate existing analytical capabilities so as to improve performance and reduce operating costs, (f) exploit the proven advances in code architecture, numerics, graphical user interfaces, and modularization in order to improve code performance and scrutibility, and (g) more effectively utilize user experience in modifying and improving the codes.

  16. OECD MCCI project enhancing instrumentation for reactor materials experiments, Rev. 0 September 3, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    Reactor safety experiments for studying the reactions of a molten core (corium) with water and/or concrete involve materials at extremely high temperature. Such high temperature severely restricts the types of sensors that can be employed to measure characteristics of the corium itself. Yet there is great interest in improving instrumentation so that the state of the melt can be established with more precision. In particular, it would be beneficial to increase both the upper range limit and accuracy of temperature measurements. The poor durability of thermocouples at high temperature is also an important issue. For experiments involving a water-quenched melt, direct measurements of the growth rate of the crust separating the melt and water would be of great interest. This is a key element in determining the nature of heat transfer between the melt and coolant. Despite its importance, no one has been able to directly measure the crust thickness during such tests. This paper considers three specialized sensors that could be introduced to enhance melt characterization: (1) A commercially fabricated, single point infrared temperature measurement with the footprint of a thermowell. A lens assembly and fiber optic cable linked to a receiver and amplifier measures the temperature at the base of a tungsten thermowell. The upper range limit is 3000 C and accuracy is {+-}0.25% of the reading. (2) In-house development of an ultrasonic temperature sensor that would provide multipoint measurements at temperatures up to {approx}3000 C. The sensors are constructed from tungsten rods and have a high temperature durability that is superior to that of thermocouples. (3) In-house development of an ultrasonic probe to measure the growth rate of the corium crust. This ultrasonic sensor would include a tungsten waveguide that transmits ultrasonic pulses up through the corium melt towards the crust and detects reflections from the melt/crust interface. A measurement of the echo time delay would provide the location of the interface. These three sensors would provide a considerable upgrade of the instrumentation used in our reactor materials tests. The infracouple is a commercial product that could provide an immediate improvement in temperature measurements. The sensor could also serve to corroborate thermocouple data by providing a measurement based upon a different physical principle. The ultrasonic temperature sensor would involve a greater investment and longer time frame than the infracouple, but offers all the advantages of the infracouple along with miniaturization and the ability to measure at multiple locations. In addition, the UTS is the platform from which we would begin development of the crust detector. Of the three sensors, the crust detector requires the most effort and entails the greatest uncertainty. However, a real-time crust thickness measurement has never before been made and such data would be unique and of great benefit to reactor materials experiments.

  17. OECD NEA Benchmark Database of Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions for World Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, Ian C; Sly, Nicholas C; Michel-Sendis, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on the isotopic concentrations in irradiated nuclear fuel represent one of the primary methods for validating computational methods and nuclear data used for reactor and spent fuel depletion simulations that support nuclear fuel cycle safety and safeguards programs. Measurement data have previously not been available to users in a centralized or searchable format, and the majority of accessible information has been, for the most part, limited to light-water-reactor designs. This paper describes a recent initiative to compile spent fuel benchmark data for additional reactor designs used throughout the world that can be used to validate computer model simulations that support nuclear energy and nuclear safeguards missions. Experimental benchmark data have been expanded to include VVER-440, VVER-1000, RBMK, graphite moderated MAGNOX, gas cooled AGR, and several heavy-water moderated CANDU reactor designs. Additional experimental data for pressurized light water and boiling water reactor fuels has also been compiled for modern assembly designs and more extensive isotopic measurements. These data are being compiled and uploaded to a recently revised structured and searchable database, SFCOMPO, to provide the nuclear analysis community with a centrally-accessible resource of spent fuel compositions that can be used to benchmark computer codes, models, and nuclear data. The current version of SFCOMPO contains data for eight reactor designs, 20 fuel assembly designs, more than 550 spent fuel samples, and measured isotopic data for about 80 nuclides.

  18. Foreign Travel Report - West Germany and Belgium - September 9 - September 13, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickford, D.F.

    2001-05-17

    This report discusses visitation of the PAMELA plant which provided an opportunity to observe the operation and design of this European waste solidification facility. The aim of the workshop was to exchange expertise relative to the safe vitrification of HLLW in order to determine which areas were technologically solved and which areas required further study.

  19. DLC+VIT4IP (Smart Grid Project) (Belgium) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    applications. These shall include the existing power distribution network for novel services in smart electricity distribution networks such as demand side management,...

  20. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

  1. Consistent Comparison of the Codes RELAP5/PARCS and TRAC-M/PARCS for the OECD MSLB Coupled Code Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlowski, Tomasz; Miller, R. Matthew; Downar, Thomas J.; Barber, Douglas A.; Joo, Han Gyu

    2004-04-15

    A generalized interface module was developed for coupling any thermal-hydraulic code to any spatial kinetic code. In the design used here the thermal-hydraulic and spatial kinetic codes function as independent processes and communicate using the Parallel Virtual Machine software. This approach helps maximize flexibility while minimizing modifications to the respective codes. Using this interface, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) three-dimensional neutron kinetic code, Purdue Advanced Reactor Core Simulator (PARCS), has been coupled to the NRC system analysis codes RELAP5 and Modernized Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-M). Consistent comparison of code results for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency main steam line break benchmark problem using RELAP5/PARCS and TRAC-M/PARCS was made to assess code performance.

  2. Simulation of the OECD Main-Steam-Line-Break Benchmark Exercise 3 Using the Coupled RELAP5/PANTHER Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneidesch, Christophe R.; Zhang Jinzhao

    2004-04-15

    The RELAP5 best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code has been coupled with the PANTHER three-dimensional neutron kinetics code via the TALINK dynamic data exchange control and processing tool. The coupled RELAP5/PANTHER code package has been qualified and will be used at Tractebel Engineering (TE) for analyzing asymmetric pressurized water reactor (PWR) accidents with strong core-system interactions. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission PWR main-steam-line-break benchmark problem was analyzed as part of the qualification efforts to demonstrate the capability of the coupled code package of simulating such transients. This paper reports the main results of TE's contribution to the benchmark Exercise 3.

  3. Trip report: European Communities 1989 International Conference on Decommissioning of Nuclear Installations, Brussels, Belgium, October 24-27, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    The European community is conducting research on the decommissioning of nuclear installations. The prime objective is to develop effective techniques to ensure the protection of man and his environment against the potential hazards of nuclear installations that have been shut down. The results of the 1979--1983 research program were presented in a conference held in Luxembourg. This program was primarily concerned with decommissioning nuclear power plants. The 1984--1988 program was extended to all types of nuclear installations. Fuel fabrication, enrichment and reprocessing plants, and research and development facilities having fulfilled their useful purposes are also awaiting decommissioning. This Program has produced numerous scientific and technical achievements. Great progress has in particular been achieved in the reduction of metal waste arising from decommissioning, due to advances in areas such as the development of aggressive decontamination procedures and of techniques for melting and recycling low-level radioactive waste metal.

  4. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  5. Energy & Financial Markets - Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration (EIA) OECD The Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consists of the United States, much of Europe, and other advanced countries. At 53 percent of world oil consumption in 2010, these large economies consume more oil than the non-OECD countries, but have much lower oil consumption growth. Oil consumption in the OECD countries actually declined in the decade between 2000 and 2010, whereas non-OECD consumption rose 40 percent during the same period. In OECD

  6. ENV-Linkages General Equilibrium Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools Website: www.oecd.orgofficialdocumentsdisplaydocumentpdf?coteECOWKP(2008)6 References: OECD1...

  7. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... U.S. Territories; for 1984 forward, Mexico; and, for 2000 forward, Chile, Estonia, and Israel. d The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consists of "OECD ...

  8. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  9. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  10. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  11. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Transient Benchmark with the Coupled Thermal-Hydraulics and Neutronics Code TRAC-M/PARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Deokjung; Downar, Thomas J.; Ulses, Anthony; Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2004-10-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip 2 (TT2) experiment has been performed using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics code TRAC-M/PARCS. The objective of the analysis was to assess the performance of TRAC-M/PARCS on a BWR transient with significance in two-phase flow and spatial variations of the neutron flux. TRAC-M/PARCS results are found to be in good agreement with measured plant data for both steady-state and transient phases of the benchmark. Additional analyses of four fictitious extreme scenarios are performed to provide a basis for code-to-code comparisons and comprehensive testing of the thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling. The obtained results of sensitivity studies on the effect of direct moderator heating on transient simulation indicate the importance of this modeling aspect.

  12. Using the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark to Study Current Numerical and Computational Issues of Coupled Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Todorova, Nadejda K.; Sartori, Enrico

    2003-05-15

    Incorporating full three-dimensional (3-D) models of the reactor core into system transient codes allows for a 'best-estimate' calculation of interactions between the core behavior and plant dynamics. Recent progress in computer technology has made the development of coupled thermal-hydraulic (T-H) and neutron kinetics code systems feasible. Considerable efforts have been made in various countries and organizations in this direction. Appropriate benchmarks need to be developed that will permit testing of two particular aspects. One is to verify the capability of the coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions. The second is to test fully the neutronics/T-H coupling. One such benchmark is the Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) Benchmark problem. It was sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and The Pennsylvania State University. The benchmark problem uses a 3-D neutronics core model that is based on real plant design and operational data for the Three Mile Island Unit 1 nuclear power plant. The purpose of this benchmark is threefold: to verify the capability of system codes for analyzing complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions; to test fully the 3-D neutronics/T-H coupling; and to evaluate discrepancies among the predictions of coupled codes in best-estimate transient simulations. The purposes of the benchmark are met through the application of three exercises: a point kinetics plant simulation (exercise 1), a coupled 3-D neutronics/core T-H evaluation of core response (exercise 2), and a best-estimate coupled core-plant transient model (exercise 3).In this paper we present the three exercises of the MSLB benchmark, and we summarize the findings of the participants with regard to the current numerical and computational issues of coupled calculations. In addition, this paper reviews in some detail the sensitivity studies on exercises 2 and 3 performed by the benchmark team using the coupled code TRAC-PF1/NEM. The purpose of these supporting studies was to aid participants in developing their models.

  13. Evaluation of select heat and pressure measurement gauges for potential use in the NRC/OECD High Energy Arc Fault (HEAF) test program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Carlos; Wente, William Baker; Figueroa, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the current state of the art in fire probabilistic risk assessment methodology, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Regulatory Research, contracted Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to conduct a series of scoping tests to identify thermal and mechanical probes that could be used to characterize the zone of influence (ZOI) during high energy arc fault (HEAF) testing. For the thermal evaluation, passive and active probes were exposed to HEAF-like heat fluxes for a period of 2 seconds at the SNLs National Solar Thermal Test Facility to determine their ability to survive and measure such an extreme environment. Thermal probes tested included temperature lacquers (passive), NANMAC thermocouples, directional flame thermometers, modified plate thermometers, infrared temperature sensors, and a Gardon heat flux gauge. Similarly, passive and active pressure probes were evaluated by exposing them to pressures resulting from various high-explosive detonations at the Sandia Terminal Ballistic Facility. Pressure probes included bikini pressure gauges (passive) and pressure transducers. Results from these tests provided good insight to determine which probes should be considered for use during future HEAF testing.

  14. Balta Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Balta Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Balta Group Place: Sint Baafs Vijve, Belgium Zip: 8710 Product: Belgium-based manufacturer of broadloom carpets, rugs and laminate...

  15. Enfinity Management BVBA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Management BVBA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enfinity Management BVBA Place: Ghent, Belgium Zip: 9051 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Belgium-based financial engineer in...

  16. Blue Planet Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Planet Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blue Planet Solar Place: Antwerp, Belgium Zip: B-2060 Sector: Services, Solar Product: Belgium-based firm that offers installation,...

  17. NNSA and the European Commission advance global nuclear nonproliferati...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    located in four countries: EURATOM Safeguards in Luxembourg, JRC Headquarters in Belgium, and the JRC institutes in Karlsruhe, Germany; Ispra, Italy; and Geel, Belgium. ...

  18. Electrawinds N V | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Electrawinds N V Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrawinds N.V. Place: Oostende, Belgium Zip: 8400 Sector: Wind energy Product: A Belgium-based producer, retailer and...

  19. Futech BvBa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Leuven, Belgium Zip: 3001 Product: Belgium-based project development and distribution company. Coordinates: 50.879385, 4.70367 Show Map Loading map......

  20. Jura Energie | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Cerneux-Veusil, Belgium Zip: 2345 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Wind and solar project developer and system integrator. Active in Belgium, France and Switzerland....

  1. Analysis of international efforts in energy research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaiyan, A.J.; Gill, R.T.

    1995-09-01

    Research and experimental development comprise innovative and creative work undertaken systematically to increase the stock of knowledge of science, engineering, and society. This knowledge reserve is used to improve living conditions and standards, including economic growth. Research and development (R&D) expenditures are useful measures of the scale and direction of technological innovation within a country, industry, or scientific field. Administrators concerned with economic growth and performance rely on R&D statistics as one possible type of indicator of technological change. R&D statistics are an essential tool in many government programs and evaluations (OECD 1993). The objective of the analysis was to identify and evaluate R&D funding sources, levels, and trends in the energy sectors of selected industrialized countries (Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States) and the European Union (EU). Fossil fuel technologies, particularly fuel cells and advanced gas turbines, were the focus of the analysis, whose results are presented in this report.

  2. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) OECD The Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consists of the United States, much of Europe, and other advanced countries. At 53 percent of world oil consumption in 2010, these large economies consume more oil than the non-OECD countries, but have much lower oil consumption growth. Oil consumption in the OECD countries actually declined in the decade between 2000 and 2010, whereas non-OECD consumption rose 40 percent during

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Nonmanufacturing sector Service sector rest of economy OECD 1.5 2.4 1.8 2 OECD ... DOEEIA-0383 (Washington, DC: April 2015). Rest of World: Oxford Economics, Global ...

  4. Oil and gas outlook

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 non-OECD consumption growth non-OECD GDP growth* Prices and economic growth are important, but policy, preferences, and technology may have a bigger...

  5. Ecofys-Country Fact Sheets | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Country: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Colombia, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, European Union,...

  6. Mesa del Sol Project Is Finalist for International Smart Grid...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... & Events, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Solar, Systems Analysis, ... ISGAN membership is voluntary, and currently includes Australia, Austria, Belgium, ...

  7. Energy & Financial Markets - Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration (EIA) Non-OECD Oil consumption in developing countries that are not part of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has risen sharply in recent years. While oil consumption in the OECD countries declined between 2000 and 2010, non-OECD oil consumption increased more than 40 percent. China, India, and Saudi Arabia had the largest growth in oil consumption among the countries in the non-OECD during this period. Economic growth has a strong impact on oil

  8. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Non-OECD Oil consumption in developing countries that are not part of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has risen sharply in recent years. While oil consumption in the OECD countries declined between 2000 and 2010, non-OECD oil consumption increased more than 40 percent. China, India, and Saudi Arabia had the largest growth in oil consumption among the countries in the non-OECD during this period. Economic growth has

  9. PowerPoint Presentation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    20 W 118 th St, New York, NY 10027 | http://energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Pacific Rim Impacts of US Shale Boom Jason Bordoff 2013 EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 1 420 W 118 th St, New York, NY 10027 | http://energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Global Gas Demand Forecast Bcf/d Source: IEA WEO2012 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Non-OECD Asia OECD Asia Africa Middle East Non-OECD Europe/Eurasia Europe Non-OECD Americas OECD Americas 2 420 W 118

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    20 W 118 th St, New York, NY 10027 | http://energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Pacific Rim Impacts of US Shale Boom Jason Bordoff 2013 EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 1 420 W 118 th St, New York, NY 10027 | http://energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Global Gas Demand Forecast Bcf/d Source: IEA WEO2012 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Non-OECD Asia OECD Asia Africa Middle East Non-OECD Europe/Eurasia Europe Non-OECD Americas OECD Americas 2 420 W 118

  11. International petroleum statistics report, October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. International petroleum statistics report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992: and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  13. Example Batch Scripts

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Examining Future Global Transportation Energy Demand For EIA Energy Conference July 11, 2016 | Washington, DC By John Maples Outline * Model overview - Passenger travel - Freight travel - Energy consumption for 16 regions: * USA, Canada, Mexico/Chile, OECD Europe, Japan, S. Korea, Australia/New Zealand * Russia, Non-OECD Europe/Eurasia, China, India, Non-OECD Asia, Middle East, Africa, Brazil, Other South/Central * IEO2016 Reference case transportation projections * Preliminary scenario results

  14. Examining Future Global Energy Demand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Examining Future Global Transportation Energy Demand For EIA Energy Conference July 11, 2016 | Washington, DC By John Maples Outline * Model overview - Passenger travel - Freight travel - Energy consumption for 16 regions: * USA, Canada, Mexico/Chile, OECD Europe, Japan, S. Korea, Australia/New Zealand * Russia, Non-OECD Europe/Eurasia, China, India, Non-OECD Asia, Middle East, Africa, Brazil, Other South/Central * IEO2016 Reference case transportation projections * Preliminary scenario results

  15. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production, oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  16. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This monthly publication provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  17. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This monthly publication provides current data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  18. Energy & Financial Markets - Petprod - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration (EIA) Consumption Countries outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) drove increases in global demand for petroleum products in recent years. In aggregate, non-OECD countries consumed more petroleum products than OECD countries for the first time in 2014. Global distillate consumption tends to rise as developing countries show robust economic growth because their economies tend to be driven by industry and manufacturing rather than services.

  19. Visualization of World Energy Supply | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    isualizationofWorldEnergySupply Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Community Generated Language: English References: OECD1 Motion chart visualization of the world energy supply...

  20. United Nations Economic Commission for Africa | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Ministerial Consultation known as "The Big Table" . Started in 2000, a small group of African Ministers of Finance gather with...

  1. By:\tDr.\tNabil\tNasr

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Raworth, K. et al. Oxfam: Oxford, UK, 2012. OECD's Sustainable Manufacturing Toolkit Sustainability components Issue Areas Indicators category Social responsibility Material use ...

  2. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in DOE technology and contains selected scientific and technical software from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). ...

  3. Widget:Motion Chart Visualizations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    References usenergyconsumption: SED data usconsumption2010: SED data worldenergysupply: OECD data Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWidget:MotionChartVisuali...

  4. International Transport Forum | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    ernationaltransportforum.orgaboutstaff.html "The International Transport Forum at the OECD is an intergovernmental organisation with 52 member countries. It acts as a strategic...

  5. Paris, France: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Agency (IEA) Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21) Registered Energy...

  6. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This report provides information on current international petroleum production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil demand and OECD demand data are presented for the years 1970 thru 1995.

  7. Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    additional fast response power plants, interconnection or storage. Much of existing transmission hardware in OECD countries was built in the middle of the last century, and a new...

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Sustainable Development (WPISD). Partners include the OECD International Energy Agency (IEA), UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), Eurostat, and the European...

  9. Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.oecd.orgdataoecd575748073739.pdf Cost:...

  10. Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.oecd.orgdataoecd325846553489.pdf Low...

  11. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4 Appendix H Table H18. World net hydroelectric electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 747 703 764 784 806 831 887 0.8 United States a 319 275 292 294 295 295 297 0.3 Canada 372 377 403 414 425 437 475 0.8 Mexico and Chile 57 51 68 76 86 99 114 2.9 OECD Europe 498 556 592 617 617 617 657 0.6 OECD Asia 128 115 127 131 135 143 153

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Appendix H Table H6. World installed hydroelectric and other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 273 293 372 396 424 460 507 2.0 United States a 168 185 233 240 252 273 301 1.8 Canada 85 87 106 114 123 132 144 1.8 Mexico and Chile 20 21 34 42 48 55 62 3.9 OECD Europe 337 372 514 534 553 594 626 1.9 OECD Asia 54 57 115 129 145 153

  13. Challenges in Alternative Energy Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... constrained by the flux Source: Tad Patzek, How Can We Outlive Our Way of Life?, OECD, Paris, 11-12 September 2007 Thebreakevencostsofenergy-input- ...

  14. Word Pro - S11

    Annual Energy Outlook

    April 2015 April 2016 Note: OECD is the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergydatamonthlyinternational. Source: Table ...

  15. Joint Statement by President Obama and Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo of

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Belgium on the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Joint Statement by President Obama and Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo of Belgium on the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit March 24, 2014 See a fact sheet here. The White House Office of the Press Secretary Belgium and the United States of America are pleased to announce that they have jointly completed the removal of a significant amount of excess highly enriched uranium (HEU) and separated plutonium from

  16. Vesuvius Group SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Vesuvius Group SA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vesuvius Group SA Place: Brussels, Belgium Zip: 1950 Sector: Solar Product: Belgian manufacturer of industrial equipment such as...

  17. U.S. and Bahamian Governments to Cooperate on Detecting Illicit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This is the sixth cooperative agreement and joins efforts currently underway in the Netherlands, Greece, Sri Lanka, Belgium and Spain. The specialized radiation detection ...

  18. European Commission Joint Research Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Centre Address: 1049 Brussels Place: Brussels, Belgium Year Founded: 1957 Website: ec.europa.eudgsjrcindex.cfm Coordinates: 50.8509279, 4.3601162 Show Map Loading map......

  19. European Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    European Commission Name: European Commission Place: Brussels, Belgium Website: ec.europa.euindexen.htm Coordinates: 50.8503396, 4.3517103 Show Map Loading map......

  20. Ceratec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Zip: B 7782 Product: Belgium-based system integrating company with activities in electro engineering and construction of PV projects. Coordinates: 50.72842, 2.87918 Show...

  1. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | April 22, 2015: ICARUS...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  2. Press Pass - Press Release - The CMS Tracking Detector's Midnight...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden,...

  3. Ikaros Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Ikaros Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ikaros Solar Place: Lier, Belgium Zip: BE 2500 Product: Belgian PV system installer, which distributes products and also sometimes...

  4. Solar Decathlon Opening Ceremony and VIP Ribbon Cutting | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Renewable and New Energy, China Competition sponsors including: Dow ... Team Belgium (Ghent University) Team China (Tongji University) Team Florida (The ...

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    Energy Savers

    Ministers and delegations invited from Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, the European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Norway, China, ...

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    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    ways different European Union (EU) member states, including the United Kingdom, Italy, France, Denmark and Belgium, have implemented energy supplier obligations and white...

  7. International Association of Public Transport | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: International Association of Public Transport Address: Rue Sainte-Marie 6 (Quai des Charbonnages) Place: Brussels, Belgium Zip: B-1080 Sector: Vehicles Year...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ASME 15th International Conference on Environmental Remediation and Radioactive Waste Management held September 8-12, 2013 in Brussels, Belgium.; Related Information:...

  9. Fact #643: October 4, 2010 Four Cylinder Engine Installations...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom from 1999 to 2009. The total amount includes the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Eire, Finland, France, Germany, ...

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nations represented in this week's events include Australia, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Netherlands, ...

  11. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... 2006) * Sweden, Switzerland, Belgium, U.K., Canada, US (WIPP) - Other Countries * Germany, Japan, Finland, France, South Korea, Spain, Netherlands 5 June 3, 2014 FEP Analysis ...

  12. Photovoltech NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Photovoltech NV Place: Tienen, Belgium Zip: 3300 Product: Manufactures PV cells. Coordinates: 50.809673, 4.930054 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  13. European Wind Energy Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Association Jump to: navigation, search Logo: European Wind Energy Association Name: European Wind Energy Association Address: Rue d'Arlon 80 B-1040 Place: Brussels, Belgium...

  14. 25 People x 4 Days + 1 Manual = Team Belgium’s E-Cube

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    No, it's not an Ikea manual; it's the instructions for how to construct Team Belgium's "E-Cube" home for the 2011 Solar Decathlon.

  15. EERE Success Story-NREL Partners with Google in Little Box Challenge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Engineers (IEEE) announced Belgium's Red Electrical Devils (a team from CE+T Power) ... Judges declared Red Electrical Devils the winner because the team's inverter had a power ...

  16. 3E | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    E Jump to: navigation, search Name: 3E Place: Brussels, Belgium Sector: Buildings, Hydro, Services, Solar, Wind energy Product: Provides engineering and consultancy services in the...

  17. Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade ...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Union Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type Lessons learnedbest practices Website http:eur-lex.europa.eusmart Country Belgium,...

  18. Press Pass - Press Release - The CMS Tracking Detector's Midnight...

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    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

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    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

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    Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, India, Israel, Japan, Republic of Korea, the Netherlands, Norway,...

  1. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | July 19, 2013: Discovery...

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    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia,...

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    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

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    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  4. Press Pass - Press Release - U.S. scientists join in "cosmic...

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    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  5. Press Pass - Press Releases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    states are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak...

  6. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | April 5, 2015: U.S. scientists...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

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    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

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    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia,...

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    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

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    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  11. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 13, 2015: Two Large...

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    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

  12. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | March 19, 2014: International...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    states are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal,...

  13. Press Pass - Press Release - LHC First Beam

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, India, Israel, Japan, Republic of Korea, the Netherlands, Norway,...

  14. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (10 project partners)in URLs of France (Tournemire), Japan (Horonobe), ... and Research (BMWi); ANDRA of France, and possibly with Belgium, Japan, and Finland. ...

  15. Status of U.S. Nuclear Outages - U.S. Energy Information Administratio...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) ...

  16. International - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) ...

  17. Eia.gov BETA - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) ...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bahamas, The Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma (Myanmar) ...

  18. UPDATED ADVISORY: Clean Energy Ministerial Photo Now at 11:15...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    invited from Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, the European Commission, Finland, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Norway, China, the Republic of Korea,...

  19. Working session 3: Tubing integrity (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Twenty-three individuals representing nine countries (Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Japan, the Slovak Republic, Spain, the UK, and the US) participated in the ...

  20. Manhattan Project: Solvay Physics Conference

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Solvay Physics Conference, held in Brussels, Belgium, October 22-29, 1933. Attendees included two future key Manhattan Project scientists (Fermi and Lawrence), the future head ...

  1. Soltech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Soltech Place: Hoegaarden, Belgium Zip: B-3320 Product: Soltech, a spin-off of IMEC, assembles and commercialises PV modules (stand alone or grid-connected)...

  2. ICOS Vision Systems NV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    ICOS Vision Systems NV Jump to: navigation, search Name: ICOS Vision Systems NV Place: Leuvan, Belgium Zip: 3001 Product: Provides inspection products for the manufacturing...

  3. Warehouse De Pauw | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Name: Warehouse De Pauw Place: Belgium Product: String representation "Warehouse De Pa ... ic and Romania." is too long. References: Warehouse De Pauw1 This article is a...

  4. NV Bekaert SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    NV Bekaert SA Place: Kortrijk, Belgium Zip: B-8500 Product: Belgian metal and metal coating company; develops components to improve the functionality of PEMFC and provider of...

  5. Sandia Energy - SNL-ESSC (Sandia National Laboratories - Extreme...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana...

  6. Secretary Chu to Speak at Solar Decathlon 2011 Awards Ceremony...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... of Technology Team Belgium (Ghent University) Team China (Tongji University) Team Florida (The University of South Florida, Florida State University, the University of ...

  7. Microsoft Word - 122006 - Mirant Potomac River LLC - Monthly...

    Energy Savers

    ... Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Texas Virginia Washington Wisconsin Azerbaijan Belgium Bolivia Brazil China England France Germany Ireland Italy Japan ...

  8. Microsoft Word - DOE Overseas Corps Training Program _Final complete...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... nuclear energy, electrical power, renewable energy, energy market dynamics, energy ... Scope: Albania; Austria; Belgium; BosniaHerzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech ...

  9. Large Power Transformers and the U.S. Electric Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, September 2007, http:... are the United States, Canada, Mexico, Austria, Belgium, Chile, Czech Republic, ...

  10. ZEN International Production and Trade bvba | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Lille, Belgium Zip: 2275 Sector: Solar Product: Produces integrated solar thermal water heating equipment, including collectors and water storage tanks, for distribution by...

  11. Demonstration and Deployment Workshop - Day 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Share of Global Energy Demand 1975 2010 2035 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 6 030 Mtoe 12 380 Mtoe 16 730 Mtoe Rest of non-OECD Middle East India China OECD 2 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 36% 30% 24% 18% ...

  12. Belgium’s Ghent University Prepares their E-Cube for Solar Decathlon 2011

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ghent University 2011 Solar Decathlon Team -- aka Team Belgium -- is a unique two-story home that could very well be an international star at the competition due to the Belgium team’s innovative, ultra-efficient, passive home design.

  13. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand and trade in OECD countries.

  14. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  15. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This monthly publication provides international oil data for January 1998. The report presents data on oil production, demand, imports, and stocks in four sections. Section 1 containes time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 containes annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H9. World installed geothermal generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 3 3 5 7 9 10 11 4.3 United States a 3 3 4 5 7 8 9 4.6 Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - Mexico and Chile 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3.3 OECD

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A14. World population by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (millions) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 484 489 523 544 564 581 597 0.7 United States a 312 315 334 347 359 370 380 0.7 Canada 34 35 38 39 41 43 44 0.8 Mexico and Chile 137 139 151 158 164 169 173 0.8 OECD Europe 548 550 565 571 576 579 581

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A8. World nuclear energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 888 867 902 891 901 900 924 0.2 United States a 790 769 804 808 808 812 833 0.3 Canada 88 89 86 72 72 67 62 -1.3 Mexico and Chile 9 8 12 12 20 20 29 4.5 OECD Europe 861 837

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - BP 2030 Outlook (EIA conference Apr 2011).ppt

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    BP Energy Outlook 2030 Washington, DC 26 April 2011 Energy Outlook 2030 2 © BP 2011 Global trends US particulars What can bend the trend? Outline Energy Outlook 2030 3 © BP 2011 Non-OECD economies drive consumption growth Billion toe Billion toe 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 OECD Non-OECD 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Renewables Hydro Nuclear Coal Gas Oil * * Includes biofuels Energy Outlook 2030 4 © BP 2011 Gas and renewables win as fuel shares

  20. SEDS | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    8 August, 2012 - 12:37 New Gapminder Visualizations Added EIA Energy data Gapminder OECD OpenEI SEDS Visualization Graph OpenEI now features some cool new Gapminder...

  1. Gapminder | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    8 August, 2012 - 12:37 New Gapminder Visualizations Added EIA Energy data Gapminder OECD OpenEI SEDS Visualization Graph OpenEI now features some cool new Gapminder...

  2. Visualization Graph | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    8 August, 2012 - 12:37 New Gapminder Visualizations Added EIA Energy data Gapminder OECD OpenEI SEDS Visualization Graph OpenEI now features some cool new Gapminder...

  3. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    by region and end-use sector, High Oil Price case, 2010-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD...

  4. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 To Cover... To Cover To Cover ... ... Transport Energy and CO 2 Where are we going? What are the dangers? How do we change direction? Primarily reporting on: IEA WEO 2008 IEA ETP 2008 On-going work with IEA's Mobility Model One or two detours to talk about modelling © OECD/IEA - 2008 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 14 000 16 000 18 000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Mtoe Other renewables Hydro Nuclear

  5. International Petroleum Statistics Report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-31

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  6. fossil fuels | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  7. policy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  8. energy scenarios | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  9. Four new publications help advance renewable energy development...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  10. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Feed ...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    according to a new OECD report. Thu, 24 Sep 2015 17:36:00 GMT CLIMATE CHANGE: Support to fossil fuels remains high Government support to fossil fuel consumption and production in...

  11. World Energy Outlook 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 To Cover... To Cover To Cover ... ... Transport Energy and CO 2 Where are we going? What are the dangers? How do we change direction? Primarily reporting on: IEA WEO 2008 IEA ETP 2008 On-going work with IEA's Mobility Model One or two detours to talk about modelling © OECD/IEA - 2008 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 14 000 16 000 18 000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Mtoe Other renewables Hydro Nuclear

  12. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

  13. Secretary Chu to Lead Delegation to IEA Ministerial in Paris...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Secretary Chu to Speak at a Working Dinner on Global Energy Governance and the Challenges Ahead OECD Conference Centre News Media Contact: (202) 586-4940 Addthis Related Articles ...

  14. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 Appendix H Table H10. World installed solar generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 5 8 32 36 44 54 67 7.7 United States a 4 8 28 32 39 48 61 7.7 Canada 1 1 2 3 3 4 4 5.9 Mexico and Chile 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 14.4 OECD Europe 52 70 93 93 93 94 98 1.2 OECD Asia 7 9 45 51 57 59 60 6.9 Japan 5 7 38 43 48 49 49 7.4 South Korea 1 1 2 3 4 4 4 5.1 Australia

  15. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Appendix H Table H16. World net nuclear electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 888 867 902 891 901 900 924 0.2 United States a 790 769 804 808 808 812 833 0.3 Canada 88 89 86 72 72 67 62 -1.3 Mexico and Chile 9 8 12 12 20 20 29 4.5 OECD Europe 861 837 845 879 930 948 896 0.2 OECD Asia 304 161 381 437 457 450 427 3.5 Japan 156 17

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix H Table H2. World installed liquids-fred generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 125 121 108 98 92 87 85 -1.2 United States a 105 101 89 80 75 71 70 -1.3 Canada 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 -1.0 Mexico and Chile 16 16 14 14 13 12 12 -1.0 OECD Europe 50 50 47 45 43 41 39 -0.9 OECD Asia 58 59 54 52 49 47 45 -1.0 Japan 52 52 49 46 44 42 40 -1.0 South

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 Appendix H Table H20. World net geothermal electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 22 21 37 49 64 75 85 5.0 United States a 15 16 27 39 52 62 70 5.5 Canada 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - Mexico and Chile 7 6 10 10 11 13 15 3.5 OECD Europe 11 12 21 23 23 23 25 2.7 OECD Asia 9 9 17 18 20 22 25 3.9 Japan 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0.1 South Korea 0 0 1 1 2 2 2

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix H Table H22. World net other renewable electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 87 94 125 151 169 191 210 2.9 United States a 75 77 103 115 119 125 138 2.1 Canada 6 9 14 28 41 55 60 7.0 Mexico and Chile 6 8 8 8 9 11 13 1.8 OECD Europe 155 149 201 210 210 210 224 1.5 OECD Asia 28 37 60 71 80 84 87 3.1 Japan 23 33 38 44 50

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 Appendix H Table H4. World installed coal-fred generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 333 327 279 276 272 272 271 -0.7 United States a 314 308 263 260 260 260 260 -0.6 Canada 10 10 7 7 3 3 2 -5.2 Mexico and Chile 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 -0.2 OECD Europe 197 198 207 200 194 188 183 -0.3 OECD Asia 109 112 117 113 111 109 110 -0.1 Japan 50 50 49 47 46 44 43

  20. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4 Appendix H Table H8. World installed wind-powered generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 53 67 107 117 127 141 159 3.1 United States a 47 59 83 84 87 97 110 2.2 Canada 5 6 15 18 20 22 24 5.0 Mexico and Chile 1 2 9 16 19 22 25 10.1 OECD Europe 94 107 189 203 222 263 277 3.5 OECD Asia 6 6 24 29 37 40 44 7.2 Japan 2 3 3 5 8 8 8 4.1 South Korea 0 0

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1. World energy consumption by country grouping, 2012-40 quadrillion Btu Region 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 OECD 238 254 261 267 274 282 0.6 Americas 118 126 128 131 134 138 0.6 Europe 81 85 87 90 93 96 0.6 Asia 39 43 45 46 47 48 0.8 OECD with U.S. CPP 238 252 258 265 272 280 0.6 OECD Americas with U.S. CPP 118 124 125 128 132 136 0.5 Non-OECD 311 375 413 451 491 533 1.9 Europe and Eurasia 51 52 55 56 58 58 0.5 Asia 176 223 246 270 295 322 2.2 Middle East

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1. World coal production by region, 2012-40 million short tons Region/country 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 OECD 2,237 2,341 2,396 2,366 2,356 2,351 0.2 OECD with CPP 2,237 2,150 2,092 2,124 2,154 2,223 0 OECD Americas 1,107 1,125 1,143 1,122 1,122 1,096 0 OECD Americas with CPP 1,107 934 839 880 920 968 -0.5 United States 1,016 1,044 1,060 1,048 1,045 1,020 0 >United States with CPP 1,016 853 756 806 843 892 -0.5 Canada 73 67 70 60 63 61 -0.6

  3. O

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    O ECD/IEA 2 013 © O ECD/IEA 2 013 Interna'onal E nergy S ta's'cs and t he C hanging O il M ap E IA E nergy C onference Washington, D C, J une 1 8, 2 013 © O ECD/IEA 2 013 New map, new challenges © O ECD/IEA 2 013 Statistics versus the market  OECD d ata a re i ncreasingly l ess r epresenta've  OECD c ountries < 5 0% o f g lobal d emand  Ascent o f n on---OECD m eans l ess v isibility  Great s trides i n J ODI d ata, b ut s 'll r oom f or i mprovement  OECD c ountries h ave

  4. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    United States 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 May 2015 May 2016 Note: OECD is the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Web Page: http:www.eia.govtotalenergydatamonthly...

  5. "U.S. Energy Information Administration"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A3. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2011-40" "(Billion 2010 dollars)" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2012-40" ,2011,2012,,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",18615.81,19080.01,,23390.4,26576.73,29942.41,33569.18,37770.22,2.468839681 " United

  6. "U.S. Energy Information Administration"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2011-40" "(Billion 2010 dollars)" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2012-40" ,2011,2012,,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",18006.08,18440.48,,22566.11,25584.58,28756.54,32165.64,36119.79,2.430102421 " United

  7. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Non-OECD Asia 168.2 175.9 222.7 246.4 269.9 295.1 322.1 2.2 China 109.4 115.0 147.3 159.4 ... Non-OECD Asia 26,261 27,914 44,139 56,222 69,542 84,680 102,015 4.7 China 13,286 14,309 ...

  8. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This document is a monthly publication which provides current data on international oil production,demand,imports and stocks. This report has four sections which contain time series data on world oil production and oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Also included is oil supply/demand balance information for the world, and data on oil imports and trade by OECD countries.

  9. Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 January 29, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration RELAP-7 is a nuclear reactor system safety analysis code. Development started in October 2011, and during the past quarter the initial

  10. International Energy Outlook 2016-Executive Summary - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration Executive Summary print version The outlook for energy use worldwide presented in the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) continues to show rising levels of demand over the next three decades, led by strong increases in countries outside of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) [3], particularly in Asia. Non-OECD Asia, including China and India, account for more than half of the world's total increase in energy consumption over the 2012 to

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Chapter footnotes Preface 1. OECD includes all members of the organization as of January 1, 2016, in all the time series included in this report. Israel, which became a member in 2010, is included in OECD Europe for statistical reporting purposes. 2. Nonmarketed energy sources include selected energy consumption data for which the energy is not bought or sold, either directly or indirectly, as an input to marketed energy-particularly, traditional fuels such as fuelwood, charcoal, agricultural

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013_summer_fuels.pptx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    S F l O tl k 2013 Summer Fuels Outlook April 9, 2013 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, pp y g , p y , expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption

  13. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    OECD Asia 203 204 207 208 208 207 206 0.0 Japan 127 127 125 123 120 117 114 -0.4 South ... Non-OECD Asia 3,691 3,730 4,013 4,159 4,278 4,373 4,443 0.6 China 1,373 1,381 1,435 1,450 ...

  14. International petroleum statistics report, February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The International petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970--1997; OECD stocks from 1973--1997; and OECD trade from 1987--1997.

  15. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. Word oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  16. International petroleum statistics report, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-04

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance fore the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  17. International petroleum statistics report, June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-27

    The report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994. 4 figs., 45 tabs.

  18. International petroleum statistics report, February 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995. 4 figs., 47 tabs.

  19. International petroleum statistics report, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  20. International petroleum statistics report, November 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995. 4 figs., 45 tabs.

  1. International petroleum statistics report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-25

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  2. International petroleum statistics report, August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  3. International petroleum statistics report, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  4. International petroleum statistics report, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  5. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  6. International petroleum statistics report, March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-30

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data for March 1995 on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  7. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international data. The report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent 12 months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996.

  8. International petroleum statistics report, November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-25

    Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The International production, and on oil and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  9. International petroleum statistics report, April 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on International oil production, demand, imports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  10. International petroleum statistics report, July 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years and annually for the three years prior to that. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1998; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1998; and OECD trade from 1988 through 1998. 4 figs., 44 tabs.

  11. International petroleum statistics report, December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. The balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. International petroleum statistics report, November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  13. International petroleum statistics report, October 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  14. International petroleum statistics report, May 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. It presents data on international production, demand, imports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two year. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997, and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 fig., 48 tabs.

  15. International petroleum statistics report, September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994. 4 figs., 45 tabs.

  16. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given the Energy Information Administration in Public Law 95-91. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  17. International petroleum statistics report, January 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, consumption, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil consumption and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1980, and monthly data for the most two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/consumption balance for the market economies (i.e., non-communist countries). This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, consumption, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD consumption data are for the years 1970 through 1990; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1990; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1990.

  18. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-27

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  19. International petroleum statistics report, December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992. 41 tabs.

  20. International petroleum statistics report, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992. 41 tables.

  1. International petroleum statistics report, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-28

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  2. International petroleum statistics report, September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-27

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  3. International petroleum statistics report, March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996.

  4. International petroleum statistics report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  5. International petroleum statistics report, June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 46 tabs.

  6. International petroleum statistics report, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995. 4 figs., 47 tabs.

  7. International petroleum statistics report, May 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1998; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1998; and OECD trade from 1988 through 1998. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  8. International petroleum statistics report, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-30

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  9. International petroleum statistics report: April 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994. 4 figs., 45 tabs.

  10. International petroleum statistics report, June 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years and annually for the three years prior to that. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1998; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1998; and OECD trade from 1988 through 1998. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  11. International petroleum statistics report, February 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-28

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  12. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1084 through 1994.

  13. International petroleum statistics report, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  14. International petroleum statistics report, December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  15. International petroleum statistics report, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years and annually for the three years prior to that. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarter data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  16. International petroleum statistics report, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-28

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  17. International petroleum statistics report, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Day) Year Belgium 1 Brazil Canada France Italy Japan Mexico Nether- lands South Korea Spain United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Other Total 1960 3 4 34 4 6 62 18 6 ...

  19. Table 5.6 Petroleum Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Barrels) Year Belgium 1 Brazil Canada France Italy Japan Mexico Nether- lands South Korea Spain United Kingdom U.S. ...

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kingdom 569 295 249 160 75 58 49 39 34 30 16 15 Mexico Canada Netherlands Brazil Japan Spain France Italy United Belgium U.S. Virgin South 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Thousand ...

  1. Fact #702: November 21, 2011 Consumer Preferences on Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    17% 9% 17% 21% 36% 100% Turkey 16% 12% 18% 24% 30% 100% Italy 15% 16% 19% 25% 25% 100% Spain 14% 13% 15% 20% 38% 100% Korea 13% 16% 23% 24% 24% 100% Belgium 12% 19% 17% 23% 29% ...

  2. NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    low enriched uranium to Mo99 producers in Australia, Belgium, South Africa and the Netherlands as well as working with producers to convert production from HEU to low-level ...

  3. Dow Corning Europe S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Corning Europe S A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dow Corning Europe S.A. Place: Seneffe, Belgium Zip: 7180 Product: Seneffe is the headquarters for Dow Corning's operations in...

  4. [pic] EERE Web Site Statistics - Lose Your Excuse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Federation|52|0%| |25.|Spain|52|0%| |26.|Indonesia|52|0%| |27.|Thailand|52|0%| |28.|Vietnam|51|0%| |29.|Belgium|48|0%| |30.|France|47|0%| |31.|Philippines|46|0%| ...

  5. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used ... R. Hertel (Research Centre Jlich, Germany); H. Brckl, K. Rott, and G. Reiss ...

  6. Fact #716: February 27, 2012 Diesels are more than Half of New Cars Sold in Western Europe

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2011, nearly 52% of all new cars sold in Western Europe were diesel. In Belgium, Norway, France and Spain more than 70% of the new car market in 2011 were diesels. The market penetration of...

  7. Global Wind Energy Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy Council Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Wind Energy Council Name: Global Wind Energy Council Address: Wind Power House Rue d'Arlon 80 Place: Brussels, Belgium Phone...

  8. WDP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Product: A Belgium warehouse real estate company, who develops a 10MW PV portfolio on its own properties. Coordinates: 50.95068, 4.30911 Show Map Loading map......

  9. GreenFever | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    a sustainable energy company, with a primary focus on the development of large power plants in Belgium. References: GreenFever1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  10. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [March 23, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-03-23

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Canada, Hong Kong, Japan, Brazil, India, Pakistan, Soviet Union, Belgium, Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, and United Kingdom.

  11. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [June 21, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1988-06-21

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Canada, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Argentina, Brazil, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Soviet Union, Belgium, France, Turkey, and the United Kingdom.

  12. GREENING YOUR BUSINESS

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... * 12 Canada * 5 India * 3 Australia * 3 Ireland * 2 Spain * 2 United Kingdom * 2 Tunisia * 1 Belgium * 1 Chile * 1 Colombia * 1 Argentina * 1 Fiji * 1 Israel * 1 Indonesia * 1 St. ...

  13. Magnetic Vortex Core Reversal by Low-Field Excitations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    thought to be necessary to accomplish this. At the ALS, a team of researchers from Germany, Belgium, and the U.S. has used time-resolved scanning transmission x-ray microscopy...

  14. Matt Schatzman € Houston € 22 October 2007

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Belgium Japan France Italy Mexico Norway* South Korea Spain Taiwan Turkey UAE US UK India ... Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Other Mexico (east) UK EU Main China India Taiwan S Korea Japan ...

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an MHK ... SYDNEY 61-2-8209-1532 1-800-010717 AUSTRIA 43-1-92-81-451 0800-005-806 BELGIUM ...

  16. Mark Nutt | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    2013, Brussels Belgium. M. Nutt, P. Swift, J. Birkholzer, W. Boyle, T. Gunter, N. Larson, R. MacKinnon, K. McMahon, K. Sorenson, Overview of the United States Department of...

  17. Notices

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1999. See Antidumping Duty Orders; Certain Stainless Steel Plate in Coils from Belgium, Canada, Italy, the Republic of Korea, South Africa, and Taiwan, 67 FR 27756 (May 21, 1999). ...

  18. A comparative analysis of accident risks in fossil, hydro, and nuclear energy chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S.

    2008-07-01

    This study presents a comparative assessment of severe accident risks in the energy sector, based on the historical experience of fossil (coal, oil, natural gas, and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)) and hydro chains contained in the comprehensive Energy-related Severe Accident Database (ENSAD), as well as Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the nuclear chain. Full energy chains were considered because accidents can take place at every stage of the chain. Comparative analyses for the years 1969-2000 included a total of 1870 severe ({>=} 5 fatalities) accidents, amounting to 81,258 fatalities. Although 79.1% of all accidents and 88.9% of associated fatalities occurred in less developed, non-OECD countries, industrialized OECD countries dominated insured losses (78.0%), reflecting their substantially higher insurance density and stricter safety regulations. Aggregated indicators and frequency-consequence (F-N) curves showed that energy-related accident risks in non-OECD countries are distinctly higher than in OECD countries. Hydropower in non-OECD countries and upstream stages within fossil energy chains are most accident-prone. Expected fatality rates are lowest for Western hydropower and nuclear power plants; however, the maximum credible consequences can be very large. Total economic damages due to severe accidents are substantial, but small when compared with natural disasters. Similarly, external costs associated with severe accidents are generally much smaller than monetized damages caused by air pollution.

  19. International petroleum statistics report, September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (ECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  20. International petroleum statistics report, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-27

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1980, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1982 through 1992.

  1. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  2. Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    OECD/IEA 2014 © OECD/IEA 2014 Antoine Halff 2014 EIA Energy Conference Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows Washington, DC July 14, 2014 © OECD/IEA 2014 Crude trade shifts further east  Asia imports increase by 2.6 mb/d to 22.1 mb, or 65% of the international crude market Crude Exports in 2019 and Growth in 2013-19 for Key Trade Routes 1 (million barrels per day) 0.2 0.3 (0) 2.0 (0.2) (-0.6) 4.1 (-0.6) 0.1 (-0.7) 3.1 1.2 (0.3) 1.0 (+0.1) -0.6 2.2 1.8 (+0.8) (-0.6) 1.1 (+0.3) Red

  3. Natural gas information 1996 (1997 edition)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-16

    A detailed reference work on gas supply and demand covering not only the OECD countries but also the rest of the world, this publication contains essential information on LNG and pipeline trade, gas reserves, storage capacity, and prices. The main part of the book concentrates on OECD countries, showing a detailed gas supply and demand balance for each country and for three OECD regions: North America, Europe, and Asia-Pacific, as well as a breakdown of gas consumption by end-user. Import and export data are reported by source and destination. Also included are maps of the pipeline systems in 25 IEA countries and information on their ownership and operations, transit of gas, regulatory features, and transportation tariffs.

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region and country in the Reference case with and without the U.S. Clean Power Plan (CPP), 1990-2040 billion metric tons Region/Country 1990 2012 2020 2030 2040 Average annual percent change, 1990-2012 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 Total change, 2012-40 (billion metric tons) Percent change, 2012-40 OECD 11.6 12.8 13 13.3 13.8 0.4 0.3 1 8 OECD with CPP 11.6 12.8 12.7 12.7 13.3 0.4 0.1 0.5 3.9 OECD Americas 5.8 6.3 6.6 6.7 6.9 0.3 0.3

  5. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  6. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix H Table H12. World total net electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 5,071 5,017 5,449 5,724 6,036 6,359 6,727 1.1 United States a 4,102 4,055 4,351 4,513 4,691 4,860 5,056 0.8 Canada 627 616 692 748 809 880 958 1.6 Mexico and Chile 342 346 406 463 535 618 713 2.6 OECD Europe 3,455 3,483 3,858 4,090 4,328 4,590 4,889 1.2

  7. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 Appendix H Table H14. World net natural gas-fred electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,234 1,446 1,396 1,600 1,840 2,048 2,237 1.6 United States a 1,014 1,228 1,117 1,223 1,371 1,478 1,569 0.9 Canada 61 63 97 136 187 230 272 5.3 Mexico and Chile 160 154 182 240 282 340 396 3.4 OECD Europe 766 645 655 746 905 1,056 1,321 2.6

  8. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 Appendix A Table A11. World carbon dioxide emissions from liquids use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 2,881 2,838 2,861 2,812 2,785 2,794 2,812 0.0 United States a 2,291 2,240 2,269 2,227 2,182 2,163 2,147 -0.2 Canada 289 291 291 289 290 295 304 0.2 Mexico and Chile 301 307 301 296 313 335 361 0.6 OECD Europe 1,969 1,903 1,823 1,804

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Reference case projections Table A12. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,666 1,715 1,766 1,849 1,965 2,063 2,167 0.8 United States a 1,305 1,363 1,394 1,432 1,497 1,538 1,586 0.5 Canada 205 205 213 234 261 287 310 1.5 Mexico and Chile 156 147 158 184 207 238 271 2.2 OECD Europe 1,016 970

  10. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix A Table A13. World carbon dioxide emissions from coal use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 2,000 1,779 1,931 1,947 1,912 1,901 1,896 0.2 United States a 1,876 1,657 1,824 1,840 1,822 1,808 1,804 0.3 Canada 68 68 53 54 36 38 33 -2.5 Mexico and Chile 56 54 53 53 54 55 58 0.3 OECD Europe 1,208 1,251 1,228 1,244 1,219 1,195 1,178

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    6 World Carbon Dioxide Emissions Nation/Region 1990 2000 2010 1990-2000 2000-2010 China 2270 2850 8262 26% 2.3% 11.2% United States 5041 5862 5644 18% 1.5% -0.4% OECD Europe 4128 4191 4094 13% 0.2% -0.2% Other Non-OECD Asia 827 1339 1872 6% 4.9% 3.4% Russia (1) 3821 1556 1632 5% -8.6% 0.5% Middle East 730 1094 1692 5% 4.1% 4.5% India 579 1003 1602 5% 5.7% 4.8% Central & S. America 716 992 1150 4% 3.3% 1.5% Japan 1047 1201 1090 3% 1.4% -1.0% Africa 726 887 1107 4% 2.0% 2.2% Oth. Non-OECD

  12. International Petroleum Statistics Report, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993. Data for the United States are developed by the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Office of Oil and Gas. Data for other countries are derived largely from published sources, including International Energy Agency publications, the EIA International Energy Annual, and the trade press. (See sources after each section.) All data are reviewed by the International Statistics Branch of EIA. All data have been converted to units of measurement familiar to the American public. Definitions of oil production and consumption are consistent with other EIA publications.

  13. "U.S. Energy Information Administration"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-2040" "(Quadrillion Btu)" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2012-40" "Region",2011,2012,,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",120.55,118.087,,125.703,128.075,130.713,133.813,138.132,,0.5615282239 " United Statesa",96.753,94.398,,100.842,101.969,102.872,103.846,105.729,,0.4056753945 "

  14. "U.S. Energy Information Administration"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A5. World liquids consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40" "(Million barrels per day)" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2012-40" ,2011,2012,,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",23.618,23.245,,24.408,24.352,24.297,24.396,24.648,0.2095252915 " United Statesa",18.863,18.466,,19.646,19.612,19.41,19.286,19.269,0.1521384118 "

  15. "U.S. Energy Information Administration"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40" "(Trillion cubic feet)" ,"History",,,"Projections",,,,,"Average annual percent change, 2012-40" ,2011,2012,,2020,2025,2030,2035,2040 "OECD" " OECD Americas",30.762,31.823,,32.789,34.341,36.452,38.203,40.082,0.8274692465 " United Statesa",24.473,25.528,,26.142,26.881,28.08,28.819,29.702,0.5423170101 "

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    C Low Economic Growth case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 47 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 123.3 123.9 124.7 126.3 128.8 0.3 United States a 96.8 94.4 98.7

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    D High Oil Price case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 125.3 127.9 130.8 135.5 142.1 0.7 United States a 96.8 94.4 100.8 102.2 103.3

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    I Reference case projections for natural gas production This page inTenTionally lefT blank 121 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 31.8 35.7 38.6 42.1 44.6 47.3 1.4 United States a 24.0 28.7

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J3. World gross domestic product (GDP) per capita by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2011-40 (2010 dollars per person) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 38,441 39,055 44,716 48,842 53,114 57,747 63,278 1.7 United States a 48,094 48,865 56,285 61,453 66,639 72,107

  20. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H1. World total installed generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,258 1,278 1,330 1,371 1,436 1,517 1,622 0.9 United States a 1,046 1,063 1,079 1,091 1,133 1,187 1,261 0.6 Canada 133 135

  1. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H11. World installed other renewable generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 41 42 45 49 52 57 59 1.2 United States a 36 37 39 39 39 40 41 0.4 Canada 4 4 5 8 12 15 16 4.9 Mexico and Chile 1 1

  2. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H13. World net liquids-fred electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 88 88 66 37 36 35 35 -3.3 United States a 30 23 18 18 18 18 18 -0.9 Canada 6 7 6 6 6 5 5 -1.0 Mexico and

  3. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H15. World net coal-fred electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,857 1,630 1,808 1,820 1,786 1,778 1,769 0.3 United States a 1,733 1,514 1,709 1,724 1,713 1,704 1,702 0.4

  4. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H17. World net hydroelectric and other renewable electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 1,004 987 1,278 1,376 1,472 1,598 1,763 2.1 United States a 535 520 704 741 781 848 934 2.1 Canada 398 397 459 491 524 557 606 1.5 Mexico and Chile 71 69 115 144

  5. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H19. World net wind-powered electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 142 156 295 327 354 404 460 3.9 United States a 120 141 232 235 245 278 319 3.0 Canada 20 11 39 46 53 60 66

  6. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H21. World net solar electricity generation by region and country, 2011-40 (billion kilowatthours) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6 12 57 65 79 96 120 8.7 United States a 6 11 51 59 71 88 110 8.5 Canada 0 0 3 3 4 5 5 10.3 Mexico and Chile 0 0 3

  7. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H3. World installed natural-gas-fred generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 410 420 455 488 534 584 640 1.5 United States a 358 367 393 409 444 481 525 1.3 Canada 20 20 25 30 36 41 46 3.0

  8. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H5. World installed nuclear generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 115 117 115 113 115 114 118 0.0 United States a 102 102 101 101 102 102 105 0.1 Canada 13 14 12 10 10 10 9 -1.5 Mexico and

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel Table H7. World installed hydroelectric generating capacity by region and country, 2011-40 (gigawatts) Region/country History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 171 171 183 187 192 198 210 0.7 United States a 78 78 80 80 80 80 80 0.1 Canada 75 75 83 85 88 90 99 1.0 Mexico and

  10. Appendix B: High Economic Growth case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    B High Economic Growth case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 43 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 128.2 132.3 137.0 142.4 150.1 0.9 United States a 96.8 94.4

  11. Appendix C - Comments and Responses

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    High Economic Growth case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 43 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 128.2 132.3 137.0 142.4 150.1 0.9 United States a 96.8 94.4 103.1

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... OECD Asia 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.3 5.1 4.9 4.8 -0.5 Japan 4.9 4.7 4.7 4.6 4.4 4.3 4.1 -0.5 South ... Non-OECD Asia 6.4 6.3 5.0 4.4 3.9 3.5 3.2 -2.4 China 8.2 8.0 6.4 5.4 4.7 4.1 3.7 -2.8 ...

  13. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    © OECD/IEA, 2008 OECD/IEA, 2008 30 30 th th Anniversary of the EIA Anniversary of the EIA Washington, 7 Washington, 7 - - 8 April 2008 8 April 2008 Energy Statistics at the IEA: Energy Statistics at the IEA: From Supply to Energy Efficiency From Supply to Energy Efficiency Will the G8 Hokkaido Summit constitute a milestone on Will the G8 Hokkaido Summit constitute a milestone on the road to a global database on efficiency? the road to a global database on efficiency? Karen Tréanton Energy

  14. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    30 Appendix A Table A5. World liquids consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.6 23.2 24.4 24.4 24.3 24.4 24.6 0.2 United States a 18.9 18.5 19.6 19.6 19.4 19.3 19.3 0.2 Canada 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 0.2 Mexico and Chile 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.9 0.6 OECD Europe 14.5 14.1 13.7 13.6 13.7 13.8 14.0 0.0 OECD Asia 7.9 8.2 7.7 7.5 7.5 7.5

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1. OECD and non-OECD net electricity generation by energy source, 2012-40 trillion kilowatthours Energy source by region 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 OECD 10.2 11.3 12 12.6 13.3 14.2 1.2 Petroleum and other liquids 0.4 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -4.1 Natural gas 2.6 2.6 3 3.5 4 4.5 2 Coal 3.2 3.4 3.4 3.3 3.3 3.3 0 Nuclear 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.3 2.2 0.7 Renewables 2.2 3 3.2 3.4 3.7 4 2.2 OECD with CPP 10.2 11.3 11.8 12.5 13.2 14 1.1 Petroleum and other liquids 0.4

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix J Table J2. World energy intensity by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (thousand Btu per 2010 dollar of GDP) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6.5 6.2 5.4 4.8 4.4 4.0 3.7 -1.9 United States a 6.4 6.1 5.4 4.8 4.3 3.9 3.5 -2.0 Canada 10.4 10.2 8.9 8.3 7.8 7.5 7.1 -1.3 Mexico and Chile 4.2 4.0 3.4 3.1 2.9 2.8 2.7 -1.4 OECD Europe 4.4 4.4 3.9 3.7 3.5 3.3 3.2 -1.1 OECD Asia 5.7 5.5 5.4 5.3 5.1 4.9 4.8 -0.5

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Appendix A Table A7. World coal consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 21.0 18.7 20.3 20.5 20.1 20.0 20.0 0.2 United States a 19.6 17.3 19.2 19.3 19.2 19.0 19.0 0.3 Canada 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.4 0.4 0.4 -2.5 Mexico and Chile 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 OECD Europe 12.9 13.4 13.2 13.3 13.1 12.8 12.6 -0.2 OECD Asia 9.7 9.7 10.2 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 0.1

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4 Appendix A Table A9. World consumption of hydroelectricity and other renewable energy by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 13.1 12.9 15.6 16.6 17.5 18.6 20.3 1.6 United States a 7.9 7.7 9.3 9.7 9.9 10.4 11.3 1.4 Canada 4.3 4.2 4.8 5.1 5.5 5.8 6.3 1.4 Mexico and Chile 0.9 1.0 1.5 1.8 2.1 2.4 2.7 3.7 OECD Europe 10.7 11.5 15.7 16.7 17.3 18.5 19.6 1.9 OECD Asia

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1. World natural gas production by region and country in the Reference case, 2012-40 trillion cubic feet Region/country 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 OECD United Statesa 24.0 28.7 30.4 32.9 34.0 35.3 1.4 Canada 6.1 5.8 6.6 7.2 7.9 8.6 1.2 Europe 10.3 8.7 9.1 10.1 11.1 11.9 0.5 Australia/New Zealand 2.1 3.3 4.2 5.0 5.9 7.0 4.4 Other OECD 1.9 1.4 1.7 2.2 2.8 3.6 2.3 Total OECD 44.4 47.9 52.0 57.4 61.9 66.4 1.4 Non-OECD Russia 21.8 21.9 23.4 25.9 29.3 31.8 1.4

  20. Monthly energy review, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-24

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  1. Monthly energy review, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Monthly Energy Review provides information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  2. Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Destination Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bangladesh Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Curacao Cyprus Czech

  3. [pic] EERE Web site statistics - Lose Your Excuse - Parents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... |16.|France|11|0%| |17.|Ireland|10|0%| |18.|Germany|10|0%| |19.|Belgium|9|0%| |20.|Saudi Arabia|8|0%| |21.|Chile|7|0%| |22.|Finland|7|0%| |23.|Taiwan|7|0%| |24.|Netherlands|7|0%| ...

  4. U.S. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Non OPEC* 3 3 2 3 1 250 2004-2016 Argentina 2006-2006 Belgium 2012-2012 Brazil 250 2004-2016 Canada 3 3 2 3 1 2004-2016 China 2006-2006 Congo (Brazzaville) 2006-2006 Costa Rica ...

  5. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) held its 36th Policy Group (PG) meeting on November 21-22 in Brussels, Belgium. The PG reviewed progress on a number of on-going actions and received progress reports from the GIF Experts Group (EG) and the GIF Senior Industry Advisory Panel (SIAP).

  6. Total number of slots consumed in long_excl.q (exclusive nodes) will be

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Destination Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bangladesh Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Curacao Cyprus Czech

  7. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [August 18, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1987-08-18

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: (1) Australia, (2) China, (3) Canada, (4) Hong Kong, (5) Japan, (6) Yugoslavia, (7) Argentina, (8) Brazil, (9) Egypt, (10) India, (11) Pakistan, (12) Soviet Union, (13) Belgium, (14) Finland, (15) France, and (16) Turkey.

  8. EM Contributes Expertise to Comprehensive Resource on Managing Nuclear Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM officials wrote a chapter of a recently published book, Managing Nuclear Projects – A Comprehensive Management Resource, which covers a range of areas with emphasis on process, requirements and lessons learned. Authors from France, Germany, Argentina, Belgium, Finland, Austria, and the U.S. contributed to the book.

  9. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 125.7 128.1 130.7 133.8 138.1 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 100.8 102.0 102.9 103.8 105.7 0.4 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.1 15.6 16.3 17.1 18.1 0.8 Mexico and Chile 9.3

  10. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Appendix A Table A3. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Reference case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,616 19,080 23,390 26,577 29,942 33,569 37,770 2.5 United States a 15,021 15,369 18,801 21,295 23,894 26,659 29,898 2.4 Canada 1,396 1,422 1,700 1,881 2,074 2,293 2,529 2.1 Mexico and Chile 2,200 2,288 2,890 3,400 3,974 4,618

  11. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A4. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in market exchange rates, Reference case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,006 18,440 22,566 25,585 28,757 32,166 36,120 2.4 United States a 15,021 15,369 18,801 21,295 23,894 26,659 29,898 2.4 Canada 1,662 1,694 2,024 2,240 2,470 2,730 3,012 2.1 Mexico

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A6. World natural gas consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 30.8 31.8 32.8 34.3 36.5 38.2 40.1 0.8 United States a 24.5 25.5 26.1 26.9 28.1 28.8 29.7 0.5 Canada 3.7 3.7 3.9 4.2 4.7 5.2 5.6 1.5 Mexico and Chile 2.6 2.6 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.2 4.8

  13. Appendix C: Draft GERMAN AVR/HTGR FUEL PROCESSING

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 125.7 128.1 130.7 133.8 138.1 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 100.8 102.0 102.9 103.8 105.7 0.4 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.1 15.6 16.3 17.1 18.1 0.8 Mexico and Chile 9.3 9.2

  14. IAEA CRP on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Benchmark Definition and Test Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Frederik Reitsma; Hans Gougar; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

    2012-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are essential elements of the reactor simulation code verification and validation process. Although several international uncertainty quantification activities have been launched in recent years in the LWR, BWR and VVER domains (e.g. the OECD/NEA BEMUSE program [1], from which the current OECD/NEA LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) benchmark [2] effort was derived), the systematic propagation of uncertainties in cross-section, manufacturing and model parameters for High Temperature Reactor (HTGR) designs has not been attempted yet. This paper summarises the scope, objectives and exercise definitions of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on HTGR UAM [3]. Note that no results will be included here, as the HTGR UAM benchmark was only launched formally in April 2012, and the specification is currently still under development.

  15. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    E Low Oil Price case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 57 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-s40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 126.5 129.2 131.8 135.0 138.9 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 101.2 102.7 103.6 104.6

  16. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Kaya Identity factor projections Table J1. World carbon dioxide intensity of energy use by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (metric tons per billion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 53.6 53.0 52.3 51.7 51.1 50.6 49.9 -0.2 United States a 55.7 55.0 54.5 54.0 53.6 53.2 52.5 -0.2 Canada 38.8 38.9 37.0 37.0 36.1 36.2 35.8 -0.3 Mexico

  17. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Oil Price case projections Table E1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-s40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 126.5 129.2 131.8 135.0 138.9 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 101.2 102.7 103.6 104.6 106.1 0.4 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.3 15.8 16.5 17.4 18.3 0.8 Mexico and

  18. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    58 Appendix E Table E2. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,616 19,080 23,330 26,574 29,998 33,626 37,702 2.5 United States a 15,021 15,369 18,742 21,299 23,963 26,735 29,885 2.4 Canada 1,396 1,422 1,700 1,881 2,073 2,290 2,521 2.1 Mexico and Chile 2,200 2,288 2,889 3,394 3,962

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Oil Price case projections Table E3. World liquids consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2011-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.6 23.2 24.9 25.0 25.2 25.5 26.1 0.4 United States a 18.9 18.5 20.0 20.1 20.1 20.2 20.4 0.4 Canada 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 0.4 Mexico and Chile 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.6

  20. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Low Economic Growth case projections Table C1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Low Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 123.3 123.9 124.7 126.3 128.8 0.3 United States a 96.8 94.4 98.7 98.1 97.5 97.4 98.0 0.1 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.0 15.4 15.9 16.6 17.3 0.6 Mexico

  1. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix C Table C2. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, Low Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,616 19,080 22,285 24,599 27,041 29,850 33,088 2.0 United States a 15,021 15,369 17,747 19,441 21,224 23,305 25,763 1.9 Canada 1,396 1,422 1,682 1,841 2,005 2,186 2,375 1.8 Mexico and Chile 2,200 2,288 2,856 3,317

  2. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I1. World total natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 31.8 35.7 38.6 42.1 44.6 47.3 1.4 United States a 24.0 28.7 30.4 32.9 34.0 35.3 1.4 Canada 6.1 5.8 6.6 7.2 7.9 8.6 1.2 Mexico 1.7 1.2 1.5 2.0 2.6 3.3

  3. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections for natural gas production Table I3. World other natural gas production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 12.0 9.8 9.5 10.7 10.3 10.3 -0.5 United States a 7.5 6.6 6.5 7.8 7.5 7.5 0.0 Canada 2.8 2.0 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.5 -2.2 Mexico 1.7 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 -1.2

  4. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A10. World carbon dioxide emissions by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (million metric tons carbon dioxide) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 6,558 6,343 6,569 6,620 6,675 6,769 6,887 0.3 United States a 5,483 5,272 5,499 5,511 5,514 5,521 5,549 0.2 Canada 562 563 557 577 587 621 647 0.5 Mexico and

  5. Appendix B: High Economic Growth case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 High Economic Growth case projections Table B1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 128.2 132.3 137.0 142.4 150.1 0.9 United States a 96.8 94.4 103.1 105.9 108.5 111.4 116.2 0.7 Canada 14.5 14.5 15.1 15.8 16.6 17.6 18.8 0.9

  6. Appendix B: High Economic Growth case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4 Appendix B Table B2. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, High Economic Growth case, 2011-40 (billion 2010 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 18,616 19,080 24,230 28,258 32,427 36,956 42,539 2.9 United States a 15,021 15,369 19,590 22,852 26,146 29,678 34,146 2.9 Canada 1,396 1,422 1,717 1,921 2,143 2,398 2,680 2.3 Mexico and Chile 2,200 2,288 2,923 3,485

  7. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 High Oil Price case projections Table D1. World total primary energy consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 117.0 120.2 119.5 124.2 128.2 131.8 136.7 144.7 0.6 United States a 94.9 97.9 96.0 99.4 100.9 101.4 103.0 107.3 0.3 Canada 13.7 13.5 13.9 14.3 15.3 16.4

  8. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Appendix D Table D3. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (billion 2005 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 15,498 15,929 17,914 20,777 23,647 26,726 30,368 34,751 2.6 United States a 12,758 13,063 14,519 16,803 19,017 21,301 23,998 27,270 2.5 Canada 1,165 1,202 1,351 1,524 1,701 1,897 2,148 2,445 2.4 Mexico/Chile 1,575

  9. Appendix AUD: Audits and Surveillances

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference case projections This page inTenTionally lefT blank 25 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2016 Reference case projections Table A1. World total primary energy consumption by region, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 120.6 118.1 125.7 128.1 130.7 133.8 138.1 0.6 United States a 96.8 94.4 100.8 102.0 102.9 103.8 105.7 0.4

  10. The distribution of the major economies’ effort in the Durban platform scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; Jewell, Jessica; Kober, Tom; Lucas, Paul; Luderer, Gunnar; McCollum, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    The feasibility of achieving climate stabilization consistent with the objective of 2C is heavily influenced by how the effort in terms of mitigation and economic resources will be distributed among the major economies. This paper provides a multi-model quantifications of the mitigation commitment in ten major regions of the world for a diversity of allocation schemes. Our results indicate that a stylized policy with uniform carbon pricing and no transfer payments would yield an uneven distribution of policy costs, which would be lower, higher and significantly higher than the average for the OECD, developing economies and energy exporters respectively. We show that resource sharing burden sharing schemes would not resolve the issue of cost distribution. An effort sharing scheme which equalizes policy costs would yield an allocation of allowances in line with the aspirational targets of the OECD countries, and which would peak before 2030 for China. In all cases, a large international carbon market would emerge.

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a : International Petroleum and Other Liquids Production, Consumption, and Inventories (Million Barrels per Day, Except OECD Commercial Stocks) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Supply includes production of crude oil (including lease condensates), natural gas plant liquids, biofuels, other liquids, and refinery processing gains. b

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1,708 2,383 2,612 2,840 3,079 3,332 2.4 China 1,065 1,153 1,657 1,808 1,937 2,066 2,194 ... Non-OECD Asia 56 56 55 53 50 48 46 -0.7 China 8 8 8 7 7 7 6 -0.9 India 8 7 7 7 7 7 6 ...

  13. International Transportation Energy Demand Determinants (ITEDD): Prototype Results for China

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Jim Turnure, Director Office of Energy Consumption & Efficiency Analysis, EIA EIA Conference: Asian Energy Demand July 14, 2014 | Washington, DC International Transportation Energy Demand Determinants (ITEDD): Prototype Results for China Dawn of new global oil market paradigm? 2 Jim Turnure, EIA Conference July 14, 2014 * Conventional wisdom has centered around $100-120/barrel oil and 110-115 million b/d global liquid fuel demand in the long term (2030-2040) * Demand in non-OECD may push

  14. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    annual percent change Region 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 20305 2040 1980-2010 2010-2040 OECD 41.6 41.6 48.3 46.0 46.4 45.3 44.7 0.3 -0.1 Americas 20.3 20.4 24.0 23.5 24.3 23.6 23.5...

  15. Innovative Financing for Clean Energy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today, as the first global Green Bank Network was announced at an event hosted in Paris by the OECD and Bloomberg Philanthropies, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz released an Energy Department report that examines innovative financing mechanisms adopted by eight states— California, Connecticut, Florida, Hawaii, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and Oregon—to spur investments in clean energy, energy efficiency and resilient infrastructure.

  16. Energy & Sustainable Chemistry: Light Harvesting & Biocatalysis |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration (EIA) Balance Inventories act as the balancing point between supply and demand. During periods when production exceeds consumption, crude oil and petroleum products can be stored for expected future use. In the economic downturn of late 2008 and early 2009, for example, the unexpected drop in world demand led to record crude oil inventories in the United States and other OECD countries. In contrast, when consumption outstrips current production, supplies can be supplemented by

  17. International Energy Agency (IEA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    International Energy Agency (IEA) International Energy Agency (IEA) History The International Energy Agency is an international energy forum comprised of 29 industrialized countries under the Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation (OECD). The IEA was established in 1974, in the wake of the 1973/74 oil crisis, to help its members respond to major oil supply disruptions, a role it continues to fulfill today. IEA's mandate has expanded over time to include tracking and analyzing

  18. Energy & Financial Markets - Crudeoil - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Administration (EIA) Balance Inventories act as the balancing point between supply and demand. During periods when production exceeds consumption, crude oil and petroleum products can be stored for expected future use. In the economic downturn of late 2008 and early 2009, for example, the unexpected drop in world demand led to record crude oil inventories in the United States and other OECD countries. In contrast, when consumption outstrips current production, supplies can be supplemented by

  19. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7 1 November 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 6, 2007 Release Highlights Global oil markets will likely remain stretched, as world oil demand has continued to grow much faster than oil supply outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), putting pressure on OPEC and inventories to bridge the gap. Additional fundamental factors contributing to price volatility include ongoing geopolitical risks, OECD inventory tightness, and worldwide refining bottlenecks. As a

  20. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8, 2014 2014 Summer Fuels Outlook Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption growth and contribute to modest declines in world crude oil prices. * Brent crude oil prices fall gradually over the forecast, averaging, from $109 per barrel in 2013 to $105 per

  1. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    (STEO) Highlights  January was the seventh consecutive month in which monthly average North Sea Brent crude oil prices decreased, reaching $48/barrel (bbl), the lowest since March 2009. The price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production and strong global supply, amid weaker global oil demand growth, which contributed to rising global oil inventories. In January, estimated Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) total commercial oil inventories

  3. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Balance Inventories act as the balancing point between supply and demand. During periods when production exceeds consumption, crude oil and petroleum products can be stored for expected future use. In the economic downturn of late 2008 and early 2009, for example, the unexpected drop in world demand led to record crude oil inventories in the United States and other OECD countries. In contrast, when consumption outstrips current production,

  4. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8, 2014 2014 Summer Fuels Outlook Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption growth and contribute to modest declines in world crude oil prices. * Brent crude oil prices fall gradually over the forecast, averaging, from $109 per barrel in 2013 to $105 per

  5. An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of an in-depth analysis of markets for US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technology (ACT) in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors of three countries -- Spain, Italy, and Turkey. These countries were chosen in a previous study, in which member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on eight factors influencing their propensity to use small-scale, US-developed ACT. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Presentation Title

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Center for Strategic and International Studies May 11, 2016 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Key findings in the IEO2016 Reference case * World energy consumption increases from 549 quadrillion Btu in 2012 to 629 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and then to 815 quadrillion Btu in 2040, a 48% increase (1.4%/year). Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) account for more than half of the increase. * The industrial sector continues to account for the largest share of delivered energy

  7. Presentation Title

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Schlumberger June 23, 2016 | Cambridge, MA By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Key findings in the IEO2016 Reference case * World energy consumption increases from 549 quadrillion Btu in 2012 to 629 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and then to 815 quadrillion Btu in 2040, a 48% increase (1.4%/year). Non-OECD Asia (including China and India) account for more than half of the increase. * The industrial sector continues to account for the largest share of delivered energy consumption; the world industrial

  8. Regional trends in the take-up of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootten, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    Using surveys of the electricity industry taken in major OECD coal producing/coal consuming regions of North America, Europe, Southern Africa, and Asia/Pacific, this paper reports on the attitudes of power plant operators and developers toward clean coal technologies, the barriers to their use and the policies and measures that might be implemented, if a country or region desired to encourage greater use of clean coal technologies.

  9. International environmental justice: Geo-political implications of the Basel agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, D.

    1995-12-01

    The 1994 Basel Convention concluded with a historical agreement to immediately ban the export of hazardous wastes for disposal from member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to non-OECD nations. The OECD nations account for approximately 98 percent of the world`s toxic waste generation. As of December 31, 1997, exports of wastes for recycling will be illegal. For many years, industrialized nations have shipped hazardous wastes to developing nations under the guise of recycling. The ban will make 90 percent of current shipments unlawful. The United States was among the industrialized OCED nations declining to partake in the agreement. In March 1994, the Waste Export and Import Control Act was introduced to Congress by a concerned coalition of Representatives. The bill would ban all exports of toxic wastes except to those nations. Critics have argued that the nature of the Agreement makes it unenforceable under certain conditions. Applied geographical techniques are employed to reveal regions where the effectiveness of the waste ban may be challenged. Formulas are developed to determine the cost-benefit ratio for non-OECD nations involved in significant levels of toxic waste trade. Political and historical analyses are applied in order to clarify the U.S. opposition to the ban. A list of predictions is offered with the future of hazardous waste transhipments within the context of the world`s ever-changing geo-political sphere. Suggestions for improving the effectiveness and enforceability of the Basel Agreement are offered for discussion.

  10. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at Intermediate Energies, T

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    7 - March 31, 2008 Introductory Remarks at the Long Range Plan Working Group Meeting, R.E. Tribble, Galveston, Texas (April, 2007). Tokyo Meeting Report: New Initiatives, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, OECD Meeting, Tokyo, Japan (May, 2007). Report to IUPAP WG9: NSAC Long Range Plan and the RIB Task Force, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, IUPAP Meeting, Tokyo, Japan (May, 2007). Radioactive Beams for Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear Astrophysics, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, Direct Reaction with Exotic

  11. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2 Appendix I Table I2. World tight gas, shale gas and coalbed methane production by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 19.8 26.0 29.0 31.4 34.3 37.0 2.3 United States a 16.6 22.1 23.9 25.1 26.5 27.8 1.9 Canada 3.3 3.8 4.9 5.5 6.3 7.0 2.8 Mexico 0.0 0.1 0.3 0.8 1.4 2.2 - Chile 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 - OECD Europe 0.0 0.5 1.7 3.3 4.6 5.5 21.8 North Europe 0.0 0.5

  12. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4 Appendix I Table I4. World net trade in natural gas by region, Reference case, 2012-40 (trillion cubic feet) Region/country Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 0.3 -2.6 -4.0 -5.4 -6.2 -6.9 - United States a 1.5 -2.6 -3.5 -4.8 -5.2 -5.6 - Canada -2.3 -1.9 -2.3 -2.4 -2.7 -2.8 0.7 Mexico 1.0 1.7 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.1 Chile 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.7 OECD Europe 7.8 10.9 11.9 12.7 13.0 14.0 2.1 North Europe 2.4 5.2 5.9 6.1 6.1 6.3 3.5

  13. International energy outlook 1995, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1995 (IEO95) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the international energy market outlook through 2010. The report is an extension of the EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). US projections appearing in the IEO95 are consistent with those published in the AEO95. IEO95 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projects are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 295(c). The IEO95 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1994. IEO95 displays projections according to six basic country groupings. The regionalization has changed since last year`s report. Mexico has been added to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and a more detailed regionalization has been incorporated for the remainder of the world, including the following subgroups: non-OECD Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China is included in non-OECD Asia. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are combined in the EE/FSU subgroup.

  14. REGULATIONS ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE DISPOSAL AND RECYCLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2001-01-29

    Environmental regulations can have a significant impact on product use, disposal, and recycling. This report summarizes the basic aspects of current federal, state and international regulations which apply to end-of-life photovoltaic (PV) modules and PV manufacturing scrap destined for disposal or recycling. It also discusses proposed regulations for electronics that may set the ground of what is to be expected in this area in the near future. In the US, several states have started programs to support the recycling of electronic equipment, and materials destined for recycling often are excepted from solid waste regulations during the collection, transfer, storage and processing stages. California regulations are described separately because they are different from those of most other states. International agreements on the movement of waste between different countries may pose barriers to cross-border shipments. Currently waste moves freely among country members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and between the US and the four countries with which the US has bilateral agreements. However, it is expected, that the US will adopt the rules of the Basel Convention (an agreement which currently applies to 128 countries but not the US) and that the Convection's waste classification system will influence the current OECD waste-handling system. Some countries adopting the Basel Convention consider end-of-life electronics to be hazardous waste, whereas the OECD countries consider them to be non-hazardous. Also, waste management regulations potentially affecting electronics in Germany and Japan are mentioned in this report.

  15. Summary of non-US national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, K.M.; Kelman, J.A.

    1982-08-01

    Brief program overviews of fuel cycle, spent fuel, and waste management activities in the following countries are provided: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, German Federal Republic, India, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Pakistan, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, USSR, and the United Kingdom. International nonproliferation activities, multilateral agreements and projects, and the international agencies specifically involved in the nuclear fuel cycle are also described.

  16. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Curacao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt

  17. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Curacao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt

  18. Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Cocos

  19. U.S. Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Import Area: U.S. Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile

  20. United States and International Partners Initial ITER Agreement |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy International Partners Initial ITER Agreement United States and International Partners Initial ITER Agreement May 24, 2006 - 10:48am Addthis Paves the Way for Large-Scale, Clean Fusion Energy Project BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - Representing the United States, Dr. Raymond L. Orbach, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, joined counterparts from China, the European Union, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the Russian Federation today to

  1. Joint Statement on Multinational Cooperation on High-Density Low-Enriched

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Uranium Fuel Development | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Joint Statement on Multinational Cooperation on High-Density Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Development March 25, 2014 The White House Office of the Press Secretary Belgium, France, Germany, the Republic of Korea and the United States, the parties to this joint statement recognize that the ultimate goal of nuclear security is advanced by minimizing highly-enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian use, which is affirmed in the

  2. NNSA Contributes to International Efforts to Further Strengthen Detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Nuclear Explosions | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Contributes to International Efforts to Further Strengthen Detection of Nuclear Explosions Friday, May 15, 2015 - 3:22pm Participants at the fifth Workshop on Signatures of Medical and Industrial Isotope Production (WOSMIP) in Brussels, Belgium Every day, thousands of patients worldwide undergo medical tests, diagnostics, and treatments that use radioactive materials. These vital materials, such as molybdeum-99

  3. International fuel cycle and waste management technology exchange activities sponsored by the United States Department of Energy: FY 1982 evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakey, L.T.; Harmon, K.M.

    1983-02-01

    In FY 1982, DOE and DOE contractor personnel attended 40 international symposia and conferences on fuel reprocessing and waste management subjects. The treatment of high-level waste was the topic most often covered in the visits, with geologic disposal and general waste management also being covered in numerous visits. Topics discussed less frequently inlcude TRU/LLW treatment, airborne waste treatment, D and D, spent fuel handling, and transportation. The benefits accuring to the US from technology exchange activities with other countries are both tangible, e.g., design of equipment, and intangible, e.g., improved foreign relations. New concepts initiated in other countries, particularly those with sizable nuclear programs, are beginning to appear in US efforts in growing numbers. The spent fuel dry storage concept originating in the FRG is being considered at numerous sites. Similarly, the German handling and draining concepts for the joule-heated ceramic melter used to vitrify wastes are being incorporated in US designs. Other foreigh technologies applicable in the US include the slagging incinerator (Belgium), the SYNROC waste form (Australia), the decontamination experience gained in decommissioning the Eurochemic reprocessing plant (Belgium), the engineered surface storage of low- and intermediate-level waste (Belgium, FRG, France), the air-cooled storage of vitrified high-level waste (France, UK), waste packaging (Canada, FRG, Sweden), disposal in salt (FRG), disposal in granite (Canada, Sweden), and sea dumping (UK, Belgium, The Netherlands, Switzerland). These technologies did not necessarily originated or have been tried in the US but for various reasons are now being applied and extended in other countries. This growing nuclear technological base in other countires reduces the number of technology avenues the US need follow to develop a solid nuclear power program.

  4. Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Local Correlations and Multi-Fractal Behaviour in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Dynamics N. Kitova and M. A. Mikhalev Institute of Electronics Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Sofia 1784, Bulgaria K. Ivanova Department of Meteorology Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania M. Ausloos Institute of Physics University of Liège Liège, Belgium T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud dynamics is

  5. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study | Grid Modernization | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Bosnia

  6. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterizing the Quality of Microwave Radiometer Measurements and Retrievals Using Time Series Analyses Ivanova, K. (a), Clothiaux, E.E. (a), Shirer, H.N. (a), Ackerman, T.P. (b), Liljegren, J.C. (c), and Ausloos, M. (d), The Pennsylvania State University (a), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (b), Argonne National Laboratiry (c), University of Liege, Liege, Belgium (d) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Time series of microwave radiometer brightness

  7. Recent developments: Industry briefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    This article is the `Industry Briefs` portion of Nuexco`s June 1992 `Recent Developments` section. Specific items mentioned in this article include: (1) a new fuel fabrication facility in South Korea, (2) use of mixed-oxide fuel in Belgium, (3) privatization of nuclear plants in Argentina, (4) startup of Ohi-4 in Japan, (5) purchase of uranium properties in Wyoming, and (6) formation of an international utilities forum.

  8. Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds K. Ivanova Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Ausloos University of Liège B-4000 Liège, Belgium Abstract We present a method on how to derive an underlying mathematical (statistical or model free) equation for a liquid water path (LWP) signal directly from empirical data. The evolution of the probability density

  9. Joint Summer School on "Atomic-level Response of Materials to Irradiation"

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium Fuel Development | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Joint Statement on Multinational Cooperation on High-Density Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Development March 25, 2014 The White House Office of the Press Secretary Belgium, France, Germany, the Republic of Korea and the United States, the parties to this joint statement recognize that the ultimate goal of nuclear security is advanced by minimizing highly-enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian use, which is affirmed in the

  10. East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Bosnia

  11. Assessing Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud Spatial and Vertical Distribution with Infrared Cloud Analyzer I. Genkova and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington T. Besnard ATMOS SARL Le Mans, France D. Gillotay Institute d'Aeronomie Spatiale de Belgique Brussels, Belgium Introduction In the effort to resolve uncertainties about global climate change, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (www.arm.gov) is improving the treatment of cloud radiative forcing and feedbacks in general

  12. Program for Numerical Simulation of Beam Losses due to Interaction with Residual Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamysheva, G.; Skripka, G.

    2010-01-05

    Program for estimation of the beam losses of light ions due to interaction with the residual gas has been written. The loss of beam intensity is determined by the cross sections for loss processes respecting different ion energies and depends on the pressure of the residual gas. The beam losses due to interaction with the residual gas by the example of C400 cyclotron (IBA, Belgium) were done.

  13. American Biogas Council: The Voice of the US Biogas Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    American Biogas Council: The Voice of the US Biogas Industry  The only U.S. organization representing the biogas and anaerobic digestion industry  Over 220 Organizations from the U.S., Germany, Italy, Canada, Sweden, Belgium and the UK  All Industry Sectors Represented:  project developers/owners  anaerobic digestion designers  equipment dealers  waste managers  waste water companies  farms  utilities  consultants and EPCs  financiers, accountants, lawyers and

  14. Summary report of first and foreign high-level waste repository concepts; Technical report, working draft 001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanke, P.M.

    1987-11-04

    Reference repository concepts designs adopted by domestic and foreign waste disposal programs are reviewed. Designs fall into three basic categories: deep borehole from the surface; disposal in boreholes drilled from underground excavations; and disposal in horizontal tunnels or drifts. The repository concepts developed in Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Canada, France, Japan, United Kingdom, Belgium, Italy, Holland, Denmark, West Germany and the United States are described. 140 refs., 315 figs., 19 tabs.

  15. Bruno Van Wonterghem

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    bruno van wonterghem Bruno Van Wonterghem Bruno Van Wonterghem Operations Manager National Ignition Facility Dr. Bruno Van Wonterghem became commissioning manager of NIF in 2001 and operations manager in 2008. He earned his Ph.D. in chemical physics at the University of Leuven in Belgium in 1987. He has extensive experience in developing laser systems for plasma research in academia through work at the University of California, Irvine; the Max Planck Institute; and LLNL. He was manager of

  16. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, Luiz C; Noguere, G; De Saint Jean, C; Kahler, A.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deciency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplication (nubar) and the prompt neutron ssion spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation eort.

  17. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    9.7 15.3 15.2 14.2 13.8 13.5 1.2 Canada 3.4 3.6 3.7 5.4 6.4 7.3 7.8 8.0 2.7 Mexico and Chile 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.4 3.7 3.9 4.2 1.1 OECD Europe 4.9 4.6 4.3 3.3 3.2 3.2 3.2 3.4 -1.0...

  18. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9.7 13.6 12.9 11.7 11.2 10.6 0.4 Canada 3.4 3.6 3.7 4.7 5.1 5.5 5.7 5.8 1.6 Mexico and Chile 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.4 2.0 2.0 2.1 2.2 -1.0 OECD Europe 4.9 4.6 4.3 3.1 2.9 2.5 2.4 2.5 -2.0...

  19. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  20. International collaboration in measurement of differential nuclear data for energy applications in the frame of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deruytter, A.; Weigmann, H.; Carlson, A.; Smith, D.

    1994-12-31

    At the occasion of the restructurisation of the Committees at the Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD, Paris), the newly formed Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (NEA-NSC) took over some of the activities of the former Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Data Committee (NEA-NDC). Amongst these activities were two Interlaboratory Collaborations, one on an important standard, the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}) cross-section, the other on measurements of activation cross-sections. Progress of these two NEA-NSC Interlaboratory Collaborations is reported.

  1. International Energy Outlook 2016-Petroleum and other liquid fuels - Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Information Administration 2. Petroleum and other liquid fuels print version Overview In the International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) Reference case, worldwide consumption of petroleum and other liquid fuels increases from 90 million barrels per day (b/d) in 2012 to 100 million b/d in 2020 and 121 million b/d in 2040. Much of the growth in world liquid fuels consumption is projected for the emerging, non-Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD) economies of Asia,

  2. Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    July 2003 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price for June was up by about $2.50 per barrel from the May average, in part because OECD oil inventories remain low by historical standards. Oil prices are not likely to fall significantly until commercial inventories rise to levels observed in recent years. EIA's Outlook is for prices to remain firm throughout the rest of 2003 (in the $29- $30 per barrel range for

  3. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Average crude oil prices for July were little changed from June. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot average for July was $30.75 per barrel compared to $30.66 in June. EIA's Outlook is for prices to remain firm through the rest of 2003, or at least until autumn, when OECD oil inventories may rebuild above observed 5-year lows. Once inventories have been rebuilt, WTI oil prices may slide gradually to $26 per barrel during

  4. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The August average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price of $31.57 per barrel was almost $1 per barrel higher than it was in July (Figure 1). Crude oil prices declined slightly in early September as pressure to buy oil dropped at the end of the summer driving season. Still, OECD oil inventories remain low, leaving the market susceptible to price uncertainty. We do not see market fundamentals as favoring sustained

  5. Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement.doc

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    April 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 April 6, 2010 Release Crude Oil Prices. WTI crude oil spot prices averaged $81 per barrel in March 2010, almost $5 per barrel above the prior month's average and $3 per barrel higher than forecast in last month's Outlook. Oil prices rose from a low this year of $71.15 per barrel on February 5 to $80 per barrel by the end of February, generally on news of robust economic and energy demand growth in non-OECD

  6. Utility experience with real time rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabors, R.D.; Schweppe, F.C.; Caramanis, M.C.

    1989-05-01

    The structure of electric utility is undergoing dramatic changes as new and expanded service options are added. The concepts of unbundling or of priority service are expanding the options open to customers. Spot pricing, or real time pricing of electricity provides the economic structure for many of these new service options. It is frequently stated that customers can not adapt to real time prices. This paper identifies the dimensions of real time rates and identifies existing rate structures in the United States and other OECD countries which incorporate these dimensions.

  7. Rare events: a state of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uppuluri, V.R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The study of rare events has become increasingly important in the context of nuclear safety. Some philosophical considerations, such as the framework for the definition of a rare event, rare events and science, rare events and trans-science, and rare events and public perception, are discussed. The technical work of the Task Force on problems of Rare Events in the Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Plants (1976-1978), sponsored by OECD, is reviewed. Some recent technical considerations are discussed, and conclusions are drawn. The appendix contains an essay written by Anne E. Beachey, under the title: A Study of Rare Events - Problems and Promises.

  8. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    A specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions was held in Santa Barbara, CA from January 5-7, 1993. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installation (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of California at Santa Barbara. The objectives of the meeting are to cross-fertilize on-going work, provide opportunities for mutual check points, seek to focus the technical issues on matters of practical significance and re-evaluate both the objectives as well as path of future research. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - GuyCaruso oilmarketmar2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Despite Excess Spare Capacity, Reduced Demand and Increased OPEC Production volumes, High , g Prices Persist.... 8 160 mmb/d US$/barrel 5 6 7 8 100 120 140 160 2 3 4 5 40 60 80 100 0 1 2 0 20 40 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 www.csis.org | 1 Source: IEA OMR September 2009, EIA Prices Surplus Capacity If the Fundamentals are so Bad, What's Driving Oil Prices to Increase? * Questionable Data ? What is really happening in non- OECD/China? Stocks and Line Fill? Cold Weather? *

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sweetnam NG Disc Slides - April 7 2010 final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context 2010 Energy Conference U.S. Energy Information Administration Johns Hopkins University - SAIS p y April 7, 2010 - Washington, DC Natural Gas: U.S. Markets is a Global Context, April 7, 2010 Richard Newell, March 2, 2010 1 Richard Newell, SAIS, December 14, 2009 1 April 7, 2010 Washington, DC Discussion Outline * Setting the context * Demand/supply outlook for 3 regions - United States United States - OECD Europe - China * Evolution of the global gas market -

  11. Fact #575: June 15, 2009 Diesel Car Sales in Europe Still Over 50% in 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy 5: June 15, 2009 Diesel Car Sales in Europe Still Over 50% in 2008 Fact #575: June 15, 2009 Diesel Car Sales in Europe Still Over 50% in 2008 More than half of all cars sold in Western Europe since 2006 are fueled by diesel. The overall share of diesel sales, however, declined slightly from 2007 to 2008. Belgium, France, and the United Kingdom continued the growth in diesel penetration, but many other European countries experienced a slight decline in the share of

  12. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  13. Endovascular Management of Complex Renal Artery Aneurysms Using the Multilayer Stent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Carsten; Verrel, Frauke; Weyer, Gunther Wilhelm, Kai

    2011-06-15

    Since its approval as an innovative stent system for peripheral aneurysm management in May 2009, the Cardiatis Multilayer Stent (Cardiatis, Isnes, Belgium) has been applied in several clinical cases. The unique design of this multilayer stent decreases mean velocity and vorticity within the aneurysm sac immediate and causes thrombus to form, resulting in physiological exclusion of the aneurysm from the circulation, whereas branches and collaterals sprouting from the aneurysm remain patent. Here we present a case of a complex renal artery aneurysm successfully treated with a 6 Multiplication-Sign 30-mm Cardiatis Multilayer Stent.

  14. EERE Success Story-NREL Partners with Google in Little Box Challenge |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Partners with Google in Little Box Challenge EERE Success Story-NREL Partners with Google in Little Box Challenge March 21, 2016 - 12:40pm Addthis Photo Courtesy | CET+Power Photo Courtesy | CET+Power Last month, Google and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) announced Belgium's Red Electrical Devils (a team from CE+T Power) as the winner of the Little Box Challenge, a competition to invent smaller, more efficient inverters that connect solar

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.8 Active Solar Systems

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    7 2009 Top 10 Destinations of U.S. Photovoltaic Cell and Module Export Shipments, by Country Peak Percent of Country U.S. Exports Germany Italy France Canada Belgium Spain China India South Korea Australia Total U.S. Exports Note(s): Source(s): 8,368 1% 681,427 100% Total U.S. exports of photovoltaic cells and modules increased by 47% from 2008 to 2009. EIA, Solar Photovoltaic Cell/Module Manufacturing Activities, Dec. 2010, Table 3.14. 18,297 3% 14,806 2% 12,581 2% 43,458 6% 27,247 4% 23,460 3%

  16. Developments advance subsea pipelaying, inspection, repair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-15

    Recent advances in laying, inspecting, and repairing pipelines are helping to cut both costs and time. A new dredging system that employs jets to clear a subsea trench for pipelay received trials off Belgium last spring. Also, within the last year, projects in the Middle East and North Sea employed technologies that promise to make inspecting the surface of a subsea pipeline in difficult terrain easier, less time consuming, and therefore less costly. Plus, subsea repair of damaged pipelines may take less time with a new ``stabbable`` pipe connector. The paper describes jet dredging, inspection advance, support software, the North Sea site, and pipeline repair.

  17. Determination of the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi (n, {gamma}) {sup 210}Bi reaction from 500 eV to 20 keV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, A.; Berthomieux, E.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Gunsing, F.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. M.; Milazzo, P. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.; Terlizzi, R.; Wynants, R.

    2006-07-01

    Energy differential neutron capture cross section measurements have been performed to determine the branching ratio for the {sup 209}Bi(n, {gamma}) reaction. The measurements were carried out at the time-of-flight facility GELINA of the IRMM in Geel (Belgium). The capture measurements were performed at a 12 m flight path using three High-Purity Germanium detectors. The experimental set-up was optimized to reduce the prompt background due to scattered neutrons. Several {gamma}-ray spectra corresponding to the {sup 209}Bi + n resonances up to 20 keV were deduced. The results of a preliminary data analysis are given in this paper. (authors)

  18. In-core and ex-core calculations of the VENUS simulated PWR benchmark experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.L.; Chowdhury, P.; Landesman, M.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The VENUS PWR engineering mockup experiment was established to simulate a beginning-of-life, generic PWR configuration at the zero-power VENUS critical facility located at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium. The experimental measurement program consists of (1) gamma scans to determine the core power distribution, (2) in-core and ex-core foil activations, (3) neutron spectrometer measurements, and (4) gamma heating measurements with TLD's. Analysis of the VENUS benchmark has been performed with two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory, using the DOT-IV code.

  19. Appendix A: Reference case projections

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Appendix A Table A2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, Reference case, 2011-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2012-40 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.3 44.6 46.4 46.1 46.0 46.2 46.7 0.2 Natural gas 31.8 32.8 33.9 35.5 37.7 39.5 41.4 0.8 Coal 21.0 18.7 20.3 20.5 20.1 20.0 20.0 0.2 Nuclear 9.4 9.2 9.5 9.4 9.5 9.5 9.7 0.2 Other 13.1 12.9 15.6 16.6 17.5 18.6 20.3 1.6 Total 120.6 118.1 125.7 128.1 130.7

  20. Insights from the WGRISK workshop on the PSA of advanced and new reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgescu, G.; Ahn, K. I.; Amri, A.

    2012-07-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment /Probabilistic Risk Assessment for new and advanced reactors is recognized as an essential complement of the deterministic approaches to achieve improved safety and performances of new nuclear power plants, comparing to the operating plants. However, the development of PSA to these reactors is encountered to concurrent challenges, mainly due to the limited available design information, as well as due to potentially new initiating events, accident sequences and phenomena. The use of PSA in the decision making process is also challenging since the resulting PSA may not sufficiently reflect the future as-built, as-operated plant information. In order to address these aspects, the OECD/NEA/WGRISK initiated two coordinated tasks on 'PSA for Advanced Reactors' and 'PSA in the frame of Design and Commissioning of New NPPs'. In this context, a joint workshop was organized by OECD, during which related subjects were presented and discussed, including PSA for generation IV reactors, PSA for evolutionary reactors, PSA for small modular reactors, severe accidents and Level 2 PSA, Level 3 PSA and consequences analysis, digital I and C modeling, passive systems reliability, safety-security interface, as well as the results of the surveys performed in the frame of theses WGRISK tasks. (authors)

  1. Technological options of Taiwan to mitigate global warming: Perspectives of a newly industrialized economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, R.T.; Fang, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    While there is no shortage of studies on whether and how OECD countries can stabilize their CO{sub 2} emissions, the situation in developing countries has been subjected to much less scrutiny. Although current emission levels in developing countries are low, they can vastly increase in the future due to higher economic growth rates. Of particular interest are newly industrializing economies; they are positioned to be the first group of countries to catch up with OECD emission levels. In this paper, the authors examine the CO{sub 2} emission scenarios in Taiwan, whose economy is still growing at more than 6% after years of impressive performance. A dynamic, multi-period optimization model was constructed to evaluate various energy system development paths. Both currently utilized technologies and advanced technologies that may become available are considered. The model meets externally specified final energy sectoral demands while keeping the objective function minimal. For devising a practical program to control greenhouse gases emissions, relative advantages of the conventional regulation approach with incentive-based approaches are compared. The comparison is made by running the model using different objective functions.

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6. Table 6-1. Annual average percent change in commercial sector delivered energy consumption by region percent per year Average annual percent change Region 2012-20 2020-30 2030-40 2012-40 OECD 1.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Americas 1.1 0.8 1 0.9 Europe 1.9 1.2 0.8 1.3 Asia 2.4 0.9 0.6 1.2 Non-OECD 3 2.5 1.9 2.4 Europe and Eurasia 2.1 1.5 0.9 1.4 Asia 3.7 2.9 2.1 2.9 Middle East 2.4 2.5 2 2.3 Africa 3.3 3.1 3.1 3.2 Americas 2.1 1.9 1.7 1.9 Total World 2.1 1.5 1.2 1.6 Source: EIA, World Energy Projection

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Table 7-2. World industrial sector delivered energy consumption by region and energy source, 2012-40 quadrillion Btu Energy source by region 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 OECD 73.3 77.6 80 81.7 83 84.6 0.5 Liquid fuels 27.2 28.9 29.8 30.3 30.4 30.6 0.4 Natural gas 21 22.7 23.4 24.2 24.9 25.7 0.7 Coal 8.5 8.7 8.8 8.9 9 9 0.2 Electricity 10.9 11.6 12.1 12.5 12.8 13.2 0.7 Renewables 5.7 5.7 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.1 0.3 Non-OECD 149 168.3 182.6 196.3 211 224.5 1.5

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 billion metric tons Region/Country 1990 2012 2020 2030 2040 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 Total change, 2012-40 (billion metric tons) Percent change, 2012-40 OECD 11.6 12.8 13 13.3 13.8 0.3 1 8 Liquid fuels 5.5 5.7 5.6 5.5 5.6 -0.1 -0.2 -3 Natural gas 2 3.1 3.3 3.8 4.2 1.1 1.1 35 Coal 4.1 3.9 4.1 4.1 4 0.1 0.1 2 OECD with CPP 11.6 12.8 12.7 12.7 13.3 0.1 0.5 4 Liquid fuels 5.5 5.7 5.6 5.5 5.5 -0.1 -0.2 -3 Natural

  5. An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placet, M.; Gerry, P.A.; Kenski, D.M.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the examination of potential overseas markets for using small-scale, US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technologies (ACTs). In previous work, member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on their potential for using ACTs through a comprehensive screening methodology. The three most promising OECD markets were found to be Spain, Italy, and Turkey. This report provides in-depth analyses of these three selected countries. First, it addresses changes in the European Community with particular reference to the 1992 restructuring and its potential effect on the energy situation in Europe, specifically in the three subject countries. It presents individual country studies that examine demographics, economics, building infrastructures, and energy-related factors. Potential niches for ACTs are explored for each country through regional analyses. Marketing channels, strategies, and the trading environments in each country are also discussed. The information gathered indicates that Turkey is a most promising market, Spain is a fairly promising market, and Italy appears to be a somewhat limited market for US ACTs. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 Appendix D Table D2. World total energy consumption by region and fuel, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas Liquids 45.5 46.4 45.0 44.8 44.1 43.6 43.8 45.0 -0.1 Natural gas 28.9 29.9 31.9 34.0 36.2 38.4 40.7 43.0 1.2 Coal 21.3 22.5 19.3 20.2 21.1 21.7 22.2 22.6 0.0 Nuclear 9.4 9.5 9.8 10.3 10.9 11.1 11.1 12.4 0.9 Other 11.9 11.9 13.6 15.0 15.9 17.0 18.9

  7. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2. World gross domestic product by country grouping, 2012-40 billion 2010 U.S. dollars, purchasing power parity Region 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change, 2012-40 OECD 44,769 52,921 58,772 64,731 71,026 78,042 2.0 Americas 19,080 23,390 26,557 29,942 33,569 37,770 2.5 Europe 18,638 21,496 23,621 25,697 27,809 30,074 1.7 Asia 7,051 8,034 8,575 9,091 9,647 10,198 1.3 Non-OECD 49,686 72,195 90,118 109,979 132,734 158,789 4.2 Europe and Eurasia 5,535 6,614 7,764 9,009 10,437

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2. World petroleum and other liquid fuels consumption by region, IEO2016 Reference case, 1990-2040 million barrels per barrel Average annual percent change Region 1990 2000 2012 2020 2030 2040 1990-2012 2012-40 OECD 42.2 48.7 45.5 45.8 45.5 46.1 0.3 0.0 Americas 20.6 24.3 23.2 24.4 24.3 24.6 0.5 0.2 Europe 14.0 15.6 14.1 13.7 13.7 14.0 0.0 0.0 Asia 7.6 8.8 8.2 7.7 7.5 7.5 0.4 -0.3 Non-OECD 25.0 29.0 44.8 54.5 63.6 74.8 2.7 1.9 Europe and Eurasia 9.3 4.4 5.3 5.8 6.2 6.1 -2.5 0.5 Asia 6.6 12.5

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    3 World Primary Energy Consumption and Population, by Country/Region 1990-2000 2000-2010 Region/Country 1990 2000 2010 1990 2000 2010 Energy Pop. Energy Pop. United States 85.0 99.8 97.8 18.7% 250 282 311 4.6% 1.6% 1.2% -0.2% 1.0% China 27.0 36.4 104.6 20.0% 1,148 1,264 1,343 20.0% 3.0% 1.0% 11.1% 0.6% OECD Europe 69.9 76.8 79.6 15.2% 402 522 550 8.2% 0.9% 2.6% 0.4% 0.5% Other Non-OECD Asia 12.5 20.6 31.3 6.0% 781 1,014 1,086 16.2% 5.1% 2.6% 4.2% 0.7% Russia (1) 61.0 27.2 29.9 5.7% 288 147 140

  10. Report on reports: nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darmstadter, J.

    1982-11-01

    A joint report by the Nuclear Energy Agency (of the OECD) and the International Energy Agency, nuclear energy prospects to 2000 surveys the factors shaping the future of nuclear power in the 24-country OECD grouping, 13 of whom were operating nuclear power plants as of the end of 1981. Among the factors reviewed are the long-term economic outlook and its effect on total energy consumption, the role of electricity within aggregate energy use, and the economic and policy determinants governing nuclear's future contribution to electric power capacity and generation. The way in which public confidence bears on the nuclear outlook is mentioned as one of the considerations in the policy process, but this is given rather short shrift for an issue which many feel to be at the heart of the present-day nuclear power dilemma. The report describes areas in which nuclear power could offer notable advantages: 1) competitive electricity costs; 2) resource adequacy; 3) security of supply; and 4) environmental integrity. (JMT)

  11. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1988-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  12. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I W; Mitchell, S J

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  13. International Legal Framework for Denuclearization and Nuclear Disarmament -- Present Situation and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.

    2012-12-01

    This thesis is the culminating project for my participation in the OECD NEA International School of Nuclear Law. This paper will begin by providing a historical background to current disarmament and denuclearization treaties. This paper will discuss the current legal framework based on current and historical activities related to denuclearization and nuclear disarmament. Then, it will propose paths forward for the future efforts, and describe the necessary legal considerations. Each treaty or agreement will be examined in respect to its requirements for: 1) limitations and implementation; 2) and verification and monitoring. Then, lessons learned in each of the two areas (limitations and verification) will be used to construct a proposed path forward at the end of this paper.

  14. Calculation of Critical Experiments involving U(37)O2F2 Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goluoglu, K.L.

    2006-03-03

    Critical experiments were conducted at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiment Facility (ORCEF) to determine the critical concentration for an unreflected 69.2-cm-diameter sphere of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}, at an enrichment of {approx}37 percent U{sup 235}, by weight. These experiments were a continuation of previous efforts to determine critical dimensions for fissile materials in simple geometry. Some of the earlier experiments in this vessel have been published as part of the OECD handbook. The reports concerning these experiments have only recently become available. Until August 2005, Refs. 2 and 3 were still classified. These documents, along with experimental logbooks and unclassified papers available on the experimental campaign and facility are being used to generate a computer model for this critical experiment.

  15. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  16. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  17. Verification of the coupled 3-D neutronics and thermal-hydraulic code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, T.; Takeuchi, A.

    2006-07-01

    In order to analyze the complex transients with coupled interactions between core behavior and plant dynamics, the three-dimensional neutronics code SKETCH-INS was coupled with the thermal-hydraulic code TRAC-P. The capability SKETCH-INS code was verified against the 3-D transient benchmark problem. The capability of the coupled code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P was verified against the NEACRP 3-D LWR core transient benchmark and OECD MSLB benchmark problems. The results of analyses were in reasonable agreement with the reference and different codes results of benchmarks. This paper provides the outline of the coupled code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P and the results of benchmarks. (authors)

  18. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-10-09

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  19. INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON OF RESIDENTIAL ENERGY USE: INDICATORS OF RESIDENTIAL ENERGY USE AND EFFICIENCY PART ONE: THE DATA BASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Ketoff, A.; Meyers, S.

    1981-05-01

    This summary report presents information on the end-uses of energy in the residential sector of seven major OECD countries over the period 1960-1978. Much of the information contained herein has never been published before. We present data on energy consumption by energy type and end-use for three to five different years for each country. Each year table is complemented by a set of indicators, which are assembled for the entire 20-year period at the end of each country listing. Finally, a set of key indicators from each country is displayed together in a table, allowing comparison for three periods: early (1960-63), pre-embargo (1970-73), and recent (1975-78). Analysis of these results, smoothing and interpolation of the data, addition of further data, and analytical comparison of in-country and cross-country trends will follow in the next phase of our work.

  20. 1993 International conference on nuclear waste management and environmental remediation, Prague, Czech Republic, September 5--11, 1993. Combined foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, S.C.; Allen, R.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the trip was to attend the 1993 International Conference on Nuclear Waste Management and Environmental Remediation. The principal objective of this conference was to facilitate a truly international exchange of information on the management of nuclear wastes as well as contaminated facilities and sites emanating from nuclear operations. The conference was sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Czech and Slovak Mechanical Engineering Societies, and the Czech and Slovak Nuclear Societies in cooperation with the Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the OECD Nuclear Agency. The conference was cosponsored by the American Nuclear Society, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Society, the (former USSR) Nuclear Society, and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. This was the fourth in a series of biennial conferences, which started in Hong Kong, in 1987. This report summarizes shared aspects of the trip; however, each traveler`s observations and recommendations are reported separately.

  1. Oil and economic performance in industrial countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordhaus, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries have experienced slower economic growth and periods of discontinuity in the energy market since the 1973-74 oil embargo. A review of this phenomenon examines changes in the market during the 1960s and 70s, linkages between oil prices and economic performance, and appropriate policy responses. When price elasticities are calculated over time, recent US economic behavior appears to have both historical and cross-sountry consistency. Little flexibility is seen in the available energy-using technologies for producing goods and services, while energy-using capital has been sluggish. Dr. Nordhaus advocates high oil price and high tax policies as the best way to limit demand without slowing economic growth. (DCK)

  2. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  3. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case projections by end-use sector and country grouping Table F15. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Asia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.3 Natural gas 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.1 3.7 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.4

  4. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  5. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.; Lakey, L.T.; Schneider, K.J.; Silviera, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  6. Making the market right for environmentally sound energy-efficient technologies: US buildings sector successes that might work in developing countries and Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-12-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, when energy prices were high, all Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries improved their E/GNP by about 2.5% annually. Increased energy efficiency accounted for 2/3rds of this improvement; the remaining portion was due to structural changes in the economy. In the US, analytic and policy tools that have successfully promoted energy efficiency include integrated resource planning, energy use labels, energy use standards, ``Golden Carrot`` incentive programs, and revenue-neutral ``feebates.`` In addition, a number of low cost, environmentally sound, energy-efficient technologies, such as electronic ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows, have recently been developed. We discuss how many of these policies and technologies are probably exportable to developing countries and Eastern Europe, giving examples of successful starts in India, the ASEAN countries, and Brazil.

  7. Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Monthly Report March 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Renae

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Formerly: Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report February 2015 Highlights; Jim Cole attended the OECD NEA Expert Group on Innovative Structural Materials meeting in Paris, France; Jim Lane and Doug Copsey of Writers Ink visited PNNL to prepare an article for the NSUF annual report; Brenden Heidrich briefed the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee-Facilities Subcommittee on the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database project and provided them with custom reports for their upcoming visits to Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and University of California-Berkeley Principal Investigator Mehdi Balooch visited PNNL to observe measurements and help finalize plans for completing the desired suite of analyses. His visit was coordinated to coincide with the visit of Jim Lane and Doug Copsey.

  8. Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Countrys Nuclear Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2010-07-15

    Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nations efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a countrys or regions economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industrys output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a given

  9. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's philosophy and approach to NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R.I.; Braunstein, H.M.; Sigal, L.L.; Trettin, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the overall responsibility for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) resides with Environmental Review and Documentations Section that is within the Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (OECD). Organizationally, OECD is a line-management division reporting to the Director for Environmental, Safety and Health Compliance. The cornerstone for NEPA compliance at ORNL is the Internal Environmental Assessment (IEA), which is designed to provide a basis for NEPA review and documentation. The Standard Operating Procedures provide for evaluation and documentation records management and training, and auditing. The IEA provides a project description and a review of environmental, health and safety issues. The completed IEA is used to make recommendations to DOE regarding the appropriate level of NEPA documentation required for the action. NEPA documents which may be prepared include the Categorical Exclusion, Abbreviated Environmental Assessment, and Environmental Assessment; actions requiring Environmental Impact Statements are prepared by US Department of Energy (US DOE). The relatively recent DOE initiative for agency-wide compliance with NEPA has created areas in which ORNL has found itself lacking adequate resources and expertise. These are discussed in this paper. Throughout ORNL, there is strong management support for compliance with NEPA which has resulted in enhanced awareness and implementation of the NEPA requirements. Guidance is being provided and Laboratory divisions are factoring early integration of NEPA into their project planning with the goal of ensuring that their activities are carried out in full compliance with the letter and the spirit of NEPA and the other environmental statutes and regulations.

  10. The framework convention on climate change a convention for sustainable energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassing, P.; Mendis, M.S.; Menezes, L.M.; Gowen, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    In 1992, over 165 countries signed the United Nation`s Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). These countries have implicitly agreed to alter their `anthropogenic activities` that increase the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere and deplete the natural sinks for these same greenhouse gases. The energy sector is the major source of the primary anthropogenic GHGs, notably carbon dioxide and methane. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries presently account for the major share of GHG emissions from the energy sector. However, the developing countries are also rapidly increasing their contribution to global GHG emissions as a result of their growing consumption of fossil-based energy. Implementation of this global climate change convention, if seriously undertaken by the signatory countries, will necessitate changes in the energy mix and production processes in both the OECD and developing countries. International actions also will be needed to put the world on a sustainable energy path. By adoption of the FCCC, representatives of the world`s populations have indicated their desire to move toward such a path. The Conference of Parties to the Convention has just concluded its second meeting, at which the Parties endorsed a U.S. proposal that legally binding and enforceable emissions targets be adopted. It is clearly evident that the FCCC, as presently operating, cannot achieve the objective of stabilizing GHG concentrations in the atmosphere unless it adopts a major protocol to significantly reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. As demonstrated here, a good starting point in determining the steps the Parties to the FCCC should take in designing a protocol is to remember that the primary source of anthropogenic GHG emissions is the consumption of fossil fuels and the future growth of GHG emissions will derive primarily from the ever-increasing demand for and consumption of these fuels.

  11. Predicting chemically-induced skin reactions. Part I: QSAR models of skin sensitization and their application to identify potentially hazardous compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves, Vinicius M.; Muratov, Eugene; Fourches, Denis; Strickland, Judy; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-04-15

    Repetitive exposure to a chemical agent can induce an immune reaction in inherently susceptible individuals that leads to skin sensitization. Although many chemicals have been reported as skin sensitizers, there have been very few rigorously validated QSAR models with defined applicability domains (AD) that were developed using a large group of chemically diverse compounds. In this study, we have aimed to compile, curate, and integrate the largest publicly available dataset related to chemically-induced skin sensitization, use this data to generate rigorously validated and QSAR models for skin sensitization, and employ these models as a virtual screening tool for identifying putative sensitizers among environmental chemicals. We followed best practices for model building and validation implemented with our predictive QSAR workflow using Random Forest modeling technique in combination with SiRMS and Dragon descriptors. The Correct Classification Rate (CCR) for QSAR models discriminating sensitizers from non-sensitizers was 71–88% when evaluated on several external validation sets, within a broad AD, with positive (for sensitizers) and negative (for non-sensitizers) predicted rates of 85% and 79% respectively. When compared to the skin sensitization module included in the OECD QSAR Toolbox as well as to the skin sensitization model in publicly available VEGA software, our models showed a significantly higher prediction accuracy for the same sets of external compounds as evaluated by Positive Predicted Rate, Negative Predicted Rate, and CCR. These models were applied to identify putative chemical hazards in the Scorecard database of possible skin or sense organ toxicants as primary candidates for experimental validation. - Highlights: • It was compiled the largest publicly-available skin sensitization dataset. • Predictive QSAR models were developed for skin sensitization. • Developed models have higher prediction accuracy than OECD QSAR Toolbox. • Putative

  12. Table 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons) Year Canada Brazil Europe Japan Other 3 Total Belgium 1 Denmark France Germany 2 Italy Nether- lands Spain Turkey United Kingdom Other 3 Total 1960 12,843 1,067 1,116 130 794 4,566 4,899 2,837 331 NA – 2,440 17,113 5,617 1,341 37,981 1961 12,135 994 971 80 708 4,326 4,797 2,552 228 NA – 2,026 15,688 6,614 974 36,405 1962 12,302 1,327 1,289 38 851 5,056 5,978 3,320 766 NA 2 1,848 19,148 6,465 973 40,215 1963 14,557 1,161

  13. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  14. Proceedings of the ninth annual underground coal gasification symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wieber, P.R.; Martin, J.W.; Byrer, C.W.

    1983-12-01

    The Ninth Underground Coal Gasification Symposium was held August 7 to 10, 1983 at the Indian Lakes Resort and Conference Center in Bloomingdale, Illinois. Over one-hundred attendees from industry, academia, National Laboratories, State Government, and the US Government participated in the exchange of ideas, results and future research plans. Representatives from six countries including France, Belgium, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, West Germany, and Brazil also participated by presenting papers. Fifty papers were presented and discussed in four formal sessions and two informal poster sessions. The presentations described current and future field testing plans, interpretation of field test data, environmental research, laboratory studies, modeling, and economics. All papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  15. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  16. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  17. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilitiesInternational Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden)Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis VlachoudisWorkshop Assistant: Graldine Jean

  18. Physical Market Conditions, Paper Market Activity,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    163,868 182,222 184,167 191,219 197,491 195,868 1981-2015 Albania 165 220 467 267 2012-2015 Algeria 0 0 0 2001-2012 Angola 0 2001-2011 Argentina 0 412 1 1 201 3 1993-2015 Aruba 0 2014-2014 Australia 3,167 3,229 2,841 2,715 2,560 2,477 1993-2015 Austria 1995-2007 Azerbaijan 0 5 2 2010-2015 Bangladesh 0 2014-2014 Bahama Islands 0 2000-2010 Bahrain 116 713 299 563 0 1993-2014 Barbados 33 169 179 121 163 158 2007-2015 Belarus 2004-2004 Belgium 3,295 3,337 2,463 2,098 2,572 2,161 1993-2015 Belize 4 2

  19. Petroleum Coke Exports by Destination

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    163,868 182,222 184,167 191,219 197,491 195,868 1981-2015 Albania 165 220 467 267 2012-2015 Algeria 0 0 0 2001-2012 Angola 0 2001-2011 Argentina 0 412 1 1 201 3 1993-2015 Aruba 0 2014-2014 Australia 3,167 3,229 2,841 2,715 2,560 2,477 1993-2015 Austria 1995-2007 Azerbaijan 0 5 2 2010-2015 Bangladesh 0 2014-2014 Bahama Islands 0 2000-2010 Bahrain 116 713 299 563 0 1993-2014 Barbados 33 169 179 121 163 158 2007-2015 Belarus 2004-2004 Belgium 3,295 3,337 2,463 2,098 2,572 2,161 1993-2015 Belize 4 2

  20. (Coordinated research programs in nuclear medicine)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1990-10-03

    The traveler visited the Clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the University of Bonn, West Germany, to review, organize, and plan collaborative studies. He also met with the editorial board of the journal NucCompact -- European/American Communications in Nuclear Medicine, on which he serves as US editor. He also visited colleagues at the Cyclotron Research Center (CRC) at the University of Liege, Belgium, to coordinate clinical applications of the ultrashort-lived iridium-191m radionuclide obtained from the osmium-190/iridium-191m generator system. The traveler planned and coordinated continuing collaboration with colleagues at the CRC for further applications of this generator system. He also visited the University of Metz, Metz, France, to organize a three-center project for the synthesis and evaluation of various receptor-specific cerebral imaging agents, involving the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), CRC, and the University of Metz.

  1. DDE-MURR Status Report of Conceptual Design Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; R.B. Nielson; M.H. Sprenger; G.K. Housley

    2012-09-01

    The Design Demonstration Experiment for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (DDE-MURR) is intended to facilitate Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) conversion of the MURR by demonstrating the performance and fabrication of the LEU fuel element design through an irradiation test in a 200mm channel at the Belgium Reactor 2. At the time this report was prepared the resources for furthering DDE design work were expected to be postponed. As such, the conceptual design effort to date is summarized herein in order to provide the status of key objectives, notable results, and provisions for future design work. These demonstrate that the DDE-MURR design effort is well on the path to producing a suitable irradiation experiment, but also exhibits several challenges for which timely resolution is recommend in order to facilitate success of the irradiation campaign and ultimate conversion of the MURR.

  2. Pfutzner_1987.pdf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    163,868 182,222 184,167 191,219 197,491 195,868 1981-2015 Albania 165 220 467 267 2012-2015 Algeria 0 0 0 2001-2012 Angola 0 2001-2011 Argentina 0 412 1 1 201 3 1993-2015 Aruba 0 2014-2014 Australia 3,167 3,229 2,841 2,715 2,560 2,477 1993-2015 Austria 1995-2007 Azerbaijan 0 5 2 2010-2015 Bangladesh 0 2014-2014 Bahama Islands 0 2000-2010 Bahrain 116 713 299 563 0 1993-2014 Barbados 33 169 179 121 163 158 2007-2015 Belarus 2004-2004 Belgium 3,295 3,337 2,463 2,098 2,572 2,161 1993-2015 Belize 4 2

  3. Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

  4. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    EP will be discussed in the full paper, selected benchmarks that have been added to the ICSBEP Handbook will be highlighted, and a preview of the new benchmarks that will appear in the September 2011 edition of the Handbook will be provided. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP will also be highlighted and the future of both projects will be discussed. REFERENCES (1) International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03/I-IX, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), September 2010 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99140-8. (2) International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)1, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), March 2011 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99141-5.

  5. Commercial viability of hybrid vehicles : best household use and cross national considerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Vyas, A. D.

    1999-07-16

    Japanese automakers have introduced hybrid passenger cars in Japan and will soon do so in the US. In this paper, we report how we used early computer simulation model results to compare the commercial viability of a hypothetical near-term (next decade) hybrid mid-size passenger car configuration under varying fuel price and driving patterns. The fuel prices and driving patterns evaluated are designed to span likely values for major OECD nations. Two types of models are used. One allows the ''design'' of a hybrid to a specified set of performance requirements and the prediction of fuel economy under a number of possible driving patterns (called driving cycles). Another provides an estimate of the incremental cost of the hybrid in comparison to a comparably performing conventional vehicle. In this paper, the models are applied to predict the NPV cost of conventional gasoline-fueled vehicles vs. parallel hybrid vehicles. The parallel hybrids are assumed to (1) be produced at high volume, (2) use nickel metal hydride battery packs, and (3) have high-strength steel bodies. The conventional vehicle also is assumed to have a high-strength steel body. The simulated vehicles are held constant in many respects, including 0-60 time, engine type, aerodynamic drag coefficient, tire rolling resistance, and frontal area. The hybrids analyzed use the minimum size battery pack and motor to meet specified 0-60 times. A key characteristic affecting commercial viability is noted and quantified: that hybrids achieve the most pronounced fuel economy increase (best use) in slow, average-speed, stop-and-go driving, but when households consistently drive these vehicles under these conditions, they tend to travel fewer miles than average vehicles. We find that hours driven is a more valuable measure than miles. Estimates are developed concerning hours of use of household vehicles versus driving cycle, and the pattern of minimum NPV incremental cost (or benefit) of selecting the hybrid over

  6. Analysis of the Younger Dryas Impact Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Richard B.; West, Allen; Revay, Zsolt; Hagstrum, Jonathon T,; Belgya, Thomas; Hee, Shane S. Que; Smith, Alan R.

    2010-02-27

    We have uncovered a thin layer of magnetic grains and microspherules, carbon spherules, and glass-like carbon at nine sites across North America, a site in Belgium, and throughout the rims of 16 Carolina Bays. It is consistent with the ejecta layer from an impact event and has been dated to 12.9 ka BP coinciding with the onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling and widespread megafaunal extinctions in North America. At many locations the impact layer is directly below a black mat marking the sudden disappearance of the megafauna and Clovis people. The distribution pattern of the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) ejecta layer is consistent with an impact near the Great Lakes that deposited terrestrial-like ejecta near the impact site and unusual, titanium-rich projectile-like ejecta further away. High water content associated with the ejecta, up to 28 at. percent hydrogen (H), suggests the impact occurred over the Laurentide Ice Sheet. YDB microspherules and magnetic grains are highly enriched in TiO{sub 2}. Magnetic grains from several sites are enriched in iridium (Ir), up to 117 ppb. The TiO{sub 2}/FeO, K/Th, TiO{sub 2}/Zr, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeO+MgO, CaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, REE/ chondrite, FeO/MnO ratios and SiO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni, Co, U, Th and other trace element abundances are inconsistent with all terrestrial and extraterrestrial (ET) sources except for KREEP, a lunar igneous rock rich in potassium (K), rare-earth elements (REE), phosphorus (P), and other incompatible elements including U and Th. Normal Fe, Ti, and {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U isotopic abundances were found in the magnetic grains, but {sup 234}U was enriched over equilibrium values by 50 percent in Murray Springs and by 130 percent in Belgium. 40K abundance is enriched by up to 100 percent in YDB sediments and Clovis chert artifacts. Highly vesicular carbon spherules containing nanodiamonds, glass-like carbon, charcoal and soot found in large quantities in the YDB layer are

  7. Simulation of a main steam line break with steam generator tube rupture using trace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    A simulation of the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project Test 5 was made with the thermal-hydraulic code TRACE5. Test 5 performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproduced a Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) with a Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The result of these simultaneous breaks is a depressurization in the secondary and primary system in loop B because both systems are connected through the SGTR. Good approximation was obtained between TRACE5 results and experimental data. TRACE5 reproduces qualitatively the phenomena that occur in this transient: primary pressure falls after the break, stagnation of the pressure after the opening of the relief valve of the intact steam generator, the pressure falls after the two openings of the PORV and the recovery of the liquid level in the pressurizer after each closure of the PORV. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis has been performed to know the effect of varying the High Pressure Injection (HPI) flow rate in both loops on the system pressures evolution. (authors)

  8. Simulation of 1% hot leg SBLOCA with TRACE5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Veru, G.

    2012-07-01

    During a Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) transient, depressurization can be slow enough to delay the Accumulators (ACC) entry for a long time. Actuation of High Pressure Injection (HPI) system is then necessary in order to maintain the core temperature low enough to avoid core boil off, and consequently avoiding the core level to fall below fuel rods level, thus producing a temperature trip in the fuel cladding. In this frame, the OECD/NEA ROSA Project Test 1.2 (SB-HL-17 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)) has been simulated using the thermal-hydraulic code TRACES. Test 1.2 was performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproducing a 1% hot leg SBLOCA in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). A comparison between experimental and the main simulated variables was performed to study the effect of important parameters (liquid stratification, geometry and size) to model the break. Finally, in an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) failure scenario, loss of coolant is large enough to produce core boil-off and a Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) excursion. With this purpose a sensitivity analysis varying the HPI mass flow rate has been performed covering the range between HPI actuation and failure. (authors)

  9. Core characterization of the new CABRI Water Loop Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritter, G.; Rodiac, F.; Beretz, D.; Girard, J.M.; Gueton, O.

    2011-07-01

    The CABRI experimental reactor is located at the Cadarache nuclear research center, southern France. It is operated by the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and devoted to IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire) safety programmes. It has been successfully operated during the last 30 years, enlightening the knowledge of FBR and LWR fuel behaviour during Reactivity Insertion Accident (RIA) and Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) transients in the frame of IPSN (Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire) and now IRSN programmes devoted to reactor safety. This operation was interrupted in 2003 to allow for a whole facility renewal programme for the need of the CABRI International Programme (CIP) carried out by IRSN under the OECD umbrella. The principle of operation of the facility is based on the control of {sup 3}He, a major gaseous neutron absorber, in the core geometry. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how several dosimetric devices have been set up to better characterize the core during the upcoming commissioning campaign. It presents the schemes and tools dedicated to core characterization. (authors)

  10. Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshonas Cole, Katherine; Dinner, Julia; Grey, Mike; Daniska, Vladimir

    2013-07-01

    The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)

  11. Return to 1990: The cost of mitigating United States carbon emissions in the post-2000 period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H.; MacCracken, C.N.; Sands, R.D.; Wise, M.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Second Generation Model (SGM) is employed to examine four hypothetical agreements to reduce emissions in Annex 1 nations (OECD nations plus most of the nations of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) to levels in the neighborhood of those which existed in 1990, with obligations taking effect in the year 2010. The authors estimate the cost to the US of complying with such agreements under three distinct conditions: no trading of emissions rights, trading of emissions rights only among Annex 1 nations, and a fully global trading regime. The authors find that the marginal cost of returning to 1990 emissions levels in the US in the absence of trading opportunities is approximately $108 per metric ton carbon in 2010. The total cost in that year is approximately 0.2% of GDP. International trade in emissions permits lowers the cost of achieving any mitigation objective by equalizing the marginal cost of carbon mitigation among countries. For the four mitigation scenarios in this study, economic costs to the US remain below 1% of GDP through at least the year 2020.

  12. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term. Volume 2, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  13. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  14. Critical Experiments that Simulated Damp MOX Powders - Do They Meet the Need?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Ali Nouri; Dr. Claes Nordborg

    2005-09-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS) identified the MOX fuel manufacturing process as an area in which there is a need for additional integral benchmark data. The specific need focused on damp MOX powders. The WPNCS was ultimately asked by the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to provide the framework for the selection and performance of new experiments that fill the identified need. A set of criteria was established to enable uniform comparison of experimental proposals with generic MOX application data. Criteria were established for five general characteristics: (1) neutronic parameters, (2) type of experiments, (3) financial aspects, (4) schedule, and (5) other considerations. Proposals were judged most importantly on their ability to match the neutronic parameters of predetermined MOX applications. The neutronic parameters that formed the basis for comparison included core average values (not local values) for flux, fission and capture rate; detailed balance data (fission and capture) for the main isotopes (Actinides, H and O); sensitivity coefficients to important nuclear reactions (fission, capture, elastic and inelastic scatter, nu-bar, mu-bar) for all uranium and plutonium isotopes, hydrogen, and oxygen; sensitivity profiles to the main nuclear reactions for uranium and plutonium isotopes; energy of average lethargy causing fission; and the average fission group energy. The focus of this paper is on the definition of the need; the neutronics criteria established to assess which, if any, of three proposed MOX experimental programs best meet the need; and the actual assessment of the proposed experimental programs.

  15. BFS, a Legacy to the International Reactor Physics, Criticality Safety, and Nuclear Data Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Anatoly Tsibulya; Yevgeniy Rozhikhin

    2012-03-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. Data provided by these two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades The Russian Federation has been a major contributor to both projects with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) as the major contributor from the Russian Federation. Included in the benchmark specifications from the BFS facilities are 34 critical configurations from BFS-49, 61, 62, 73, 79, 81, 97, 99, and 101; spectral characteristics measurements from BFS-31, 42, 57, 59, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101; reactivity effects measurements from BFS-62-3A; reactivity coefficients and kinetics measurements from BFS-73; and reaction rate measurements from BFS-42, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101.

  16. A Two-Step Approach to Uncertainty Quantification of Core Simulators

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Yankov, Artem; Collins, Benjamin; Klein, Markus; Jessee, Matthew A.; Zwermann, Winfried; Velkov, Kiril; Pautz, Andreas; Downar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For the multiple sources of error introduced into the standard computational regime for simulating reactor cores, rigorous uncertainty analysis methods are available primarily to quantify the effects of cross section uncertainties. Two methods for propagating cross section uncertainties through core simulators are the XSUSA statistical approach and the “two-step” method. The XSUSA approach, which is based on the SUSA code package, is fundamentally a stochastic sampling method. Alternatively, the two-step method utilizes generalized perturbation theory in the first step and stochastic sampling in the second step. The consistency of these two methods in quantifying uncertainties in the multiplication factor andmore » in the core power distribution was examined in the framework of phase I-3 of the OECD Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling benchmark. With the Three Mile Island Unit 1 core as a base model for analysis, the XSUSA and two-step methods were applied with certain limitations, and the results were compared to those produced by other stochastic sampling-based codes. Based on the uncertainty analysis results, conclusions were drawn as to the method that is currently more viable for computing uncertainties in burnup and transient calculations.« less

  17. Fuel Safety Activities in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auh, Geun-Sun; Shin, A.D.; Lee, J.S.; Woo, S.W.; Ryu, Y.H.; Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kim, S.K.; Jeong, Y.H.

    2007-07-01

    The current regulatory requirements for fuel performance were based on earlier test data of fresh or low burnup Zircaloy fuels of less than 40 GWD/MTU. Most countries have not changed the current regulatory requirements even if they are actively investigating the high burnup and new cladding alloy effects. Korea agrees with commonly accepted international consensus that although there are technical issues requiring resolutions, these issues do not constitute immediate safety concerns. The high burnup fuel reactor performance experiences of Korea do not show any major problems even if there have been some burnup related fuel failures which are described in the paper. KINS has recommended the industry to have lower fuel failure rates than 1-2 per 50,000 fuel rods. A research project of High Burnup Fuel Safety Tests and Evaluations has started in 2002 under a joint cooperation of KAERI/KNFC/KEPRI and KINS to obtain performance results of high burnup fuel and to develop evaluation technologies of high burnup fuel safety issues. From 1998, KINS has closely monitored and actively participated in international activities such as OECD/NEA CABRI Water Loop Program to reflect on regulatory requirements if needed. KINS will closely monitor the high burnup fuel performances of Korea to strength the regulatory activities if needed. The research activities in Korea including of LOCA and RIA being performed at KAERI with active supports of the industry are summarized in the paper. (authors)

  18. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  19. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  20. Advanced fuel assembly characterization capabilities based on gamma tomography at the Halden boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcombe, S.; Eitrheim, K.; Svaerd, S. J.; Hallstadius, L.; Willman, C.

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of individual fuel rods using gamma spectroscopy is a standard part of the Post Irradiation Examinations performed on experimental fuel at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. However, due to handling and radiological safety concerns, these measurements are presently carried out only at the end of life of the fuel, and not earlier than several days or weeks after its removal from the reactor core. In order to enhance the fuel characterization capabilities at the Halden facilities, a gamma tomography measurement system is now being constructed, capable of characterizing fuel assemblies on a rod-by-rod basis in a more timely and efficient manner. Gamma tomography for measuring nuclear fuel is based on gamma spectroscopy measurements and tomographic reconstruction techniques. The technique, previously demonstrated on irradiated commercial fuel assemblies, is capable of determining rod-by-rod information without the need to dismantle the fuel. The new gamma tomography system will be stationed close to the Halden reactor in order to limit the need for fuel transport, and it will significantly reduce the time required to perform fuel characterization measurements. Furthermore, it will allow rod-by-rod fuel characterization to occur between irradiation cycles, thus allowing for measurement of experimental fuel repeatedly during its irradiation lifetime. The development of the gamma tomography measurement system is a joint project between the Inst. for Energy Technology - OECD Halden Reactor Project, Westinghouse (Sweden), and Uppsala Univ.. (authors)

  1. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  2. The CIELO Collaboration:Neutron Reactions on 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Chadwick, M. B.

    2014-05-29

    CIELO (Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization) provides a new working paradigm to facilitate evaluated nuclear reaction data advances. It brings together experts from across the international nuclear reaction data community to identify and document discrepancies among existing evaluated data libraries, measured data, and model calculation interpretations, and aims to make progress in reconciling these discrepancies to create more accurate ENDF-formatted files. The focus will initially be on a small number of the highest-priority isotopes, namely 1H, 16O, 56Fe, 235,238U, and 239Pu. This paper identifies discrepancies between various evaluations of the highest priority isotopes, and was commissioned by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency WPEC (Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Co-operation) during a meeting held in May 2012. The evaluated data for these materials in the existing nuclear data libraries — ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-4.0, CENDL-3.1, ROSFOND, IRDFF 1.0 — are reviewed, discrepancies are identified, and some integral properties are given. The paper summarizes a program of nuclear science and computational work needed to create the new CIELO nuclear data evaluations.

  3. Oil supply increase due in 1996`s second half

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1996-07-29

    The crucial oil-market issue for this year`s second half is new supply. Production will increase again outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. And Iraq has general approval to resume exports under limits set by the United Nations, although start of the exports has been delayed by at least 60 days. The big question is the market`s ability to absorb the supply gains. As usual, the market`s need for oil in the second half will depend on economies. So far in 1996, economic growth has pushed consumption to levels unexpected a year ago. Demand the rest of the year depends heavily on economic performances of the industrialized nations that make up the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the rapidly growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region. Growth in countries elsewhere in the developing world, especially Latin America, remains a wild card. The paper discusses the worldwide outlook, crude oil prices, US product prices, natural gas prices, US economy, US energy demand, natural gas in the US, US oil demand, gasoline prices, distillate gains, resid slumps, LPG, ethane, US supply, production patterns, rise in refinery capacity, imports, stocks, and stock coverage.

  4. MCNP6 Results for the Phase III Sensitivity Benchmark of the OCED/NEA Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C.

    2012-06-19

    Within the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the calculation of cross section sensitivity coefficients of k{sub eff} for integral experiment design and uncertainty analysis. The OECD/NEA has an Expert Group devoted to Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis within the Working Party for Nuclear Criticality Safety. This expert group has developed benchmarks to assess code capabilities and performance for doing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Phase III of a set of sensitivity benchmarks evaluates capabilities for computing sensitivity coefficients. MCNP6 has the capability to compute cross section sensitivities for k{sub eff} using continuous-energy physics. To help verify this capability, results for the Phase III benchmark cases are generated and submitted to the Expert Group for comparison. The Phase III benchmark has three cases: III.1, an array of MOX fuel pins, III.2, a series of infinite lattices of MOX fuel pins with varying pitches, and III.3 two spheres with homogeneous mixtures of UF{sub 4} and polyethylene with different enrichments.

  5. Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Price, Lynn; McNeil, Michael; de la rue du Can, Stephane

    2010-05-01

    This Methodology Booklet provides a comprehensive review and methodology guiding principles for constructing energy efficiency indicators, with illustrative examples of application to individual countries. It reviews work done by international agencies and national government in constructing meaningful energy efficiency indicators that help policy makers to assess changes in energy efficiency over time. Building on past OECD experience and best practices, and the knowledge of these countries' institutions, relevant sources of information to construct an energy indicator database are identified. A framework based on levels of hierarchy of indicators -- spanning from aggregate, macro level to disaggregated end-use level metrics -- is presented to help shape the understanding of assessing energy efficiency. In each sector of activity: industry, commercial, residential, agriculture and transport, indicators are presented and recommendations to distinguish the different factors affecting energy use are highlighted. The methodology booklet addresses specifically issues that are relevant to developing indicators where activity is a major factor driving energy demand. A companion spreadsheet tool is available upon request.

  6. Further evaluation of the CSNI separate effect test activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Auria, F.; Aksan, S.N.; Glaeser, H.

    1995-09-01

    An internationally agreed Separate Effect Test (SET) Validation Matrix for the thermalhydraulic system codes has been established by a subgroup of the Task Group on Thermalhydraulic System Behaviour as requested by OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Principal Working Group No. 2 on Coolant System Behavior. The construction of such matrix constituted an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data to select for code validation. As a final result, 67 phenomena have been identified and characterized, roughly 200 facilities have been considered and more than 1000 experiments have been selected as useful for the validation of the codes. The objective of the present paper is to provide additional evaluation of the obtained data base and to supply an a-posteriori judgement in relation to (a) the data base adequacy, (b) the phenomenon, and (c) the need for additional experiments. This has been provided independently by each of the authors. The main conclusions are that large amount of data are available for certain popular phenomena e.g. heat transfer, but data are severely lacking in more esoteric areas e.g. for characterizing phenomena such as parallel channel instability and boron mixing and transport.

  7. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  8. Benefit cost estimation and cooperation in greenhouse gas abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamaide, B.

    1997-12-31

    The world is divided in five players: the USA, the other OECD countries, the former Soviet Union, China and the Rest of the World. The damage equation is formulated around the benchmark damage (at twice the CO{sub 2} level) and the change of temperature in time due to past concentration and current emissions. For having damage cost data (or benefit data) with respect to emissions reduction, damages must be computed at each level of restriction, summed from 2000 to 2100 and discounted back at a predetermined two percent rate of time preference. Abatement costs have been estimated by various authors, some of which believe in no-regrets and some of which only believe in low-regrets policy, some of which are aggregate and some of which are disaggregate. Both theories are taken into account to find abatement cost data between the lower bound of some studies and the upper bound of others. Finally, all exercise is undertaken for getting a curve through the disaggregated benefit and cost data and the best regional fit, represented by a mathematical expression is chosen.

  9. Progress of the work of the Megascience Forum as of 15 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborne, M.W.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives an account of the activities of the OECD Megascience Forum following its creation in June 1992, in particular the reviews of two areas of megascience: Astronomy and deep drilling (both deep sea and continental). It presents the main policy conclusions reached by the Megascience Forum on these areas. It also give an indication of ongoing and future work. With regard to ongoing and future work, the Forum will review at its next meeting, in July 1993, the area of global change research, and for this purpose an expert meeting was held in late March 1993 in Cambridge, Mass. (USA). Areas to be reviewed later in 1993 include oceanography, and neutron sources and synchrotron radiation sources as multipurpose facilities for the study of condensed matter, as well as for other applications such as element transmutation. The Megascience Forum will also undertake to discuss generic science and technology policy issues related to the development and management of megascience, starting with a discussion, at its next meeting, of national decision-making structure and processes.

  10. Progress of the work of the Megascience Forum as of 15 May 1993. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborne, M.W.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives an account of the activities of the OECD Megascience Forum following its creation in June 1992, in particular the reviews of two areas of megascience: Astronomy and deep drilling (both deep sea and continental). It presents the main policy conclusions reached by the Megascience Forum on these areas. It also give an indication of ongoing and future work. With regard to ongoing and future work, the Forum will review at its next meeting, in July 1993, the area of global change research, and for this purpose an expert meeting was held in late March 1993 in Cambridge, Mass. (USA). Areas to be reviewed later in 1993 include oceanography, and neutron sources and synchrotron radiation sources as multipurpose facilities for the study of condensed matter, as well as for other applications such as element transmutation. The Megascience Forum will also undertake to discuss generic science and technology policy issues related to the development and management of megascience, starting with a discussion, at its next meeting, of national decision-making structure and processes.

  11. RELAP-7 and PRONGHORN Initial Integration Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; D. Andrs; A.A. Bingham; R.C. Martineau; J.W. Peterson

    2012-05-01

    Modern nuclear reactor safety codes require the ability to solve detailed coupled neutronicthermal fluids problems. For larger cores, this implies fully coupled 3-D spatial dynamics with appropriate feedback models that can provide enough resolution to accurately compute core heat generation and removal during steady and unsteady conditions. The reactor analyis code PRONGHORN is being coupled to RELAP-7 as a first step to extend RELAP's current capabilities. This report details the mathematical models, the type of coupling, and the testing that will be used to produce an integrated system. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations in 1-D for a compressible fluid. The pipe and joint capabilities enable it to model parts of the PCU system. The PRONGHORN application, also developed on the MOOSE infrastructure, solves the coupled equations that define the neutron diffusion, fluid flow, and heat transfer in a 3-D core model. Initially, the two systems will be loosely coupled to simplify the transition towards a more complex infrastructure. The integration will be tested with the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Coupled Neutronics-Thermal Fluids benchmark model.

  12. Initial Coupling of the RELAP-7 and PRONGHORN Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; D. Andrs; A.A. Bingham; R.C. Martineau; J.W. Peterson

    2012-10-01

    Modern nuclear reactor safety codes require the ability to solve detailed coupled neutronic- thermal fluids problems. For larger cores, this implies fully coupled higher dimensionality spatial dynamics with appropriate feedback models that can provide enough resolution to accurately compute core heat generation and removal during steady and unsteady conditions. The reactor analysis code PRONGHORN is being coupled to RELAP-7 as a first step to extend RELAPs current capabilities. This report details the mathematical models, the type of coupling, and the testing results from the integrated system. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations in 1-D for a compressible fluid. The pipe and joint capabilities enable it to model parts of the power conversion unit. The PRONGHORN application, also developed on the MOOSE infrastructure, solves the coupled equations that define the neutron diffusion, fluid flow, and heat transfer in a full core model. The two systems are loosely coupled to simplify the transition towards a more complex infrastructure. The integration is tested on a simplified version of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Coupled Neutronics-Thermal Fluids benchmark model.

  13. Comparison of MACCS users calculations for the international comparison exercise on probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, October 1989--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L.

    1994-04-01

    Over the past several years, the OECD/NEA and CEC sponsored an international program intercomparing a group of six probabilistic consequence assessment (PCA) codes designed to simulate health and economic consequences of radioactive releases into atmosphere of radioactive materials following severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs): ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this effort, two separate groups performed similar calculations using the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Results produced in the MACCS Users Group (Greece, Italy, Spain, and USA) calculations and their comparison are contained in the present report. Version 1.5.11.1 of the MACCS code was used for the calculations. Good agreement between the results produced in the four participating calculations has been reached, with the exception of the results related to the ingestion pathway dose predictions. The main reason for the scatter in those particular results is attributed to the lack of a straightforward implementation of the specifications for agricultural production and counter-measures criteria provided for the exercise. A significantly smaller scatter in predictions of other consequences was successfully explained by differences in meteorological files and weather sampling, grids, rain distance intervals, dispersion model options, and population distributions.

  14. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4 Appendix F Table F10. Total Non-OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 5.1 5.4 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.0 4.9 -0.2 Natural gas 7.9 8.9 10.4 12.3 14.3 16.2 17.9 2.8 Coal 3.8 3.7 3.7 3.8 3.8 3.8 3.7 -0.1 Electricity 7.0 9.0 11.4 14.0 16.9 20.0 23.3 4.1 Total 23.9 27.0 30.8 35.1 40.0 45.0 49.8 2.5 Commercial Liquids 1.9 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.8

  15. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 Appendix F Table F12. Delivered energy consumption in Other Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -0.1 Natural gas 1.7 1.7 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.4 1.2 Coal 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 -1.4 Electricity 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 1.0 2.4 Total 2.4 2.5 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.4 3.6 1.3 Commercial Liquids 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1

  16. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 Appendix F Table F2. Total OECD delivered energy consumption by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 4.3 4.0 3.9 3.8 3.7 3.5 3.4 -0.8 Natural gas 12.0 11.9 12.2 12.5 12.8 12.9 12.9 0.3 Coal 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 -1.4 Electricity 10.6 11.1 11.7 12.5 13.2 13.9 14.6 1.1 Total 28.2 28.1 29.0 29.9 30.8 31.3 32.0 0.4 Commercial Liquids 2.6 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.2

  17. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 Appendix F Table F6. Delivered energy consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector and fuel, 2010-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector/fuel Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Residential Liquids 2.1 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.6 -0.8 Natural gas 5.6 5.6 5.9 6.3 6.5 6.6 6.8 0.7 Coal 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.5 -1.3 Electricity 3.3 3.8 4.1 4.4 4.6 4.8 5.0 1.4 Total 11.7 11.9 12.5 13.1 13.5 13.7 13.9 0.6 Commercial Liquids 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.7 -1.0

  18. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  19. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications

    2008-01-01

    Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both "above ground" and "below ground" factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. The Energy Information Administration will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

  20. Global Energy Futures Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less