National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for moxa swan fabian

  1. SNL-SWAN

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Sandia National Laboratories has modified Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), the Delft University of Technology code,, to include functionality to better model wave energy converters (WECs). The code modified by SNL has been named SNL-SWAN. SNL-SWAN includes a frequency dependent WEC Module that builds upon the traditional obstacle module in SWAN. In SNL-SWAN, a frequency dependent transmission coefficient is calculated to model power absorbed by WEC devices. The power transmission coefficients are calculated based on the WEC's power performance, which is defined by the user in the input text files. Two methods of defining WEC power performance have been implemented: a user-specified power matrix, and a user-specified relative capture width. These methods allow the user to define the WEC's frequency dependent energy absorption as a function of period and/or wave height. SWAN test cases were run to verify the compiled code's functionality, and verification of the frequency dependent WEC Module in SNL-SWAN has also been performed. SNL-SWAN code is will be released as open source code and will be made publicly available.

  2. SNL-SWAN

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2015-10-20

    Sandia National Laboratories has modified Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), the Delft University of Technology code,, to include functionality to better model wave energy converters (WECs). The code modified by SNL has been named SNL-SWAN. SNL-SWAN includes a frequency dependent WEC Module that builds upon the traditional obstacle module in SWAN. In SNL-SWAN, a frequency dependent transmission coefficient is calculated to model power absorbed by WEC devices. The power transmission coefficients are calculated based on themore » WEC's power performance, which is defined by the user in the input text files. Two methods of defining WEC power performance have been implemented: a user-specified power matrix, and a user-specified relative capture width. These methods allow the user to define the WEC's frequency dependent energy absorption as a function of period and/or wave height. SWAN test cases were run to verify the compiled code's functionality, and verification of the frequency dependent WEC Module in SNL-SWAN has also been performed. SNL-SWAN code is will be released as open source code and will be made publicly available.« less

  3. SwanTurbines | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    SwanTurbines Jump to: navigation, search Name: SwanTurbines Place: United Kingdom Product: SwanTurbines is developing a tidal stream turbine. The company is currently working on a...

  4. SNL-SWAN (Sandia National Laboratories - Simulating WAves Nearshore...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    SWAN (Sandia National Laboratories - Simulating WAves Nearshore) - Sandia Energy Energy ... SNL-SWAN (Sandia National Laboratories - Simulating WAves Nearshore) HomeStationary ...

  5. Air quality monitoring for dioxins, furans and PCBs in the Swan Hills area, Summer 1997, July 7 to August 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Summarizes results of air quality monitoring activities carried out in the Swan Hills area of Alberta in summer 1997. At four locations in the area, samples of dioxin, furan, and polychlorinated biphenyls were analyzed and ambient concentrations determined. Results are presented in terms of toxic equivalents of dioxins and furans, total dioxins, total furans, and total polychlorinated biphenyls, normalized by compounds within each homologue group.

  6. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume II, Technical Information, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leathe, Stephen A.

    1985-07-01

    This report summarizes a study to determine the potential cumulative effects of proposed small hydro development on the fisheries of the Swan River drainage. This report contains technical information and is a support document for the main report (Leathe and Enk, 1985). Consequently, discussion of results was minimized. The sections on fish population monitoring, streambed monitoring, habitat survey comparisons, and water temperature are the only portions that were not discussed in the main report. 5 refs., 55 figs., 44 tabs.

  7. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, First Annual Progress Report (Covering Field Season July-November 1982).

    SciTech Connect

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Graham, Patrick J.

    1984-03-01

    This fisheries study is to determine the potential cumulative biological and economic effects of 20 small or micro-hydro-electric facilities (less than 5 megawatts) proposed to be constructed on tributaries to the Swan River, a 1738 square kilometer (671 square mile) drainage located in northwestern Montana. The study addresses portions of measure 1204 (b) (2) of the Norwthwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Aerial pre-surveys conducted during 1982 identified 102 stream reaches that may support fish populations in the Swan drainage between Swan and Lindbergh lakes. These reaches were located in 49 tributary streams and constituted 416 kilometers (258 miles) of potential fish habitat. Construction of all proposed small hydro projects would divert water from 54 kilometers (34 miles) or about 13 percent of the tributary system. Only two of the 20 proposed hydro sites did not support trout populations and most were populated by migratory bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Potential cumulative habitat losses that could result from dewatering of all proposed project areas were predicted using a stream reach classification scheme involving stream gradient, drainage ara, and fish population data. Preliminary results of this worst case analysis indicate that 23, 19 and 6 percent of the high quality rearing habitat for cutthroat, bull, and brook trout respectively would be lost.

  8. WATER PRODUCTION IN COMETS 2001 Q4 (NEAT) AND 2002 T7 (LINEAR) DETERMINED FROM SOHO/SWAN OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Combi, M. R.; Lee, Y.; Maekinen, J. T. T.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quemerais, E.

    2009-06-15

    The SWAN all-sky camera on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft detected the hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Ly{alpha}) comae of comets 2001 Q4 NEAT and 2002 T7 LINEAR for large portions of their perihelion apparitions in 2003 and 2004. C/2001 Q4 NEAT was observed from 2003 September 14 through 2004 November 2, covering heliocentric distances from 3.23 AU before perihelion to 2.75 AU after, and C/2002 T7 LINEAR was observed from 2003 December 4 through 2004 August 6, covering heliocentric distances from 2.52 AU before perihelion to 2.09 AU after. We combined the full set of comet specific and full-sky observations and used our time-resolved model (TRM), which enables us to extract continuous values of the daily-average value of the water production rate throughout most of this entire period. The average power-law fit to the production rate variation of C/2001 Q4 NEAT with heliocentric distance, r, gives 3.5 x 10{sup 29} r {sup -1.7} and that for C/2002 T7 LINEAR gives 4.6 x 10{sup 29} r {sup -2.0}. Both comets show roughly a factor of 2 asymmetry in activity about perihelion, being more active before perihelion. C/2001 Q4 NEAT showed a production rate outburst about 30 days before perihelion (2004 April 15) and then a large extended increase above the nominal trend from 50 to 70 days after perihelion (2004 July 5-July 25)

  9. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume I, Summary, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leathe, Stephen A.; Enk, Michael D.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to develop and apply methods to evaluate the cumulative effects of 20 proposed small hydro projects on the fisheries resources of the Swan River drainage located in northwestern Montana. Fish population and reach classification information was used to estimate total populations of 107,000 brook trout, 65,000 cut-throat trout and 31,000 juvenile bull trout within the tributary system. Distribution, abundance, and life history of fish species in the drainage and their contribution to the sport fishery were considered in the cumulative impact analysis. Bull trout were chosen as the primary species of concern because of their extensive use of project areas, sensitivity to streambed sedimentation, and their importance to the lake and river sport fisheries. Dewatering of hydroelectric diversion zones and streambed sedimentation (resulting from forest and small hydro development) were the major impacts considered. The developer proposed to divert up to the entire streamflow during low flow months because maintenance of recommended minimum bypass flows would not allow profitable project operation. Dewatering was assumed to result in a total loss of fish production in these areas. 105 refs., 19 figs., 38 tabs.

  10. Cumulative Effects of Micro-Hydro Development on the Fisheries of the Swan River Drainage, Montana, Volume III, Fish and Habitat Inventory of Tributary Streams, 1983-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leathe, Stephen A.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes a study of the fisheries of the Swan River drainage in relation to potential small hydro development. This information was collected in order to obtain a reliable basin-wide database which was used to evaluate the potential cumulative effects of a number of proposed small hydro developments on the fisheries of the drainage. For each named tributary stream there is a reach-by-reach narrative summary of general habitat characteristics, outstanding features of the stream, and fish populations and spawning use. An attempt was made to rank many of the measured parameters relative to other surveyed stream reaches in the drainage. 3 refs.

  11. Idaho_SmithSwanLake

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Steve Smith, Swanlake Site 0603 Latitude: N. 42 deg. 29.804' Longitude: W. 112 deg. 01.934' Elevation: 6950' Anemometer Height: 20 Meters Placed in service: September 17, 2004...

  12. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Engineering...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Waleffe, Fabian (Fabian Waleffe) - Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Weingarten, Leonid (Leonid Weingarten) - Department of Particle Physics, ...

  13. Development Verification and Application of the SNL-SWAN Open...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1 K. Ruehl 1 , A. Porter 2* , C. Chartrand 3 , H. Smith 4+ , G. Chang 5 , J. Roberts 6 SAND2015-7463C Outline * Intro * Background * New Code Features *...

  14. SNL-SWAN Open Source Wave Farm Code K. Ruehl

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    1 , A. Porter 2* , C. Chartrand 3 , H. Smith 4+ , G. Chang 5 , J. Roberts 6 Sandia ... + University of Exeter Exeter, UK 4 H.C.M.Smith@exeter.ac.uk Integral Consulting Inc. ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Schmidt, Fabian ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Smith, Kendrick M ; Whiteson, Daniel Aspen ... (Stanford University), and Kendrick Smith (Princeton University). less Full Text ...

  16. Sandia Energy - SNL-SWAN Beta Code Development: Frequency-Dependent...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental effects created by changes in wave climates associated with the deployment of various sizes and configurations of wave farms in the ocean. Energy spectra at...

  17. Sandia Energy - SNL-SWAN Beta Code Development: Frequency-Dependent...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    module was verified. This was accomplished by comparing the shape of the incident energy spectrum (before the WEC) to the lee energy spectra (after the WEC), and noting varying...

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office Waste Isolation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Joe Baca; and Chauncey Ortega. The WIPP Red Team included: Matt Ridgway, team captain; Curtis Sanders; Kirk Nance; Mark Long; Fabian Carrasco; Doug Pitzer; and Nico Dominguez. Both...

  19. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Publications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Zutic, "Semiconductor Spintronics," Acta Physica Slovaca, 57, 565-907 (342 pages) (2007). ... Zutic, I., J. Fabian, and S. C. Erwin, "Bipolar Spintronics: from Spin injection to ...

  20. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  1. Regional Wave Field Modeling and Array Effects

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Scale Morison EQ solver * SWAN: Large Scale spectral wave solver * SNL-EFDC: Resource Scale Hydrodynamics Columbia Power WEC array testing at OSU Tsunami Basin (left) and SWAN ...

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    and Hurricane Fabian appears headed for the East Coast, away from the producing area. ... 59 cents or nearly 12 percent to average 4.51 per MMBtu on Wednesday, September 3. ...

  3. TTW 12-19-06

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Boys were leaning toward guitars, skateboards, skateboard wheels, bikes, bats, gloves, balls .... One of the Josiah Carrasco, age 4, son of Fabian Carrasco (L&M), was a very good ...

  4. EA-1882: U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Littlerock Solar Power Gen 1, LLC for the Littlerock Solar Power Gen 1, LLC Project and to Swan Solar Power Gen Station 1, LLC for the Swan Solar Power Gen Station 1, LLC Project

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an Environmental Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Stand-Off Experiment (SOX) Range.  The objective of the EA was to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of...

  5. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP ... BLU E FOREST SWAN DEER HILL FOGART Y CREEK GREEN RIVER BEND DRY PINEY SWAN S HOGSBACK AREA ...

  6. Bonneville County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inc Places in Bonneville County, Idaho Ammon, Idaho Idaho Falls, Idaho Iona, Idaho Irwin, Idaho Ririe, Idaho Swan Valley, Idaho Ucon, Idaho Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Sandia Publishes Five Reports on the Environmental Effects of...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... As such, one report describes coupling SWAN with the SNL-EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) circulation model to investigate changes in nearshore ocean circulation and ...

  8. SANDIA REPORT

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of wave energy depending upon device efficiency, device geometry, array configuration, ... and WEC array deployment location depth contour) was investigated. 2.1. SWAN Model As ...

  9. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. LED; light-emitting diode; CFL; incandescent; halogen; lamp; bulb; TCLP; STLC; TTLC; WET; hazardous waste; electronic...

  10. EIS-0267: BPA/Lower Valley Transmission System Reinforcement Project, Wyoming

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA and LVPL proposal to construct a new 115-kV line from BPA’s Swan Valley Substation near Swan Valley in Bonneville County, Idaho about 58 km (36 miles) east to BPA’s Teton Substation near Jackson in Teton County, Wyoming.

  11. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Wells | Department of Energy High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells fabian_ctd_ zonal_isolation_peer2013.pdf (809.57 KB) More Documents & Publications High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells track 3: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015

  12. Untitled

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NUCLEAR REACTION RATE UNCERTAINTIES AND THE 22 Ne(p, ) 23 Na REACTION: CLASSICAL NOVAE AND GLOBULAR CLUSTERS Keegan John Kelly A dissertation submitted to the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics. Chapel Hill 2016 Approved by: Arthur E. Champagne Christian Iliadis Thomas B. Clegg Fabian Heitsch Nicholas Law All rights reserved INFORMATION TO ALL USERS The quality

  13. Microsoft Word - Group3Cloud Properties(RS).docx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties Report Participants: Sonja Drueke, McGill University Mallory Row, University of Oklahoma Zhiyuan Jiang, Pennsylvania State University Fabian Hoffmann, Leibniz Universität, Hannover, Germany Instructors: Susanne Crewell, University of Cologne, Germany Kerstin Ebell, University of Cologne, Germany July 2015 Group 3, July 2015, ARM Summer Training and Science Applications 1 1.0 Cloud Properties The liquid water path (LWP) is a major parameter used for estimating the impact of clouds on

  14. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Wells | Department of Energy Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Design, demonstrate, and qualify high-temperature high pressure zonal isolation devices compatible with the high temperature downhole Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) environment. specialized_fabian_zonal_isolation.pdf (440.53 KB) More

  15. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Office eere.energy.gov Public Service of Colorado Ponnequin Wind Farm Geothermal Technologies Office 2013 Peer Review New Concepts in Zonal Isolation for EGS High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells Track 2, R&D April 25, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Paul E. Fabian, PI Jacob Barker, Project Engineer Composite Technology Development, Inc. Project Overview * Goal: Develop

  16. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE HOGSBACK CHIMNEY BUT TE BIG PINEY AREA TIP TOP UNI T LINCOLN ROAD BLU E FOREST DEER HILL FOGART Y CREEK GREEN RIVER BEND ...

  17. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Annual Energy Outlook

    The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods ... BIG PINEY TIP TOP BIR D CANYON SWAN FONTEN ELL E LABARGE HOGSBACK CHIMNEY BUT TE BIG PINEY ...

  18. CX-012404: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Palisades-Swan Valley Transmission Line Rebuild CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 06/30/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration BIG PINEY TIP ... LINCOLN ROAD BLU E FOREST DEER HILL FOGART Y CREEK GREEN RIVER BEND DRY PINEY SWAN S ...

  20. CX-006777: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Swan Valley-Goshen Concrete Box Culvert at Granite CreekCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 08/24/2011Location(s): Bonneville County, IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-006482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Swan Valley - Palisades Communication UpgradeCX(s) Applied: B1.7, B4.6Date: 08/05/2011Location(s): IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-011174: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Swan Valley-Teton Number 1 and Number 2 Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/16/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. CX-012232: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Swan Valley-Teton Overhead Fiber Line Install CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 06/02/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Authors: Tuenge, Jason R. ; Hollomon, Brad ; Dillon, Heather E. ; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. Publication Date: 2013-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 1074312 Report Number(s): PNNL-22346 ...

  5. BPA-2015-01485-FCorrespondence

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM In reply refer to: FOIA BPA-2015-01485-F Arlene Montgomery Friends of the Wild Swan PO Box 103 Bigfork, MT 59911 Ms. Montgomery: The Department...

  6. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jason R Hollomon Brad Dillon Heather E Snowden Swan Lesley J LED light emitting diode CFL incandescent halogen lamp bulb TCLP STLC TTLC WET hazardous waste electronic waste e...

  7. CX-004259: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funding the Acquisition by the State of Montana of Habitat in the West Swan ValleyCX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 10/21/2010Location(s): Lake County, MontanaOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-012364: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Swan Lake Point Radio Station Project CX(s) Applied: B1.19 Date: 05/22/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. Cloud&Proper+es:& How&much&water&is&in&a&cloud?&

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer Training 2015 How much water is in a cloud? ! Cloud&Proper+es:& How&much&water&is&in&a&cloud?& ! ! ! ! presented&by&& Sonja&Drueke&(McGill&University)& Mallory&Row&(University&of&Oklahoma)& &Zhiyuan&Jiang&(Penn&State&University)& &Fabian&Hoffmann&(Leibniz&Universität&Hannover)& & with&guidance&from&!

  10. TTW 7-16-09

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2009 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 7-15-09) 7,583 Shipments received since opening (7,335 CH and 248 RH) 61,184 Cubic meters of waste disposed (61,070CH and 114 RH) 116,765 Containers disposed in the underground (116,523 CH and 242 RH) A special thanks to all those who prepared for and assisted with the EMS audit Hardy Bellows Wes Boatwright Leroy Bostick Tom Fabian Ed Flynn Marty Gonzales Ken Hasten James Hedin Bill Jaco Judy Lanier Tom Lichty Willie Most Parrish Roush Craig Suggs Steve Travis

  11. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1.2.4 - Thermal Conversion Sustainability Interface May 20, 2013 Technology Area Review: Analysis and Sustainability PI: Lesley Snowden-Swan Organization: PNNL This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Goal Statements * Integration of BETO's Thermochemical Conversion and Sustainability Thrusts: - Incorporate sustainability considerations during design and development of emerging pathways

  12. CX-009709: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood Pole Replacements Along the Drummond-Macks Inn, Macks Inn-Madison, and Swan Valley-Teton 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Rights-of-Way CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/29/2012 Location(s): Idaho, Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  13. EFFECTS EYALUATION POST-SHOT RE-ENTRY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NVO-122 9-12 8 (Preliminary) EFFECTS EYALUATION POST-SHOT RE-ENTRY PROJECT RULISON ( u ) November 1 1 , 1969 Contract A~(29-2)-1229 U .S . Atomic Energy Commission Nevada Operations O f f i c e Las Vegas, Nevada Hydrogeology S e c t i o n ISOTOPES, A TELEDYNE C O M P A V Y P a l o A l t o L a b o r a t o r i e s 4062 Fabian S t r e e t P a l o A l t o , C a l i f o r n i a 94303 I. INTRODUCTION Post-event d r i l l b a c k a t P r o j e c t RULISON w i l l r e s u l t i n t h e r e l e a s e o f

  14. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  15. Ethanol from biomass: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.

    1996-12-31

    Programmatic and technical activities of SWAN Biomass, a company formed by Amoco Corporation and Stone & Webster, to convert non-grain biomass material to ethanol, are highlighted in this presentation. The potential ethanol markets identified are: (1) fuel oxygenate and octane additive, and (2) waste reduction in the agricultural and forestry industries and in municipal waste streams. Differences in the SWAN process from that used in corn-based ethanol facilities include more intense pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, different enzymes, hydrolysis and fermentation of sugar polymers is performed in the same vessel, and a typical solid residue of lignin. The major market and technical risks have been assessed as being manageable. 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Swan, R" Name Name ORCID Product Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, Amarillo, TX

  17. Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Condensing Boiler Optimization Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, www.ithacanhs.org; Appropriate Designs, www.hydronicpros.com; HTP, www.htproducts.com; Peerless, www.peerlessboilers.com; Grundfos, us.grundfos.com; Bell & Gossett, www.bell-gossett.com; Emerson Swan, www.emersonswan.com. Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings,

  18. Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio-Oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Fuels | Argonne National Laboratory Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Fuels Title Supply Chain Sustainability Analysis of Fast Pyrolysis and Hydrotreating Bio-Oil to Produce Hydrocarbon Fuels Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2016 Authors Adom, FK, Cai, H, Dunn, JB, Hartley, D, Searcy, E, Tan, E, Jones, S, Snowden-Swan, L Date Published 03/2016 Institution Argonne National

  19. Collaborative Research. Damage and Burst Dynamics in Failure of Complex Geomaterials. A Statistical Physics Approach to Understanding the Complex Emergent Dynamics in Near Mean-Field Geological Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, John B.; Klein, William

    2015-09-29

    We have carried out research to determine the dynamics of failure in complex geomaterials, specifically focusing on the role of defects, damage and asperities in the catastrophic failure processes (now popularly termed “Black Swan events”). We have examined fracture branching and flow processes using models for invasion percolation, focusing particularly on the dynamics of bursts in the branching process. We have achieved a fundamental understanding of the dynamics of nucleation in complex geomaterials, specifically in the presence of inhomogeneous structures.

  20. Hydronic Systems: Designing for Setback Operation, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydronic Systems: Designing for Setback Operation Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Condensing Boilers- Optimizing Efficiency and Response Time During Setback Operation Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, www.ithacanhs.org Appropriate Designs, www.hydronicpros.com HTP, www.htproducts.com Peerless, www.peerlessboilers.com Grundfos, www.grundfos.com Bell & Gossett, www.bell-gossett.com Emerson Swan, www.emersonswan.com Consortium for Advanced

  1. HTL Model Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1.3.4.100 HTL Model Development MARCH 24, 2015 ALGAE Sue Jones Yunhua Zhu, Lesley Snowden-Swan, Dan Anderson, Rich Hallen, Karl Albrecht, Doug Elliott, Andy Schmidt Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement for HTL Model 2 GOAL: Enable R&D to produce sustainable, economic liquid fuels through targeted research coupled with techno-economic analysis (TEA) leading to optimized algal

  2. Laser scattered images observed from carbon plasma stagnation and following molecular formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, K.; Shibata, R.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Sunahara, A.

    2014-06-16

    Two carbon targets were irradiated to create plasma plumes to collide at right angle with two UV laser pulses each other at 10 J/cm{sup 2}/pulse. The collision results in carbon plasma stagnation. Laser scattered imaging indicates that the carbon large molecular formation takes place much later in time after the laser irradiation and stagnation. Compared with the temporal history of electron density (n{sub e}), ion density (n{sub i}), and plasma self-emission dominated by carbon Swan band, it is estimated that the carbon large molecular formation has been initiated with the ion collision followed by the C{sub 2} formation.

  3. Efficient utilization of red maple lumber in glued-laminated timber beams. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Janowiak, J.J.; Manbeck, H.B.; Hernandez, R.; Moody, R.C.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

    1995-09-01

    The feasibility of utilizing cant-sawn hardwood lumber, which would not usually be desired for furniture manufacture, was studied for the manufacture of structural glue-laminated (glulam) timber. Two red maple beam combinations were evaluated. Test results of 42 red maple glulam beams showed that it was feasible to develop structural glulam timber from cant-swan lumber. The glulam combinations made from E-rated lumber exceeded the target design bending stress of 2,400 lb/in 2 and met the target modulus of elasticity (MOE) of 1.8 x 106 lb/in 2.

  4. Integration of Sustainability Metrics into Design Cases and State of Technology Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Integration of Sustainability Metrics into Design Cases and State of Technology Assessments 2.1.0.100/2.1.0.302 NREL 2.1.0.301 PNNL Mary Biddy On behalf Eric Tan, Abhijit Dutta, Ryan Davis, Mike Talmadge NREL Lesley Snowden-Swan On behalf of Sue Jones, Aye Meyer, Ken Rappe, Kurt Spies PNNL Goal Statement 2 Support the development

  5. Ultrafast Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Dynamic Response of Single Crystal PETN and Beta-HMX Authors: Zaug, J M ; Armstrong, M R ; Crowhurst, J C ; Feranti, L ; Swan, R ; Gross, R ; Teshlich, N E ; Wall, M ; Austin, R A ; Fried, L E Publication Date: 2014-06-30 OSTI Identifier: 1149550 Report Number(s): LLNL-CONF-656341 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation:

  6. Buckyball microwave plasmas: Fragmentation and diamond-film growth

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Buckyball microwave plasmas: Fragmentation and diamond-film growth Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Buckyball microwave plasmas: Fragmentation and diamond-film growth Microwave discharges (2.45 GHz) have been generated in C{sub 60}-containing Ar produced by flowing Ar over fullerene-containing soot. Optical spectroscopy shows that the spectrum is dominated by the d{sup 3}{Pi}g-a{sup 3}{Pi}u Swan bands of C{sub 2} and

  7. Laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry of carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Jain, Jinesh; Russo, Richard E.; McIntyre, Dustin; Mao, Xianglei

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative determination of carbon isotopes using Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry (LAMIS) is described. Optical emission of diatomic molecules CN and C2 is used in these measurements. Two quantification approaches are presented:empirical calibration of spectra using a set of reference standards and numerical fitting of a simulated spectrum to the experimental one. Formation mechanisms of C2 and CN in laser ablation plasma are briefly reviewed to provide insights for implementation of LAMIS measurements. A simulated spectrum of the 12C2 Swan system was synthesized using four constituents within 473.5–476.5 nm. Simulation included three branches of 12C2 (1-0), branches R(0-0) and R(1-1), and branch P(9-8) of 12C2. Spectral positions of the tail lines in R(0-0) and R(1-1) were experimentally measured, since they were not accurately known before. The Swan band (1-0) of the isotopologue 13C12C was also simulated. Fitting to the experimental spectrumyielded the ratio 13C/12C = 1.08% in a good agreement with measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. LAMIS promises to be useful in coal, oil and shale exploration, carbon sequestration monitoring, and agronomy studies

  8. Investigation of Spatial Variation of Sea States Offshore of Humboldt Bay CA Using a Hindcast Model.

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01

    Spatial variability of sea states is an important consideration when performing wave resource assessments and wave resource characterization studies for wave energy converter (WEC) test sites and commercial WEC deployments. This report examines the spatial variation of sea states offshore of Humboldt Bay, CA, using the wave model SWAN . The effect of depth and shoaling on bulk wave parameters is well resolved using the model SWAN with a 200 m grid. At this site, the degree of spatial variation of these bulk wave parameters, with shoaling generally perpendicular to the depth contours, is found to depend on the season. The variation in wave height , for example, was higher in the summer due to the wind and wave sheltering from the protruding land on the coastline north of the model domain. Ho wever, the spatial variation within an area of a potential Tier 1 WEC test site at 45 m depth and 1 square nautical mile is almost negligible; at most about 0.1 m in both winter and summer. The six wave characterization parameters recommended by the IEC 6 2600 - 101 TS were compared at several points along a line perpendicular to shore from the WEC test site . As expected, these parameters varied based on depth , but showed very similar seasonal trends.

  9. Survey of glaciers in the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana and Wyoming; Size response to climatic fluctuations 1950-1996

    SciTech Connect

    Chatelain, E.E.

    1997-09-01

    An aerial survey of Northern Rocky Mountain glaciers in Montana and Wyoming was conducted in late summer of 1996. The Flathead, Swan, Mission, and Beartooth Mountains of Montana were covered, as well as the Teton and Wind River Ranges of Wyoming. Present extent of glaciers in this study were compared to limits on recent USGS 15 and 7.5 topographic maps, and also from selected personal photos. Large cirque and hanging glaciers of the Flathead and Wind River Ranges did not display significant decrease in size or change in terminus position. Cirque glaciers in the Swan, Mission, Beartooth and Teton Ranges were markedly smaller in size; with separation of the ice body, growth of the terminus lake, or cover of the ice terminus with rockfalls. A study of annual snowfall, snowdepths, precipitation, and mean temperatures for selected stations in the Northern Rocky Mountains indicates no extreme variations in temperature or precipitation between 1950-1996, but several years of low snowfall and warmer temperatures in the 1980`s appear to have been sufficient to diminish many of the smaller cirque glaciers, many to the point of extinction. The disappearance of small cirque glaciers may indicate a greater sensitivity to overall climatic warming than the more dramatic fluctuations of larger glaciers in the same region.

  10. Emission spectra analysis of arc plasma for synthesis of carbon nanostructures in various magnetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jian; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge supported by the erosion of anode materials is one of the most practical and efficient methods to synthesize various high-quality carbon nanostructures. By introducing a non-uniform magnetic field in arc plasmas, high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and large-scale graphene flakes can be obtained in a single step. In this paper, ultraviolet-visible emission spectra of arc in different spots under various magnetic conditions are analyzed to provide an in situ investigation for transformation processes of evaporated species and growth of carbon nanostructures in arc. Based on the arc spectra of carbon diatomic Swan bands, vibrational temperature in arc is determined. The vibrational temperature in arc center was measured around 6950 K, which is in good agreement with our simulation results. Experimental and simulation results suggest that SWCNT are formed in the arc periphery region. Transmission electronic microscope and Raman spectroscope are also employed to characterize the properties of carbon nanostructures.

  11. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on the Nearshore Environment: A Month-Long Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool, SNL - SWAN, was used to perform model simulations for hourly initial wave conditio ns measured during the month of October 2009. The model was run with an array of 50 wave energy converters (WECs) and compared with model runs without WECs. Maximum changes in H s were found in the lee of the WEC array along the angles of incident wave dire ction and minimal changes were found along the western side of the model domain due to wave shadowing by land. The largest wave height reductions occurred during observed typhoon conditions and resulted in 14% decreases in H s along the Santa Cruz shoreline . Shoreline reductions in H s were 5% during s outh swell wave conditions and negligible during average monthly wave conditions.

  12. Where are the mini Kreutz-family comets?

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Wiegert, Paul A.; Hui, Man-To; Kracht, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    The Kreutz family of sungrazing comets contains over 2000 known members, many of which are believed to be under ∼100 m sizes (mini comets) and have only been studied at small heliocentric distances (r {sub H}) with space-based SOHO/STEREO spacecraft. To understand the brightening process of mini Kreutz comets, we conducted a survey using CFHT/MegaCam at moderate r {sub H} guided by SOHO/STEREO observations. We identify two comets that should be in our search area but are not detected, indicating that the comets have either followed a steeper brightening rate within the previously reported rapid brightening stage (the brightening burst), or the brightening burst starts earlier than expected. We present a composite analysis of the pre-perihelion light curves of five Kreutz comets that cover to ∼1 AU. We observe significant diversity in the light curves that can be used to grossly classify them into two types: C/Ikeya-Seki and C/SWAN follow the canonical r{sub H}{sup −4} while the others follow r{sub H}{sup −7}. In particular, C/SWAN seems to have undergone an outburst (Δm > 5 mag) or a rapid brightening (n ≳ 11) between r {sub H} = 1.06 AU and 0.52 AU, and shows hints of structural/compositional differences compared to other bright Kreutz comets. We also find evidence that the Kreutz comets as a population lose their mass less efficiently than the dynamically new comet, C/ISON, and are relatively devoid of species that drive C/ISON's activity at large r {sub H}. Concurrent observations of C/STEREO in different wavelengths also suggest that a blueward species such as CN may be the main driver for brightening bursts, instead of sodium as previously thought.

  13. 2012 Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy and Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, John; Olivier, Dore; Fox, Patrick; Furic, Ivan; Halkiadakis, Eva; Schmidt, Fabian; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick M; Whiteson, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Shamit Kachru of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled The Small (and Large) Scale Structure of Space-Time.There were 237 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 65 people attended the physics cafe to discuss the current topic with Matthew Kleban (New York University) and Chao-Lin Kuo (Stanford University). This workshop was organized by Olivier Dore (Jet Propulsion Lab), Fabian Schmidt (Caltech), Leonardo Senatore (Stanford University), and Kendrick Smith (Princeton University).

  14. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs formore » large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.« less

  15. Numerical modeling of the effects of wave energy converter characteristics on nearshore wave conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.; Ruehl, K.; Jones, C. A.; Roberts, J.; Chartrand, C.

    2015-12-24

    Modeled nearshore wave propagation was investigated downstream of simulated wave energy converters (WECs) to evaluate overall near- and far-field effects of WEC arrays. Model sensitivity to WEC characteristics and WEC array deployment scenarios was evaluated using a modified version of an industry standard wave model, Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN), which allows the incorporation of device-specific WEC characteristics to specify obstacle transmission. The sensitivity study illustrated that WEC device type and subsequently its size directly resulted in wave height variations in the lee of the WEC array. Wave heights decreased up to 30% between modeled scenarios with and without WECs for large arrays (100 devices) of relatively sizable devices (26 m in diameter) with peak power generation near to the modeled incident wave height. Other WEC types resulted in less than 15% differences in modeled wave height with and without WECs, with lesser influence for WECs less than 10 m in diameter. Wave directions and periods were largely insensitive to changes in parameters. Furthermore, additional model parameterization and analysis are required to fully explore the model sensitivity of peak wave period and mean wave direction to the varying of the parameters.

  16. Optical emission diagnostics of plasmas in chemical vapor deposition of single-crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hemawan, Kadek W. Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-15

    A key aspect of single crystal diamond growth via microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition is in-process control of the local plasma–substrate environment, that is, plasma gas phase concentrations of activated species at the plasma boundary layer near the substrate surface. Emission spectra of the plasma relative to the diamond substrate inside the microwave plasma reactor chamber have been analyzed via optical emission spectroscopy. The spectra of radical species such as CH, C{sub 2}, and H (Balmer series) important for diamond growth were identified and analyzed. The emission intensities of these electronically excited species were found to be more dependent on operating pressure than on microwave power. Plasma gas temperatures were calculated from measurements of the C{sub 2} Swan band (d{sup 3}Π → a{sup 3}Π transition) system. The plasma gas temperature ranges from 2800 to 3400 K depending on the spatial location of the plasma ball, microwave power and operating pressure. Addition of Ar into CH{sub 4}+H{sub 2} plasma input gas mixture has little influence on the Hα, Hβ, and Hγ intensities and single-crystal diamond growth rates.

  17. Plasma flows in the heliosheath along the Voyager 1 and 2 trajectories due to effects of the 11 yr solar cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Provornikova, E.; Opher, M.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Richardson, J. D.; Toth, G. E-mail: mopher@bu.edu E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu

    2014-10-10

    We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variations in the solar wind (SW) parameters on the flows in the heliosheath using a new three-dimensional time-dependent model of the interaction between the SW and the interstellar medium. For boundary conditions in the model we use realistic time and the latitudinal dependence of the SW parameters obtained from SOHO/SWAN and interplanetary scintillation data for the last two solar cycles (1990-2011). This data set generally agrees with the in situ Ulysses measurements from 1991 to 2009. For the first ?30 AU of the heliosheath the time-dependent model predicts constant radial flow speeds at Voyager 2 (V2), which is consistent with observations and different from the steady models that show a radial speed decrease of 30%. The model shows that V2 was immersed in SW with speeds of 500-550 km s{sup 1} upstream of the termination shock before 2009 and in wind with upstream speeds of 450-500 km s{sup 1} after 2009. The model also predicts that the radial velocity along the Voyager 1 (V1) trajectory is constant across the heliosheath, contrary to observations. This difference in observations implies that additional effects may be responsible for the different flows at V1 and V2. The model predicts meridional flows (VN) higher than those observed because of the strong bluntness of the heliosphere shape in the N direction in the model. The modeled tangential velocity component (VT) at V2 is smaller than observed. Both VN and VT essentially depend on the shape of the heliopause.

  18. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  19. It`s slim with a plain green cover: Australia`s management plan for polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Brotherton, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    In November 1995, the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC, the Council of State and National Environment Ministers) adopted a National Management Plan for PCBs. This was a significant milestone in the very long saga of Australian efforts to develop public policy and management structures for dealing with persistent organochlorine wastes. The author was part of a four-person consultation panel that carried out a public involvement program to assist and inform the process of developing the National Management Plan. The program involved, among other things, visiting every state and territory of Australia at least twice. This paper describes the development and delivery of the public involvement program, including ongoing interactions with Governments. The latter is often a complex (and many would say an unduly complex) matter in the federal system, where primary responsibility for waste management resides in the individual state/territory jurisdictions. The paper also attempts to draw lessons from the process. While some participants learned and acted upon some of these lessons quite early in the process, other participants (particularly governments) took longer to realize their importance and thus took longer to refrain from actions that might be regarded as not keeping faith with the activities they had set in process. Finally, the lessons learned here are contrasted with those drawn by participants in the process that led to the establishment and expansion of the Swan Hills facility in Alberta. While the outcomes of the Australian and Albertan processes appear to be very different, a number of the essential lessons to be drawn from the two processes are virtually identical. 13 refs.

  20. Motivation deficit in ADHD is associated with dysfunction of the dopamine reward pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Newcorn, J.H.; Kollins, S.H.; Wigal, T.L.; Telang, F.; Folwer, J.S.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Klein, N.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.; Swanson, J.M.

    2010-08-17

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is typically characterized as a disorder of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity but there is increasing evidence of deficits in motivation. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we showed decreased function in the brain dopamine reward pathway in adults with ADHD, which, we hypothesized, could underlie the motivation deficits in this disorder. To evaluate this hypothesis, we performed secondary analyses to assess the correlation between the PET measures of dopamine D2/D3 receptor and dopamine transporter availability (obtained with [{sup 11}C]raclopride and [{sup 11}C]cocaine, respectively) in the dopamine reward pathway (midbrain and nucleus accumbens) and a surrogate measure of trait motivation (assessed using the Achievement scale on the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire or MPQ) in 45 ADHD participants and 41 controls. The Achievement scale was lower in ADHD participants than in controls (11 {+-} 5 vs 14 {+-} 3, P < 0.001) and was significantly correlated with D2/D3 receptors (accumbens: r = 0.39, P < 0.008; midbrain: r = 0.41, P < 0.005) and transporters (accumbens: r = 0.35, P < 0.02) in ADHD participants, but not in controls. ADHD participants also had lower values in the Constraint factor and higher values in the Negative Emotionality factor of the MPQ but did not differ in the Positive Emotionality factor - and none of these were correlated with the dopamine measures. In ADHD participants, scores in the Achievement scale were also negatively correlated with symptoms of inattention (CAARS A, E and SWAN I). These findings provide evidence that disruption of the dopamine reward pathway is associated with motivation deficits in ADHD adults, which may contribute to attention deficits and supports the use of therapeutic interventions to enhance motivation in ADHD.

  1. MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH INCLUDING SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Tóth, G. E-mail: mopher@bu.edu E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu

    2015-04-10

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ∼100 km s{sup −1} larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  2. In situ optical emission study on the role of C{sub 2} in the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Motaung, David Edmond; Moodley, Mathew Kisten; Manikandan, E.; Coville, Neil J.

    2010-02-15

    In situ optical emission spectroscopy was used to study the temporal and spatial behavior of laser induced plasmas in the laser-furnace synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A graphite composite target located within a sealed quartz tube with a chemical stoichiometric composition of 95:4:1 at. wt % of carbon, yttrium, and nickel, respectively, was ablated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser delivering colinear, focused laser pulses of 1064 and 532 nm temporarily separated by 20 ns. The ablation process was done at a furnace temperature of 1273 K in a flow of argon gas at either 150 or 200 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The pressure was varied (100, 400, and 600 Torr) for each gas flow setting. The temporal and spatial behavior of the emission intensity associated with C{sub 2} Swan bands (d {sup 3{Pi}}{sub g}-a {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}) was investigated and found to be influenced by the pressure and flow rate of the argon gas. At conditions optimal to SWCNT production, a sharp drop in C{sub 2} intensity followed by a rise in C{sub 2} intensity was observed. The temporal and spatial behavior of the electron density was determined by the Stark broadening profile of the CII emission peak at 283.7 nm and was found to decrease with the adiabatic expansion of the plume. We propose that the sharp drop in C{sub 2} intensity and the rise in electron density and electron temperature observed in this study are due to the accompanying rapid nucleation and growth of SWCNTs.

  3. 11,23,1,1,,19,10,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","ELLSWORTH",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,2941,0,0,3518,0,0,4870,0,0,1732,0,0,3252,0,0,2193,0,0,134,0,0,447,0,0,465,0,0,538,0,0,4295,0,0,3601,0,0,1469,6,50159,"WAT","HY"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ","FLOS INN",0,"LIGHT OIL",11522,"0M",1294,,,95,27,115,314,19,82,232,-29,0,232,19,79,373,-23,2,371,-16,0,371,13,80,290,124,284,232,74,135,323,-3,51,272,-25,8,264,217,451,388,1514,6,51747,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,3,2,94,25,"MAINE PUBLIC SERVICE CO","HOULTON",0,"LIGHT OIL",11522,"0M",1294,,,95,6,28,13,-8,1,12,-8,2,10,-8,0,10,-6,0,10,-3,0,10,-2,0,10,-3,0,10,-3,0,10,-4,0,11,-4,2,8,14,34,6,1515,6,51747,"FO2","IC" 11,23,1,2,1,97,1,"MAINE YANKEE ATOMIC PWR C","MAIN YANKEE",0,"NUCLEAR",11525,"0M",1294,,,95,197577,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1517,6,51748,"UR","ST" 11,23,1,3,2,116,10,"PUB SERV CO OF NEW HAMP","SWANS FALLS",0,"LIGHT OIL",15472,"0M",1294,"R",180,95,-7,0,2,-7,0,2,-6,0,2,-3,0,2,-2,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-1,0,2,-3,0,2,0,0,0,1518,6,52411,"FO2","IC" 11,23,5,1,,525,1,"LEWISTON (CITY OF)","ANDRO UPPER",0,,10963,"0A",1294,,,95,296,0,0,378,0,0,310,0,0,424,0,0,264,0,0,390,0,0,256,0,0,258,0,0,304,0,0,270,0,0,342,0,0,324,0,0,7046,6,54168,"WAT","HY" 11,23,5,1,,566,1,"MADISON (CITY OF)","NORRIDGEWCK",0,,11477,"0A",1294,,,95,306,0,0,241,0,0,261,0,0,291,0,0,379,0,0,277,0,0,75,0,0,0,0,0,26,0,0,121,0,0,197,0,0,224,0,0,6701,6,51737,"WAT","HY" 11,23,8,3,2,835,5,"EASTERN MAINE ELEC COOP","PORTABLE",0,"LIGHT OIL",5609,"0A",1294,"S",,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6366,6,50848,"FO2","IC" 11,23,8,3,2,940,1,"SWANS ISLAND ELEC COOP","MINTURN",0,"LIGHT OIL",18368,"0A",1294,"S",,95,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0