National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for model output location

  1. Climate Model Output Rewriter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2004-06-21

    CMOR comprises a set of FORTRAN 90 dunctions that can be used to produce CF-compliant netCDF files. The structure of the files created by CMOR and the metadata they contain fulfill the requirements of many of the climate community’s standard model experiments (which are referred to here as "MIPS", which stands for "model intercomparison project", including, for example, AMIP, CMIP, CFMIP, PMIP, APE, and IPCC scenario runs), CMOR was not designed to serve as anmore » all-purpose wfiter of CF-compliant netCDF files, but simply to reduce the effort required to prepare and manage MIP data. Although MIPs encourage systematic analysis of results across models, this is only easy to do if the model output is written in a common format with files structured similarly and with sufficient metadata uniformly stored according to a common standard. Individual modeling groups store their data in different ways. but if a group can read its own data with FORTRAN, then it should easily be able to transform the data, using CMOR, into the common format required by the MIPs, The adoption of CMOR as a standard code for exchanging climate data will facilitate participation in MIPs because after learning how to satisfy the output requirements of one MIP, it will be easy to prepare output for the other MIPs.« less

  2. Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

  3. PV output variability modeling using satellite imagery.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J.

    2010-11-01

    High frequency irradiance variability measured on the ground is caused by the formation, dissipation, and passage of clouds in the sky. If we can identify and associate different cloud types/patterns from satellite imagery, we may be able to predict irradiance variability in areas lacking sensors. With satellite imagery covering the entire U.S., this allows for more accurate integration planning and power flow modeling over wide areas. Satellite imagery from southern Nevada was analyzed at 15 minute intervals over a year. Methods for image stabilization, cloud detection, and textural classification of clouds were developed and tested. High Performance Computing parallel processing algorithms were also investigated and tested. Artificial Neural Networks using imagery as inputs were trained on ground-based measurements of irradiance to model the variability and were tested to show some promise as a means for predicting irradiance variability.

  4. Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output and physical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    observations (Conference) | SciTech Connect Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output and physical observations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output and physical observations Authors: Higdon, David M [1] ; Lawrence, Earl [1] ; Heitmann, Katrin [2] ; Habib, Salman [2] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory ANL Publication Date: 2011-07-25 OSTI Identifier: 1084581 Report Number(s):

  5. A model to predict the power output from wind farms

    SciTech Connect

    Landberg, L.

    1997-12-31

    This paper will describe a model that can predict the power output from wind farms. To give examples of input the model is applied to a wind farm in Texas. The predictions are generated from forecasts from the NGM model of NCEP. These predictions are made valid at individual sites (wind farms) by applying a matrix calculated by the sub-models of WASP (Wind Atlas Application and Analysis Program). The actual wind farm production is calculated using the Riso PARK model. Because of the preliminary nature of the results, they will not be given. However, similar results from Europe will be given.

  6. Regional Model Calibration for Improving Seismic Location

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, J.L.; Schultz, C.A.; Myers, S.C.

    2000-07-14

    Accurate seismic event location is integral to the effective monitoring of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), as well as being a fundamental component of earthquake source characterization. To account for the effects of crustal and mantle structure on seismic travel times, and to improve seismic event location in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), we are developing a set of radially heterogeneous and azimuthally invariant travel-time models of the crust and upper mantle for each MENA seismic station. We begin by developing an average one-dimensional velocity model that minimizes the P-phase travel-time residuals from regional through teleseismic distance at each station. To do this we (1) generate a suite of 1-D velocity models of the earth, (2) compute travel times through the 1-D models using a tau-p formulation to produce standard travel-time tables, and (3) minimize the root-mean-square (rms) residuals between the P-phase arrivals predicted by each model and a groomed set of ISC P-phase arrival times (Engdahl et al., 1991). Once we have an average one-dimensional velocity model that minimizes the P-phase travel-time residuals for all distances, we repeat steps 1 through 3, systematically perturbing the travel-time model and using a grid search procedure to optimize models within regional, upper mantle, and teleseismic distance ranges. Regionalized models are combined into one two-dimensional model, using indicator functions and smoother methodologies to reduce distance and depth discontinuity artifacts between the individual models. Preliminary results of this study at a subset of MENA stations show that we are improving predictability with these models. Cross-validating the travel-time predictions with an independent data set demonstrates a marked reduction in the variance of the travel-time model error distributions. We demonstrate the improvement provided by these 2-D models by relocating the 1991 Racha aftershock sequence. We will

  7. Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    -limited" experiment, in which emissions are assumed to be constrained, so that the concentration of carbon dioxide levels off at 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) shortly after 2100. The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

  8. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  9. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  10. The Influence of Building Location on Combined Heat and Power/ Hydrogen (Tri-Generation) System Cost, Hydrogen Output and Efficiency (Presentation)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Hydrogen Association Meeting Darlene M. Steward Mike Penev National Renewable Energy Laboratory Columbia, SC March 30 - April 3, 2009 NREL/PR-560-45628 The Influence of Building Location on Combined Heat and Power/ Hydrogen (Tri-Generation) System Cost, Hydrogen Output and Efficiency This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Acknowledgements Development of

  11. Methods to Register Models and Input/Output Parameters for Integrated Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Droppo, James G.; Whelan, Gene; Tryby, Michael E.; Pelton, Mitchell A.; Taira, Randal Y.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2010-07-10

    Significant resources can be required when constructing integrated modeling systems. In a typical application, components (e.g., models and databases) created by different developers are assimilated, requiring the framework’s functionality to bridge the gap between the user’s knowledge of the components being linked. The framework, therefore, needs the capability to assimilate a wide range of model-specific input/output requirements as well as their associated assumptions and constraints. The process of assimilating such disparate components into an integrated modeling framework varies in complexity and difficulty. Several factors influence the relative ease of assimilating components, including, but not limited to, familiarity with the components being assimilated, familiarity with the framework and its tools that support the assimilation process, level of documentation associated with the components and the framework, and design structure of the components and framework. This initial effort reviews different approaches for assimilating models and their model-specific input/output requirements: 1) modifying component models to directly communicate with the framework (i.e., through an Application Programming Interface), 2) developing model-specific external wrappers such that no component model modifications are required, 3) using parsing tools to visually map pre-existing input/output files, and 4) describing and linking models as dynamic link libraries. Most of these approaches are illustrated using the widely distributed modeling system called Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES). The review concludes that each has its strengths and weakness, the factors that determine which approaches work best in a given application.

  12. Input-output model for MACCS nuclear accident impacts estimation¹

    SciTech Connect

    Outkin, Alexander V.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Vargas, Vanessa N

    2015-01-27

    Since the original economic model for MACCS was developed, better quality economic data (as well as the tools to gather and process it) and better computational capabilities have become available. The update of the economic impacts component of the MACCS legacy model will provide improved estimates of business disruptions through the use of Input-Output based economic impact estimation. This paper presents an updated MACCS model, bases on Input-Output methodology, in which economic impacts are calculated using the Regional Economic Accounting analysis tool (REAcct) created at Sandia National Laboratories. This new GDP-based model allows quick and consistent estimation of gross domestic product (GDP) losses due to nuclear power plant accidents. This paper outlines the steps taken to combine the REAcct Input-Output-based model with the MACCS code, describes the GDP loss calculation, and discusses the parameters and modeling assumptions necessary for the estimation of long-term effects of nuclear power plant accidents.

  13. Characteristic operator functions for quantum input-plant-output models and coherent control

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, John E.

    2015-01-15

    We introduce the characteristic operator as the generalization of the usual concept of a transfer function of linear input-plant-output systems to arbitrary quantum nonlinear Markovian input-output models. This is intended as a tool in the characterization of quantum feedback control systems that fits in with the general theory of networks. The definition exploits the linearity of noise differentials in both the plant Heisenberg equations of motion and the differential form of the input-output relations. Mathematically, the characteristic operator is a matrix of dimension equal to the number of outputs times the number of inputs (which must coincide), but with entries that are operators of the plant system. In this sense, the characteristic operator retains details of the effective plant dynamical structure and is an essentially quantum object. We illustrate the relevance to model reduction and simplification definition by showing that the convergence of the characteristic operator in adiabatic elimination limit models requires the same conditions and assumptions appearing in the work on limit quantum stochastic differential theorems of Bouten and Silberfarb [Commun. Math. Phys. 283, 491-505 (2008)]. This approach also shows in a natural way that the limit coefficients of the quantum stochastic differential equations in adiabatic elimination problems arise algebraically as Schur complements and amounts to a model reduction where the fast degrees of freedom are decoupled from the slow ones and eliminated.

  14. Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Auffhammer, Maximilian; Hsiang, Solomon M.; Schlenker, Wolfram; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-06-28

    Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

  15. Scaled Tests and Modeling of Effluent Stack Sampling Location Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barnett, J. M.

    2009-02-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code to evaluate the mixing at a sampling system location of a research and development facility. The facility requires continuous sampling for radioactive air emissions. Researchers sought to determine whether the location would meet the criteria for uniform air velocity and contaminant concentration as prescribed in the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) standard, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requires that the sampling location be well-mixed and stipulates specific tests (e.g., velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity and cyclonic flow angle) to verify the extent of mixing.. The exhaust system for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory was modeled with a CFD code to better understand the flow and contaminant mixing and to predict mixing test results. The CFD results were compared to actual measurements made at a scale-model stack and to the limited data set for the full-scale facility stack. Results indicated that the CFD code provides reasonably conservative predictions for velocity, gas, and aerosol uniformity. Cyclonic flow predicted by the code is less than that measured by the required methods. In expanding from small to full scale, the CFD predictions for full-scale measurements show similar trends as in the scale model and no unusual effects. This work indicates that a CFD code can be a cost-effective aid in design or retrofit of a facilitys stack sampling location that will be required to meet Standard ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999.

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Industrial Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas ...

  17. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    C. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  18. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  20. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  1. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    F. Wood Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all ...

  2. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  4. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  5. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  6. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric ...

  7. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) ...

  8. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    F. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities ...

  9. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nillius, Peter Klamra, Wlodek; Danielsson, Mats; Sibczynski, Pawel; Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. Methods: The authors measured light output from a 490-?m CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridMANTIS, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. Results: The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV{sup ?1} while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV{sup ?1}. The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the

  10. The Effect of Ionospheric Models on Electromagnetic Pulse Locations

    SciTech Connect

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Triplett, Laurie A.

    2014-07-01

    Locations of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) determined by time-of-arrival (TOA) often have outliers with significantly larger errors than expected. In the past, these errors were thought to arise from high order terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation. We simulated 1000 events randomly spread around the Earth into a constellation of 22 GPS satellites. We used four different ionospheres: simple where the time delay goes as the inverse of the frequency-squared, full Appleton-Hartree, the BobRD integrals and a full raytracing code. The simple and full Appleton-Hartree ionospheres do not show outliers whereas the BobRD and raytracing do. This strongly suggests that the cause of the outliers is not additional terms in the Appleton-Hartree equation, but rather is due to the additional path length due to refraction. A method to fix the outliers is suggested based on fitting a time to the delays calculated at the 5 GPS frequencies with BobRD and simple ionospheres. The difference in time is used as a correction to the TOAs.

  11. Evaluation of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Properties and Dynamical Processes Derived from ECMWF Model Output and Ground Based Mea...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Cirrus Cloud Properties and Dynamical Processes Derived from ECMWF Model Output and Ground-Based Measurements Over Nauru Island J. M. Comstock and J. H. Mather Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia Introduction Identifying the mechanisms responsible for the formation of cirrus clouds is important in understanding the role of cirrus in the tropical atmosphere. Thin cirrus clouds near the tropical

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2013 414 0 132 206 76 2014 852 88 266 326 173

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commercial Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2013 1,486 0 96 11 1,379 2014 1,283 3 90 16

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2013 831 0 261 423 147

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0

  11. Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS) documentation. Volume I. Methodology description and user's guide. Appendix A: model abstract; Appendix B: technical appendix; Appendix C: sample input and output. [Compustat

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS) is a utility specific financial modeling system used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to evaluate the impact on electric utilities of changes in the regulatory, economic, and tax environments. Included in the RRMS is a power plant life-cycle revenue requirements model designed to assess the comparative economic advantage of alternative generating plant. This report is Volume I of a 2-volume set and provides a methodology description and user's guide, a model abstract and technical appendix, and sample input and output for the models. Volume II provides an operator's manual and a program maintenance guide.

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2015" "Company Name","Plant Location" "Top Ten Manufacturers" "American Crystal Sugar Co","MN, ND" "Archer Daniels Midland","IA, IL, MN, NE" "Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc","AL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, WI" "Cemex Inc","AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX" "Dakota Gasification Company","ND" "Eastman Chemical

  13. Prediction of Lumen Output and Chromaticity Shift in LEDs Using Kalman Filter and Extended Kalman Filter Based Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, Pradeep; Wei, Junchao; Davis, J Lynn

    2014-06-24

    Abstract— Solid-state lighting (SSL) luminaires containing light emitting diodes (LEDs) have the potential of seeing excessive temperatures when being transported across country or being stored in non-climate controlled warehouses. They are also being used in outdoor applications in desert environments that see little or no humidity but will experience extremely high temperatures during the day. This makes it important to increase our understanding of what effects high temperature exposure for a prolonged period of time will have on the usability and survivability of these devices. Traditional light sources “burn out” at end-of-life. For an incandescent bulb, the lamp life is defined by B50 life. However, the LEDs have no filament to “burn”. The LEDs continually degrade and the light output decreases eventually below useful levels causing failure. Presently, the TM-21 test standard is used to predict the L70 life of LEDs from LM-80 test data. Several failure mechanisms may be active in a LED at a single time causing lumen depreciation. The underlying TM-21 Model may not capture the failure physics in presence of multiple failure mechanisms. Correlation of lumen maintenance with underlying physics of degradation at system-level is needed. In this paper, Kalman Filter (KF) and Extended Kalman Filters (EKF) have been used to develop a 70-percent Lumen Maintenance Life Prediction Model for LEDs used in SSL luminaires. Ten-thousand hour LM-80 test data for various LEDs have been used for model development. System state at each future time has been computed based on the state space at preceding time step, system dynamics matrix, control vector, control matrix, measurement matrix, measured vector, process noise and measurement noise. The future state of the lumen depreciation has been estimated based on a second order Kalman Filter model and a Bayesian Framework. Life prediction of L70 life for the LEDs used in SSL luminaires from KF and EKF based models have

  14. Evaluation of global horizontal irradiance to plane-of-array irradiance models at locations across the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, Matthew; Hayes, William; Pohl, Andrew; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2015-02-02

    We report an evaluation of the accuracy of combinations of models that estimate plane-of-array (POA) irradiance from measured global horizontal irradiance (GHI). This estimation involves two steps: 1) decomposition of GHI into direct and diffuse horizontal components and 2) transposition of direct and diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI) to POA irradiance. Measured GHI and coincident measured POA irradiance from a variety of climates within the United States were used to evaluate combinations of decomposition and transposition models. A few locations also had DHI measurements, allowing for decoupled analysis of either the decomposition or the transposition models alone. Results suggest that decomposition models had mean bias differences (modeled versus measured) that vary with climate. Transposition model mean bias differences depended more on the model than the location. Lastly, when only GHI measurements were available and combinations of decomposition and transposition models were considered, the smallest mean bias differences were typically found for combinations which included the Hay/Davies transposition model.

  15. Evaluation of global horizontal irradiance to plane-of-array irradiance models at locations across the United States

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Hayes, William; Pohl, Andrew; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2015-02-02

    We report an evaluation of the accuracy of combinations of models that estimate plane-of-array (POA) irradiance from measured global horizontal irradiance (GHI). This estimation involves two steps: 1) decomposition of GHI into direct and diffuse horizontal components and 2) transposition of direct and diffuse horizontal irradiance (DHI) to POA irradiance. Measured GHI and coincident measured POA irradiance from a variety of climates within the United States were used to evaluate combinations of decomposition and transposition models. A few locations also had DHI measurements, allowing for decoupled analysis of either the decomposition or the transposition models alone. Results suggest that decompositionmore » models had mean bias differences (modeled versus measured) that vary with climate. Transposition model mean bias differences depended more on the model than the location. Lastly, when only GHI measurements were available and combinations of decomposition and transposition models were considered, the smallest mean bias differences were typically found for combinations which included the Hay/Davies transposition model.« less

  16. Application of global weather and climate model output to the design and operation of wind-energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Judith

    2015-05-21

    This project addressed the challenge of providing weather and climate information to support the operation, management and planning for wind-energy systems. The need for forecast information is extending to longer projection windows with increasing penetration of wind power into the grid and also with diminishing reserve margins to meet peak loads during significant weather events. Maintenance planning and natural gas trading is being influenced increasingly by anticipation of wind generation on timescales of weeks to months. Future scenarios on decadal time scales are needed to support assessment of wind farm siting, government planning, long-term wind purchase agreements and the regulatory environment. The challenge of making wind forecasts on these longer time scales is associated with a wide range of uncertainties in general circulation and regional climate models that make them unsuitable for direct use in the design and planning of wind-energy systems. To address this challenge, CFAN has developed a hybrid statistical/dynamical forecasting scheme for delivering probabilistic forecasts on time scales from one day to seven months using what is arguably the best forecasting system in the world (European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting, ECMWF). The project also provided a framework to assess future wind power through developing scenarios of interannual to decadal climate variability and change. The Phase II research has successfully developed an operational wind power forecasting system for the U.S., which is being extended to Europe and possibly Asia.

  17. Comparisons of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry based on physical input-output life-cycle assessment model

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Sai; Zhang, Tianzhu; Xu Yijian

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using crop straws and wood wastes for paper production should be promoted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bagasse and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Imports of scrap paper should be encouraged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity analysis, uncertainties and policy implications are discussed. - Abstract: Waste recycling for paper production is an important component of waste management. This study constructs a physical input-output life-cycle assessment (PIO-LCA) model. The PIO-LCA model is used to investigate environmental impacts of four categories of waste recycling in China's paper industry: crop straws, bagasse, textile wastes and scrap paper. Crop straw recycling and wood utilization for paper production have small total intensity of environmental impacts. Moreover, environmental impacts reduction of crop straw recycling and wood utilization benefits the most from technology development. Thus, using crop straws and wood (including wood wastes) for paper production should be promoted. Technology development has small effects on environmental impacts reduction of bagasse recycling, textile waste recycling and scrap paper recycling. In addition, bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling have big total intensity of environmental impacts. Thus, the development of bagasse recycling and textile waste recycling should be properly limited. Other pathways for reusing bagasse and textile wastes should be explored and evaluated. Moreover, imports of scrap paper should be encouraged to reduce large indirect impacts of scrap paper recycling on domestic environment.

  18. Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Sai; Zhang Tianzhu

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts of solid waste recycling on Suzhou's urban metabolism in 2015 are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical levels of reusing scrap tires and food wastes should be improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary wastes from reusing food wastes and sludge should be concerned. - Abstract: Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

  19. Accurate modeling and inversion of electrical resistivity data in the presence of metallic infrastructure with known location and dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2015-06-26

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been widely used in environmental applications to study processes associated with subsurface contaminants and contaminant remediation. Anthropogenic alterations in subsurface electrical conductivity associated with contamination often originate from highly industrialized areas with significant amounts of buried metallic infrastructure. The deleterious influence of such infrastructure on imaging results generally limits the utility of ERT where it might otherwise prove useful for subsurface investigation and monitoring. In this manuscript we present a method of accurately modeling the effects of buried conductive infrastructure within the forward modeling algorithm, thereby removing them from the inversion results. The method is implemented in parallel using immersed interface boundary conditions, whereby the global solution is reconstructed from a series of well-conditioned partial solutions. Forward modeling accuracy is demonstrated by comparison with analytic solutions. Synthetic imaging examples are used to investigate imaging capabilities within a subsurface containing electrically conductive buried tanks, transfer piping, and well casing, using both well casings and vertical electrode arrays as current sources and potential measurement electrodes. Results show that, although accurate infrastructure modeling removes the dominating influence of buried metallic features, the presence of metallic infrastructure degrades imaging resolution compared to standard ERT imaging. However, accurate imaging results may be obtained if electrodes are appropriately located.

  20. New Location

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Location Precision measurement for particle physics Peter W. Graham Stanford University May 18, 2016 4:00 p.m. - Wilson Hall, Curia II Precision measurement offers a powerful new approach for particle physics. I will discuss novel experiments using technologies such as atom interferometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, high precision magnetometry, and torsion balances for direct detection of dark matter and gravitational waves. These provide the optimal method for direct detection of light dark

  1. AEO2014: Preliminary Industrial Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    and demand computed from Input-Output basis * Major drivers: capacity utilization, interest rates, relative prices, ... For the energy industries (coal mining, oil & gas ...

  2. Modeling

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    WVMinputs-outputs Permalink Gallery Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) Modeling, News, Photovoltaic, Solar Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) ...

  3. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2011-11-29

    The Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada uses chemical stoichiometry to estimate Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon atom availability from waste water and carbon dioxide emissions streams, and requirements for those same elements to produce a unit of algae. This information is then combined to find limiting nutrient information and estimate potential productivity associated with waste water and carbon dioxide sources. Output is visualized in terms of distributions or spatial locations. Distances are calculated betweenmore » points of interest in the model using the great circle distance equation, and the smallest distances found by an exhaustive search and sort algorithm.« less

  4. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-29

    The Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada uses chemical stoichiometry to estimate Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon atom availability from waste water and carbon dioxide emissions streams, and requirements for those same elements to produce a unit of algae. This information is then combined to find limiting nutrient information and estimate potential productivity associated with waste water and carbon dioxide sources. Output is visualized in terms of distributions or spatial locations. Distances are calculated between points of interest in the model using the great circle distance equation, and the smallest distances found by an exhaustive search and sort algorithm.

  5. Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Dunham, Mark E.; Morley, David W.

    1996-01-01

    A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

  6. Igniter and actuator output testing

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    Closed system mechanical work output measurements were made for five types of thermal battery igniters and one type of valve actuator. Each unit was fired into a high-precision fit piston/cylinder arrangement, and the work output was determined from measuring the rise of a known weight. The results showed that work output for an individual igniter type varied over a considerable range while the mean work output values of the various igniter types appeared to depend principally on the type of closure disc and the details of the charge mix. The large variability in igniter output was the principal inducement to build a second apparatus, with approximately 10 times the capacity of the first, to investigate the output actuators. Compared with igniters, the actuator work output was appropriately in scale, but the variability was considerably reduced (R=1.5), and was attributed to increase in scale. Motion picture photography at 8000 to 9000 frames per second was used to determine the motion of the rising weight and the associated output pressure, which exhibited three distinct phases. Initially, the average acceleration of the weight was of the order of 100 g during the first half-millisecond of weight rise and corresponded to average pressures of 15,000 to 37,000 psi, depending principally on the mass of the weight. This was followed by a significant weight rise at a constant pressure of approximately 150 to 450 psi. Finally, the weight decelerated to rest under gravity to reach the maximum recorded height. 2 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Using Mesoscale Weather Model Output as Boundary Conditions for Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulations and Wind-Plant Aerodynamic Simulations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Michalakes, J.; Vanderwende, B.; Lee, S.; Sprague, M. A.; Lundquist, J. K.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-10-01

    Wind plant aerodynamics are directly affected by the microscale weather, which is directly influenced by the mesoscale weather. Microscale weather refers to processes that occur within the atmospheric boundary layer with the largest scales being a few hundred meters to a few kilometers depending on the atmospheric stability of the boundary layer. Mesoscale weather refers to large weather patterns, such as weather fronts, with the largest scales being hundreds of kilometers wide. Sometimes microscale simulations that capture mesoscale-driven variations (changes in wind speed and direction over time or across the spatial extent of a wind plant) are important in wind plant analysis. In this paper, we present our preliminary work in coupling a mesoscale weather model with a microscale atmospheric large-eddy simulation model. The coupling is one-way beginning with the weather model and ending with a computational fluid dynamics solver using the weather model in coarse large-eddy simulation mode as an intermediary. We simulate one hour of daytime moderately convective microscale development driven by the mesoscale data, which are applied as initial and boundary conditions to the microscale domain, at a site in Iowa. We analyze the time and distance necessary for the smallest resolvable microscales to develop.

  8. Bayesian Mulitple-Event Location

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2010-03-30

    Bayesloc is a statistical model of the multiple seismic location system, including event hypocenters, corrections to model-based travel time predictions, assessments precision for measurement phase arrival times, and phase lavels which indicate phase ray path.

  9. Efficient algorithm for locating and sizing series compensation devices in large power transmission grids: I. Model implementation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Frolov, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2014-10-24

    We explore optimization methods for planning the placement, sizing and operations of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices installed to relieve transmission grid congestion. We limit our selection of FACTS devices to Series Compensation (SC) devices that can be represented by modification of the inductance of transmission lines. Our master optimization problem minimizes the l1 norm of the inductance modification subject to the usual line thermal-limit constraints. We develop heuristics that reduce this non-convex optimization to a succession of Linear Programs (LP) which are accelerated further using cutting plane methods. The algorithm solves an instance of the MatPower Polishmore » Grid model (3299 lines and 2746 nodes) in 40 seconds per iteration on a standard laptop—a speed up that allows the sizing and placement of a family of SC devices to correct a large set of anticipated congestions. We observe that our algorithm finds feasible solutions that are always sparse, i.e., SC devices are placed on only a few lines. In a companion manuscript, we demonstrate our approach on realistically-sized networks that suffer congestion from a range of causes including generator retirement. In this manuscript, we focus on the development of our approach, investigate its structure on a small test system subject to congestion from uniform load growth, and demonstrate computational efficiency on a realistically-sized network.« less

  10. Efficient algorithm for locating and sizing series compensation devices in large power transmission grids: I. Model implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2014-10-24

    We explore optimization methods for planning the placement, sizing and operations of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices installed to relieve transmission grid congestion. We limit our selection of FACTS devices to Series Compensation (SC) devices that can be represented by modification of the inductance of transmission lines. Our master optimization problem minimizes the l1 norm of the inductance modification subject to the usual line thermal-limit constraints. We develop heuristics that reduce this non-convex optimization to a succession of Linear Programs (LP) which are accelerated further using cutting plane methods. The algorithm solves an instance of the MatPower Polish Grid model (3299 lines and 2746 nodes) in 40 seconds per iteration on a standard laptop—a speed up that allows the sizing and placement of a family of SC devices to correct a large set of anticipated congestions. We observe that our algorithm finds feasible solutions that are always sparse, i.e., SC devices are placed on only a few lines. In a companion manuscript, we demonstrate our approach on realistically-sized networks that suffer congestion from a range of causes including generator retirement. In this manuscript, we focus on the development of our approach, investigate its structure on a small test system subject to congestion from uniform load growth, and demonstrate computational efficiency on a realistically-sized network.

  11. Efficient Algorithm for Locating and Sizing Series Compensation Devices in Large Transmission Grids: Model Implementation (PART 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2014-01-14

    We explore optimization methods for planning the placement, sizing and operations of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices installed to relieve transmission grid congestion. We limit our selection of FACTS devices to Series Compensation (SC) devices that can be represented by modification of the inductance of transmission lines. Our master optimization problem minimizes the l1 norm of the inductance modification subject to the usual line thermal-limit constraints. We develop heuristics that reduce this non-convex optimization to a succession of Linear Programs (LP) which are accelerated further using cutting plane methods. The algorithm solves an instance of the MatPower Polish Grid model (3299 lines and 2746 nodes) in 40 seconds per iteration on a standard laptop—a speed up that allows the sizing and placement of a family of SC devices to correct a large set of anticipated congestions. We observe that our algorithm finds feasible solutions that are always sparse, i.e., SC devices are placed on only a few lines. In a companion manuscript, we demonstrate our approach on realistically-sized networks that suffer congestion from a range of causes including generator retirement. In this manuscript, we focus on the development of our approach, investigate its structure on a small test system subject to congestion from uniform load growth, and demonstrate computational efficiency on a realistically-sized network.

  12. Dipole Well Location

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    1998-08-03

    The problem here is to model the three-dimensional response of an electromagnetic logging tool to a practical situation which is often encountered in oil and gas exploration. The DWELL code provide the electromagnetic fields on the axis of a borehole due to either an electric or a magnetic dipole located on the same axis. The borehole is cylindrical, and is located within a stratified formation in which the bedding planes are not horizontal. The anglemore » between the normal to the bedding planes and the axis of the borehole may assume any value, or in other words, the borehole axis may be tilted with respect to the bedding planes. Additionally, all of the formation layers may have invasive zones of drilling mud. The operating frequency of the source dipole(s) extends from a few Hertz to hundreds of Megahertz.« less

  13. Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  14. Bayesian approaches for combining computational model output...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Joint Statistical Meetings ; August 2, 2011 ; Miami, FL Research Org: Los Alamos ...

  15. Ombuds Office Location & Hours

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds Office Location & Hours Ombuds Office Location & Hours Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing business with the...

  16. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    19,710 alternative fuel stations in the United States Excluding private stations Location details are subject to change. We recommend calling the stations to verify location, hours...

  17. Overload protection circuit for output driver

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, Roger G.

    1982-05-11

    A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Locations Locations Sandia California CINT photo A national and international presence Sandia operates laboratories, testing facilities, and offices in multiple sites around the United States and participates in research collaborations around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located in Livermore, California. Although most of our 9,840 employees work at these two locations,

  19. Investigation of the effects of cell model and subcellular location of gold nanoparticles on nuclear dose enhancement factors using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhongli; Chattopadhyay, Niladri; Kwon, Yongkyu Luke; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Lechtman, Eli; Reilly, Raymond M.; Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E2; Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The authors aims were to model how various factors influence radiation dose enhancement by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and to propose a new modeling approach to the dose enhancement factor (DEF).Methods: The authors used Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP 5) computer code to simulate photon and electron transport in cells. The authors modeled human breast cancer cells as a single cell, a monolayer, or a cluster of cells. Different numbers of 5, 30, or 50 nm AuNPs were placed in the extracellular space, on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, or in the nucleus. Photon sources examined in the simulation included nine monoenergetic x-rays (10100 keV), an x-ray beam (100 kVp), and {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds. Both nuclear and cellular dose enhancement factors (NDEFs, CDEFs) were calculated. The ability of these metrics to predict the experimental DEF based on the clonogenic survival of MDA-MB-361 human breast cancer cells exposed to AuNPs and x-rays were compared.Results: NDEFs show a strong dependence on photon energies with peaks at 15, 30/40, and 90 keV. Cell model and subcellular location of AuNPs influence the peak position and value of NDEF. NDEFs decrease in the order of AuNPs in the nucleus, cytoplasm, cell membrane, and extracellular space. NDEFs also decrease in the order of AuNPs in a cell cluster, monolayer, and single cell if the photon energy is larger than 20 keV. NDEFs depend linearly on the number of AuNPs per cell. Similar trends were observed for CDEFs. NDEFs using the monolayer cell model were more predictive than either single cell or cluster cell models of the DEFs experimentally derived from the clonogenic survival of cells cultured as a monolayer. The amount of AuNPs required to double the prescribed dose in terms of mg Au/g tissue decreases as the size of AuNPs increases, especially when AuNPs are in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. For 40 keV x-rays and a cluster of cells, to double the prescribed x-ray dose (NDEF = 2

  20. Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2011-08-01

    We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

  1. Short range radio locator system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers to sample the ether for the radar pulse. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information.

  2. Short range radio locator system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information. 5 figs.

  3. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  4. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  5. Object locating system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.; Petterson, Ben

    1998-06-09

    A sensing system locates an object by sensing the object's effect on electric fields. The object's effect on the mutual capacitance of electrode pairs varies according to the distance between the object and the electrodes. A single electrode pair can sense the distance from the object to the electrodes. Multiple electrode pairs can more precisely locate the object in one or more dimensions.

  6. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    2002-01-01

    A locator with a part support is used to hold a part onto the kinematic mount of a tooling machine so that the part can be held in or replaced in exactly the same position relative to the cutting tool for machining different surfaces of the part or for performing different machining operations on the same or different surfaces of the part. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls placed at equidistant positions around the planar surface of the locator and the kinematic mount has a plurality of magnets which alternate with grooves which accommodate the portions of the steel balls projecting from the locator. The part support holds the part to be machined securely in place in the locator. The locator can be easily detached from the kinematic mount, turned over, and replaced onto the same kinematic mount or another kinematic mount on another tooling machine without removing the part to be machined from the locator so that there is no need to touch or reposition the part within the locator, thereby assuring exact replication of the position of the part in relation to the cutting tool on the tooling machine for each machining operation on the part.

  7. Motor vehicle output and GDP, 1968-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, D. J.; Poyer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we assess the performance of the BEA series 'value of motor vehicle output' as an indicator of the business cycle over the period 1968-2007. We statistically assess the causal relationship between real motor vehicle output (RMVO) and real gross domestic product (RGDP). This is accomplished by standard estimation and statistical methods used to assess vector autoregressive models. This assessment represents the initial results of a more encompassing research project, the intent of which is to determine the dynamic interaction of the transport sector with the overall economy. It's a start to a more comprehensive assessment of how transport and economic activity interrelate.

  8. google-map-of-argonne-location

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Google Map of Argonne Location Map of Building 222 (TRACC)- Green Arrow TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling

  9. System and method for cancelling the effects of stray magnetic fields from the output of a variable reluctance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chingchi; Degner, Michael W.

    2002-11-19

    A sensor system for sensing a rotation of a sensing wheel is disclosed. The sensor system has a sensing coil in juxtaposition with the sensing wheel. Moreover, the sensing coil has a sensing coil output signal indicative of the rotational speed of the sensing wheel. Further, a cancellation coil is located remotely from the sensing coil and connected in series therewith. Additionally, the cancellation coil has a cancellation coil output signal indicative of an environmental disturbance which is effecting the sensing coil output signal. The cancellation coil output signal operates to cancel the effects of the environmental disturbance on the sensing coil output signal.

  10. Berkeley Lab Shower Locations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    LBNL ShowerS Shower facilities are available at several locations: Bldg. 2-Main Entry Men's & Women's Bldg. 6-2204,2206 Men's & Women's (limited building access) Bldg. 46-143 Men's...

  11. Automated detection and location of indications in eddy current signals

    DOEpatents

    Brudnoy, David M.; Oppenlander, Jane E.; Levy, Arthur J.

    2000-01-01

    A computer implemented information extraction process that locates and identifies eddy current signal features in digital point-ordered signals, signals representing data from inspection of test materials, by enhancing the signal features relative to signal noise, detecting features of the signals, verifying the location of the signal features that can be known in advance, and outputting information about the identity and location of all detected signal features.

  12. Location and Infrastructure

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Facts, Figures » Location and Infrastructure Location and Infrastructure The Lab's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. April 12, 2012 Aerial View of Los Alamos National Laboratory The central Laboratory technical area is featured in this aerial view. Boundary Peak, separating the Santa Fe National Forest and

  13. Object locating system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.; Petterson, B.

    1998-06-09

    A sensing system locates an object by sensing the object`s effect on electric fields. The object`s effect on the mutual capacitance of electrode pairs varies according to the distance between the object and the electrodes. A single electrode pair can sense the distance from the object to the electrodes. Multiple electrode pairs can more precisely locate the object in one or more dimensions. 12 figs.

  14. High Energy Output Marx Generator Design

    SciTech Connect

    Monty Lehmann

    2011-07-01

    High Energy Output Marx Generator Design a design of a six stage Marx generator that has a unipolar pulse waveform of 200 kA in a 50500 microsecond waveform is presented. The difficulties encountered in designing the components to withstand the temperatures and pressures generated during the output pulse are discussed. The unique methods and materials used to successfully overcome these problems are given. The steps necessary to increase the current output of this Marx generator design to the meg-ampere region or higher are specified.

  15. Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of

  16. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  17. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  18. A description of the location and structure of the essential spectrum of a model operator in a subspace of a Fock space

    SciTech Connect

    Yodgorov, G R; Ismail, F; Muminov, Z I

    2014-12-31

    We consider a certain model operator acting in a subspace of a fermionic Fock space. We obtain an analogue of Faddeev's equation. We describe the location of the essential spectrum of the operator under consideration and show that the essential spectrum consists of the union of at most four segments. Bibliography: 19 titles.

  19. Electric current locator

    DOEpatents

    King, Paul E.; Woodside, Charles Rigel

    2012-02-07

    The disclosure herein provides an apparatus for location of a quantity of current vectors in an electrical device, where the current vector has a known direction and a known relative magnitude to an input current supplied to the electrical device. Mathematical constants used in Biot-Savart superposition equations are determined for the electrical device, the orientation of the apparatus, and relative magnitude of the current vector and the input current, and the apparatus utilizes magnetic field sensors oriented to a sensing plane to provide current vector location based on the solution of the Biot-Savart superposition equations. Description of required orientations between the apparatus and the electrical device are disclosed and various methods of determining the mathematical constants are presented.

  20. PV output smoothing with energy storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2012-03-01

    This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

  1. Presentation Title Presentation Location

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... of canisters * Development of more-realistic thermal models using computational fluid dynamics methods * Analysis of potential effects of residual moisture * Surveys of ...

  2. METHOD OF LOCATING GROUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Macleish, K.G.

    1958-02-11

    ABS>This patent presents a method for locating a ground in a d-c circult having a number of parallel branches connected across a d-c source or generator. The complete method comprises the steps of locating the ground with reference to the mildpoint of the parallel branches by connecting a potentiometer across the terminals of the circuit and connecting the slider of the potentiometer to ground through a current indicating instrument, adjusting the slider to right or left of the mildpoint so as to cause the instrument to indicate zero, connecting the terminal of the network which is farthest from the ground as thus indicated by the potentiometer to ground through a condenser, impressing a ripple voltage on the circuit, and then measuring the ripple voltage at the midpoint of each parallel branch to find the branch in which is the lowest value of ripple voltage, and then measuring the distribution of the ripple voltage along this branch to determine the point at which the ripple voltage drops off to zero or substantially zero due to the existence of a ground. The invention has particular application where a circuit ground is present which will disappear if the normal circuit voltage is removed.

  3. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    DOEpatents

    Tong, Timothy W.; Sathe, Sanjeev B.; Peck, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  4. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, Robert M.; Dale, Gregory E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  5. Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System This presentation summarizes the information given ...

  6. Error estimates for fission neutron outputs (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Error estimates for fission neutron outputs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Error estimates for fission neutron outputs You are accessing a document from the...

  7. Neutron light output and detector efficiency (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron light output and detector efficiency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron light output and detector efficiency You are accessing a document from the ...

  8. Neutron light output and detector efficiency (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron light output and detector efficiency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron light output and detector efficiency Authors: Taddeucci, Terry N 1 + Show Author ...

  9. Method of locating underground mines fires

    DOEpatents

    Laage, Linneas; Pomroy, William

    1992-01-01

    An improved method of locating an underground mine fire by comparing the pattern of measured combustion product arrival times at detector locations with a real time computer-generated array of simulated patterns. A number of electronic fire detection devices are linked thru telemetry to a control station on the surface. The mine's ventilation is modeled on a digital computer using network analysis software. The time reguired to locate a fire consists of the time required to model the mines' ventilation, generate the arrival time array, scan the array, and to match measured arrival time patterns to the simulated patterns.

  10. Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) Linear Systems Extreme Inputs/Outputs

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Smallwood, David O.

    2007-01-01

    A linear structure is excited at multiple points with a stationary normal random process. The response of the structure is measured at multiple outputs. If the autospectral densities of the inputs are specified, the phase relationships between the inputs are derived that will minimize or maximize the trace of the autospectral density matrix of the outputs. If the autospectral densities of the outputs are specified, the phase relationships between the outputs that will minimize or maximize the trace of the input autospectral density matrix are derived. It is shown that other phase relationships and ordinary coherence less than one willmore » result in a trace intermediate between these extremes. Least favorable response and some classes of critical response are special cases of the development. It is shown that the derivation for stationary random waveforms can also be applied to nonstationary random, transients, and deterministic waveforms.« less

  11. Off-set stabilizer for comparator output

    DOEpatents

    Lunsford, James S.

    1991-01-01

    A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

  12. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  13. FFTF Asbestos Location Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.A.

    1994-09-15

    An Asbestos Location Tracking Program was prepared to list, locate, and determine Asbestos content and to provide baseline {open_quotes}good faith{close_quotes} for yearly condition inspections for the FFTF Plant and buildings and grounds.

  14. DIORAMA Location Type User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2015-01-29

    The purpose of this report is to present the current design and implementation of the DIORAMA location type object (LocationType) and to provide examples and use cases. The LocationType object is included in the diorama-app package in the diorama::types namespace. Abstractly, the object is intended to capture the full time history of the location of an object or reference point. For example, a location may be speci ed as a near-Earth orbit in terms of a two-line element set, in which case the location type is capable of propagating the orbit both forward and backward in time to provide a location for any given time. Alternatively, the location may be speci ed as a xed set of geodetic coordinates (latitude, longitude, and altitude), in which case the geodetic location of the object is expected to remain constant for all time. From an implementation perspective, the location type is de ned as a union of multiple independent objects defi ned in the DIORAMA tle library. Types presently included in the union are listed and described in subsections below, and all conversions or transformation between these location types are handled by utilities provided by the tle library with the exception of the \\special-values" location type.

  15. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, T.A.; White, J.P.

    1998-03-03

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece. 5 figs.

  16. Spring loaded locator pin assembly

    DOEpatents

    Groll, Todd A.; White, James P.

    1998-01-01

    This invention deals with spring loaded locator pins. Locator pins are sometimes referred to as captured pins. This is a mechanism which locks two items together with the pin that is spring loaded so that it drops into a locator hole on the work piece.

  17. Room-return scattering in fission neutron outputs (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Room-return scattering in fission neutron outputs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Room-return scattering in fission neutron outputs You are accessing a document from...

  18. Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop...

    Energy Saver

    Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  19. Characterization of the proton beam at the output of the 6.7MeV LEDA RFQ.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C. K.; Colestock, P. L. ,; Gilpatrick, J. D.; Lysenko, W. P.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; Schneider, J. D.; Sheffield, R. L.; Smith, H. V.; Wangler, Thomas P.,; Crandall, K. R.; Chan, D.; Garnett, R. W.; Schulze, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present configuration of the Low-Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) consists of a 75-keV proton injector, a 6.7-MeV 350-MHz cw radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) with associated high-power and lowlevel rf systems, a 52-magnet periodic lattice followed by a short high-energy beam transport (HEBT) and highpower (670-kW cw) beam stop. The rms beam emittance was measured prior to the installation of the 52-magnet lattice, based on wire-scanner measurements of the beam profile at a single location in the HEBT. New measurements with additional diagnostic hardware have been performed to determine the rms transverse beam properties of the beam at the output of the 6.7-MeV LEDA RFQ. The 52-magnet periodic lattice also includes ten beam position monitors (BPMs) evenly spaced in pairs of two. The BPMs provide a measure of the bunched beam current that exhibits nulls at different locations in the lattice. Model predictions of the locations of the nulls and the strength of the bunched beam current are made to determine what information this data can provide regarding the longitudinal beam emittance.

  20. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Energy - Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Alternative Fueling Station Locator Fuel Type Biodiesel (B20 and above) Compressed Natural Gas Electric Ethanol (E85) Hydrogen ...

  1. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1995-01-01

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

  2. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-02-07

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

  3. Precision zero-home locator

    DOEpatents

    Stone, William J.

    1986-01-01

    A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

  4. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  5. Precision zero-home locator

    DOEpatents

    Stone, W.J.

    1983-10-31

    A zero-home locator includes a fixed phototransistor switch and a moveable actuator including two symmetrical, opposed wedges, each wedge defining a point at which switching occurs. The zero-home location is the average of the positions of the points defined by the wedges.

  6. Locations of Industrial Assessment Centers

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    To apply for an assessment, contact one of the 24 schools across the country that currently participate in the IAC Program. Click on a university name below for contact information for each location.

  7. Method and apparatus for varying accelerator beam output energy

    DOEpatents

    Young, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    A coupled cavity accelerator (CCA) accelerates a charged particle beam with rf energy from a rf source. An input accelerating cavity receives the charged particle beam and an output accelerating cavity outputs the charged particle beam at an increased energy. Intermediate accelerating cavities connect the input and the output accelerating cavities to accelerate the charged particle beam. A plurality of tunable coupling cavities are arranged so that each one of the tunable coupling cavities respectively connect an adjacent pair of the input, output, and intermediate accelerating cavities to transfer the rf energy along the accelerating cavities. An output tunable coupling cavity can be detuned to variably change the phase of the rf energy reflected from the output coupling cavity so that regions of the accelerator can be selectively turned off when one of the intermediate tunable coupling cavities is also detuned.

  8. Halbach array generator/motor having mechanically regulated output voltage and mechanical power output

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2005-06-14

    A motor/generator has its stationary portion, i.e., the stator, positioned concentrically within its rotatable element, i.e., the rotor, along the axis of rotation of the rotor. The rotor includes a Halbach array of magnets. The voltage and power outputs are regulated by varying the radial gap in between the stator windings and the rotating Halbach array. The gap is varied by extensible and retractable supports attached to the stator windings that can move the windings in a radial direction.

  9. Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Lesson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Factors Affecting Power Output by Photovoltaic Cells Grade Level(s): IB 2 (Senior - 3 ... C.8 Photovoltaic cells and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) Understandings: * Solar ...

  10. High natural gas output and inventories contribute to lower prices

    Annual Energy Outlook

    High natural gas output and inventories contribute to lower prices High natural gas production and ample gas inventories are expected to keep natural gas prices relatively low for ...

  11. Quantum Dot Materials Can Reduce Heat, Boost Electrical Output...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Dot Materials Can Reduce Heat, Boost Electrical Output May 23, 2005 Golden, Colo. - Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory ...

  12. Output-Based Error Estimation and Adaptation for Uncertainty...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Output-Based Error Estimation and Adaptation for Uncertainty Quantification Isaac M. Asher and Krzysztof J. Fidkowski University of Michigan US National Congress on Computational...

  13. Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs

    DOEpatents

    Moeller, Charles P. (Del Mar, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A waveguide power divider (10) for splitting electromagnetic microwave power and directionally coupling the divided power includes an input waveguide (21) and reduced height output waveguides (23) interconnected by axial slots (22) and matched loads (25) and (26) positioned at the unused ends of input and output guides (21) and (23) respectively. The axial slots are of a length such that the wave in the input waveguide (21) is directionally coupled to the output waveguides (23). The widths of input guide (21) and output guides (23) are equal and the width of axial slots (22) is one half of the width of the input guide (21).

  14. Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Condensation of spent generator steam is a critical part of Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output When power production at The Geysers geothermal power complex ...

  15. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for photovoltaic system modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Clifford W.; Pohl, Andrew Phillip; Jordan, Dirk

    2013-12-01

    We report an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for modeling DC energy from photovoltaic systems. We consider two systems, each comprised of a single module using either crystalline silicon or CdTe cells, and located either at Albuquerque, NM, or Golden, CO. Output from a PV system is predicted by a sequence of models. Uncertainty in the output of each model is quantified by empirical distributions of each model's residuals. We sample these distributions to propagate uncertainty through the sequence of models to obtain an empirical distribution for each PV system's output. We considered models that: (1) translate measured global horizontal, direct and global diffuse irradiance to plane-of-array irradiance; (2) estimate effective irradiance from plane-of-array irradiance; (3) predict cell temperature; and (4) estimate DC voltage, current and power. We found that the uncertainty in PV system output to be relatively small, on the order of 1% for daily energy. Four alternative models were considered for the POA irradiance modeling step; we did not find the choice of one of these models to be of great significance. However, we observed that the POA irradiance model introduced a bias of upwards of 5% of daily energy which translates directly to a systematic difference in predicted energy. Sensitivity analyses relate uncertainty in the PV system output to uncertainty arising from each model. We found that the residuals arising from the POA irradiance and the effective irradiance models to be the dominant contributors to residuals for daily energy, for either technology or location considered. This analysis indicates that efforts to reduce the uncertainty in PV system output should focus on improvements to the POA and effective irradiance models.

  16. LOCATION: Johnson County Sheriff's Office

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    LOCATION: Johnson County Sheriff's Office Criminalistics Laboratory 11890 Sunset Drive Olathe, Kansas 66061 DATE: JULY 15TH - JULY 18TH, 2013 TUITION: MAFS MEMBERS: $550 Non-MAFS Members: $650 HOW TO ENROLL: Follow this link and complete on-line registration. Pay- ment may be made online via PayPal or a company check may be mailed to MAFS Treasurer. Payment information is all located at the registration site: http://www.mafs.net/summer-workshop LODGING AND TRAVEL: Training Rate $107.77 per night

  17. AEO2016 Preliminary Industrial Output Results

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1: Preliminary macroeconomic results For Macro-Industrial Working Group December 3, 2015 | Washington, DC By Kay Smith, Macro Team Leader, Elizabeth Sendich, Russ Tarver, and Vipin Arora DO NOT CITE OR DISTRIBUTE Macro Team's AEO2016 Briefing Plans * Review incorporation of completed AEO macroeconomic initiatives - Revised commercial floorspace model using indices rather than levels so that EIA customers won't have to incur extra data costs to compensate Dodge - Enhancements of the industrial

  18. Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Countrys Nuclear Status

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2010-07-15

    Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nations efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a countrys or regions economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industrys output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a given

  19. Engineering microbial consortia for controllable outputs

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lindemann, Stephen R.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Song, Hyun -Seob; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Fields, Matthew W.; Shou, Wenying; Johnson, David R.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2016-03-11

    In this study, much research has been invested into engineering microorganisms to perform desired biotransformations; nonetheless, these efforts frequently fall short of expected results due to the unforeseen effects of biofeedback regulation and functional incompatibility. In nature, metabolic function is compartmentalized into diverse organisms assembled into robust consortia, in which the division of labor is thought to lead to increased community efficiency and productivity. Here we consider whether and how consortia can be designed to perform bioprocesses of interest beyond the metabolic flexibility limitations of a single organism. Advances in post-genomic analysis of microbial consortia and application of high-resolution globalmore » measurements now offer the promise of systems-level understanding of how microbial consortia adapt to changes in environmental variables and inputs of carbon and energy. We argue that, when combined with appropriate modeling frameworks, systems-level knowledge can markedly improve our ability to predict the fate and functioning of consortia. Here we articulate our collective perspective on the current and future state of microbial community engineering and control while placing specific emphasis on ecological principles that promote control over community function and emergent properties.« less

  20. Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Gregory C.; Martin, Stephen J.

    1991-01-01

    A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

  1. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, James R.; Bemis, Jr., Curtis E.

    1986-01-01

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  2. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

    1984-07-17

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

  3. Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2013-09-18

    ABCLAT was built to help any model user with spatially explicit Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Carbon Dioxide nutrient flux information, and solar resource information evaluate algal cultivation potential. Initial applications of this modeling framework include Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool Canada and Australia. The Canadian application was copyrighted November 29th 2011 as the Algae Biofuels Co-Location Assessment Tool for Canada. This copyright assertion is for the general framework from which any country or region with themore » requisite data could create a regionally specific application. The ABCLAT model framework developed by SNL looks at the growth potential in a given region as a function of available nutrients from wastewater and other sources, carbon dioxide from power plants, available solar potential, and if available, land cover and use information. The model framework evaluates the biomass potential, fixed carbon dioxide, potential algal biocrude and required land area for nutrient sources. ABCLAT is built with an object-oriented software program that can provide an easy to use interface for exploring questions related to aigal biomass production.« less

  4. WINDExchange: School Wind Project Locations

    WindExchange

    School Wind Project Locations Tips for Using the Google Map On top of the Google Map, use the Country, State, Project Status, and Project Type dropdown lists to filter projects. Along the left margin, use the zooming meter to zoom in or out of your view. In the top left corner, click Reset View to reset all the filters and zooming. Click on Map, Satellite, and Terrain to view the map three different ways. Click and drag the map to move it around. Use the right scroll bar to view the project

  5. Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System Low Capital Photovoltaic Panel Electrical Output-Booster System This presentation summarizes the information given during the DOE SunShot Grand Challenge: Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012. ssgrandchallenge_finance_schrag.pdf (63.07 KB) More Documents & Publications 2016 CSP Summit Day 2 2016 CSP Summit Day 1 The SunShot Vision Study

  6. PROJECT PROFILE: Advanced Thermal Management for Higher Module Power Output

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Higher temperatures of photovoltaic (PV) modules are causing lower than projected module performance. For example, a free-standing Si PV module has 0.4% decrease in efficiency per degree Celsius. Reducing the module temperature to near ambient levels will increase yearly energy output by 8%. This project will enable lower operating temperatures for modules, resulting in higher module power output and lower levelized cost of electricity (LCOE).

  7. Ota City : characterizing output variability from 553 homes with residential PV systems on a distribution feeder.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Nakashima, Eichi; Lave, Matthew

    2011-11-01

    This report describes in-depth analysis of photovoltaic (PV) output variability in a high-penetration residential PV installation in the Pal Town neighborhood of Ota City, Japan. Pal Town is a unique test bed of high-penetration PV deployment. A total of 553 homes (approximately 80% of the neighborhood) have grid-connected PV totaling over 2 MW, and all are on a common distribution line. Power output at each house and irradiance at several locations were measured once per second in 2006 and 2007. Analysis of the Ota City data allowed for detailed characterization of distributed PV output variability and a better understanding of how variability scales spatially and temporally. For a highly variable test day, extreme power ramp rates (defined as the 99th percentile) were found to initially decrease with an increase in the number of houses at all timescales, but the reduction became negligible after a certain number of houses. Wavelet analysis resolved the variability reduction due to geographic diversity at various timescales, and the effect of geographic smoothing was found to be much more significant at shorter timescales.

  8. Alternative Fueling Station Locator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Alternative Fueling Station Locator Alternative Fueling Station Locator Find alternative fueling stations near an address or ZIP code or along a route in the United States. Enter a ...

  9. Method for separating FEL output beams from long wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George; Shinn, Michelle D.; Gubeli, Joseph

    2016-04-26

    A method for improving the output beam quality of a free electron laser (FEL) by reducing the amount of emission at wavelengths longer than the electron pulse length and reducing the amount of edge radiation. A mirror constructed of thermally conductive material and having an aperture therein is placed at an oblique angle with respect to the beam downstream of the bending magnet but before any sensitive use of the FEL beam. The aperture in the mirror is sized to deflect emission longer than the wavelength of the FEL output while having a minor impact on the FEL output beam. A properly sized aperture will enable the FEL radiation, which is coherent and generally at a much shorter wavelength than the bending radiations, to pass through the aperture mirror. The much higher divergence bending radiations will subsequently strike the aperture mirror and be reflected safely out of the way.

  10. GE Global Research Locations | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Locations GE Global Research is innovating around the clock. Select one of our locations to learn more about operations there.GE Global Research is innovating around the clock. Select a location to learn more about our operations. Home > Locations GE Global Research is ALWAYS OPEN Already know about our locations? Experience a special look at a day in our life around the world! See What We're Doing Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Founded: 2015 Employees: 15 Focus Areas: Material Characterization,

  11. Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube

    SciTech Connect

    R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read, Robert Jackson

    2012-05-09

    This report contains the results of Phase I of an SBIR to develop a Pulsed Inductive Output Tube (IOT) with 140 kW at 400 MHz for powering H-proton beams. A number of sources, including single beam and multiple beam klystrons, can provide this power, but the IOT provides higher efficiency. Efficiencies exceeding 70% are routinely achieved. The gain is typically limited to approximately 24 dB; however, the availability of highly efficient, solid state drivers reduces the significance of this limitation, particularly at lower frequencies. This program initially focused on developing a 402 MHz IOT; however, the DOE requirement for this device was terminated during the program. The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and collector. Significant improvement was achieved in modeling capability and simulation accuracy.

  12. Optical device with conical input and output prism faces

    DOEpatents

    Brunsden, Barry S.

    1981-01-01

    A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

  13. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, M.L.; McNeilly, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phtotransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  14. Light-operated proximity detector with linear output

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Marc L.; McNeilly, David R.

    1985-01-01

    A light-operated proximity detector is described in which reflected light intensity from a surface whose proximity to the detector is to be gauged is translated directly into a signal proportional to the distance of the detector from the surface. A phototransistor is used to sense the reflected light and is connected in a detector circuit which maintains the phototransistor in a saturated state. A negative feedback arrangement using an operational amplifier connected between the collector and emitter of the transistor provides an output at the output of the amplifier which is linearly proportional to the proximity of the surface to the detector containing the transistor. This direct proportional conversion is true even though the light intensity is varying with the proximity in proportion to the square of the inverse of the distance. The detector may be used for measuring the distance remotely from any target surface.

  15. Development of a high-output dual-fuel engine

    SciTech Connect

    Danyluk, P.R. . Fairbanks Morse Engineering Division)

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a new dual-fuel engine development program. The engine is the largest commercially available in terms of power output (650 hp/cyl) and features very low emissions (1 g/hp-hr NO[sub x]) and excellent fuel consumption (43 percent thermal efficiency). A two-cylinder turbocharged prototype was designed and built for the initial development. Results from testing on 18-cylinder production versions are also reported.

  16. Development of output user interface software to support analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wahanani, Nursinta Adi Natsir, Khairina Hartini, Entin

    2014-09-30

    Data processing software packages such as VSOP and MCNPX are softwares that has been scientifically proven and complete. The result of VSOP and MCNPX are huge and complex text files. In the analyze process, user need additional processing like Microsoft Excel to show informative result. This research develop an user interface software for output of VSOP and MCNPX. VSOP program output is used to support neutronic analysis and MCNPX program output is used to support burn-up analysis. Software development using iterative development methods which allow for revision and addition of features according to user needs. Processing time with this software 500 times faster than with conventional methods using Microsoft Excel. PYTHON is used as a programming language, because Python is available for all major operating systems: Windows, Linux/Unix, OS/2, Mac, Amiga, among others. Values that support neutronic analysis are k-eff, burn-up and mass Pu{sup 239} and Pu{sup 241}. Burn-up analysis used the mass inventory values of actinide (Thorium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Uranium). Values are visualized in graphical shape to support analysis.

  17. Ring laser having an output at a single frequency

    DOEpatents

    Hackell, Lloyd A.

    1991-01-01

    A ring laser is disclosed that produces a single frequency of laser radiation in either the pulsed mode of operation or the continuous waveform (cw) mode of operation. The laser comprises a ring laser in a bowtie configuration, a birefringent gain material such as Nd:YLF, an improved optical diode that supports laser oscillation having a desired direction of travel and linear polarization, and a Q-switch. An output coupler (mirror) having a high reflectivity, such as 94%, is disclosed. Also disclosed is a self-seeded method of operation in which the laser can provide a pulse or a series of pulses of high power laser radiation at a consistent single frequency with a high degree of amplitude stability and temporal stability. In operation, the laser is operated in continuous waveform (cw) at a low power output with the Q-switch introducing a loss into the resonating cavity. Pumping is continued at a high level, causing the gain material to store energy. When a pulse is desired, the Q-switch is actuated to substantially reduce the losses so that a pulse can build up based on the low level cw oscillation. The pulse quickly builds, using the stored energy in the gain medium to provide a high power output pulse. The process may be repeated to provide a series of high power pulses of a consistent single frequency.

  18. Evaluation of PV performance models and their impact on project risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Cameron, Christopher P.

    2010-12-01

    Photovoltaic systems are often priced in $/W{sub p}, where Wp refers to the DC power rating of the modules at Standard Test Conditions (1000 W/m{sup 2}, 25 C cell temperature) and $ refers to the installed cost of the system. However, the true value of the system is in the energy it will produce in kWhs, not the power rating. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, the annual energy yield (kWh/kW{sup p}) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. Understanding energy yield is a key part of understanding system value. System performance models are used during project development to estimate the expected output of PV systems for a given design and location. Performance modeling is normally done by the system designer/system integrator. Often, an independent engineer will also model system output during a due diligence review of a project. A variety of system performance models are available. The most commonly used modeling tool for project development and due diligence in the United States is probably PVsyst, while those seeking a quick answer to expected energy production may use PVWatts. In this paper, we examine the variation in predicted energy output among modeling tools and users and compare that to measured output.

  19. Calculation of output characteristics of semiconductor quantum-well lasers with account for both electrons and holes

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolova, Z N; Tarasov, I S; Asryan, L V

    2014-09-30

    Using an extended theoretical model, which includes the rate equations for both electrons and holes, we have studied the output characteristics of semiconductor quantum-well lasers. We have found non-trivial dependences of electron and hole concentrations in the waveguide region of the laser on the capture velocities of both types of carriers from the waveguide region into the quantum well. We have obtained the dependences of the internal differential quantum efficiency and optical output power of the laser on the capture velocities of electrons and holes. An increase in the capture velocities has been shown to result in suppression of parasitic recombination in the waveguide region and therefore in a substantial increase in the quantum efficiency and output power. (lasers)

  20. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V.; Hall, R.; Colina, K.

    2008-07-01

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  1. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Remote Sensing Techniques For Locating Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Poster: Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Techniques For...

  2. Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Candidate Locations...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Candidate Locations for Possible Small Modular Reactor Siting (3.84 MB) More Documents & Publications Evaluation of Proposed Hampton Roads ...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Kauai Test Facility

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    KTF provides the following location-enabled operations: Joint experiments with launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base or orbiting objects Experiments on phenomena occurring in the ...

  4. Climate Measurement & Modeling

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable ... Arctic Climate Measurements Global Climate Models Software Sustainable Subsurface ...

  5. Fault Locating, Prediction and Protection (FLPPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yinger, Robert, J.; Venkata, S., S.; Centeno, Virgilio

    2010-09-30

    One of the main objectives of this DOE-sponsored project was to reduce customer outage time. Fault location, prediction, and protection are the most important aspects of fault management for the reduction of outage time. In the past most of the research and development on power system faults in these areas has focused on transmission systems, and it is not until recently with deregulation and competition that research on power system faults has begun to focus on the unique aspects of distribution systems. This project was planned with three Phases, approximately one year per phase. The first phase of the project involved an assessment of the state-of-the-art in fault location, prediction, and detection as well as the design, lab testing, and field installation of the advanced protection system on the SCE Circuit of the Future located north of San Bernardino, CA. The new feeder automation scheme, with vacuum fault interrupters, will limit the number of customers affected by the fault. Depending on the fault location, the substation breaker might not even trip. Through the use of fast communications (fiber) the fault locations can be determined and the proper fault interrupting switches opened automatically. With knowledge of circuit loadings at the time of the fault, ties to other circuits can be closed automatically to restore all customers except the faulted section. This new automation scheme limits outage time and increases reliability for customers. The second phase of the project involved the selection, modeling, testing and installation of a fault current limiter on the Circuit of the Future. While this project did not pay for the installation and testing of the fault current limiter, it did perform the evaluation of the fault current limiter and its impacts on the protection system of the Circuit of the Future. After investigation of several fault current limiters, the Zenergy superconducting, saturable core fault current limiter was selected for

  6. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOEpatents

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2010-08-24

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  7. Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator

    DOEpatents

    Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean; Vuk, Carl Thomas

    2009-06-02

    The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

  8. Enhancing e-waste estimates: Improving data quality by multivariate Input–Output Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Huisman, Jaco; Stevels, Ab; Baldé, Cornelis Peter

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • A multivariate Input–Output Analysis method for e-waste estimates is proposed. • Applying multivariate analysis to consolidate data can enhance e-waste estimates. • We examine the influence of model selection and data quality on e-waste estimates. • Datasets of all e-waste related variables in a Dutch case study have been provided. • Accurate modeling of time-variant lifespan distributions is critical for estimate. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (or e-waste) is one of the fastest growing waste streams, which encompasses a wide and increasing spectrum of products. Accurate estimation of e-waste generation is difficult, mainly due to lack of high quality data referred to market and socio-economic dynamics. This paper addresses how to enhance e-waste estimates by providing techniques to increase data quality. An advanced, flexible and multivariate Input–Output Analysis (IOA) method is proposed. It links all three pillars in IOA (product sales, stock and lifespan profiles) to construct mathematical relationships between various data points. By applying this method, the data consolidation steps can generate more accurate time-series datasets from available data pool. This can consequently increase the reliability of e-waste estimates compared to the approach without data processing. A case study in the Netherlands is used to apply the advanced IOA model. As a result, for the first time ever, complete datasets of all three variables for estimating all types of e-waste have been obtained. The result of this study also demonstrates significant disparity between various estimation models, arising from the use of data under different conditions. It shows the importance of applying multivariate approach and multiple sources to improve data quality for modelling, specifically using appropriate time-varying lifespan parameters. Following the case study, a roadmap with a procedural guideline is provided to enhance e

  9. Assessment of User Home Location Geoinference Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Joshua J.; Bell, Eric B.; Corley, Courtney D.; Dowling, Chase P.; Cowell, Andrew J.

    2015-05-29

    This study presents an assessment of multiple approaches to determine the home and/or other important locations to a Twitter user. In this study, we present a unique approach to the problem of geotagged data sparsity in social media when performing geoinferencing tasks. Given the sparsity of explicitly geotagged Twitter data, the ability to perform accurate and reliable user geolocation from a limited number of geotagged posts has proven to be quite useful. In our survey, we have achieved accuracy rates of over 86% in matching Twitter user profile locations with their inferred home locations derived from geotagged posts.

  10. High lumen compact fluorescents boost light output in new fixtures

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Some compact fluorescent lamps aren`t so compact. General Electric (GE), OSRAM, and Philips have been expanding offerings in longer, more powerful, hard wired CFLs that generate enough light to serve applications once limited to conventional fluorescents and metal halide systems. All three of these manufacturers have for some time offered 18- to 40-watt high-output CFLs, which use a fluorescent tube doubled back on itself to produce a lot of light in a compact source. Now GE has introduced an even larger, more powerful 50-watt unit, and OSRAM is soon to follow suit with a 55-watt lamp. These new entries to the field of turbocharged CFLs can provide general lighting at ceiling heights of 12 feet or more as well as indirect lighting, floodlighting, and wall washing. They are such a concentrated source of light that they can provide the desired illumination using fewer lamps and fixtures than would be needed with competing sources.

  11. Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Site Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    of the zip code area instead of the actual location. If you're having difficulty, please contact the technical response team at 800-254-6735. They will be able to assist you. TSE...

  12. Regulatory Reform to Promote Clean Energy: The Potential of Output-Based Emissions Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Matthew; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann; Jackson, Roderick K

    2011-01-01

    Barriers to industrial energy-efficient technologies hinder their use. A number of EPA analyses and industrial experts have found that the utilization of input-based emissions standards (measured in parts-per-million or pounds/MMBtu) in the Clean Air Act creates a regulatory barrier to the installation and deployment of technologies that emit fewer criteria pollutants and use energy more efficiently. Changing emission management strategies to an output-based emissions standard (measured in tons of pollutant emitted) is a way to ameliorate some of these barriers. Combined heat and power (CHP) is one of the key technologies that would see increased industrial application if the emissions standards were modified. Many states have made this change since the EPA first approved it in 2000, although direction from the Federal government could speed implementation modifications. To analyze the national impact of accelerated state adoption of output-based standards on CHP technologies, this paper uses detailed National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and spreadsheet analysis illustrating two phased-in adoption scenarios for output-based emissions standards in the industrial sector. Benefit/cost metrics are calculated from a private and public perspective, and also a social perspective that considers the criteria and carbon air pollution emissions. These scenarios are compared to the reference case of AEO 2010 and are quite favorable, with a social benefit-cost ratio of 16.0 for a five-year phase-in scenario. In addition, the appropriateness of the Federal role, applicability, technology readiness, and administrative feasibility are discussed.

  13. Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004 Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004 The U.S. ...

  14. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...

    Energy Saver

    Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm ...

  15. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 12:00am ...

  16. Modeling Solar Power Plant Variability: Benefits of Geographic...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Matthew Lave U.S.-Japan Collaborative Smart Grid Project Collective Research Workshop ... resolution * PV output and load for each house * Irradiance at 6 locations Pictures ...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Livermore, California: Visiting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia/California: Maps and Directions Locations Maps and Directions to Sandia/California Sandia/California is located at 7011 East Avenue in Livermore, Calif., a suburban community about 45 miles east of San Francisco. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is directly across the street from Sandia on the north side of East Avenue. Access to Sandia's California site is limited to those with authorized badges. If you do not have an authorized badge, be sure to make arrangements with

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations: Livermore, California: Visiting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia/California California Livermore, California administration building Our location and hours of operation Sandia/California is located at 7011 East Avenue in Livermore, Calif., a suburban community about 45 miles east of San Francisco. Positioned at the eastern edge of the San Francisco Bay Area, Sandia is within easy commuting distance of many affordable housing communities in San Joaquin County and the Central Valley. The official hours of operation at Sandia/California are from 7:30

  19. modeling

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ...

  20. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally

  1. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the Electromechanical battery

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition.

  2. Fail safe controllable output improved version of the electromechanical battery

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1999-01-19

    Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition. 4 figs.

  3. Utility Locating in the DOE Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Clark Scott; Gail Heath

    2006-04-01

    Some advances have been made in utility locating in recent years and standards have been recently published to try and categorize the level of information known about the utility in the subsurface. At the same time some characterization about the level of effort or technology in the geophysicist approach to utility locating may be generalized. The DOE environment poses some added difficulties and this presentation covers these issues, costs and the technical approach that has been developed at the INEEL to prevent utility hits and how it fits into the generalized classification of effort.

  4. Method for optimizing the mechanical output of a fluid pressure free piston engine

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrell, E.W.; Schaich, W.A.

    1988-07-05

    The method is described for minimizing rotational speed variations of a centrifugal piston expander engine comprising the steps of: (1) supplying a pressured gas to a centrifugal piston expander engine having a rotatable output element and a discharge conduit for cooled exhaust gas; (2) expanding and cooling the pressured gas in the centrifugal piston expander engine to produce cyclically varying oppositely directed, positive and negative torques on the rotatable output shaft; (3) driving a rotary load in the positive torque direction by the rotatable output element through one rotatable element of a unidirectional clutch having two rotating elements relatively movable in only the negative torque direction; and (4) connecting a battery operated motor-generator unit to the rotatable output shaft to supplement the rotary speed of the output shaft during periods of negative torque output by the centrifugal piston expander engine and to recharge the battery during periods of maximum positive torque output of the centrifugal expander engine.

  5. Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards Research Site Locations for Current ...

  6. ARM: Ship navigational location and attitude: Position and Heading...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ship navigational location and attitude: Position and Heading Data Title: ARM: Ship navigational location and attitude: Position and Heading Data Ship navigational location and ...

  7. Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Demonstration Project Locations Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Smart Grid Demonstration projects created with funding ...

  8. Method for locating defective nuclear fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, W.E.; White, N.W.; Womack, R.E.

    1982-02-02

    Defects in nuclear fuel elements are ascertained and located within an assembled fuel assembly by ultrasonic means. In a typical embodiment of the invention, an ultrasonic search unit is positioned within the fuel assembly opposite the lower plenum of the fuel element to be tested. An ultrasonic pulse is radially projected into the element. Defective fuel elements are ascertained by ultrasonic reflection measurements.

  9. TWRS information locator database system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, B.J.

    1996-09-13

    This document gives an overview and description of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Locator Database (ILD)system design. The TWRS ILD system is an inventory of information used in the TWRS Systems Engineering process to represent the TWRS Technical Baseline. The inventory is maintained in the form of a relational database developed in Paradox 4.5.

  10. Updated Eastern Interconnect Wind Power Output and Forecasts for ERGIS: July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Pennock, K.

    2012-10-01

    AWS Truepower, LLC (AWST) was retained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to update wind resource, plant output, and wind power forecasts originally produced by the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS). The new data set was to incorporate AWST's updated 200-m wind speed map, additional tall towers that were not included in the original study, and new turbine power curves. Additionally, a primary objective of this new study was to employ new data synthesis techniques developed for the PJM Renewable Integration Study (PRIS) to eliminate diurnal discontinuities resulting from the assimilation of observations into mesoscale model runs. The updated data set covers the same geographic area, 10-minute time resolution, and 2004?2006 study period for the same onshore and offshore (Great Lakes and Atlantic coast) sites as the original EWITS data set.

  11. Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S.

    2012-06-01

    Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

  12. New runners to boost peak output at Niagara Falls

    SciTech Connect

    Reason, J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrofitted Francis turbines will improve the value of power generated from Niagara Falls by increasing the peak output of the hydroturbine units at the Robert Moses hydroelectric plant. The computer-designed runners are expected to add 330 MW to the peak capacity of the 28-yr-old plant and significantly increase the efficiency at high flow rates. Next year, the first new runner will be retrofit to the highly instrumented Unit 4. If the retrofit unit meets it increased-performance expectations, the other 12 units will be upgraded between 1993 and 1998. The work is part of an overall expansion of the Niagara Power Project designed to made better use of the power value of Niagara river water, within the constraints of a treaty with Canada and the scenic value of the falls. These constraints, together with varying flows and heads, introduced enormous complexities into the selection and design of the new runners. The alterations being made to Unit 4, in addition to replacing the turbine runner, include modifying the draft tube-liners, increasing the wicket-gate stroke, replacing the turbine discharge ring (to accommodate longer blades), making various electrical modifications to the generator, and replacing the transformer. But the key to the retrofit is the computer-designed runner. Charles Grose, senior project manager, New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY, emphasizes that such computer design techniques were not available a few years ago; neither were the computer-controlled machining techniques necessary to manufacture the new runners. Other aspects of the upgrading that were analyzed include runner stability, resonance, shaft torsional stress, and runaway speed.

  13. Leak locating microphone, method and system for locating fluid leaks in pipes

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Spevak, Lev

    1994-01-01

    A leak detecting microphone inserted directly into fluid within a pipe includes a housing having a first end being inserted within the pipe and a second opposed end extending outside the pipe. A diaphragm is mounted within the first housing end and an acoustic transducer is coupled to the diaphragm for converting acoustical signals to electrical signals. A plurality of apertures are provided in the housing first end, the apertures located both above and below the diaphragm, whereby to equalize fluid pressure on either side of the diaphragm. A leak locating system and method are provided for locating fluid leaks within a pipe. A first microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a first selected location and sound is detected at the first location. A second microphone is installed within fluid in the pipe at a second selected location and sound is detected at the second location. A cross-correlation is identified between the detected sound at the first and second locations for identifying a leak location.

  14. Models & Tools

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Models & Tools - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Multimedia & Software Videos Images Models & Tools Partnerships Tribal Energy Program ...

  15. Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Biomass Program Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations in the United States Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations (63.81 KB) More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Algal Biofuel Technologies

  16. The effect of output-input isolation on the scaling and energy consumption of all-spin logic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiaxi; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-05-07

    All-spin logic (ASL) is a novel approach for digital logic applications wherein spin is used as the state variable instead of charge. One of the challenges in realizing a practical ASL system is the need to ensure non-reciprocity, meaning the information flows from input to output, not vice versa. One approach described previously, is to introduce an asymmetric ground contact, and while this approach was shown to be effective, it remains unclear as to the optimal approach for achieving non-reciprocity in ASL. In this study, we quantitatively analyze techniques to achieve non-reciprocity in ASL devices, and we specifically compare the effect of using asymmetric ground position and dipole-coupled output/input isolation. For this analysis, we simulate the switching dynamics of multiple-stage logic devices with FePt and FePd perpendicular magnetic anisotropy materials using a combination of a matrix-based spin circuit model coupled to the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation. The dipole field is included in this model and can act as both a desirable means of coupling magnets and a source of noise. The dynamic energy consumption has been calculated for these schemes, as a function of input/output magnet separation, and the results show that using a scheme that electrically isolates logic stages produces superior non-reciprocity, thus allowing both improved scaling and reduced energy consumption.

  17. VCSEL fault location apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Keeler, Gordon A.; Serkland, Darwin K.

    2007-05-15

    An apparatus for locating a fault within an optical fiber is disclosed. The apparatus, which can be formed as a part of a fiber-optic transmitter or as a stand-alone instrument, utilizes a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to generate a test pulse of light which is coupled into an optical fiber under test. The VCSEL is subsequently reconfigured by changing a bias voltage thereto and is used as a resonant-cavity photodetector (RCPD) to detect a portion of the test light pulse which is reflected or scattered from any fault within the optical fiber. A time interval .DELTA.t between an instant in time when the test light pulse is generated and the time the reflected or scattered portion is detected can then be used to determine the location of the fault within the optical fiber.

  18. Diagnostics of the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by quantum dots via polarization measurements of the output radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kukushkin, V. A.; Baidus, N. V.; Zdoroveishchev, A. V.

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated that the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation at a metal-semiconductor interface by active quantum dots can be determined from measurements of the polarization characteristics of the output radiation. Experimentally, the proposed diagnostic method is based on finding the ratio of the intensities of the output radiation with polarizations orthogonal and parallel to the nanoheterostructure plane for two different distances between the quantum-dot layer and the metal-semiconductor interface. These data are then used to obtain the unknown parameters in the proposed mathematical model which makes it possible to calculate the rate of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by active quantum dots. As a result, this rate can be determined without complicated expensive equipment for fast time-resolved measurements.

  19. Our Locations | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Locations The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables NNSA to accomplish its work across its four mission areas. The NNSA's nuclear security enterprise spans eight sites, including three national laboratories, with more than six decades of cutting-edge nuclear security experience. That history and technical expertise enables

  20. Detrecting and Locating Partial Discharges in Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Shourbaji, A.; Richards, R.; Kisner, R. A.; Hardy, J.

    2005-02-04

    A collaborative research between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the American Electric Power (AEP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and the State of Ohio Energy Office (OEO) has been formed to conduct a feasibility study to detect and locate partial discharges (PDs) inside large transformers. The success of early detection of the PDs is necessary to avoid costly catastrophic failures that can occur if the process of PD is ignored. The detection method under this research is based on an innovative technology developed by ORNL researchers using optical methods to sense the acoustical energy produced by the PDs. ORNL researchers conducted experimental studies to detect PD using an optical fiber as an acoustic sensor capable of detecting acoustical disturbances at any point along its length. This technical approach also has the potential to locate the point at which the PD was sensed within the transformer. Several optical approaches were experimentally investigated, including interferometric detection of acoustical disturbances along the sensing fiber, light detection and ranging (LIDAR) techniques using frequency modulation continuous wave (FMCW), frequency modulated (FM) laser with a multimode fiber, FM laser with a single mode fiber, and amplitude modulated (AM) laser with a multimode fiber. The implementation of the optical fiber-based acoustic measurement technique would include installing a fiber inside a transformer allowing real-time detection of PDs and determining their locations. The fibers are nonconductive and very small (core plus cladding are diameters of 125 μm for single-mode fibers and 230 μm for multimode fibers). The research identified the capabilities and limitations of using optical technology to detect and locate sources of acoustical disturbances such as in PDs in large transformers. Amplitude modulation techniques showed the most promising results and deserve further research to better quantify the technique’s sensitivity

  1. Locating PHEV exchange stations in V2G

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Bent, Russell; Berscheid, Alan; Izraelevitz, David

    2010-01-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PREV) is an environment friendly modem transportation method and has been rapidly penetrate the transportation system. Renewable energy is another contributor to clean power but the associated intermittence increases the uncertainty in power generation. As a foreseen benefit of a vchicle-to-grid (V2G) system, PREV supporting infrastructures like battery exchange stations can provide battery service to PREV customers as well as being plugged into a power grid as energy sources and stabilizer. The locations of exchange stations are important for these two objectives under constraints from both ,transportation system and power grid. To model this location problem and to understand and analyze the benefit of a V2G system, we develop a two-stage stochastic program to optimally locate the stations prior to the realizations of battery demands, loads, and generation capacity of renewable power sources. Based on this model, we use two data sets to construct the V2G systems and test the benefit and the performance of these systems.

  2. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore » multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  3. Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2004 | Department of Energy Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004 Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed this handbook to assist state, local, and tribal regulators in developing output-based regulations. The handbook provides practical information to help regulators decide if they want to use output-based regulations and explains how to develop an

  4. Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and ...

  5. Double Power Output for GaAs Solar Cells Embedded in Luminescent...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Double power output of bifacial thin-film GaAs microscale solar cells is achieved by embedding in luminescent waveguides (LSCs) with light- trapping backside reflectors (BSRs). ...

  6. Date Time Event Description/Participants Location

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated: 06/11/2015 Date Time Event Description/Participants Location Point of Contact 11 thru 12 All Day Meeting Todd Allen, deputy director of Science and Technology at INL, has been invited to speak at the Idaho Society of Professional Engineers (ISPE) annual meeting. Coeur d'Alene, ID Sara Prentice, 526-9591 18 9:00 AM Education Outreach Approximately 50 iSTEM students and instructors will tour various INL Idaho Falls facilities Idaho Falls, ID INL Tours Office, 526-0050 23 All Day Meeting

  7. Thickness measurement locations of mechanical integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, J.R.; Rivas, N.

    1996-07-01

    This paper will describe the importance of establishing thickness measurement location (TNE) criteria. It will also seek to quantify the frequency of inspections and review the methods for establishing techniques to ensure reliability and repeatability of inspections at TMLs using qualified inspectors. Also discussed will be the most useful way to document the results of an inspection and how to effectively maintain consistency in the mechanical integrity program. It reviews different methods of inspection and uses lessons learned from in-service experience with numerous mechanical projects in the petrochemical industry. The importance of qualified inspectors, quality inspection, electronic data acquisition and electronic data storage will be discussed.

  8. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  9. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    1996-11-08

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  10. ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

    DOE Data Explorer

    Karen Johnson; Michael Jensen

    ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

  11. Estimating Solar PV Output Using Modern Space/Time Geostatistics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. J.; George, R.; Bush, B.

    2009-04-29

    This presentation describes a project that uses mapping techniques to predict solar output at subhourly resolution at any spatial point, develop a methodology that is applicable to natural resources in general, and demonstrate capability of geostatistical techniques to predict the output of a potential solar plant.

  12. System for adjusting frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bartholomew, David B.

    2006-11-14

    A system for setting and adjusting a frequency of electrical output pulses derived from an oscillator in a network is disclosed. The system comprises an accumulator module configured to receive pulses from an oscillator and to output an accumulated value. An adjustor module is configured to store an adjustor value used to correct local oscillator drift. A digital adder adds values from the accumulator module to values stored in the adjustor module and outputs their sums to the accumulator module, where they are stored. The digital adder also outputs an electrical pulse to a logic module. The logic module is in electrical communication with the adjustor module and the network. The logic module may change the value stored in the adjustor module to compensate for local oscillator drift or change the frequency of output pulses. The logic module may also keep time and calculate drift.

  13. Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1999-03-16

    The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range. 3 figs.

  14. Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range.

  15. Technique for enhancing the power output of an electrostatic generator employing parametric resonance

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2016-02-23

    A circuit-based technique enhances the power output of electrostatic generators employing an array of axially oriented rods or tubes or azimuthal corrugated metal surfaces for their electrodes. During generator operation, the peak voltage across the electrodes occurs at an azimuthal position that is intermediate between the position of minimum gap and maximum gap. If this position is also close to the azimuthal angle where the rate of change of capacity is a maximum, then the highest rf power output possible for a given maximum allowable voltage at the minimum gap can be attained. This rf power output is then coupled to the generator load through a coupling condenser that prevents suppression of the dc charging potential by conduction through the load. Optimized circuit values produce phase shifts in the rf output voltage that allow higher power output to occur at the same voltage limit at the minimum gap position.

  16. Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-04-13

    Locating hardware faults in a parallel computer, including defining within a tree network of the parallel computer two or more sets of non-overlapping test levels of compute nodes of the network that together include all the data communications links of the network, each non-overlapping test level comprising two or more adjacent tiers of the tree; defining test cells within each non-overlapping test level, each test cell comprising a subtree of the tree including a subtree root compute node and all descendant compute nodes of the subtree root compute node within a non-overlapping test level; performing, separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, an uplink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels; and performing, separately from the uplink tests and separately on each set of non-overlapping test levels, a downlink test on all test cells in a set of non-overlapping test levels.

  17. Location Independent Professional Project: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.A.; Long, J.P.; Miller, M.M.

    1999-02-01

    This pilot study project explored the problem of providing access to the nomadic worker who desires to connect a computer through network access points at a number of different locations within the SNL/NM campus as well as outside the campus. The design and prototype development gathered knowledge that may allow a design to be developed that could be extended to a larger number of SNL/NM network drop boxes. The focus was to provide a capability for a worker to access the SNL IRN from a network drop box (e.g. in a conference room) as easily as when accessing the computer network from the office normally used by the worker. Additional study was done on new methods to authenticate the off campus worker, and protect and control access to data.

  18. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    M. WILLIAMS

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  19. Location performance objectives for the NNWSI area-to-location screening activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnock, S.; Fernandez, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-four objectives were identified to guide the screening of the Nevada Research and Development Area of the Nevada Test Site for relatively favorable locations for the disposal of nuclear waste in a mined geologic repository. The objectives were organized as a hierarchy composed of 4 upper-level, 12 middle-level, and 38 lower-level objectives. The four upper-level objectives account for broad national goals to contain and isolate nuclear waste in an environmentally sound and economically acceptable manner. The middle-level objectives correspond to topical categories that logically relate the upper-level objectives to site-specific concerns such as seismicity, sensitive species, and flooding hazards (represented by the lower-level objectives). The relative merits of alternative locations were compared by an application of decision analysis based on standard utility theory. The relative favorabilities of pertinent physical conditions at each alternative location were weighted in relation to the importance of objectives, and summed to produce maps indicating the most and the least favorable locations. Descriptions of the objectives were organized by the hierarchical format; they detail the applicability of each objective to geologic repository siting, previously published siting criteria corresponding to each objective, and the rationale for the weight assigned to each objective, and the pertinent attributes for evaluating locations with respect to each objective. 51 references, 47 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative

  2. Energy Department Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon 2013 Energy Department Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon 2013 January 26, 2012 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, ...

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations on Twitter ...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas ...

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    21,812 alternative fuel stations in the United States Excluding private stations Location details are subject to change. We recommend calling the stations to verify location, hours ...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Locate Stations Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Station Locator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels ...

  7. Property:EIA/861/NercLocation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    type String. Description: Nerc Location NERC Location: The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) region where the utility has its primary business operations...

  8. Energy Department Announces Locations of Consent-Based Siting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Announces Locations of Consent-Based Siting Initiative's Eight Public Meetings Energy Department Announces Locations of Consent-Based Siting Initiative's Eight Public Meetings ...

  9. Precise relative locations for earthquakes in the northeast Pacific region

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cleveland, K. Michael; VanDeMark, Thomas F.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-10-09

    We report that double-difference methods applied to cross-correlation measured Rayleigh wave time shifts are an effective tool to improve epicentroid locations and relative origin time shifts in remote regions. We apply these methods to seismicity offshore of southwestern Canada and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, occurring along the boundaries of the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (including the Explorer Plate and Gorda Block) Plates. The Blanco, Mendocino, Revere-Dellwood, Nootka, and Sovanco fracture zones host the majority of this seismicity, largely consisting of strike-slip earthquakes. The Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda spreading ridges join these fracture zones and host normal faultingmore » earthquakes. Our results show that at least the moderate-magnitude activity clusters along fault strike, supporting suggestions of large variations in seismic coupling along oceanic transform faults. Our improved relative locations corroborate earlier interpretations of the internal deformation in the Explorer and Gorda Plates. North of the Explorer Plate, improved locations support models that propose northern extension of the Revere-Dellwood fault. Relocations also support interpretations that favor multiple parallel active faults along the Blanco Transform Fault Zone. Seismicity of the western half of the Blanco appears more scattered and less collinear than the eastern half, possibly related to fault maturity. We use azimuthal variations in the Rayleigh wave cross-correlation amplitude to detect and model rupture directivity for a moderate size earthquake along the eastern Blanco Fault. Lastly, the observations constrain the seismogenic zone geometry and suggest a relatively narrow seismogenic zone width of 2 to 4 km.« less

  10. Precise relative locations for earthquakes in the northeast Pacific region

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, K. Michael; VanDeMark, Thomas F.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-10-09

    We report that double-difference methods applied to cross-correlation measured Rayleigh wave time shifts are an effective tool to improve epicentroid locations and relative origin time shifts in remote regions. We apply these methods to seismicity offshore of southwestern Canada and the U.S. Pacific Northwest, occurring along the boundaries of the Pacific and Juan de Fuca (including the Explorer Plate and Gorda Block) Plates. The Blanco, Mendocino, Revere-Dellwood, Nootka, and Sovanco fracture zones host the majority of this seismicity, largely consisting of strike-slip earthquakes. The Explorer, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda spreading ridges join these fracture zones and host normal faulting earthquakes. Our results show that at least the moderate-magnitude activity clusters along fault strike, supporting suggestions of large variations in seismic coupling along oceanic transform faults. Our improved relative locations corroborate earlier interpretations of the internal deformation in the Explorer and Gorda Plates. North of the Explorer Plate, improved locations support models that propose northern extension of the Revere-Dellwood fault. Relocations also support interpretations that favor multiple parallel active faults along the Blanco Transform Fault Zone. Seismicity of the western half of the Blanco appears more scattered and less collinear than the eastern half, possibly related to fault maturity. We use azimuthal variations in the Rayleigh wave cross-correlation amplitude to detect and model rupture directivity for a moderate size earthquake along the eastern Blanco Fault. Lastly, the observations constrain the seismogenic zone geometry and suggest a relatively narrow seismogenic zone width of 2 to 4 km.

  11. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-04-30

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules. 15 figs.

  12. Homodyne impulse radar hidden object locator

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    An electromagnetic detector is designed to locate an object hidden behind a separator or a cavity within a solid object. The detector includes a PRF generator for generating 2 MHz pulses, a homodyne oscillator for generating a 2 kHz square wave, and for modulating the pulses from the PRF generator. A transmit antenna transmits the modulated pulses through the separator, and a receive antenna receives the signals reflected off the object. The receiver path of the detector includes a sample and hold circuit, an AC coupled amplifier which filters out DC bias level shifts in the sample and hold circuit, and a rectifier circuit connected to the homodyne oscillator and to the AC coupled amplifier, for synchronously rectifying the modulated pulses transmitted over the transmit antenna. The homodyne oscillator modulates the signal from the PRF generator with a continuous wave (CW) signal, and the AC coupled amplifier operates with a passband centered on that CW signal. The present detector can be used in several applications, including the detection of metallic and non-metallic objects, such as pipes, studs, joists, nails, rebars, conduits and electrical wiring, behind wood wall, ceiling, plywood, particle board, dense hardwood, masonry and cement structure. The detector is portable, light weight, simple to use, inexpensive, and has a low power emission which facilitates the compliance with Part 15 of the FCC rules.

  13. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    2012-07-08

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

  14. SAPLE: Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine.

    SciTech Connect

    Procopio, Michael J.

    2010-04-01

    We present the Sandia Advanced Personnel Locator Engine (SAPLE) web application, a directory search application for use by Sandia National Laboratories personnel. SAPLE's purpose is to return Sandia personnel 'results' as a function of user search queries, with its mission to make it easier and faster to find people at Sandia. To accomplish this, SAPLE breaks from more traditional directory application approaches by aiming to return the correct set of results while placing minimal constraints on the user's query. Two key features form the core of SAPLE: advanced search query interpretation and inexact string matching. SAPLE's query interpretation permits the user to perform compound queries when typing into a single search field; where able, SAPLE infers the type of field that the user intends to search on based on the value of the search term. SAPLE's inexact string matching feature yields a high-quality ranking of personnel search results even when there are no exact matches to the user's query. This paper explores these two key features, describing in detail the architecture and operation of SAPLE. Finally, an extensive analysis on logged search query data taken from an 11-week sample period is presented.

  15. Sanov and central limit theorems for output statistics of quantum Markov chains

    SciTech Connect

    Horssen, Merlijn van; Gu??, M?d?lin

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we consider the statistics of repeated measurements on the output of a quantum Markov chain. We establish a large deviations result analogous to Sanovs theorem for the multi-site empirical measure associated to finite sequences of consecutive outcomes of a classical stochastic process. Our result relies on the construction of an extended quantum transition operator (which keeps track of previous outcomes) in terms of which we compute moment generating functions, and whose spectral radius is related to the large deviations rate function. As a corollary to this, we obtain a central limit theorem for the empirical measure. Such higher level statistics may be used to uncover critical behaviour such as dynamical phase transitions, which are not captured by lower level statistics such as the sample mean. As a step in this direction, we give an example of a finite system whose level-1 (empirical mean) rate function is independent of a model parameter while the level-2 (empirical measure) rate is not.

  16. Optimization of the output and efficiency of a high power cascaded arc hydrogen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Vijvers, W. A. J.; Gils, C. A. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Meiden, H. J. van der; Veremiyenko, V. P.; Westerhout, J.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Rooij, G. J. van; Schram, D. C.

    2008-09-15

    The operation of a cascaded arc hydrogen plasma source was experimentally investigated to provide an empirical basis for the scaling of this source to higher plasma fluxes and efficiencies. The flux and efficiency were determined as a function of the input power, discharge channel diameter, and hydrogen gas flow rate. Measurements of the pressure in the arc channel show that the flow is well described by Poiseuille flow and that the effective heavy particle temperature is approximately 0.8 eV. Interpretation of the measured I-V data in terms of a one-parameter model shows that the plasma production is proportional to the input power, to the square root of the hydrogen flow rate, and is independent of the channel diameter. The observed scaling shows that the dominant power loss mechanism inside the arc channel is one that scales with the effective volume of the plasma in the discharge channel. Measurements on the plasma output with Thomson scattering confirm the linear dependence of the plasma production on the input power. Extrapolation of these results shows that (without a magnetic field) an improvement in the plasma production by a factor of 10 over where it was in van Rooij et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121501 (2007)] should be possible.

  17. Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map Uranium Lease Tracts Location Map (999.93 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-1037: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1535: Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment EIS-0472: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

  18. Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Stockwell, PhD

    2010-09-23

    Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing concentrations of aerosol, and land alteration. A particular concern is that atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} may be rising faster than at any time in Earth's history, except possibly following rare events like impacts from large extraterrestrial objects (AMS, 2007). Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have increased since the mid-1700s through fossil fuel burning and changes in land use, with more than 80% of this increase occurring since 1900. The increased levels of CO{sub 2} will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. The complexity of the climate system makes it difficult to predict specific aspects of human-induced climate change, such as exactly how and where changes will occur, and their magnitude. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) was established by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations in 1988. The IPCC was tasked with assessing the scientific, technical and socioeconomic information needed to understand the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC concluded in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increased in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2007).

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank

  20. Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects created with funding from the Smart Grid Demonstration Project, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations (86.17 KB) More Documents & Publications Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Smart Grid Demonstration Project

  1. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4e. Gross Output1by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002...

  2. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 3e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 3e. Gross Output1 by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Current Billion Dollars) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998...

  3. Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

    2012-08-01

    This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

  4. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratorys Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  5. Enhancing the Output of LED Lighting | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancing the Output of LED Lighting Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 04.01.12 Enhancing the Output of LED Lighting Adding

  6. Phasing surface emitting diode laser outputs into a coherent laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F.

    2006-10-10

    A system for generating a powerful laser beam includes a first laser element and at least one additional laser element having a rear laser mirror, an output mirror that is 100% reflective at normal incidence and <5% reflective at an input beam angle, and laser material between the rear laser mirror and the output mirror. The system includes an injector, a reference laser beam source, an amplifier and phase conjugater, and a combiner.

  7. DETERMINING THE OPTIMAL LOCATIONS FOR SHOCK ACCELERATION IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Polko, Peter; Markoff, Sera; Meier, David L.

    2010-11-10

    Observations of relativistic jets from black hole systems suggest that particle acceleration often occurs at fixed locations within the flow. These sites could be associated with critical points that allow the formation of standing shock regions, such as the magnetosonic modified fast point (MFP). Using the self-similar formulation of special relativistic magnetohydrodynamics by Vlahakis and Koenigl, we derive a new class of flow solutions that are both relativistic and cross the MFP at a finite height. Our solutions span a range of Lorentz factors up to at least 10, appropriate for most jets in X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei, and a range in injected particle internal energy. A broad range of solutions exists, which will allow the eventual matching of these scale-free models to physical boundary conditions in the analysis of observed sources.

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",46.45,40.85,71.02,44.1,71.11,-38 " Canada*",59.39,85.43,69.55,66.79,71.43,-6.5 " Dominican

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",899931,586002,1504086,1485933,1950271,-23.8 " Canada*",790197,440922,1245194,1231119,1584251,-22.3 "

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",78.05,91.86,97.73,83.5,96.5,-13.5 " Canada*",73.44,88.1,98.87,78.69,96.39,-18.4 "

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" ,2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",9656462,9472145,10958603,19128607,24554294,-22.1 " Baltimore, MD",3702460,3850539,3838106,7552999,8724574,-13.4 " Boston,

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" ,2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",7809967,7922195,9080872,15732162,19263918,-18.3 " Baltimore, MD",2437512,2990819,2816659,5428331,6161335,-11.9 " Buffalo, NY",297371,196,419927,297567,515518,-42.3 "

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Coal Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",241095,240168,325205,481263,496903,-3.1 " Canada",240878,239440,325205,480318,496836,-3.3 " Mexico",217,728,"-",945,67,"NM" "South America

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Price of U.S. Coal Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",73.59,71.92,122.71,72.76,117.29,-38 " Canada",73.61,71.93,122.71,72.77,117.29,-38 " Mexico",59.08,66.79,"-",65.02,113.43,-42.7 "South

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Production, 2010 - 2016" "(thousand short tons)" "Year","January - March","April - June","July - September","October - December","Total" 2010,265702,264982,277505,276180,1084368 2011,273478,264291,275006,282853,1095628 2012,266865,241047,258956,249591,1016458 2013,244867,243211,257595,239169,984842 2014,245271,245844,255377,253557,1000049 2015,240299,212452,236990,207237,896977

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Imports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" ,2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",62212,312200,114560,374412,634619,-41 " Boston, MA",52580,278171,52801,330751,449174,-26.4 " Buffalo, NY",23,71,251,94,260,-63.8 " New York City, NY",22,773,445,795,888,-10.5

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. U.S. Coke Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",17390,2763,2184,20153,4219,377.7 " Canada",17390,2763,2184,20153,4219,377.7 "South America Total",37157,"-",322,37157,322,"NM" "

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Origin",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",113,181.85,192.95,122.44,203.02,-39.7 " Canada",113,181.85,192.95,122.44,203.02,-39.7 "South America

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    by State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Coal-Producing Region","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "and State",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "Alabama",2223,2446,3504,4669,7561,-38.2 "Alaska",228,310,345,538,610,-11.9 "Arizona",1235,1335,1912,2569,3667,-29.9 "Arkansas",15,11,27,27,48,-44.9

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016" "(thousand short tons)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2010,17807,4803,21965,5058,21074,4680,20870,4811,81716,19353

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2010 - 2016" "(dollars per short ton)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports"

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2010 - 2016" "(short tons and dollars per short ton)" "Year and Quarter","Australia","Canada","Colombia","Indonesia","China","Venezuela","Other","Total" ,,,,,,,"Countries" 2010,380404,1766896,14583950,1904040,52869,581700,82828,19352687 2011,61745,1680490,9500387,856038,22128,778887,187931,13087606

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",1991066,1373100,3131636,3364166,4996883,-32.7 " Canada*",1213126,608869,1792272,1821995,2507975,-27.4 " Dominican Republic",14,19,54923,33,56668,-99.9 "

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",60.73,62.62,83.85,61.5,81.02,-24.1 " Canada*",68.54,87.37,89.92,74.83,87.2,-14.2 " Dominican

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2016,2015,"Percent" "of Destination",2016,2016,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",1091135,787098,1627550,1878233,3046612,-38.4 " Canada*",422929,167947,547078,590876,923724,-36 " Dominican Republic",14,19,54923,33,56668,-99.9 "

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    No.: DOE/EIA 0218/46" "Report Released: November 17, 2016" "Next Release Date: November 28, 2016" "Weekly U.S. Coal Production Overview" ,"Week Ended",,,"Year to Date1",,,"52 Weeks Ended" "Coal-Producing Region & State","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","%

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2004 through 2014 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Total Electric Industry 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 142,121,652 2008 125,037,837 17,582,382 774,808 726 143,395,753 2009 125,208,829 17,562,235 757,537 704 143,529,305 2010 125,717,935

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2004 through 2014 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 3,669,918,840

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Revenue from Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2004 through 2014 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Total Electric Industry 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 343,703 2008 155,496 137,036 70,231 820 363,583 2009 157,044 132,747 62,670 828 353,289 2010 166,778 135,554 65,772 814 368,918 2011 166,714

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2004 - December 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,380,662 1,336,133 1,009,516 7,653 3,733,965 2009 1,364,758 1,306,853 917,416 7,768

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Revenue from Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2004 - December 2014 (Million Dollars) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 343,703 2008 155,496 137,036 70,231 820 363,583 2009 157,044 132,747 62,670 828 353,289 2010 166,778 135,554 65,772 814 368,918 2011 166,714

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Purchases, 2004 through 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2005 2,760,043 3,250,298 12,201 69,744 6,092,285 2006 2,605,315 2,793,288 26,628 77,353 5,502,584 2007 2,504,002 2,805,833 24,942 76,646 5,411,422 2008 2,483,927 3,024,730 25,431 78,693 5,612,781 2009 2,364,648 2,564,407 27,922 71,669 5,028,647 2010 2,353,086 3,319,211 23,976 73,861 5,770,134

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2004 through 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2004 1,923,440 3,756,175 1,053,364 25,996 6,758,975 2005 1,925,710 2,867,048 1,252,796 26,105 6,071,659 2006 1,698,389 2,446,104 1,321,342 27,638 5,493,473 2007 1,603,179 2,476,740 1,368,310 31,165 5,479,394 2008 1,576,976 2,718,661 1,355,017 30,079 5,680,733 2009 1,495,636 2,240,399

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Green Pricing Customers by End Use Sector, 2005 through 2012 (Table Discontinued) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2005 871,774 70,303 695 -- 942,772 2006 606,919 35,414 522 1 642,856 2007 773,391 61,608 553 99 835,651 2008 918,284 63,521 987 203 982,995 2009 1,058,185 64,139 1,454 -- 1,123,778 2010 1,137,047 78,128 1,407 -- 1,216,582 2011 1,187,867 89,677 1,440 -- 1,278,984 2012 2,162,230 102,223 1,509 -- 2,265,963 2012 was the last year this data was collected. In

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric and Solar Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric and Solar Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2004 1,513,641 62,196 11,498 199,662 374 475,682 245,546 6 3,686 -7,526 467 2,505,231 2005 1,484,855 58,572 11,150 238,204 10 436,296 245,553 16 4,930

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commercial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric and Solar Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commercial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Generation Net Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Estimated Distributed Solar

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Net Generation by Energy Source: Residential Sector, 2014 (Thousand Megawatthours) Distributed Generation Period Estimated Distributed Solar Photovoltaic Generation Annual Totals 2014 4,243 Year 2014 January 226 February 238 March 328 April 361 May 402 June 410 July 431 August 431 September 404 October 382 November 319 December 311 See Glossary for definitions. Values are final. See Technical Notes for a discussion of the sample design for the Form EIA-923 and predecessor forms. Totals may

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Other Gases by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Nuclear Energy by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Conventional) Power by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Wind by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Solar Photovoltaic by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation from Solar Thermal by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Census Division and State Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2004 through 2014 Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewables Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total (All Sectors) 2004 625 1,143 1,670 46 66 1,425 749 39 28 2005 619 1,133 1,664 44 66 1,422 781 39 29 2006 616 1,148 1,659 46 66 1,421 843 39 29 2007 606 1,163 1,659 46 66 1,424 929 39 25 2008 598 1,170 1,655 43 66 1,423 1,076

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2004 through 2014 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2004 6,456.0 398.0 6,182.0 2,152.0 3,529.0 18,717.0 2005 8,706.0 411.0 6,193.0 2,285.0 3,609.0 21,205.0 2006 11,329.0 411.0 6,372.0 2,274.0 3,727.0 24,113.0 2007 16,515.0 502.0 6,704.0 2,214.0 4,134.0 30,069.0 2008 24,651.0 536.0 6,864.0 2,229.0

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2015-2019 Generator Additions Generator Retirements Net Capacity Additions Energy Source Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Year 2015 U.S. Total 704 21,965.9 234 18,351.4 470 3,614.5 Coal 2 52.2 95 13,325.5 -93 -13,273.3 Petroleum 24 24.2 44 902.8 -20 -878.6 Natural Gas 76 6,192.8 61 3,964.2 15 2,228.6 Other Gases -- -- -- -- -- -- Nuclear 1 1,122.0 --

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Net Summer Capacity Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2014 and 2013 (Megawatts) Summer Capacity at Utility Scale Facilities Distributed Capacity Summer Capacity From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Capacity Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Estimated Distributed Solar Photovoltaic Capacity Estimated Total Solar Photovoltaic Capacity Estimated Total Solar

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Capacity Factors for Utility Scale Generators Primarily Using Fossil Fuels, January 2013-December 2014 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Period Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Natural Gas Fired Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Internal Combustion Engine Steam Turbine Petroleum Liquids Fired Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine Annual Factors 2013 59.7% 48.2% 4.9% 10.6% 6.1% 12.1% 0.8% 2.2% 2014 61.0% 48.3% 5.2% 10.4% 8.5% 12.5% 1.1% 1.4% Year 2013 January 61.2% 46.3% 3.6% 7.3% 4.6% 10.0%

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. Capacity Factors for Utility Scale Generators Not Primarily Using Fossil Fuels, January 2013-December 2014 Period Nuclear Conventional Hydropower Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Landfill Gas and Muncipal Solid Waste Other Biomass Including Wood Geothermal Annual Factors 2013 89.9% 38.9% 32.4% NA NA 68.9% 56.7% 73.6% 2014 91.7% 37.3% 34.0% 25.9% 19.8% 68.9% 58.9% 74.0% Year 2013 January 93.9% 42.3% 33.5% NA NA 66.0% 56.5% 76.9% February 90.3% 38.3% 35.4% NA NA 65.2% 56.0% 76.1% March

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 2005 through 2014 Capacity (MW) Year Internal Combustion Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Hydro Wind Photovoltaic Storage Other Wind and Other Total Number of Generators Distributed Generators 2005 4,025.0 1,917.0 1,830.0 999.0 -- -- -- -- 995.0 9,766.0 17,371 2006 3,646.0 1,298.0 2,582.0 806.0 -- -- -- -- 1,081.0 9,411.0 5,044 2007 4,624.0 1,990.0 3,596.0 1,051.0 -- -- -- -- 1,441.0 12,702.0 7,103 2008 5,112.0 1,949.0

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 1,020,523 772,224 240,235 377 7,687 2005 1,041,448 761,349 272,218 377 7,504 2006 1,030,556 753,390 269,412 347 7,408 2007 1,046,795 764,765 276,581 361 5,089 2008 1,042,335 760,326 276,565 369 5,075 2009 934,683 695,615 234,077 317 4,674 2010 979,684 721,431

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 New England 356,658 388,323 -8.2% 3,585 2,587 330,872 354,489 9,416 8,407 12,786 22,839 Connecticut 108,833 115,211 -5.5% 121

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 New England 3,947 3,913 0.9% 0 0 3,670 3,630 277 283 0 0 Connecticut 1,439 1,416 1.6% 0 0 1,362 1,330 77 86 0 0

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2004 - 2014 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2004 - 2014 Electric Power Sector Period Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Coal Total End of Year Stocks 2004 49,022 53,618 4,029 106,669 2005 52,923 44,377 3,836 101,137 2006 67,760 68,408 4,797 140,964 2007 63,964 82,692 4,565 151,221 2008 65,818 91,214 4,556 161,589 2009 91,922 92,448 5,097 189,467 2010 81,108 86,915 6,894 174,917 2011 82,056 85,151 5,179 172,387 2012 86,437 93,833 4,846 185,116 2013 73,113 69,720 5,051 147,884

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2004 through 2014 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Receipts (Thousand Barrels) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Receipts (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per MMBtu) 2004 1,002,032 0.97 1.36 27.42

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2004 through 2014 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight 2004 470,619 1.52 10.4 445,603 0.36 6.0 78,268 1.05 14.2 2005 480,179 1.56 10.5 456,856 0.36 6.2 77,677

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 2004 through 2014 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Period Average Btu per Pound Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Gallon Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Cubic Foot 2004 10,074 0.97 9.0 147,286 1.66 0.2 1,027 2005 10,107 0.98 9.0 146,481 1.61 0.2 1,028 2006 10,063 0.97 9.0 143,883 2.31 0.2 1,027 2007 10,028 0.96 8.8 144,546 2.10 0.1

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2004 through 2014 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks Period Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu)

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2004 15,440,681 758,557 1.34 27.30 0.91 98.2 592,478 93,034 4.80

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2004 - 2014 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2004 4,410,775 227,700 1.41 27.27 1.13 93.3 337,011

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 73,745 2,609 0.72 20.30

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2004 - 2014 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2004 10,682 451 2.08 49.32 2.48 23.5 3,066 527 6.19 35.96 0.20

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 16,176 15,804

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2004 - 2014 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2004 326,495 15,324 1.63 34.79 1.43 57.6 25,491 4,107 4.98 30.93

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 14,876 540 0.98 27.01 5.59 40.4

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2014 Year 2013 Percentage Change Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2013 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8.1. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2004 through 2014 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2004 10331 10571 8647 10428 2005 10373 10631 8551 10436 2006 10351 10809 8471 10435 2007 10375 10794 8403 10489 2008 10378 11015 8305 10452 2009 10414 10923 8160 10459 2010 10415 10984 8185 10452 2011 10444 10829 8152 10464 2012 10498 10991 8039 10479 2013 10459 10713 7948 10449 2014 10428 10814 7907 10459 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous,

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2004 through 2014 (Mills per Kilowatthour) Operation Maintenance Year Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale 2004 8.97 3.13 3.83 4.27 5.38 2.96 2.76 2.14 2005 8.26 3.21 3.95 3.69 5.27 2.98 2.73 1.89 2006 9.03 3.57 3.76 3.51 5.69 3.19 2.70 2.16 2007 9.54 3.63 5.44 3.26 5.79 3.37 3.87 2.42 2008 9.89 3.72 5.78 3.77 6.20

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2004 through 2014 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 2013 2,172,355 3,609 2,188 2014 2,166,603

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Quantity and Net Summer Capacity of Operable Cooling Systems, by Energy Source and Cooling System Type, 2004 - 2014 Once-Through Cooling Systems Recirculating Cooling Systems Cooling Ponds Dry Cooling Systems Hybrid Wet and Dry Cooling Systems Other Cooling System Types Energy Source Quantity Associated Net Summer Capacity (MW) Quantity Associated Net Summer Capacity (MW) Quantity Associated Net Summer Capacity (MW) Quantity Associated Net Summer Capacity (MW) Quantity Associated Net Summer

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, 2004 through 2012 (Table Discontinued) Energy Efficiency Load Management Total Year Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) Potential Peak Load Reduction (MW) Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) 2004 52,663 14,272 1,966 20,997 9,263 54,629 23,535 2005 59,000 15,394 930 21,259 10,341 59,930 25,735 2006 63,076 16,006 790

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2004 through 2012 (Table Discontinued) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2004 17,185 24,290 11,137 50 52,663 2005 18,894 28,073 11,986 47 59,000 2006 21,150 28,720 13,155 50 63,076 2007 22,772 30,359 14,038 108 67,278 2008 25,396 34,634 14,766 75 74,871 2009 27,395 34,831 14,610 76 76,912 2010 32,150 37,416 17,259 89 86,914 2011 46,790

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Demand-Side Management Program Incremental Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2004 through 2012 (Table Discontinued) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2004 1,827 1,812 894 -- 4,532 2005 2,249 2,559 1,071 -- 5,879 2006 2,127 2,281 986 -- 5,394 2007 3,659 2,830 1,178 13 7,680 2008 4,568 4,383 1,477 1 10,428 2009 5,030 4,959 2,918 1 12,907 2010 6,492 5,325 1,771 5 13,592 2011 9,989 8,166 3,261 6 21,421 2012 9,531

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 2004 through 2012 (Thousand Dollars) (Table Discontinued) Year Energy Efficiency Load Management Direct Cost Indirect Cost Total Cost 2004 910,816 510,281 1,421,097 132,295 1,560,578 2005 1,180,576 622,287 1,802,863 127,925 1,939,115 2006 1,270,602 663,980 1,934,582 128,886 2,072,962 2007 1,677,969 700,362 2,378,331 160,326 2,604,711 2008 2,137,452 836,359 2,973,811 181,843 3,186,742 2009 2,221,480 944,261 3,165,741 394,193 3,607,076

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. Energy Efficiency Category, by Sector, 2013 through 2014 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Incremental Annual Savings - Energy Savings (MWh) 2013 11,031,419 10,478,997 3,141,213 29,894 24,681,523 2014 11,442,191 11,928,895 3,074,819 19,316 26,465,221 Incremental Annual Savings - Peak Demand Savings (MW) 2013 6,812 11,319 1,463 5 19,599 2014 3,031 2,920 564 2 6,517 Incremental Costs - Customer Incentive (thousand dollars) 2013 1,252,085 1,274,406 345,676 5 2,872,171

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7. Energy Efficiency - Life Cycle Category, by Sector, 2013 through 2014 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Life Cycle Savings - Energy Savings (MWh) 2013 84,525,515 128,026,835 38,500,862 448,421 251,464,746 2014 100,729,499 149,493,353 39,631,016 287,925 290,141,793 Life Cycle Savings - Peak Demand Savings (MW) 2013 44,351 70,979 19,524 6 134,861 2014 17,911 46,600 12,248 2 76,760 Life Cycle Costs - Customer Incentive (thousand dollars) 2013 2,698,741 2,875,605 455,357

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 2007 through 2014 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Automated Meter Reading (AMR) 2007 25,785,782 2,322,329 44,015 109 28,152,235 2008 36,425,943 3,529,985 77,122 13 40,033,063 2009 41,462,111 4,239,531 107,033 11 45,808,686 2010 43,913,225 4,611,877 159,315 626 48,685,043 2011 41,451,888 4,341,105 172,692 77 45,965,762 2012 43,455,437 4,691,018 185,862 125 48,330,822 2013 42,491,242 4,632,744 196,132 1,202 47,321,320 2014

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Cyclone Firing Boiler Fluidized Bed Firing Boiler Stoker Boiler Tangential Firing Boiler All Other Boiler Types Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine Distillate Fuel Oil* DFO Source: 2, Table 3.1-2a, 3.4-1 & 1.3-1 Lbs per MG

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Tangential Boiler All Other Boiler Types Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Cyclone Firing Boiler Fluidized Bed Firing Boiler Stoker Boiler Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel EIA Fuel Code Factor (Kilograms of CO2 Per Million Btu)*** Notes Bituminous Coal BIT 93.3 Distillate Fuel Oil DFO 73.16 Geothermal GEO 7.71 Jet Fuel JF 70.9 Kerosene KER 72.3 Lignite Coal LIG 97.7 Municipal Solid Waste MSW 41.69 Natural Gas NG 53.07 Petroleum Coke PC 102.1 Propane Gas PG 63.07 Residual Fuel Oil RFO 78.79 Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas SGC 53.07 Assumed to have emissions similar to Natural Gas Synthesis Gas from Petroleum Coke SGP

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5. Unit of Measure Equivalents Unit Equivalent Kilowatt (kW) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watts Megawatt (MW) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watts Gigawatt (GW) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watts Terawatt (TW) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watts Gigawatt 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatts Thousand Gigawatts 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Kilowatts Kilowatthours (kWh) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watthours Megawatthours (MWh) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watthours Gigawatthours (GWh) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watthours

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. U.S. Transformer Outages by Type and NERC region, 2013 Outage Type Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 59.00 --...

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6. U.S. Coal Consumption by End Use Sector, Census Division, and State, 2014 and 2013" ... independent power producers) comprises electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power(CHP) ...

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7. Utility Scale Facility Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2014 and 2013 (Thousand Megawatthours) All Sectors Electric Power Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Electric ...

  5. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4. Average Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sectors 2004 through 2014 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total ...

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    7. Average Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2004 - December 2014 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial ...

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0. Average Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2014 and 2013 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All ...

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,6913,92.02,7481,92.15,-7.6 "U.S. Total",19351,79.04,19746,78.51,-2 "- No data ... coal reserves at reporting mines, weighted for all mines in the reported geographic area. ...

  9. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    59,369,660 12,860,889 7,140,624 437,364 66,510,284 13,298,253 Notes: In 2013, EIA revised ... 714, Annual Electric Balancing Authority Area and Planning Report; California Energy ...

  10. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Steam Generator 178 28,133.5 8,767.9 Combined Cycle 411 45,051.7 6,383.4 Internal Combustion 314 ...

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net ... generators is reported in a single generator record and is presented as a single ...

  12. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Steam Generator 10,158 10,398 10,440 10,489 Gas Turbine -- 13,217 11,632 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,447 10,175 -- Combined Cycle W 10,970 7,577 -- 2008 Steam Generator 10,138 ...

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "State" "Alabama",89.68,79.42,87.17,88.19,88.24,88.2,1.7,-10,-1.2 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" ...

  14. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2013 December 2014 December 2013 Coal (Thousand Tons) New England 1,611 1,129 42.7% W W W W Middle Atlantic 8,079 5,973 35.3% W 0 W 5,973 East North Central 33,839 28,279 19.7% ...

  15. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 1: Stationary Point and Area Sources); available at: http:www.epa.govttnchiefap42 Source 1: AP-42, Table 1.1-2 Source 2: AP-42, Section 1.3.4.3 Text ...

  16. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    NA 64,400 5,305 304 -- 70,009 2009 NA NA NA NA NA 88,205 7,365 919 -- 96,489 Photovoltaic 2010 697.890 517.861 243.051 -- 1,458.802 137,618 11,897 1,225 -- 150,740 2011 ...

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2014 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type ...

  18. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2014 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total ...

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2014 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial ...

  20. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Other Gases -- -- -- -- 4 40.0 40.0 40.0 Nuclear -- -- -- -- 1 563.4 612.4 622.4 ... capacity includes conventional hydroelectric power excluding pumped storage facilities. ...

  1. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Other Gases 93 2,227.6 1,914.3 1,889.9 Nuclear 99 103,860.4 98,569.3 100,610.3 ... capacity includes conventional hydroelectric power excluding pumped storage facilities. ...

  2. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Generation at Utility Scale Facilities Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar Renewable Sources Excluding ...

  3. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Generation From Utility Scale Facilities and Distributed Generation Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Solar ...

  4. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Facilities 12,022 12,853 -6.5% 112 798 3,246 3,524 0 0 8,664 8,531 0 0 Nuclear Utility Scale Facilities 797,166 789,016 1.0% 419,871 406,114 377,295 382,902 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydro Conven- tional Wind 2004 313,020 ... Conventional hydroelectric power excludes pumped storage facilities. Wood and wood derived ...

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other ... capacity includes conventional hydroelectric power excluding pumped storage facilities. ...

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Pumped Storage Other Energy Storage Nuclear All Other Sources All Sources Year 2014 ... Values are final. NOTES: Capacity from facilities with a total generator nameplate ...

  8. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Imports and Exports: Mexico data - DOE, Fossil Fuels, Office of Fuels Programs, Form OE-781R, "Annual Report of International Electrical ExportImport Data:" Canada data - National ...

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent ...

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities ...

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power ...

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power ...

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Wood Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities ...

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power ...

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2004 - 2014 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent ...

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    9. Demand Response - Program Costs Category, by Sector, 2013 through 2014 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Customer Incentives (thousand dollars) 2013 ...

  17. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    8. Demand Response - Yearly Energy and Demand Savings Category, by Sector, 2013 through 2014 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Number of Customers ...

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Average Operation and Maintenance Costs (Dollars per Megawatthour) Average Installed ... Years in which Operation and Maintenance Costs were not collected display a '--' to ...

  19. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    14,346 14,718 15,991 ......Maintenance 11,743 12,033 12,838 13,181 14,192 ... 18,353 17,738 17,532 ......Maintenance 14,957 15,772 15,489 15,505 16,801 ...

  20. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    268.4 599.9 606.5 25,445.0 25,396.6 Michigan 4,291.6 4,210.1 3,556.8 3,614.4 3,051.3 ... or planned capacity for some technologies such as solar photovoltaic generation. Sources:

  1. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2004 - 2014 (Thousand ... and Distributed Generation Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and ...

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    mile. Some structures were designed and then built to carry future transmission circuits in order to handle expected growth in new capability requirements. Lines are taken...

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2014" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" ...

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Reliability web page: http:www.eia.govcneafelectricitypageeia411eia411.html Projected data are updated annually. Net Energy for Load represents net Balancing...

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Montana",1,7902,5,36660,6,44562 " Big Horn","-","-",3,27308,3,27308 " ...,345,354704,613,643721,985,1000049 "- No data reported." "Note: Totals may not equal sum ...

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2014 and 2013" "(percent)" ,2014,,,2013 "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" ...

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    per short ton)" "Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)","Underground","Surface","Total" "Over 1,000",53.25,18.86,30.21 "Over 500 to 1,000",71.1,54.14,63.75 "Over 200 ...

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal Thickness (inches)","Underground","Surface","Total" "Under 7","-",922,922 "7 - Under ...

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface...

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine ... "Mine Production Range","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable ...

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2014 and 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,2014,,2013,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Nu...

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Coal Rank, 2014" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number ...

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9.B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2013 Actual, 2014-2018 Projected Net...

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8.B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2013 Actual, 2014-2018 Projected Net...

  15. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2004 - ... Notes: NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on EIA's Electricity ...

  16. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2004 - 2014, Actual ... Notes: NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on EIA's Electricity ...

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2013 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern...

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2013 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts Voltage Region Type Operating...

  19. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2013 Outage Type FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages...

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2015" "Rank","Controlling Company Name","Production (thousand short tons)","Percent of Total Production" 1,"Peabody Energy Corp",175908,19.6 2,"Arch Coal Inc",130654,14.6 3,"Cloud Peak Energy",75040,8.4 4,"Alpha Natural Resources",70398,7.8 5,"Murray Energy Corp",55524,6.2 6,"Alliance Resource Partners LP",44716,5 7,"Westmoreland Coal Company",36628,4.1

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2015 and 2014" "(thousand short tons)" ,2015,,,2014,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",10955,4664,15620,13915,5530,19445,-21.3,-15.7,-19.7

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2015" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity"

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve Base by Mining Method, 2015" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground - Minable Coal",,,"Surface - Minable Coal",,,"Total"

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2015" "(million short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2015 and 2014" ,2015,,,2014,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State and Region1" "Alabama",2464,748,3212,2852,842,3694,-13.6,-11.2,-13

  6. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2015" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","Above 0","Zero2","Total Number" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to

  7. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2015" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "and Region1" "Alabama",2209,56,255,658 "Alaska","-",113,"-","-" "Arizona","-",403,"-","-"

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2015 and 2014" ,"Number of Mining Operations2",,,"Number of Employees3",,,"Average Production per Employee Hour" ,,,,,,,"(short tons)4" "Coal-Producing State, Region1",2015,2014,"Percent",2015,2014,"Percent",2015,2014,"Percent" "and Mine Type",,,"Change",,,"Change",,,"Change"

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2015" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1 and Mine Type","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",0.67,"-",1.74,1.63 "Arkansas",0.56,"-","-",0.56 "Colorado",3.18,"-",5.44,5.21 "Illinois",4.49,7.95,7.83,6.24

  10. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2015" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State,","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","10 or Under","Total2" "Region1 and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to

  11. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2015" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "Alabama",1.75,2.52,0.64,1.9 "Alaska","-",4.62,"-","-" "Arizona","-",6.97,"-","-"

  12. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2015" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Continuous1","Conventional and","Longwall3","Total" ,,"Other2" "Alabama",87.26,"-",84.48,84.59 "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","-","w",34.32

  13. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2015" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",419,"-",9478,9897 "Arkansas",91,"-","-",91 "Colorado",815,"-",12327,13141 "Illinois",17819,2011,32143,51973

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0. Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2015" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",31,13660,84.05 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Franklin",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",11,7143,80.69 " Shelby",2,"w","w"

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3. Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2015" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market1","Captive2","Total3" "Alabama","w","w",84.05 "Alaska","w","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w" "Colorado",31.28,43.3,36.12

  16. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Coal Disposition by State, 2015" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market Sales1","Captive Sales / Transactions2","Exports3","Total" "Alabama",5102,3,8555,13660 "Alaska",1013,"-",149,1162 "Arizona",6574,"-","-",6574 "Arkansas",193,"-","-",193 "Colorado",8590,9023,1641,19254

  17. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2015" "Rank","Mine Name / Operating Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining LLC","Surface","Wyoming",109343913 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company LLC","Surface","Wyoming",99450689 3,"Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal

  18. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... equal to Internal Demand less Direct Control Load Management and Interruptible Demand. ... Capacity Margin is the amount of unused available capability of an electric power system at ...

  19. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5. Revenue and Expense Statistics for U.S. Cooperative Borrower-Owned Electric Utilities, 2003 through 2013 (Million Dollars) Description 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Operating...

  20. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...nation",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",294.8,204.63,276.27,294.8,276.27,6...,355.59,611.72,791.78,611.72,29.4 "South America Total",501.14,"-",702.17,501.14,702.17,-2...

  1. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...nation",2016,2015,2015,,,"Change" "North America Total",72167,239165,99293,72167,99293,-27... Other**",215,167,303,215,303,-29 "South America Total",21,"-",78,21,78,-73.1 " ...

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1.00 1.00 Fire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- 2.00 -- -- -- 2.00 Failed AC Substation Equipment --...

  3. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    28.00 2.00 2.00 23.00 89.00 Fire 1.00 -- 1.00 1.00 3.00 -- -- 50.00 56.00 Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- 7.00 -- -- -- 7.00 Failed AC Substation Equipment...

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems Electrostatic Precipitators Baghouses Select Catalytic and Non-Catalytic Reduction Systems Activated Carbon Injection Systems Direct Sorbent ...

  5. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Demand-Side Management Program Incremental Effects by Program Category, 2004 through 2012 (Table Discontinued) Energy Efficiency Load Management Total Year Energy Savings (Thousand ...

  6. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Notes: NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on EIA's Electricity Reliability web page: http:www.eia.govcneafelectricitypageeia411eia411.html Net ...

  7. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Notes: NERC region and reliability assessment area maps are provided on EIA's Electricity Reliability web page: http:www.eia.govcneafelectricitypageeia411eia411.html Circuit ...

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    the former utility members joined RFC. Reliability First Corporation (RFC) came into existence on January 1, 2006. RFC submitted a consolidated filing covering the historical NERC...

  9. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...1,2730243,2501775,10875372,11870666,-8.4 " Charleston, SC",124,148,1030,563,2223,-74.7 " El Paso, TX",25988,44883,167,122862,7508,"NM" " Houston-Galveston, TX",113426,232428,225146...

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 1,518 1,406 Massachusetts 3,491 3,282 3,827 2,521 1,014 2,169 32 47 8,364 8,020 New Hampshire 791 744 640 611 235 225 0 0 1,666 1,579 Rhode Island 527 481 533 474 114 109 4 3 ...

  11. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 526 2.29 7.8 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- ...

  12. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8,726 2 3 8 9 Maine 3,403 3,675 10 12 8 9 Massachusetts 12,917 14,735 6 11 13 14 New Hampshire 3,458 3,447 3 3 4 5 Rhode Island 2,566 2,838 0.09 1 1 1 Vermont 14 15 0.06 0.07 1 ...

  13. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- ...

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 18.09 18.16 -0.4% 19.94 21.91 17.75 17.68 New Hampshire W W W 15.16 16.84 W W Rhode Island W W W -- -- W W Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- ...

  15. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 0 -- Maine 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Massachusetts W 582 W 1,965 1,496 31.3% 0 0 -- New Hampshire W W W W W W 0 0 -- Rhode Island W 0 W W W W 0 0 -- Vermont 0 0 -- 57 NM NM 0 0 -- ...

  16. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 ...

  17. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    829 3.8% 0 0 860 829 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 4,233 4,087 3.6% 0 0 4,233 4,087 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,871 1,839 1.7% 0 0 1,195 1,128 676 711 0 0 Rhode Island 3,980 956 316% 0 0 3,980 ...

  18. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    " Massachusetts","w",8,"-","-",281,582,8,"-","-",481,"w",1071,"w" " New Hampshire","w","-","-","-","-","w","-","-","-","-","w","w",-2.5 " Rhode ...

  19. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    -- Maine 85 0.85 8.2 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 1,225 0.72 11.3 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 526 2.29 7.8 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 254 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Vermont 0 ...

  20. SAS Output

    Annual Energy Outlook

    14% 1 1 476 424 6 6 43 30 Massachusetts 1,646 713 131% 240 126 1,324 546 80 39 1 2 New Hampshire 454 187 143% 216 135 222 41 16 11 0.05 0.19 Rhode Island 113 75 50% 21 22 83 38 NM ...

  1. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    19 15 27% 0 0 10 7 0 0 9 8 Massachusetts 1,248 1,723 -28% 0 0 1,244 1,718 0 0 5 5 New Hampshire 544 616 -12% 544 616 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 ...

  2. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    -- 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.94 8.4 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- ...

  3. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Maine -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Massachusetts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New Hampshire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- ...

  4. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    W W Connecticut W W W -- -- W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts W W W -- -- W W New Hampshire 4.27 4.21 1.4% 4.27 4.21 -- -- Rhode Island W -- W -- -- W -- Vermont -- -- -- -- ...

  5. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    66 30% 0 0 53 38 0 0 32 28 Massachusetts 1,225 1,805 -32% 0 0 1,225 1,805 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 526 726 -28% 526 726 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 254 0 -- 0 0 254 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 ...

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -458 -368 24.5% 0 0 -458 -368 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 ...

  7. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    -- 6.65 6.06 Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 6.46 5.75 12% 5.54 6.84 6.47 5.74 New Hampshire W W W 6.05 8.85 W W Rhode Island W 5.67 W -- -- W 5.67 Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- ...

  8. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    " Massachusetts","w","w","-","-","w","w","-","-",-7.4,"s","-","-" " New Hampshire",108.29,"-","-","-",108.33,"-","-","-","s","-","-","-" " Rhode ...

  9. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    27.6% 1 1 261 204 2 2 41 32 Massachusetts 1,005 390 157.4% 131 71 793 287 80 31 1 1 New Hampshire 287 105 175.0% 108 62 163 28 16 14 0.07 0.26 Rhode Island 88 51 74.9% 11 11 60 26 ...

  10. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5,409 14,249 Massachusetts 126,810 148,736 -15% 1,544 1,245 125,265 147,491 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 31,309 29,644 5.6% 424 355 30,885 29,289 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 44,839 46,035 -2.6% ...

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    -- Maine 53 0.80 8.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 1,225 0.72 11.3 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 254 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- ...

  12. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    11,855 Massachusetts 20,071 20,728 26,076 17,713 7,961 16,463 361 361 54,469 55,265 New Hampshire 4,510 4,554 4,465 4,517 1,969 1,973 0 0 10,944 11,043 Rhode Island 3,070 3,165 ...

  13. SAS Output

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0 587 873 0 0 50 25 Massachusetts 1,867 1,300 44% 301 154 1,566 1,146 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 741 354 110% 455 268 287 86 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 217 31 594% 0 0 217 31 0 0 0 0 ...

  14. SAS Output

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rosebud","-",12756,12756,250,186,276 "1787 Roland","-",12094,12094,464,384,495 "1701 Smith","-",12069,12069,912,912,912 "0280 Blue Creek",11738,190,11928,50,12,52 "1570 ...

  15. Grid-Search Location Methods for Ground-Truth Collection from Local and Regional Seismic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, C A; Rodi, W; Myers, S C

    2003-07-24

    The objective of this project is to develop improved seismic event location techniques that can be used to generate more and better quality reference events using data from local and regional seismic networks. Their approach is to extend existing methods of multiple-event location with more general models of the errors affecting seismic arrival time data, including picking errors and errors in model-based travel-times (path corrections). Toward this end, they are integrating a grid-search based algorithm for multiple-event location (GMEL) with a new parameterization of travel-time corrections and new kriging method for estimating the correction parameters from observed travel-time residuals. Like several other multiple-event location algorithms, GMEL currently assumes event-independent path corrections and is thus restricted to small event clusters. The new parameterization assumes that travel-time corrections are a function of both the event and station location, and builds in source-receiver reciprocity and correlation between the corrections from proximate paths as constraints. The new kriging method simultaneously interpolates travel-time residuals from multiple stations and events to estimate the correction parameters as functions of position. They are currently developing the algorithmic extensions to GMEL needed to combine the new parameterization and kriging method with the simultaneous location of events. The result will be a multiple-event location method which is applicable to non-clustered, spatially well-distributed events. They are applying the existing components of the new multiple-event location method to a data set of regional and local arrival times from Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions with known origin parameters. Preliminary results show the feasibility and potential benefits of combining the location and kriging techniques. They also show some preliminary work on generalizing of the error model used in GMEL with the use of mixture

  16. Energy Department Announces Denver as Next Location for Solar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Denver as Next Location for Solar Decathlon Competition in 2017 Energy Department Announces Denver as Next Location for Solar Decathlon Competition in 2017 March 11, 2016 - 12:01pm ...

  17. File:VallesLocationMap.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    VallesLocationMap.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:VallesLocationMap.pdf Size of this preview: 800 479 pixels. Full resolution (934...

  18. A Look at Health Care Buildings - Where are they located

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Location Return to: A Look at Health Care Buildings How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them? Are they...

  19. Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects Map of the United States ...

  20. MULTISCALE THERMOHYDROLOGIC MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    T. Buscheck

    2005-07-07

    geometry of the gravel grains). Thus, given that reasonable invert properties are applied, the ability to predict a reasonable range of relevant MSTHM output parameters for the invert are based on valid predictions of thermal-hydrologic processes in the host rock. The MSTHM calculates the following thermal-hydrologic parameters: temperature, relative humidity, liquid-phase saturation, evaporation rate, air-mass fraction, gas-phase pressure, capillary pressure, and liquid- and gas-phase fluxes. The thermal-hydrologic parameters used to support ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' are identified in Table 1-1. The thermal-hydrologic parameters are determined as a function of position along each of the emplacement drifts and as a function of waste package type. These parameters are determined at various reference locations within the emplacement drifts, including the waste package and drip-shield surfaces and in the invert. The parameters are also determined at various defined locations in the adjoining host rock.

  1. Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    47.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Algal Biofuel Technologies Slide 1

  2. Research Site Locations for Current EERE Postdoctoral Awards | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Site Locations for Current EERE Postdoctoral Awards Research Site Locations for Current EERE Postdoctoral Awards map_postdoctoral-research_awards.png (1.18 MB) More Documents & Publications Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards EERE Postdoctoral Research Award Letter of Reference Form EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards Application Form

  3. A combined compensation method for the output voltage of an insulated core transformer power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Yang, J. Liu, K. F.; Qin, B.; Chen, D. Z.

    2014-06-15

    An insulated core transformer (ICT) power supply is an ideal high-voltage generator for irradiation accelerators with energy lower than 3 MeV. However, there is a significant problem that the structure of the segmented cores leads to an increase in the leakage flux and voltage differences between rectifier disks. A high level of consistency in the output of the disks helps to achieve a compact structure by improving the utilization of both the rectifier components and the insulation distances, and consequently increase the output voltage of the power supply. The output voltages of the disks which are far away from the primary coils need to be improved to reduce their inhomogeneity. In this study, by investigating and comparing the existing compensation methods, a new combined compensation method is proposed, which increases the turns on the secondary coils and employs parallel capacitors to improve the consistency of the disks, while covering the entire operating range of the power supply. This method turns out to be both feasible and effective during the development of an ICT power supply. The non-uniformity of the output voltages of the disks is less than 3.5% from no-load to full-load, and the power supply reaches an output specification of 350 kV/60 mA.

  4. Modeling

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Modelers at the CRF are developing high-fidelity simulation tools for engine combustion and detailed micro-kinetic, surface chemistry modeling tools for catalyst-based exhaust ...

  5. Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-07

    GEMS is an integrated environment that allows technical analysts, modelers, researchers, etc. to integrate and deploy models and/or decision tools with associated data to the internet for direct use by customers. GEMS does not require that the model developer know how to code or script and therefore delivers this capability to a large group of technical specialists. Customers gain the benefit of being able to execute their own scenarios directly without need for technical support. GEMS is a process that leverages commercial software products with specialized codes that add connectivity and unique functions to support the overall capability. Users integrate pre-existing models with a commercial product and store parameters and input trajectories in a companion commercial database. The model is then exposed into a commercial web environment and a graphical user interface (GUI) is applied by the model developer. Users execute the model through the web based GUI and GEMS manages supply of proper inputs, execution of models, routing of data to models and display of results back to users. GEMS works in layers, the following description is from the bottom up. Modelers create models in the modeling tool of their choice such as Excel, Matlab, or Fortran. They can also use models from a library of previously wrapped legacy codes (models). Modelers integrate the models (or a single model) by wrapping and connecting the models using the Phoenix Integration tool entitled ModelCenter. Using a ModelCenter/SAS plugin (DOE copyright CW-10-08) the modeler gets data from either an SAS or SQL database and sends results back to SAS or SQL. Once the model is working properly, the ModelCenter file is saved and stored in a folder location to which a SharePoint server tool created at INL is pointed. This enables the ModelCenter model to be run from SharePoint. The modeler then goes into Microsoft SharePoint and creates a graphical user interface (GUI) using the ModelCenter WebPart (CW-12

  6. Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center

    2012-02-07

    GEMS is an integrated environment that allows technical analysts, modelers, researchers, etc. to integrate and deploy models and/or decision tools with associated data to the internet for direct use by customers. GEMS does not require that the model developer know how to code or script and therefore delivers this capability to a large group of technical specialists. Customers gain the benefit of being able to execute their own scenarios directly without need for technical support.more » GEMS is a process that leverages commercial software products with specialized codes that add connectivity and unique functions to support the overall capability. Users integrate pre-existing models with a commercial product and store parameters and input trajectories in a companion commercial database. The model is then exposed into a commercial web environment and a graphical user interface (GUI) is applied by the model developer. Users execute the model through the web based GUI and GEMS manages supply of proper inputs, execution of models, routing of data to models and display of results back to users. GEMS works in layers, the following description is from the bottom up. Modelers create models in the modeling tool of their choice such as Excel, Matlab, or Fortran. They can also use models from a library of previously wrapped legacy codes (models). Modelers integrate the models (or a single model) by wrapping and connecting the models using the Phoenix Integration tool entitled ModelCenter. Using a ModelCenter/SAS plugin (DOE copyright CW-10-08) the modeler gets data from either an SAS or SQL database and sends results back to SAS or SQL. Once the model is working properly, the ModelCenter file is saved and stored in a folder location to which a SharePoint server tool created at INL is pointed. This enables the ModelCenter model to be run from SharePoint. The modeler then goes into Microsoft SharePoint and creates a graphical user interface (GUI) using the ModelCenter Web

  7. Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth U.S. crude oil production reached 7 million barrels per day at the end of 2012 for the first time in two decades and is well on its way to topping 8 million barrels per day by 2014. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects daily oil output will average 7.3 million barrels this year and then increase to 8.1 million barrels next year. The increase in U.S. and other North American oil production will account

  8. High-output microwave detector using voltage-induced ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Yoichi Suzuki, Yoshishige; Miwa, Shinji; Tamaru, Shingo; Nozaki, Takayuki; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji

    2014-11-10

    We investigated the voltage-induced ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) with various DC bias voltage and input RF power in magnetic tunnel junctions. We found that the DC bias monotonically increases the homodyne detection voltage due to the nonlinear FMR originating in an asymmetric magnetization-potential in the free layer. In addition, the linear increase of an output voltage to the input RF power in the voltage-induced FMR is more robust than that in spin-torque FMR. These characteristics enable us to obtain an output voltage more than ten times than that of microwave detectors using spin-transfer torque.

  9. Achieving high power factor and output power density in p-type

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    half-Heuslers Nb 1-x Ti x FeSb (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Achieving high power factor and output power density in p-type half-Heuslers Nb 1-x Ti x FeSb Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 15, 2017 Title: Achieving high power factor and output power density in p-type half-Heuslers Nb 1-x Ti x FeSb Authors: He, Ran ; Kraemer, Daniel ; Mao, Jun ; Zeng, Lingping ; Jie, Qing ; Lan, Yucheng ; Li, Chunhua ; Shuai, Jing ; Kim, Hee Seok ;

  10. The Inforum LIFT Model

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Inforum LIFT Model U.S. Energy and Economic Outlook Douglas S. Meade 2011 EIA Energy Conference Overview  The Inforum LIFT Model  Treatment of energy flows and emissions in LIFT.  Calibrating to AEO  Model extensions  U.S. Energy and Macroeconomic Outlook  Modeling of energy and environmental regulation April 26, 2011 2 2011 EIA Energy Conference LIFT: An Interindustry Macro (IM) Model  Input-Output (IO) relationships form the core of LIFT, both for output and price

  11. US-CERT Control System Center Input/Output (I/O) Conceputal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-02-01

    This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Center of the National Cyber Security Division (NCSD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs the federal departments to identify and prioritize critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the NCSD to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems; the I/O upgrade described in this document supports these goals. The vulnerability assessment Test Bed, located in the Information Operations Research Center (IORC) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), consists of a cyber test facility integrated with multiple test beds that simulate the nation's critical infrastructure. The fundamental mission of the Test Bed is to provide industry owner/operators, system vendors, and multi-agency partners of the INL National Security Division a platform for vulnerability assessments of control systems. The Input/Output (I/O) upgrade to the Test Bed (see Work Package 3.1 of the FY-05 Annual Work Plan) will provide for the expansion of assessment capabilities within the IORC facility. It will also provide capabilities to connect test beds within the Test Range and other Laboratory resources. This will allow real time I/O data input and communication channels for full replications of control systems (Process Control Systems [PCS], Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems [SCADA], and components

  12. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  13. Soliton quenching NLTL impulse circuit with a pulse forming network at the output

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.; Dallum, G.E.

    1998-09-08

    An impulse forming circuit is disclosed which produces a clean impulse from a nonlinear transmission line compressed step function without customary soliton ringing by means of a localized pulse shaping and differentiating network which shunts the nonlinear transmission line output to ground. 5 figs.

  14. Soliton quenching NLTL impulse circuit with a pulse forming network at the output

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.; Dallum, Gregory E.

    1998-01-01

    An impulse forming circuit is disclosed which produces a clean impulse from a nonlinear transmission line compressed step function without customary soliton ringing by means of a localized pulse shaping and differentiating network which shunts the nonlinear transmission line output to ground.

  15. Improved thermoelectric power output from multilayered polyethylenimine doped carbon nanotube based organic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hewitt, Corey A.; Montgomery, David S.; Barbalace, Ryan L.; Carlson, Rowland D.; Carroll, David L.

    2014-05-14

    By appropriately selecting the carbon nanotube type and n-type dopant for the conduction layers in a multilayered carbon nanotube composite, the total device thermoelectric power output can be increased significantly. The particular materials chosen in this study were raw single walled carbon nanotubes for the p-type layers and polyethylenimine doped single walled carbon nanotubes for the n-type layers. The combination of these two conduction layers leads to a single thermocouple Seebeck coefficient of 96 ± 4 μVK{sup −1}, which is 6.3 times higher than that previously reported. This improved Seebeck coefficient leads to a total power output of 14.7 nW per thermocouple at the maximum temperature difference of 50 K, which is 44 times the power output per thermocouple for the previously reported results. Ultimately, these thermoelectric power output improvements help to increase the potential use of these lightweight, flexible, and durable organic multilayered carbon nanotube based thermoelectric modules in low powered electronics applications, where waste heat is available.

  16. PHI.VCS.P8.01 VERAOUT - VERA HDF5 Output Specification Andrew...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HDFView shows the "C" ordering. CASL-U-2014-0043-001 Milestone L3:PHI.VCS.P8.01 8 H5Dump H5Dump produces output consistent with HDFView. H5Dump also uses "C" order when...

  17. Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Candidate Locations for Possible

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Small Modular Reactor Siting | Department of Energy Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Candidate Locations for Possible Small Modular Reactor Siting Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Candidate Locations for Possible Small Modular Reactor Siting This report documents population density studies of selected sites in the Hampton Roads, Virginia area. Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Candidate Locations for Possible Small Modular Reactor Siting (3.84 MB) More Documents &

  18. Energy Department Announces Locations of Consent-Based Siting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Initiative's Eight Public Meetings | Department of Energy Locations of Consent-Based Siting Initiative's Eight Public Meetings Energy Department Announces Locations of Consent-Based Siting Initiative's Eight Public Meetings February 18, 2016 - 12:10pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the locations of eight public meetings on the Department's consent-based siting initiative. These eight public meetings are

  19. Energy Department Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2013 | Department of Energy Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon 2013 Energy Department Announces Student Teams, New Location for Solar Decathlon 2013 January 26, 2012 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - At an event today in Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced the 20 collegiate teams selected to compete in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 and unveiled the competition's location, the Orange County Great Park in Irvine,

  20. NETL Emergency Preparedness and Contact Information by Location

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NETL Emergency Information by Location There are currently no emergency events at any NETL location. General Emergency Preparedness Information by location Monongalia County, West Virginia Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Linn County, Oregon Shelter-in-Place or Evacuation A release of hazardous materials from an NETL site, may require a shelter-in-place or evacuation instructions. Shelter-in-place means that you should stay in your home, shut all the windows and doors, and shut off any fans that

  1. ARM: Ship navigational location and attitude: Position and Heading Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | Data Explorer Ship navigational location and attitude: Position and Heading Data Title: ARM: Ship navigational location and attitude: Position and Heading Data Ship navigational location and attitude: Position and Heading Data Authors: Scott Walton Publication Date: 2012-11-03 OSTI Identifier: 1150248 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  2. Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the U. S.: Locations and Local...

    WindExchange

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the U.S.: Locations and Local Impacts WINDPOWER 2010 Conference...

  3. Drone Detection, Video Feed Interception and Pilot Locating System...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Drone Detection, Video Feed Interception and Pilot Locating System The invention provides the capability of detecting commercially available and custom homemade remotely operated ...

  4. Alternative Fueling Station Locator - Mobile | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    version of the Alternative Fueling Station Locator, part of the Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Datacenter, allows users to search for alternative...

  5. Evaluation of Potential Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Evaluation of Proposed Hampton Roads Area Sites for Using Small Modular Reactors to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals Population Sensitivity Evaluation of Two Candidate Locations ...

  6. Check Out the New Alternative Fuel Station Locator | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The locator provides information on biodiesel, ethanol, electricity, hydrogen, natural gas ... to reveal anything from natural gas stations in Seattle to biodiesel stations in Alabama. ...

  7. Mobile Truck Stop Electrification Locator Now Available - News...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    a billion gallons of fuel each year nationwide," said Wendy Dafoe, NREL manager of DOE's Alternative Fuels and Advanced ... of electrification sites, the mobile locator can ...

  8. Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    31.1 KB) More Documents & Publications Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Slide 1 The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol

  9. NSO Explores Closure Options for Historic Nuclear Testing Locations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NSO Explores Closure Options for Historic Nuclear Testing Locations Recent environmental restoration work at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) focuses on a number of ...

  10. Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Enhancement of the visibility of objects located below the surface of a scattering medium ... The enhancement of the image contrast of a subsurface structure is based on the ...

  11. Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  12. LEDS Collaboration in Action Workshop Location | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    location close to London (Underground direct to Little Chalfont), the M25 and Heathrow Airport. The Conference Centre is designed around a major presentation suite and offers...

  13. Title 33 CFR 115 Bridge Locations and Clearances: Administrative...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    115 Bridge Locations and Clearances: Administrative Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

  14. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator Now Available - News...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator allows drivers to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85 (ethanol), hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites. This ...

  15. Argonne Site Map Showing CNM Location | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Site Map Showing CNM Location Find your way to the Center for Nanoscale Materials on the Argonne National Laboratory campus. PDF icon CNM-Argonne_map

  16. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility 6801 Industrial Road Springfield, VA Date: October 9, 2014 Time: ...

  17. National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State

    SciTech Connect

    Foxworthy, C; Fung, T; Beeler, R; Li, J; Dugorepec, J; Chang, C

    2011-07-25

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

  18. Upper Rio Grande Simulation Model (URGSiM)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable ... Arctic Climate Measurements Global Climate Models Software Sustainable Subsurface ...

  19. Modeling of the radiation belt megnetosphere in decisional timeframes

    DOEpatents

    Koller, Josef; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H.W.

    2013-04-23

    Systems and methods for calculating L* in the magnetosphere with essentially the same accuracy as with a physics based model at many times the speed by developing a surrogate trained to be a surrogate for the physics-based model. The trained model can then beneficially process input data falling within the training range of the surrogate model. The surrogate model can be a feedforward neural network and the physics-based model can be the TSK03 model. Operatively, the surrogate model can use parameters on which the physics-based model was based, and/or spatial data for the location where L* is to be calculated. Surrogate models should be provided for each of a plurality of pitch angles. Accordingly, a surrogate model having a closed drift shell can be used from the plurality of models. The feedforward neural network can have a plurality of input-layer units, there being at least one input-layer unit for each physics-based model parameter, a plurality of hidden layer units and at least one output unit for the value of L*.

  20. IR DIAL performance modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sharlemann, E.T.

    1994-07-01

    We are developing a DIAL performance model for CALIOPE at LLNL. The intent of the model is to provide quick and interactive parameter sensitivity calculations with immediate graphical output. A brief overview of the features of the performance model is given, along with an example of performance calculations for a non-CALIOPE application.