National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mo midwest region

  1. NASEO Midwest Regional Meeting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) is hosting its Midwest Regional Meeting in Des Moines, Iowa.

  2. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Midwest Region

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Midwest Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Midwest Region ...

  3. Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt056_ti_gilbert_2012_o.pdf (1.37 MB) More Documents & Publications Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project DeKalb County/Metropolitan Atlanta Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicle Project

  4. Midwest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Midwest Climate C hange a nd t he U .S. E nergy S ector: Regional v ulnerabilities a nd r esilience s olutions Summary i n B rief The M idwest i s h ome t o e xpansive a gricultural l ands, f orests i n the n orth, t he G reat L akes, s ubstantial i ndustrial a ctivity, a nd major u rban c enters. T he r egion h as a n e nergy---intensive economy, a nd i ts e lectricity m ix i s h eavily d ependent o n thermoelectric p lants, w ith c oal--- a nd n atural g as---fired p ower plants a ccounting f

  5. ,"Midwest Region Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...282016 11:29:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Underground Storage" ... Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (MMcf)","Midwest Region Natural Gas ...

  6. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary June 21, 2013

  7. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect

    James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2005-12-01

    This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for

  8. MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect

    David Ball; Judith Bradbury; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom; Neeraj Gupta; Robert Burns; Bob Dahowski

    2004-04-30

    This is the first semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

  9. Energy Efficiency as a Resource Regional Report: Midwest Region

    SciTech Connect

    Glatt, Sandy; Harry, Ryan; Shields, Garrett

    2010-06-25

    This Industrial Technologies Program report identifies the amount of energy efficiency potential within key manufacturing industries in the Midwest

  10. State and Local Code Implementation: Midwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Midwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: Midwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Isaac Elencave, Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance View the Presentation State and Local Code Implementation: Midwest Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review (637.53 KB) More Documents & Publications Midwest Building Energy Program Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review

  11. Midwest Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Midwest Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Midwest Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet) Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 2010-Jan 01/01 900 01/08 820 01/15 750 01/22 710 01/29 661 2010-Feb 02/05 604 02/12 552 02/19 502 02/26 464 2010-Mar 03/05 433 03/12 422 03/19 419 03/26 410 2010-Apr 04/02 410 04/09 429 04/16 444 04/23 462 04/30 480 2010-May

  12. Midwest Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Midwest Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Midwest Producing Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 37.50 45.20 77.20 72.70 38.10 19.90 9.40 5.50 4.00 4.60 12.20 15.70 2016 23.70 75.90 115.20 82.90 53.00 34.90 21.80 10.60 - = No Data

  13. Midwest Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Midwest Region Natural Gas Total Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 2,720,465 2,720,436 2,720,436 2,720,436 2,720,881 2,720,881 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2014 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,721,231 2,723,336 2,725,497 2,725,535 2015 2,727,987 2,727,987 2,727,987

  14. Midwest Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Midwest Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 245,791 202,093 152,913 32,351 4,462 2,642 7,377 4,478 2,266 14,497 103,084 248,313 2014 303,499 226,394 125,284 24,726 2,965 1,475 2,904 3,200 2,019 8,158 110,419 134,700 2015 243,669 277,575 114,546 18,265 3,379 2,610 6,047 3,637 2,234 4,518 49,679 115,761 2016 230,165 164,964 82,682 32,304

  15. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Midwest

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative (MIE) is hosting a webinar on Midwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by...

  16. "Table HC12.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,9.7,7.3,2.4

  17. "Table HC12.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,8.1,5.6,2.5 "Use a

  18. "Table HC12.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On"

  19. "Table HC12.2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than

  20. "Table HC12.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N" "Have Main

  1. "Table HC12.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,2.1,1.8,0.3 "Have Cooling

  2. "Table HC12.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S.",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an

  3. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Midwest

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative (MIE) is hosting a webinar on midwest impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations by nationally recognized policymakers, researchers, and educators. Speakers will highlight growing opportunities for workforce development, clean energy advancement, and increases in domestic energy production.

  4. ,"Weekly Midwest Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Midwest Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Midwest Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Weekly","11/11/2016" ,"Release Date:","11/17/2016" ,"Next Release

  5. "Table HC12.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,24.5,17.1,7.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.9,0.5,0.4

  6. ,"Midwest Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at ...dnavnghistn5030852m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  7. "Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A

  8. "Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,8.1,5.6,2.5 "Use

  9. "Table HC12.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N"

  10. "Table HC12.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,2.1,1.8,0.3 "Have Cooling

  11. MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP) MANAGING CLIMATE CHANGE AND SECURING A FUTURE FOR THE MIDWEST'S INDUSTRIAL BASE

    SciTech Connect

    David Ball; Robert Burns; Judith Bradbury; Bob Dahowski; Casie Davidson; James Dooley; Neeraj Gupta; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom

    2005-04-29

    This is the third semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two-year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

  12. ,"Midwest Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Midwest Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  13. Midwest Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Midwest Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,503,197 1,503,193 1,502,629 1,501,810 1,503,236 1,504,117 1,504,116 1,504,114 1,504,506 1,502,817 1,502,848 1,503,480 2014 1,505,645 1,504,979 1,497,798 1,502,556 1,498,128 1,498,610 1,498,610 1,498,610 1,498,887 1,496,791 1,496,848 1,497,021 2015 1,497,256 1,496,957 1,496,400 1,495,858 1,495,743 1,496,917 1,496,915

  14. Midwest Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Midwest Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage - Change in Working Gas from Same Month Previous Year (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 -63,664 -102,296 -211,632 -235,463 -214,379 -166,660 -123,165 -100,408 -77,814 -65,919 -81,637 -181,602 2014 -243,074 -255,871 -209,941 -189,692 -156,914 -124,375 -83,035 -47,387 -33,755

  15. Midwest Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttica, John; Haefke, Cliff

    2013-12-31

    The Midwest Clean Energy Application Center (CEAC) was one of eight regional centers that promoted and assisted in transforming the market for combined heat and power (CHP), waste heat to power (WHP), and district energy (DE) technologies and concepts throughout the United States between October 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. The key services the CEACs provided included: Market Opportunity Analyses – Supporting analyses of CHP market opportunities in diverse markets including industrial, federal, institutional, and commercial sectors. Education and Outreach – Providing information on the energy and non-energy benefits and applications of CHP to state and local policy makers, regulators, energy end-users, trade associations and others. Information was shared on the Midwest CEAC website: www.midwestcleanergy.org. Technical Assistance – Providing technical assistance to end-users and stakeholders to help them consider CHP, waste heat to power, and/or district energy with CHP in their facility and to help them through the project development process from initial CHP screening to installation. The Midwest CEAC provided services to the Midwest Region that included the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

  16. Climate Action Champions: Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO Climate Action Champions: Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) is a nonprofit association of city and county governments and the metropolitan planning organization for the bistate Kansas City region. They provide a forum for the region to work together to advance social, economic and environmental progress. MARC received the Climate Action Champion designation in consortium with the City

  17. 2017 Midwest Cleantech University Prize for Student Entrepreneurs Now Open!

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy 2017 Midwest Cleantech University Prize for Student Entrepreneurs Now Open! 2017 Midwest Cleantech University Prize for Student Entrepreneurs Now Open! October 25, 2016 - 6:57pm Addthis Applications are open for university-based cleantech companies in the Midwest to compete in Clean Energy Trust's (CET's) regional Cleantech University Prize (UP) competition. Cleantech UP, sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE),

  18. Hawkeye Renewables formerly Midwest Renewables | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    (formerly Midwest Renewables) Place: Iowa Falls, Iowa Zip: 50126 Product: Midwest bioethanol producer References: Hawkeye Renewables (formerly Midwest Renewables)1 This...

  19. Midwest Industrial Energy Efficiency Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-25

    This Industrial Technologies Program handbook connects industry with the various energy efficiency resources available in the midwest.

  20. 2016 Midwest Energy Solutions Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance invites all energy stakeholders to gather at the annual Midwest Energy Solutions Conference to raise awareness and reinforce the importance of energy efficiency in the Midwest. This annual conference is about celebrating accomplishments and inspirations in energy efficiency, as well as laying out the efficiency program and policy landscape for the coming year.

  1. Regional Energy Efficiency Programs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation covers regional industrial energy efficiency programs in the Midwest, Southeast, and Southwest.

  2. Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  3. Midwest Region Alternative Fuels Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  4. MEEA Midwest Energy Solutions Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) is hosting its annual conference at the Chicago Hilton and Towers in Chicago, IL, on Jan. 28-30, 2015.

  5. Midwest Energy Cooperative | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Phone Number: 800.492.5989 Website: www.teammidwest.com Twitter: @TeamMidwestCoop Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesMidwest-Energy-Cooperative315135885402 Outage...

  6. Midwest Biodiesel Products | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Products Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Biodiesel Products Place: Caseyville, Illinois Zip: 62232 Product: Midwest Biodiesel Products, Inc. is an Illinois based...

  7. Midwest Wind Finance LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Wind Finance LLC Place: Minnesota Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project equity finance provider. References: Midwest Wind Finance...

  8. Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation Place: Joice, Iowa Zip: Iowa 50446 Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product: Midwest...

  9. Midwest Underground Technology | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Underground Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Midwest Underground Technology Facility Midwest Underground Technology Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind...

  10. Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator Place: Carmel, IN References: SGIC1 This...

  11. 2016 Midwest Energy Solutions Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Once a year, MEEA invites all energy stakeholders to gather at our annual Midwest Energy Solutions Conference to raise awareness and reinforce the importance of energy efficiency in the Midwest. MES is about celebrating accomplishments in energy efficiency, as well as laying out the efficiency program and policy landscape for the coming year.

  12. Midwest Hydro Users Group Meeting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Midwest Hydro Users Group will be holding their annual Fall meeting on November 12th and 13th in Wausau, Wisconsin.  An Owners-only meeting on the afternoon of the 12th followed by a full...

  13. ITC Midwest LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ITC Midwest LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: ITC Midwest LLC Place: Michigan Phone Number: (877) 482-4829 or 319-297-6731 Website: www.itc-holdings.comitc-midwe Twitter:...

  14. Tuesday Webcast for Industry: Regional Energy Efficiency Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Webcast for Industry: Regional Energy Efficiency Programs December 13, 2011 MEEA's Midwest Industrial Initiative Stacey Paradis Deputy Director Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance ...

  15. Midwest Alliance of Sovereign Tribes Summer Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Midwest Alliance of Sovereign Tribes (MAST) Summer Meeting is a two-day meeting featuring tribal leader roundtable discussions.

  16. Fact #756: December 3, 2012 Midwest Produces Two-Thirds of All Light Vehicles

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although there are many new vehicle assembly plants located in the South, the Midwest region continues to produce about two-thirds of all light vehicles. The year 2009 was the low point for vehicle...

  17. Midwest Transmission Workshop II Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Bryan

    2002-12-05

    OAK-B135 After introductions of all participants, Abby Arnold, RESOLVE, reviewed the purpose of the meeting and the agenda. The purpose of the workshop was to share the results of the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) scenario development for wind and other fuel sources and the corresponding implications for transmission throughout the MISO control area. The workshop agenda is included in Attachment A.

  18. Midwest Grain Processors MGP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Midwest Grain Processors (MGP) Place: Lakota, Iowa Zip: 50451 Product: Iowa-based bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock. Coordinates: 48.042535, -98.335979 Show Map...

  19. Midwest Biodiesel Producers LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Biodiesel Producers LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Biodiesel Producers LLC Place: Alexandria, South Dakota Zip: 57311 Product: South Dakota-based biodiesel producer....

  20. Midwest Residential Energy Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Residential Energy Conference Midwest Residential Energy Conference March 7, 2017 9:00AM EST to March 8, 2017 5:00PM EST Lexington, Kentucky

  1. Midwest Wind Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Wind Energy LLC Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60611 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind farm developer, owner and operator....

  2. Midwest Residential Energy Conference | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Residential Energy Conference Midwest Residential Energy Conference March 7, 2017 9:00AM EST to March 8, 2017 5:00PM EST Lexington, Kentucky

  3. Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation Partners LLC | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Sector: Wind energy Product: Iberdrola subsidiary that develops wind farms in Midwest USA and Canada. References: Midwest Renewable Energy Corporation Partners LLC1 This...

  4. KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Owner KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Energy Purchaser KTFC Midwest Bible Radio Location IA Coordinates 42.4837, -96.3068 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  5. The Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name: The Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Place: Chicago, IL Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Midwest Manufacturing Co...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Midwest Manufacturing Co - IL 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MIDWEST MANUFACTURING CO (IL.0-04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated...

  7. Upper Midwest Hydrogen Initiative UMHI | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Midwest Hydrogen Initiative UMHI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Upper Midwest Hydrogen Initiative (UMHI) Place: Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip: 55407 Product: An industry-led,...

  8. Midwest Building Energy Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes02_paradis_040213.pdf (652.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Stretch/Reach Codes Appliance Standards and Building Codes Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices

  9. Midwest Region Combined Heat and Power Projects

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's CHP Technical Assistance Partnerships (CHP TAPs) have compiled a select number of combined heat and power (CHP) project profiles, which are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. 

  10. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Breakout Session Summary (372.05 KB) More Documents & Publications Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop Multimaterial Joining Workshop Manufacturing ...

  11. Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... State Museum Institute Ohio Coal Development Office within ... Specifically, the MRCSP demonstrated the safety and ... Mining operations ceased at different times for each of the ...

  12. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... studies for multi-material joining Joining and corrosion ... A cumbersome process for producing ... stamping operations used with other material systems Aluminum forming ...

  13. Midwest Energy Solutions Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Solutions Conference Midwest Energy Solutions Conference February 22, 2017 9:00AM EST to February 24, 2017 5:00PM EST Chicago Hilton and Towers Chicago, Illinois

  14. CHP in the Midwest - Presentation from the July 2010 Advancing Renewables

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    in the Midwest Conference | Department of Energy in the Midwest - Presentation from the July 2010 Advancing Renewables in the Midwest Conference CHP in the Midwest - Presentation from the July 2010 Advancing Renewables in the Midwest Conference This presentation by Recycled Enegy Development (RED) from the "Advancing Renewables in the Midwest Conference" held on July 15, 2010, proposes policy changes that could make the Midwest and the United States a world leader in reducing

  15. Midwest Has Potential to Store Hundreds of Years of CO2 Emissions |

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Geologic capacity exists to permanently store hundreds of years of regional carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in nine states stretching from Indiana to New Jersey, according to injection field tests conducted by the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). MRCSP's just-released Phase II final report indicates the region has likely total storage of 245.5 billion metric tons of CO2, mostly in deep saline rock formations, a large capacity compared to present

  16. Midwest States Save Energy Now Partnership Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Midwest States Save Energy Now Partnership Program Midwest States Save Energy Now Partnership Program Map highlighting the Midwest states: Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Kentucky The industrial sector accounts for approximately one-third of all energy consumed in the United States each year. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO; formerly the Industrial Technologies Program) developed multiple resources and a best

  17. Petrich receives ACS Midwest Award | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Petrich receives ACS Midwest Award [PHOTO]Jacob Petrich Jacob Petrich, an Ames Laboratory scientist and professor of chemistry at Iowa State University, has been named the winner of the 2016 ACS Midwest Award from the American Chemical Society. Petrich is studying specialized analytical techniques for understanding chemical phenomena and solar energy conversion materials in the Ames Laboratory's Chemical and Biological Sciences division. The ACS Midwest Award was established in 1944 to publicly

  18. Midwest Research Institute Receives Contract Extension to Manage NREL -

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Midwest Research Institute Receives Contract Extension to Manage NREL February 9, 2004 Golden, Colo. - Midwest Research Institute (MRI) in Kansas City has received a four-year contract extension to manage and operate the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The NREL contract was last competed in 1998 and this extends MRI's management for the full 10 years. Midwest Research Institute has managed NREL since the Laboratory's founding as

  19. Midwest Renewable Energy Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Services LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Renewable Energy Services LLC Place: Florida Zip: FL 33408 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: MRE Services provides...

  20. Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc (MEPI) Place: O'Neill, Nebraska Zip: 68763 Product: Focused on ethanol production....

  1. Midwest Renewable Energy Credits LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Credits LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Renewable Energy Credits LLC Place: Florida Sector: Renewable Energy Product: MRE Credits markets renewable energy credits to...

  2. Midwest Renewable Energy Projects LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Projects LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Renewable Energy Projects LLC Place: Florida Zip: FL 33408 Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product: MRE Projects LLC is...

  3. Midwest Energy Inc. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    allows Midwest to improve power system models and analysis tools, increasing reliability of grid operations.3 Equipment 9 Relay-based Phasor Measurement Units...

  4. EERE Leadership Discusses Energy Innovation in Midwest | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    EERE Leadership Discusses Energy Innovation in Midwest Cori Sue Morris Communications ... game-changing research and innovation needed to advance America's clean energy economy. ...

  5. Mo-99

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    its project for domestic production of molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) without highly enriched uranium (HEU).

    Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m, which is the most widely...

  6. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  7. Threatened and endangered fish and wildlife of the midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, D.W.; Robeck, K.E.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains information of federally-listed endangered and/or threatened fish and wildlife occurring in the midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The information was compiled as a support document for the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) project sponsored by the Regional Assessments Division of the Office of Technology Impacts within the Department of Energy. The information on midwestern endangered species distribution, habitats, and reasons for population decline included in this document are designed to help assess the potential for adverse impacts if energy activities are sited within the general range of an endangered species. It is hoped that this document will thereby enhance the reliability of one portion of energy-related assessments performed in the Midwest. This report considers only those species listed prior to October 1979 as endangered and/or threatened in the federal endangered species list published in the Federal Register and that have been known to occur in the region in the last 20 years.

  8. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than

  9. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  10. Mo-99

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes to further develop its technology to produce Mo-99 via neutron capture, bringing the total NNSA support to this project to the maximum of 25...

  11. Midwest Region Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 7,437 14,235 22,615 66,408 136,813 155,687 156,839 166,332 149,212 119,162 35,641 16,420 2015 7,171 4,815 20,994 74,813 ...

  12. Midwest Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1,955,319 1,742,978 1,640,311 1,681,894 1,816,029 1,970,375 2,124,374 2,287,540 2,434,709 2,544,399 2,469,652 2,351,566 2015 2,114,435 1,841,510 1,747,800 1,804,413 1,933,388...

  13. Midwest Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 296,063 212,159 102,669 -41,683 -133,848 -154,212 -153,935 -163,132 -147,193 -111,005 74,778 118,280 2015 236,452 272,661 ...

  14. Geothermometry At U.S. Midwest Region (Vugrinovich, 1987) | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Michigan "The silica heat flow estimator does provide estimates of surface heat flow which appear to be in good...

  15. Midwest Regions Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 181,071 -101,059 -126,362

  16. Midwest Region Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Working Gas...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 449,673 237,999 142,513 179,338 317,901 471,765 625,764 788,930 935,822 1,047,609 972,803 854,545 2015 617,716 345,091 ...

  17. Midwest Region Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    375 2,180,135 2,319,830 2,461,785 2,582,258 2,578,619 2014-2015 Base Gas 1,496,379 1,496,378 1,488,687 1,489,658 1,487,866 1,487,894 2014-2015 Working Gas 564,995 683,757 831,144...

  18. Midwest Region Natural Gas Working Underground Storage Capacity (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    May 2003 1 Despite a national economic slowdown and a 4.9 percent drop in overall U.S. natural gas consumption in 2001, 1 more than 3,571 miles of pipeline and a record 12.8 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of natural gas pipeline capacity were added to the national pipeline network during 2002 (Table 1). The estimated cost was $4.4 billion. Overall, 54 natural gas pipeline projects were completed during 2002 (Figure 1, Table 2). 2 Of these, 34 were expansions of existing pipeline systems or

  19. Buildings*","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    B5. Census Region and Division, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central","Mountain","Pacific" "All

  20. Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance: Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Building America Webinar Series Standardized Retrofit Packages - What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance: Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Scott Yee March 19 th , 2014 1 Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance 2 MEEA is a collaborative network whose purpose is to advance energy efficiency to support sustainable economic development and environmental preservation. Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR) Midwest Energy Efficiency

  1. Forensic Science Education Programs in the Midwest | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education Programs in the Midwest Carroll University Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.), Chemistry Major with a Forensic Science emphasis Chemistry Program | Forensic Science emphasis Columbia College of Missouri Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree in Forensic Science Forensic Science Program Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Master of Science (M.S.) Degree in Forensic Science Forensic and Investigative Sciences Program Iowa State University

  2. Midwest Forensics Resource Center Project Summary June 2005

    SciTech Connect

    David Baldwin

    2005-06-01

    The mission of the MFRC Research and Development Program, is to provide technological advances in forensic science for the benefit of our regional partners as well as the forensic community at large. Key areas of forensic science need are identified through our interactions with our Midwest partners and our R&D advisory group, as well as through our participation in national meetings in forensic science. Under the sponsorship of the National Institute of Justice, the MFRC solicits proposals for the development of practical and useful technology, instrumentation, and methodology that address needs in areas related to forensic science and its application to operational crime laboratories. The MFRC facilitates proposal development by working to establish partnerships between researchers and our regional partners. The MFRC administers a peer-review of the proposals and then funds the selected projects at a cost of approximately $55,000 each, with a 12-month period of performance. The process for selection of these projects includes the following steps: (1) drafting of a call for proposals by MFRC staff, (2) review of the draft call by members of the R&D advisory committee, (3) review and approval of the call by NIJ, (4) issuance of the call to ISU, Ames Laboratory, regional partners, and research organizations, (5) receipt of proposals, (6) review of proposals by R&D advisory committee, (7) ranking and selection by MFRC staff using advisory committee reviews, with concurrence by NIJ, (8) notification of proposers, (9) receipt and review of progress reports by MFRC, (10) receipt and review of final reports by MFRC, R&D advisory committee, and NIJ. The decision to fund any specific project is based upon a peer-reviewed call-for-proposal system administered by the MFRC. The reviewers are crime laboratory specialists and scientists who are asked to rate the proposals on four criteria areas including: (1) relevance to the mission of the MFRC, (2) technical approach and

  3. Future of Clean Energy in the Midwest - Joint Center for Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    October 21, 2014, Videos Future of Clean Energy in the Midwest David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy for the Department of Energy; Amy ...

  4. Midwest Energy (Gas and Electric)- How$mart Energy Efficiency Finance Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Energy offers its residential and small commercial electricity and natural gas customers in good standing a way to finance energy efficiency improvements on eligible properties. Under the...

  5. Application experiences with distributed resources in the Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    O`Sullivan, J.B.; Jacobs, K.; Guzy, L.

    1998-12-31

    Distributed generation consists of the use of integrated or stand-alone natural gas or liquid fueled power generation equipment. These distributed resources (DR) may provide power in the 5-kW to 50-MW range and can provide power directly to the customer, thereby potentially deferring additional transmission and distribution systems upgrades by the utility and improving power quality and reliability for the customer. Compact, technically advanced units in a variety of technologies presently available include diesel engines, lean burning gas fired internal combustion engine generator sets, cogeneration packages, small microturbines, and fuel cells. This class of resources has the potential to provide a cost effective, reliable, addition to a utility`s generating resource mix and is once again gaining favor in era characterized both by uncertainty and opportunity. Strategic deployment of these resources can also eliminate or delay expensive central plant capacity additions. Installations may be tailored to meet customer technical and financial requirements with projects being developed by utilities on customer sites as well as by Independent Power Producers and others. Economic constraints as well as key environmental and operating issues must be understood and clarified for those seeking to capitalize on this approach. As the first phase of a project with the objective of developing a best practices approach to implementing DR, EPRI`s project Application Experiences with Distributed Resources in the Midwest examined these issues. This report contains the results of an in-depth technical survey, which was given to distributed resource sites throughout the Midwest. Aspects of DR projects involving electrical interconnection, siting and permitting, operations and maintenance and various operating practices are examined.

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Heating Oil Price Model

    Reports and Publications

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential heating oil price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  7. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Regional Residential Propane Price Model

    Reports and Publications

    2009-01-01

    The regional residential propane price module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide residential retail price forecasts for the 4 Census regions: Northeast, South, Midwest, and West.

  8. The potential impacts of a competitive wholesale market in the midwest: A preliminary examination of centralized dispatch

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Bartholomew, Emily; Eto, Joseph H.; Hale, Douglas; Luong, Thanh

    2004-07-01

    In March 2005, the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) will begin operating the first-ever wholesale market for electricity in the central and upper Midwestern portion of the United States. Region-wide, centralized, security-constrained, bid-based dispatch will replace the current system of decentralized dispatch by individual utilities and control areas. This report focuses on how the operation of generators may change under centralized dispatch. We analyze a stylized example of these changes by comparing a base case dispatch based on a ''snapshot'' taken from MISO's state estimator for an actual, historical dispatch (4 p.m., July 7, 2003) to a hypothetical, centralized dispatch that seeks to minimize the total system cost of production, using estimated cost data collected by the EIA. Based on these changes in dispatch, we calculate locational marginal prices, which in turn reveals the location of congestion within MISO's footprint, as well as the distribution of congestion revenues. We also consider two sensitivity scenarios that examine (1) the effect of changes in MISO membership (2003 vs. 2004 membership lists), and (2) different load and electrical data, based on a snapshot from a different date and time (1 p.m., Feb. 18, 2004). Although our analysis offers important insights into how the MISO market could operate when it opens, we do not address the question of the total benefits or costs of creating a wholesale market in the Midwest.

  9. Intermetallic phase formation and breakdown of Mo diffusion barriers in Ni-Mo-Cu and Ni-Mo-Monel 400 diffusion triads

    SciTech Connect

    Shueh, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the kinetics of compound formation and the interdiffusion behavior of a sacrificial type diffusion barrier in a model system. Ni-Mo diffusion couples were annealed in an inert atmosphere at 950-1050{degree}C for 5-300 hours. Ni-Mo-Cu and Ni-Mo-Monel 400 diffusion triads with varied thicknesses of Mo layers sandwiched by Ni and C or Monel 400 disks were annealed under the same conditions. Parabolic growth of the intermetallic phase, {beta}, was observed at 1000{degree}C and 1050{degree}C in the semi-infinite Ni-Mo diffusion couple an din the Ni-Mo-Cu diffusion triad when a finite thickness of the Mo layer remained. The {beta} phase exhibited more or less planar morphology except in the case of some extremely rugged interfaces which were associated with grain boundaries adjacent to these interfaces. Dissociation and recession of the compound layer in Ni-Mo-Cu diffusion triads initiated when the Mo layer was nearly consumed. The product phases of the dissociation reaction are consistent with those predicted from the Ni-Mo-Cu ternary phase diagram. Numerical methods based on a finite difference technique, and an analytical solution based on diffusion controlled parabolic growth and quasi-steady-state approximation in the {beta} phase region were used to analyze the results.

  10. One-way coupling of an integrated assessment model and a water resources model: evaluation and implications of future changes over the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Voisin, Nathalie; Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-18

    An integrated model is being developed to advance our understanding of the interactions between human activities, terrestrial system and water cycle, and how system interactions will be affected by a changing climate at the regional scale. As a first step towards that goal, a global integrated assessment model including a waterdemand model is coupled offline with a land surface hydrology routing water resources management model. A spatial and temporal disaggregation approach is developed to project the annual regional water demand simulations into a daily time step and subbasin representation. The model demonstrated reasonable ability to represent the historical flow regulation and water supply over the Midwest (Missouri, Upper Mississippi and Ohio). Implications for the future flow regulation, water supply and supply deficit are investigated using a climate change projection with the B1 emission scenario which affects both natural flow and water demand. Over the Midwest, changes in flow regulation are mostly driven by the change in natural flow due to the limited storage capacity over the Ohio and Upper Mississippi river basins. The changes in flow and demand have a combined effect on the Missouri Summer regulated flow. The supply deficit tends to be driven by the change in flow over the region. Spatial analysis demonstrates the relationship between the supply deficit and the change in demand over urban areas not along a main river or with limited storage, and over areas upstream of groundwater dependent fields with therefore overestimated demand.

  11. MoS2

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... mechanisms for its eventual aging and demise. Figure 3: Typical x-ray diffraction of the poorly crystalline MoS phase. (reference 5) Often transmission electron microscopy (TEM) ...

  12. Development and Implementation of the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium CO2-Technology Transfer Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Sallie E.

    2015-06-30

    In 2009, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), in collaboration with the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), created a regional technology training center to disseminate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology gained through leadership and participation in regional carbon sequestration projects. This technology training center was titled and branded as the Sequestration Training and Education Program (STEP). Over the last six years STEP has provided local, regional, national, and international education and training opportunities for engineers, geologists, service providers, regulators, executives, K-12 students, K-12 educators, undergraduate students, graduate students, university and community college faculty members, and participants of community programs and functions, community organizations, and others. The goal for STEP educational programs has been on knowledge sharing and capacity building to stimulate economic recovery and development by training personnel for commercial CCS projects. STEP has worked with local, national and international professional organizations and regional experts to leverage existing training opportunities and provide stand-alone training. This report gives detailed information on STEP activities during the grant period (2009-2015).

  13. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The first day of the event will focus on the job and education fair, time with exhibitors, and the Iowa Wind Energy Association's annual membership meeting. The second day will be a traditional...

  14. Sustainable bioenergy production from marginal lands in the US Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, Ilya; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Gross, Katherine L.; Robertson, G. P.

    2013-01-24

    Long-term measurements of global warming impact coupled with spatially explicit modeling suggests that both climate benefits and the production potential of cellulosic crops grown on marginal lands of the US North Central region are substantial but will be insufficient to meet long-term biofuel needs.

  15. Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-230-4 International Transmission Company: Supplemental Comments of the Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supplemental comments of the Midwest Independent Transmission System Operaton on the application from International Transmission Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Latty Avenue Site - MO 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Former Cotter Site, Latty Avenue Properties Contemporary Metals Corp. Continental Mining and Milling MO.04-1 MO.04-2 MO.04-5 MO.04-6 MO.06-8 MO.06-11 Location: 9200 Latty ...

  17. Summary of the Midwest conference on small-scale hydropower in the Midwest: an old technology whose time has come

    SciTech Connect

    1980-05-01

    A variety of decision makers convened to examine and discuss certain significant problems associated with small-scale hydroelectric development in the Midwestern region, comprised of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The conference opened with an introductory panel of resource persons who outlined the objectives of the conference, presented information on small-scale hydro, and described the materials available to conference participants. A series of workshop sessions followed. Two of the workshop sessions discussed problems and policy responses raised by state and Federal regulation. The remaining two workshops dealt with economic issues confronting small-scale hydro development and the operation and usefulness of the systems dynamics model developed by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College. A plenary session and recommendations completed the workshop.

  18. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less

  19. Regional coal-mining employment in the United States from 1985 to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.D.; Hoag, J.H.

    1984-07-01

    Mining employment projections for 15 coal-producing regions in the US indicate that substantial regional reallocation of employment will occur over the time frame considered. The East and Midwest are expected to be net losers of employment, while a major portion of the Appalachian coal region and the West will show considerable growth. Further analysis to separate the percentage of change in employment into the components of change show major dislocations in the coal-mining industry. Historically, mining employment response to such dislocation has been sluggish. If major migration of mining employment does not take place, there will be significant unemployment in the East and Midwest. 2 figures, 5 tables.

  20. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... Yes Yes No No 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US MO No Car CAR IS PARKED WITHIN 20 FT OF ELECTRICAL OUTLET More highlights from RECS on housing characteristics and energy-related ...

  1. Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production

    SciTech Connect

    Liem, Peng Hong; Tran, Hoai Nam; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Arbie, Bakri

    2014-09-30

    To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor)

  2. Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Von Thoma, Ed; Ojzcyk, Cindy

    2012-12-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored.

  3. Mo-Si alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  4. SSL Demonstration: Street Lighting, Kansas City, MO

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing an SSL street lighting demonstration at nine separate installations in Kansas City, MO.

  5. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tkac, Peter; Rotsch, David A.; Stepinski, Dominique; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Harvey, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  6. Practices and Processes of Leading High Performance Home Builders in the Upper Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Von Thoma, E.; Ojczyk, C.

    2012-12-01

    The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team proposed this study to gain insight into the business, sales, and construction processes of successful high performance builders. The knowledge gained by understanding the high performance strategies used by individual builders, as well as the process each followed to move from traditional builder to high performance builder, will be beneficial in proposing more in-depth research to yield specific action items to assist the industry at large transform to high performance new home construction. This investigation identified the best practices of three successful high performance builders in the upper Midwest. In-depth field analysis of the performance levels of their homes, their business models, and their strategies for market acceptance were explored. All three builders commonly seek ENERGY STAR certification on their homes and implement strategies that would allow them to meet the requirements for the Building America Builders Challenge program. Their desire for continuous improvement, willingness to seek outside assistance, and ambition to be leaders in their field are common themes. Problem solving to overcome challenges was accepted as part of doing business. It was concluded that crossing the gap from code-based building to high performance based building was a natural evolution for these leading builders.

  7. Measurement of the direct CP -violating parameter ACP in the decay D<mo>+ stretchy='false'>→mo>K<mo>-mo>π<mo>+mo>π+>

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-12-01

    We measure the direct CP-violating parameter ACP for the decay of the charged charm meson, Dmo>+ stretchy="false">→mo>Kmo>-mo>πmo>+mo>πmo>+> (and charge conjugate), using the full 10.4 fbmo>->1 sample of ppmo accent="true" stretchy="false">¯mo> collisions at smo>=>1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from Bmo stretchy="false">→mo

  8. EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric tons of CO2 over a 4-year period. The project and EA are on hold.

  9. A WSe{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} heterostructure photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Flöry, Nikolaus; Jain, Achint; Bharadwaj, Palash; Parzefall, Markus; Novotny, Lukas; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji

    2015-09-21

    We report on the photovoltaic effect in a WSe{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} heterojunction, demonstrating gate tunable current rectification with on/off ratios of over 10{sup 4}. Spatially resolved photocurrent maps show the photovoltaic effect to originate from the entire overlap region. Compared to WSe{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2} heterostructures, our devices perform better at long wavelengths and yield higher quantum efficiencies, in agreement with Shockley-Queisser theory.

  10. mo_whitson.jpg | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information mo_whitson

  11. Mo99 Production Plant Layout

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Naranjo, Angela Carol

    2015-06-25

    The NorthStar Medical Technologies 99Mo production facility configuration is envisioned to be 8 accelerator pairs irradiating 7 100Mo targets (one spare accelerator pair undergoing maintenance while the other 7 pairs are irradiating targets). The required shielding in every direction for the accelerators is initially estimated to be 10 feet of concrete. With the accelerator pairs on one (ground) level and spaced with the required shielding between adjacent pairs, the only practical path for target insertion and removal while minimizing floor space is vertical. The current scheme then requires a target vertical lift of nominally 10 feet through a shield stack. It is envisioned that the lift will be directly into a hot cell where an activated target can be removed from its holder and a new target attached and lowered. The hot cell is on a rail system so that a single hot cell can service all active target locations, as well as deliver the ready targets to the separations lab. On this rail system, coupled to the hot cell, will be a helium recovery and clean-up system. All helium coolant equipment is located on the upper level near to the target removal point.

  12. Fact #675: May 16, 2011 Gasoline Prices by Region, May 2, 2011 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy 5: May 16, 2011 Gasoline Prices by Region, May 2, 2011 Fact #675: May 16, 2011 Gasoline Prices by Region, May 2, 2011 The West Coast region paid the highest prices for gasoline averaging $4.14 for a gallon of regular gasoline while the Rocky Mountain region paid the least at $3.70 per gallon. The southern states, including the Gulf Coast Region and the Lower Atlantic region, paid less than the states in the Midwest, Central Atlantic and New England regions where gasoline was about

  13. Phase Development in a U-7 wt.% Mo vs. Al-7 wt.% Ge Diffusion Couple

    SciTech Connect

    E. Perez; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; Y.H. Sohn

    2013-10-01

    Fuel development for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has demonstrated that U-Mo alloys in contact with Al develop interaction regions with phases that have poor irradiation behavior. The addition of Si to the Al has been considered with positive results. Compositional modification to replace Si with Ge is now under evaluation to attempt to further improve irradiation behavior. In this study, the microstructural and phase development of a diffusion couple of U-7 wt.% Mo in contact with Al-7 wt.% Ge was examined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The interdiffusion zone developed a microstructure that included the cubic-UGe3 phase and amorphous phases. The UGe3 phase was observed with and without Mo and Al solid solutioning developing a (U,Mo)(Al,Ge)3 phase.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis Airport - MO 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - MO 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites St. Louis Airport, MO Alternate Name(s): Airport Site St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS) Former Robertson Storage Area Robertson Airport MO.01-1 ...

  15. Modulation of extremes in the Atlantic region by modes of climate variability/change: A mechanistic coupled regional model study

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2015-01-09

    During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: 1) Explored the parameter space of component models to minimize regional model bias 2) Assessed the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, focusing in particular on the role of the oceanic barrier layer 3) Contributed to the activities of the U.S. CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 4) Assessed the impact of lateral and lower boundary conditions on extreme flooding events in the U.S. Midwest in regional model simulations 5) Analyzed the concurrent impact of El Nio-Southern Oscillation and Atlantic Meridional Mode on Atlantic Hurricane activity using observations and regional model simulations

  16. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Nine ...

  17. Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR Jump to: navigation, search Name: Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR) Place: Jefferson City,...

  18. Update to M&O Contractor Model Subcontract entitled "Standard...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    M&O Contractor Model Subcontract entitled "Standard Research Subcontract (Educational Institution or Nonprofit Organization)" Update to M&O Contractor Model Subcontract entitled ...

  19. Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene/ Mo S 2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene Mo S 2 van der Waals ... Title: Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene Mo S 2 van der Waals ...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Nuclear Corp - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNITED NUCLEAR CORP. (MO.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate ...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Lake Landfill - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lake Landfill - MO 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: West Lake Landfill (MO.05) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

  2. High blue-near ultraviolet photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene-MoS{sub 2}-metal heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wi, Sungjin; Chen, Mikai; Nam, Hongsuk; Liu, Amy C.; Meyhofer, Edgar; Liang, Xiaogan

    2014-06-09

    We present a study on the photodiode response of vertically stacked graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures in which MoS{sub 2} layers are doped with various plasma species. In comparison with undoped heterostructures, such doped ones exhibit significantly improved quantum efficiencies in both photovoltaic and photoconductive modes. This indicates that plasma-doping-induced built-in potentials play an important role in photocurrent generation. As compared to indium-tin-oxide/ MoS{sub 2}/metal structures, the presented graphene/MoS{sub 2}/metal heterostructures exhibit greatly enhanced quantum efficiencies in the blue-near ultraviolet region, which is attributed to the low density of recombination centers at graphene/MoS{sub 2} heterojunctions. This work advances the knowledge for making photo-response devices based on layered materials.

  3. Thermophysical Properties of U-10MO Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Phillips; G. S. Mickum; D. E. Burkes

    2010-11-01

    This report provides an overview of thermophysical properties of unirradiated uranium alloyed with ten weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo), with particular focus on those material properties needed for modeling of new fuels for HPRRs (High Performance Research Reactors). The report contains both historical data available in the literature on U-10Mo, as well as more recent results conducted by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative fuel development program. The main use of the report is intended as a standard U-10Mo alloy properties reference for reactor models and simulations.

  4. State and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives Meeting, Challenges for State and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Initiatives Meeting March 19, 2007 Notes from "Coalition Management Breakout" FACILITATOR: Rolf Nordstrom, Upper Midwest Hydrogen Initiative, Great Plains Institute: www.umhi.org, Rnordstrom@gpisd.net, 612-278-7156. Challenges for State and Regional Hydrogen Initiatives: 1. Hard to get money to do much when we're out in front of mass commercialization. We're all trying to serve an industry that is not yet profitable. 2. State programs are very self-focused. If you, as a private

  5. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http:www.eia.govsurveyformeia14instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https:...

  6. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  7. Oxidation, Reduction, and Condensation of Alcohols over (MO3)3 (M=Mo, W) Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zongtang; Li, Zhenjun; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Li, Shenggang; Hennigan, Jamie M.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

    2014-10-02

    The reactions of deuterated methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, 2-butanol and t-butanol over cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) clusters were studied experimentally with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and theoretically with coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory and density functional theory. The reactions of two alcohols per M3O9 cluster are required to provide agreement with experiment for D2O release, dehydrogenation and dehydration. The reaction begins with the elimination of water by proton transfers and forms an intermediate dialkoxy species which can undergo further reaction. Dehydration proceeds by a ? hydrogen transfer to a terminal M=O. Dehydrogenation takes place via an ? hydrogen transfer to an adjacent MoVI = O atom or a WVI metal center with redox involved for M = Mo and no redox for M = W. The two channels have comparable activation energies. H/D exchange to produce alcohols can take place after olefin is released or via the dialkoxy species depending on the alcohol and the cluster. The Lewis acidity of the metal center with WVI being larger than MoVI results in the increased reactivity of W3O9 over Mo3O9 for dehydrogenation and dehydration.

  8. Elastic modulus of phases in Ti–Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-dong; Liu, Yong; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Zhang, Tuo-yang; Lan, Xiao-dong; Yao, Tian-hang

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a series of binary Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were prepared using non-consumable arc melting. The microstructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, and the elastic modulus was evaluated by nanoindentation testing technique. The evolution of the volume fractions of ω phase was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the phase constitution and elastic modulus of the Ti–Mo alloys are sensitive to the Mo content. Ti–3.2Mo and Ti–8Mo alloys containing only α and β phases, respectively, have a low elastic modulus. In contrast, Ti–4.5Mo, Ti–6Mo, Ti–7Mo alloys, with different contents of ω phase, have a high elastic modulus. A simple micromechanical model was used to calculate the elastic modulus of ω phase (E{sub ω}), which was determined to be 174.354 GPa. - Highlights: • Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were investigated. • XPS was used to investigate the volume fractions of ω phase. • The elastic modulus of Ti–Mo alloys is sensitive to the Mo content. • The elastic modulus of ω phase was determined to be 174.354 GPa.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rogers Iron Works Co - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Ohio Analytical Data Sheet 9908; August 2, 1956 MO.10-2 - MemorandumChecklist, Williams to File; Subject: Rogers Iron; June 1, 1990 MO.10-3 - DOE Memorandum; Williams to the...

  10. Accelerator Production Options for 99MO

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Shortages of {sup 99}Mo, the most commonly used diagnostic medical isotope, have caused great concern and have prompted numerous suggestions for alternate production methods. A wide variety of accelerator-based approaches have been suggested. In this paper we survey and compare the various accelerator-based approaches.

  11. Microstructure evolution in solution treated Ti15Mo alloy processed by high pressure torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Jane?ek, Milo; ?ek, Jakub; Strsk, Josef; Vclavov, Kristna; Hruka, Petr; Polyakova, Veronika; Gatina, Svetlana; Semenova, Irina

    2014-12-15

    Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of ultra-fine grained Ti15Mo alloy processed by high pressure torsion were investigated. High pressure torsion straining resulted in strong grain refinement as-observed by transmission electron microscopy. Microhardness and light microscopy showed two distinct regions (i) a central region with radial material flow and low microhardness (340 HV) and (ii) a peripheral region with rotational material flow and high microhardness (430 HV). Positron annihilation spectroscopy showed that the only detectable defects in the material are dislocations, whose density increases with the radial distance and the number of high pressure torsion revolutions. The local chemical environment around defects does not differ significantly from the average composition. - Highlights: Beta-Ti alloy Ti15Mo was processed by high pressure torsion (HPT). Lateral inhomogeneity of the microstructure and microhardness was found. Dislocations are the only lattice defects detectable by positron annihilation. Molybdenum is not preferentially segregated along dislocation cores.

  12. Development Of Sustainable Biobased Products And Bioenergy In Cooperation With The Midwest Consortium For Sustainable Biobased Products And Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ladisch; Randy Woodson

    2009-03-18

    Collaborative efforts of Midwest Consortium have been put forth to add value to distiller's grains by further processing them into fermentable sugars, ethanol, and a protein rich co-product consistent with a pathway to a biorenewables industry (Schell et al, 2008). These studies were recently published in the enclosed special edition (Volume 99, Issue 12) of Bioresource Technology journal. Part of them have demonstrated the utilization of distillers grains as additional feedstock for increased ethanol production in the current dry grind process (Kim et al., 2008a, b; Dien et al.,2008, Ladisch et al., 2008a, b). Results showed that both liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) were effective for enhancing digestibility of distiller's grains. Enzymatic digestion of distiller's grains resulted in more than 90% glucose yield under standard assay conditions, although the yield tends to drop as the concentration of dry solids increases. Simulated process mass balances estimated that hydrolysis and fermentation of distillers grains can increase the ethanol yield by 14% in the current dry milling process (Kim et al., 2008c). Resulting co-products from the modified process are richer in protein and oil contents than conventional distiller's grains, as determined both experimentally and computationally. Other research topics in the special edition include water solubilization of DDGS by transesterification reaction with phosphite esters (Oshel el al., 2008) to improve reactivity of the DDGS to enzymes, hydrolysis of soluble oligomers derived from DDGS using functionalized mesoporous solid catalysts (Bootsma et al., 2008), and ABE (acetone, butanol, ethanol) production from DDGS by solventogenic Clostridia (Ezeji and Blaschek, 2008). Economic analysis of a modified dry milling process, where the fiber and residual starch is extracted and fermented to produce more ethanol from the distillers grains while producing highly concentrated protein co

  13. Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    The Keystone Center

    2005-06-15

    The Keystone Center convened and facilitated a year-long Dialogue on "Regional Transmission Projects: Finding Solutions" to develop recommendations that will help address the difficult and contentious issues related to expansions of regional electric transmission systems that are needed for reliable and economic transmission of power within and across regions. This effort brought together a cross-section of affected stakeholders and thought leaders to address the problem with the collective wisdom of their experience and interests. Transmission owners sat at the table with consumer advocates and environmental organizations. Representatives from regional transmission organizations exchanged ideas with state and federal regulators. Generation developers explored common interests with public power suppliers. Together, the Dialogue participants developed consensus solutions about how to begin unraveling some of the more intractable issues surrounding identification of need, allocation of costs, and reaching consensus on siting issues that can frustrate the development of regional transmission infrastructure. The recommendations fall into three broad categories: 1. Recommendations on appropriate institutional arrangements and processes for achieving regional consensus on the need for new or expanded transmission infrastructure 2. Recommendations on the process for siting of transmission lines 3. Recommendations on the tools needed to support regional planning, cost allocation, and siting efforts. List of Dialogue participants: List of Dialogue Participants: American Electric Power American Transmission Company American Wind Energy Association California ISO Calpine Corporation Cinergy Edison Electric Institute Environmental Defense Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Great River Energy International Transmission Company ISO-New England Iowa Public Utility Board Kanner & Associates Midwest ISO National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners National Association

  14. Role of SrMoO{sub 4} in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vasala, S.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M.

    2011-05-15

    Here we investigate the elemental and phase compositions during the solid-state synthesis of the promising SOFC-anode material, Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, and demonstrate that molybdenum does not notably evaporate under the normal synthesis conditions with temperatures up to 1200 {sup o}C due to the formation of SrMoO{sub 4} as an intermediate product at low temperatures, below 600 {sup o}C. However, partial decomposition of the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} phase becomes evident at the higher temperatures ({approx}1500 {sup o}C). The effect of SrMoO{sub 4} on the electrical conductivity of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is evaluated by preparing a series of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with different amounts of additional SrMoO{sub 4}. Under the reducing operation conditions of an SOFC anode the insulating SrMoO{sub 4} phase is apparently reduced to the highly conductive SrMoO{sub 3} phase. Percolation takes place with 20-30 wt% of SrMoO{sub 4} in a Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} matrix, with a notable increase in electrical conductivity after reduction. Conductivity values of 14, 60 and 160 S/cm are determined at 800 {sup o}C in 5% H{sub 2}/Ar for the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with 30, 40 and 50 wt% of added SrMoO{sub 4}, respectively. -- Graphical abstract: SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low temperatures during the synthesis of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, which prevents the volatilization of Mo from typical precursor mixtures of this promising SOFC anode material. SrMoO{sub 4} is insulating and it is often found as an impurity in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples. It is however readily reduced to highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3}. Composites of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} and SrMoO{sub 3} show increased electrical conductivities compared to pure Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} under the reductive operation conditions of an SOFC anode. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is a promising SOFC anode material. {yields} During the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low

  15. Two-step growth of two-dimensional WSe2/MoSe2 heterostructures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Gong, Yongji; Lei, Sidong; Lou, Jun; Liu, Zheng; Vajtai, Robert; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pullikel M.; Ye, Gonglan; Li, Bo; He, Yongmin; et al

    2015-08-03

    Two dimensional (2D) materials have attracted great attention due to their unique properties and atomic thickness. Although various 2D materials have been successfully synthesized with different optical and electrical properties, a strategy for fabricating 2D heterostructures must be developed in order to construct more complicated devices for practical applications. Here we demonstrate for the first time a two-step chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for growing transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterostructures, where MoSe2 was synthesized first and followed by an epitaxial growth of WSe2 on the edge and on the top surface of MoSe2. Compared to previously reported one-step growth methods, thismore » two-step growth has the capability of spatial and size control of each 2D component, leading to much larger (up to 169 μm) heterostructure size, and cross-contamination can be effectively minimized. Furthermore, this two-step growth produces well-defined 2H and 3R stacking in the WSe2/MoSe2 bilayer regions and much sharper in-plane interfaces than the previously reported MoSe2/WSe2 heterojunctions obtained from one-step growth methods. The resultant heterostructures with WSe2/MoSe2 bilayer and the exposed MoSe2 monolayer display rectification characteristics of a p-n junction, as revealed by optoelectronic tests, and an internal quantum efficiency of 91% when functioning as a photodetector. As a result, a photovoltaic effect without any external gates was observed, showing incident photon to converted electron (IPCE) efficiencies of approximately 0.12%, providing application potential in electronics and energy harvesting.« less

  16. Mo-99 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mo-99 DOE/NNSA Successfully Establishes Uranium Lease and Takeback Program to Support Critical Medical Isotope Production In January 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) successfully established the Uranium Lease and Take-Back (ULTB) program, as directed in the American Medical Isotopes Production Act of 2012, to support the commercial production of the medical... NNSA's work aids in fight against cancer World Cancer Day encourages citizens

  17. Two-dimensional GaSe/MoSe2 misfit bilayer heterojunctions by van der Waals epitaxy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming-Wei; Lin, Junhao; Huang, Bing; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Kai; Zhou, Wu; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Chi, Miaofang; et al

    2016-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures hold the promise for future atomically-thin electronics and optoelectronics due to their diverse functionalities. While heterostructures consisting of different transition metal dichacolgenide monolayers with well-matched lattices and novel physical properties have been successfully fabricated via van der Waals (vdW) or edge epitaxy, constructing heterostructures from monolayers of layered semiconductors with large lattice misfits still remains challenging. Here, we report the growth of monolayer GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures with large lattice misfit by two-step chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both vertically stacked and lateral heterostructures are demonstrated. The vertically stacked GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures exhibit vdW epitaxy with well-aligned lattice orientation between themore » two layers, forming an incommensurate vdW heterostructure. However, the lateral heterostructures exhibit no lateral epitaxial alignment at the interface between GaSe and MoSe2 crystalline domains. Instead of a direct lateral connection at the boundary region where the same lattice orientation is observed between GaSe and MoSe2 monolayer domains in lateral GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures, GaSe monolayers are found to overgrow MoSe2 during CVD, forming a stripe of vertically stacked vdW heterostructure at the crystal interface. Such vertically-stacked vdW GaSe/MoSe2 heterostructures are shown to form p-n junctions with effective transport and separation of photo-generated charge carriers between layers, resulting in a gate-tunable photovoltaic response. In conclusion, these GaSe/MoSe2 vdW heterostructures should have applications as gate-tunable field-effect transistors, photodetectors, and solar cells.« less

  18. Fission induced swelling and creep of U–Mo alloy fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Yeon Soo Kim; G. L. Hofman; J. S. Cheon; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2013-06-01

    Tapering of U–Mo alloy fuel at the end of plates is attributed to lateral mass transfer by fission induced creep, by which fuel mass is relocated away from the fuel end region where fission product induced fuel swelling is in fact the highest. This mechanism permits U–Mo fuel to achieve high burnup by effectively relieving stresses at the fuel end region, where peak stresses are otherwise expected because peak fission product induced fuel swelling occurs there. ABAQUS FEA was employed to examine whether the observed phenomenon can be simulated using physical–mechanical data available in the literature. The simulation results obtained for several plates with different fuel fabrication and loading scheme showed that the measured data were able to be simulated with a reasonable creep rate coefficient. The obtained creep rate constant lies between values for pure uranium and MOX, and is greater than all other ceramic uranium fuels.

  19. DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) recently released a report finding that inter-regional cooperation can help lower the cost of transporting wind energy from windy areas in the Midwest and South-Central United States to areas with less wind generation capability in the Southeastern United States, improving the ability to meet our nation's electricity demand using clean resources. DOE awarded the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and LCG Consulting an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) grant to evaluate the benefits of coordinating inter-regional transfers of wind energy.

  20. Role of Si on the Diffusional Interactions between U-Mo and Al-Si Alloys at 823 K (550 degrees C)

    SciTech Connect

    E. Perez; Y.H. Sohn; D.D. Keiser, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    U-Mo dispersions in Al-alloy matrix and monolithic fuels encased in Al-alloy are under development to fulfill the requirements for research and test reactors to use low-enriched molybdenum stabilized uranium alloys fuels. Significant interaction takes place between the U-Mo fuel and Al during manufacturing and in-reactor irradiation. The interactions products are Al-rich phases with physical and thermal characteristics that adversely affect fuel performance and lead to premature failure. Detailed analysis of the interdiffusion and microstructural development of this system was carried through diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo in contact with pure Al, Al-2wt.%Si, and Al-5wt.%Si, annealed at 823K for 1, 5 and 20 hours. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed for the analysis. Diffusion couples consisting of U-Mo vs. pure Al contained UAl3, UAl4, U6Mo4Al43, and UMo2Al20 phases. The addition of Si to the Al significantly reduced the thickness of the interdiffusion zone. The interdiffusion zones developed Al and Si enriched regions, whose locations and size depended on the Si and Mo concentrations in the terminal alloys. In the couples, the (U,Mo)(Al,Si)3 phase was observed throughout interdiffusion zone, and the U6Mo4Al43 and UMo2Al20 phases were observed only where the Si concentrations were low.

  1. Midwest Forensics Resource Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Discrimination of Salvia divinorum from Related Salvia Species Using Chemometric...

  2. Midwest Building Energy Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... * Adjust Energy Conservation Measure (ECM) Requirements to Meet Opposition Critics and State Code Mandates * Develop an Implementation Plan Simultaneously but Separately ...

  3. Midwest Energy Codes Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... MEEA Policy Funds 100K+ for benchmarking IL Dept. of Commerce & Economic Opportunity 155K for CANDI compliance program Budget History FY2012 - FY2013 (past) FY2014 ...

  4. NNSA Awards Mo-99 Cooperative Agreement to General Atomics | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Awards Mo-99 Cooperative Agreement to General Atomics September 30, 2015 WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced that it will award a cooperative agreement to General Atomics (GA) to support its project for domestic production of molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) without highly enriched uranium (HEU). Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m, which is the most widely used radioisotope

  5. "Table HC10.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,20.6,"N","N","N" "New

  6. MoRu/Be multilayers for extreme ultraviolet applications

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa C.; Wall, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    High reflectance, low intrinsic roughness and low stress multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography comprise amorphous layers MoRu and crystalline Be layers. Reflectance greater than 70% has been demonstrated for MoRu/Be multilayers with 50 bilayer pairs. Optical throughput of MoRu/Be multilayers can be 30-40% higher than that of Mo/Be multilayer coatings. The throughput can be improved using a diffusion barrier to make sharper interfaces. A capping layer on the top surface of the multilayer improves the long-term reflectance and EUV radiation stability of the multilayer by forming a very thin native oxide that is water resistant.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chemical Company) concerning the procurement of enriched uranium; Feb 24, 1960 MO.0-01-5 - AEC Letter; Price to Greenlee (Spencer Chemical Co.) concerning an inspection of ...

  8. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Kinzey...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Kinzey, Bruce R.; Royer, Michael P.; Hadjian, M.; Kauffman, Rick LED streetlighting; field illuminance measurement LED streetlighting; field...

  9. Predicting sigma formation in mo-bearing stainless steels. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Predicting sigma formation in mo-bearing stainless steels. No abstract prepared. Authors: Perricone, Matthew ; Dupont, John Neuman ; Anderson, T. D. 1 ; Robino, Charles ...

  10. Structure and electronic properties of Cu nanoclusters supported on Mo2C(001) and MoC(001) surfaces

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Viñes, Francesc; Rodríguez, José A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-09-15

    In this study, the atomic structure and electronic properties of Cun nanoclusters (n = 4, 6, 7, and 10) supported on cubic nonpolar δ-MoC(001) and orthorhombic C- or Mo-terminated polar β-Mo2C(001) surfaces have been investigated by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations. The electronic properties have been analyzed by means of the density of states, Bader charges, and electron localization function plots. The Cu nanoparticles supported on β-Mo2C(001), either Mo- or C-terminated, tend to present a two-dimensional structure whereas a three-dimensional geometry is preferred when supported on δ-MoC(001), indicating that the Mo:C ratio and the surface polarity playmore » a key role determining the structure of supported clusters. Nevertheless, calculations also reveal important differences between the C- and Mo-terminated β-Mo2C(001) supports to the point that supported Cu particles exhibit different charge states, which opens a way to control the reactivity of these potential catalysts.« less

  11. Gate controlled electronic transport in monolayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y. F.; Wang, B.; Yu, Y. J.; Wei, Y. D. E-mail: jianwang@hku.hk; Xian, H. M.; Wang, J. E-mail: jianwang@hku.hk

    2015-03-14

    The electronic spin and valley transport properties of a monolayer MoS{sub 2} are investigated using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Due to the presence of strong Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI), the electronic valence bands of monolayer MoS{sub 2} are split into spin up and spin down Zeeman-like texture near the two inequivalent vertices K and K′ of the first Brillouin zone. When the gate voltage is applied in the scattering region, an additional strong RSOI is induced which generates an effective magnetic field. As a result, electron spin precession occurs along the effective magnetic field, which is controlled by the gate voltage. This, in turn, causes the oscillation of conductance as a function of the magnitude of the gate voltage and the length of the gate region. This current modulation due to the spin precession shows the essential feature of the long sought Datta-Das field effect transistor (FET). From our results, the oscillation periods for the gate voltage and gate length are found to be approximately 2.2 V and 20.03a{sub B} (a{sub B} is Bohr radius), respectively. These observations can be understood by a simple spin precessing model and indicate that the electron behaviors in monolayer MoS{sub 2} FET are both spin and valley related and can easily be controlled by the gate.

  12. LANL Experience Rolling Zr-Clad LEU-10Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Hammon, Duncan L.; Clarke, Kester D.; Alexander, David J.; Kennedy, Patrick K.; Edwards, Randall L.; Duffield, Andrew N.; Dombrowski, David E.

    2015-05-29

    The cleaning, canning, rolling and final trimming of Low Enriched Uranium-10 wt. pct. Molybdenum (LEU-10Mo) foils for ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) fuel plates to be used in the AFIP-7 (ATR Full Size Plate In Center Flux Trap Position) experiments are summarized. Six Zr-clad foils were produced from two LEU-10Mo castings supplied to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by Y-12 National Security Complex. Details of cleaning and canning procedures are provided. Hot- and cold-rolling results are presented, including rolling schedules, images of foils in-process, metallography and local compositions of regions of interest, and details of final foil dimensions and process yield. This report was compiled from the slides for the presentation of the same name given by Duncan Hammon on May 12, 2011 at the AFIP-7 Lessons Learned meeting in Salt Lake City, UT, with Los Alamos National Laboratory document number LA-UR 11-02898.

  13. MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF (209.56 KB) More Documents & Publications Scanned_Agreement.pdf International_Agreements_January_2001_December_2004.pdf Implementing Arrangement Between DOE and METI on R&D Cooperation on Clean Energy Technology - April 2015

  14. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of the photocatalytic performance of Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} solar light driven plasmonic photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, Rajesh; Malla, Shova; Gyawali, Gobinda; Sekino, Tohru; Lee, Soo Wohn

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} solar light driven photocatalyst was successfully synthesized. Photocatalyst exhibited strong absorption in the visible region. Photocatalytic activity was significantly enhanced. Enhanced activity was caused by the SPR effect induced by Ag nanoparticles. - Abstract: Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} plasmonic photocatalyst was synthesized in ethanol/water mixture by photo assisted co-precipitation method at room temperature. As synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UVVis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and BrunauerEmmettTeller (BET) surface area analyzer. Photocatalytic activity was evaluated by performing the degradation experiment over methylene blue (MB) and indigo carmine (IC) as model dyes under simulated solar light irradiation. The results revealed that the Ag-CdMoO{sub 4} showed the higher photocatalytic performance as compared to CdMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles. Dispersion of Ag nanoparticles over the surface of CdMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles causes the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and enhances the broad absorption in the entire visible region of the solar spectrum. Hence, dispersion of Ag nanoparticles over CdMoO{sub 4} nanoparticles could be the better alternative to enhance the absorption of visible light by scheelite crystal family for effective photocatalysis.

  15. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near amore » critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.« less

  16. Irradiation induced structural change in Mo2Zr intermetallic phase

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Gan, J.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Eriksson, N.; Sohn, Y. H.; Kirk, M.

    2016-05-14

    The Mo2Zr phase has been identified as a major interaction product at the interface of U-10Mo and Zr. Transmission electron microscopy in-situ irradiation with Kr ions at 200 °C with doses up to 2.0E + 16 ions/cm2 was carried out to investigate the radiation stability of the Mo2Zr. The Mo2Zr undergoes a radiation-induced structural change, from a large cubic (cF24) to a small cubic (cI2), along with an estimated 11.2% volume contraction without changing its composition. The structural change begins at irradiation dose below 1.0E + 14 ions/cm2. Furthermore, the transformed Mo2Zr phase demonstrates exceptional radiation tolerance with the developmentmore » of dislocations without bubble formation.« less

  17. Neutrino scattering off the stable even-even Mo isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Balasi, K. G.; Kosmas, T. S.; Divari, P. C. [Theoretical Physics Section, University of Ioannina, GR 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2009-11-09

    Inelastic neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are studied focusing on the neutral current processes. Particularly, we investigate the angular and initial neutrino-energy dependence of the differential and integrated cross sections for low and intermediate energies of the incoming neutrino. The nuclear wave functions for the initial and final nuclear states are constructed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) tested on the reproducibility of the low-lying energy spectrum. The results presented here refer to the isotopes Mo{sup 92}, Mo{sup 94}, Mo{sup 96}, Mo{sup 98} and Mo{sup 100}. These isotopes could play a significant role in supernova neutrino detection in addition to their use in double-beta and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments (e.g. MOON, NEMO III)

  18. Structure of Mo(VI) complexes. VI. Mo(VI) oxodiperoxo complexes with urea and some of its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Timosheva, A.P.; Kazakova, E.K.; Vul`fson, S.G.

    1995-05-20

    Procedures for synthesizing Mo(VI) oxodiperoxo complexes with urea and some of its derivatives have been described. The dipole moment of the peroxo molybdenum complex with hexametapol and urea, [MoO{sub 5}(HMPT)CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}], has been determined, and its structure has been proposed. 10 refs.

  19. Catalytic activity in lithium-treated core–shell MoOx/MoS2 nanowires

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Kappera, Rajesh; Voiry, Damien; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Jasinski, Jacek; Kelly, Dan; Chhowalla, Manish; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; et al

    2015-09-22

    Significant interest has grown in the development of earth-abundant and efficient catalytic materials for hydrogen generation. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides present opportunities for efficient electrocatalytic systems. Here, we report the modification of 1D MoOx/MoS2 core–shell nanostructures by lithium intercalation and the corresponding changes in morphology, structure, and mechanism of H2 evolution. The 1D nanowires exhibit significant improvement in H2 evolution properties after lithiation, reducing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) onset potential by ~50 mV and increasing the generated current density by ~600%. The high electrochemical activity in the nanowires results from disruption of MoS2 layers in the outer shell, leadingmore » to increased activity and concentration of defect sites. This is in contrast to the typical mechanism of improved catalysis following lithium exfoliation, i.e., crystal phase transformation. As a result, these structural changes are verified by a combination of Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).« less

  20. Mo-O bond doping and related-defect assisted enhancement of photoluminescence in monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoxu; Yu, Zhihao; Cheng, Ying; Yu, Linwei; Wang, Junzhuan Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Hu, Fengrui; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we report a strong photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under different treatments. We find that by simple ambient annealing treatment in the range of 200?C to 400?C, the PL emission can be greatly enhanced by a factor up to two orders of magnitude. This enhancement can be attributed to two factors: first, the formation of Mo-O bonds during ambient exposure introduces an effective p-doping in the MoS{sub 2} layer; second, localized electrons formed around Mo-O bonds related defective sites where the electrons can be effectively localized with higher binding energy resulting in efficient radiative excitons recombination. Time resolved PL decay measurement showed that longer lifetime of the treated sample consistent with the higher quantum efficiency in PL. These results give more insights to understand the luminescence properties of the MoS{sub 2}.

  1. "Table HC10.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.2,1.4,3,2.6 "2 Times A

  2. "Table HC10.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by U.S. Census Regions, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,6.9,8.1,14.2,6.4 "Use a Personal

  3. "Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,6.9,8.1,14.2,6.4 "Use a Personal

  4. "Table HC10.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per

  5. "Table HC10.2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.9,0.5,0.9,1 "500 to 999",23.8,4.6,3.9,9,6.3

  6. "Table HC10.4 Space Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Space Heating Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.7 "Have Main Space Heating

  7. "Table HC10.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","Q",0.7 "Have Space Heating

  8. "Table HC10.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.1,1.4,10.3 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,16.5,23.5,39.3,13.9 "Use Cooling

  9. "Table HC10.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,4,2.1,1.4,10.3 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,16.5,23.5,39.3,13.9 "Use Cooling

  10. "Table HC10.8 Water Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,19.6,24.5,39,23.2 "2 or More",3.7,0.3,0.9,1.5,1 "Do Not Use Hot

  11. "Table HC10.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by U.S. Census Regions, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by U.S. Census Regions, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total U.S.",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,20.3,25.3,40.2,23.7

  12. Prediction of U-Mo dispersion nuclear fuels with Al-Si alloy using artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Susmikanti, Mike; Sulistyo, Jos

    2014-09-30

    Dispersion nuclear fuels, consisting of U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al-Si matrix, are being developed as fuel for research reactors. The equilibrium relationship for a mixture component can be expressed in the phase diagram. It is important to analyze whether a mixture component is in equilibrium phase or another phase. The purpose of this research it is needed to built the model of the phase diagram, so the mixture component is in the stable or melting condition. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a modeling tool for processes involving multivariable non-linear relationships. The objective of the present work is to develop code based on artificial neural network models of system equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This model can be used for prediction of type of resulting mixture, and whether the point is on the equilibrium phase or in another phase region. The equilibrium model data for prediction and modeling generated from experimentally data. The artificial neural network with resilient backpropagation method was chosen to predict the dispersion of nuclear fuels U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This developed code was built with some function in MATLAB. For simulations using ANN, the Levenberg-Marquardt method was also used for optimization. The artificial neural network is able to predict the equilibrium phase or in the phase region. The develop code based on artificial neural network models was built, for analyze equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix.

  13. Results of U-xMo (x=7, 10, 12 wt.%) Alloy versus Al-6061 Cladding Diffusion Couple Experiments Performed at 500, 550 and 600 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Yongho Sohn

    2013-04-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has been developing low enrichment fuel systems encased in Al 6061 for use in research and test reactors. U–Mo alloys in contact with Al and Al alloys can undergo diffusional interactions that can result in the development of interdiffusion zones with complex fine-grained microstructures composed of multiple phases. A monolithic fuel currently being developed by the RERTR program has local regions where the U–Mo fuel plate is in contact with the Al 6061 cladding and, as a result, the program finds information about interdiffusion zone development at high temperatures of interest. In this study, the microstructural development of diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo, and U-12wt.%Mo vs. Al 6061 (or 6061 aluminum) cladding, annealed at 500, 550, 600 degrees C for 1, 5, 20, 24, or 132 hours, was analyzed by backscatter electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy on a scanning electron microscope. Concentration profiles were determined by standardized wavelength dispersive spectroscopy and standardless x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results of this work shows that the presence of surface layers at the U–Mo/Al 6061 interface can dramatically impact the overall interdiffusion behavior in terms of rate of interaction and uniformity of the developed interdiffusion zones. It further reveals that relatively uniform interaction layers with higher Si concentrations can develop in U–Mo/Al 6061 couples annealed at shorter times and that longer times at temperature result in the development of more non-uniform interaction layers with more areas that are enriched in Al. At longer annealing times and relatively high temperatures, U–Mo/Al 6061 couples can exhibit more interaction compared to U–Mo/pure Al couples. The minor alloying constituents in Al 6061 cladding can result in the development of many complex phases in the interaction layer of U–Mo

  14. A novel three dimensional semimetallic MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhen-Kun; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Li-Min; Liu, Hao; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2014-05-28

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have many potential applications, while the performances of TMDs are generally limited by the less surface active sites and the poor electron transport efficiency. Here, a novel three-dimensional (3D) structure of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) with larger surface area was proposed based on first-principle calculations. 3D layered MoS{sub 2} structure contains the basal surface and joint zone between the different nanoribbons, which is thermodynamically stable at room temperature, as confirmed by first principles molecular dynamics calculations. Compared the two-dimensional layered structures, the 3D MoS{sub 2} not only owns the large surface areas but also can effectively avoid the aggregation. Interestingly, although the basal surface remains the property of the intrinsic semiconductor as the bulk MoS{sub 2}, the joint zone of 3D MoS{sub 2} exhibits semimetallic, which is derived from degenerate 3d orbitals of the Mo atoms. The high stability, large surface area, and high conductivity make 3D MoS{sub 2} have great potentials as high performance catalyst.

  15. Imaging findings and pharmacokinetics of 111-indium ZME-018 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) in malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Rosenblum, M.; Lamki, L.; Haynie, T.P.; Glenn, H.; Jahns, M.; Plager, C.; Hersh, E.M.; Unger, M.; Carlo, D.L.

    1985-05-01

    13 patients with metastatic melanoma were studied using 5 mCi of In-111 labeled MoAb ZME-018 which reacts with GP 240 melanoma-associated antigen. The MoAb was infused over 2 h at doses of 2.5 mg (5 pts), 5 mg (5 pts), and 10 mg (3 pts). Total body tomograms and planar spot views with region of interest analysis were performed at 4, 24 and 72 hours post infusion. No adverse side effects were noted. There was rapid distribution to spleen, bone, bone marrow, liver, and testes. Tumor sites could be visualized as early as 24 hours but were more easily seen at 72 hours when the background activity was less. 20 of 46 (43%) previously documented metastases were identified. More sites imaged with increasing concentrations of MoAB, I.E., 25% at 2.5 mg; 67% at 5 mg; 70% at 10 mg. Tumor localization occurred in a significant number of patients especially at MoAb doses above 2.5 mg. In two instances, uptake of 111-In occurred in previously undiagnosed sites. The pharmacokinetics of MoAb were analyzed at each dose level. At the 5 mg dose, the terminal phase half-life for 111-In in plasma was 24.5 +- 2.7 hours. The apparent volume of distribution (Vd) was 4.03 +- 5iota similar to the plasma value, and the calculated clearance rate for 111-In label was 0.0259 + 0.002 ml/kg/min. Mean urinary excretion of 111-In label was 8.7 +- 0.6% of the administered dose over 48 hours after administration. The calculated pharmacokinetic parameters were independent of antibody dose. ZME 018 was cleared more rapidly from plasma, compared to previous studies with P97 antimelanoma MoAb.

  16. Polystyrene/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Altavilla, Claudia; Ciambelli, Paolo; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    The effects of adding different concentrations of MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nano particles on the thermal and mechanical properties of polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites have been investigated. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of the resulting nanocomposites. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. It has been found that the MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanoparticles have a good compatibility with the PS matrix forming homogeneous dispersion even at high concentrations. The PS/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites showed enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat polystyrene.

  17. Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray ) The Slow Mo Guys came to GE Global Research in Niskayuna to film our researchers demonstrate a process called "cold spray", in which metal powders are sprayed at high velocities to build a part or add

  18. iRESM INITIATIVE UNDERSTANDING DECISION SUPPORT NEEDS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION --US Midwest Region—

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Jennie S.; Runci, Paul J.; Moss, Richard H.; Anderson, Kate L.

    2010-10-01

    The impacts of climate change are already affecting human and environmental systems worldwide, yet many uncertainties persist in the prediction of future climate changes and impacts due to limitations in scientific understanding of relevant causal factors. In particular, there is mounting urgency to efforts to improve models of human and environmental systems at the regional scale, and to integrate climate, ecosystem and energy-economic models to support policy, investment, and risk management decisions related to climate change mitigation (i.e., reducing greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (i.e., responding to climate change impacts). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a modeling framework, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), to address regional human-environmental system interactions in response to climate change and the uncertainties therein. The framework will consist of a suite of integrated models representing regional climate change, regional climate policy, and the regional economy, with a focus on simulating the mitigation and adaptation decisions made over time in the energy, transportation, agriculture, and natural resource management sectors.

  19. Diffusion Barrier Selection from Refractory Metals (Zr, Mo and Nb) via Interdiffusion Investigation for U-Mo RERTR Fuel Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    K. Huang; C. Kammerer; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; Y. H. Sohn

    2014-04-01

    U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment monolithic fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Diffusional interactions between the U-Mo fuel alloy and Al-alloy cladding within the monolithic fuel plate construct necessitate incorporation of a barrier layer. Fundamentally, a diffusion barrier candidate must have good thermal conductivity, high melting point, minimal metallurgical interaction, and good irradiation performance. Refractory metals, Zr, Mo, and Nb are considered based on their physical properties, and the diffusion behavior must be carefully examined first with U-Mo fuel alloy. Solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Mo, Zr, or Nb diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 degrees C for various times. The interdiffusion microstructures and chemical composition were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. For all three systems, the growth rate of interdiffusion zone were calculated at 1000, 900 and 800 degrees C under the assumption of parabolic growth, and calculated for lower temperature of 700, 600 and 500 degrees C according to Arrhenius relationship. The growth rate was determined to be about 10 3 times slower for Zr, 10 5 times slower for Mo and 10 6 times slower for Nb, than the growth rates reported for the interaction between the U-Mo fuel alloy and pure Al or Al-Si cladding alloys. Zr, however was selected as the barrier metal due to a concern for thermo- mechanical behavior of UMo/Nb interface observed from diffusion couples, and for ductile-to-brittle transition of Mo near room temperature.

  20. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidationmore » state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.« less

  1. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidation state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.

  2. Ethanol Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Fang, Zongtang; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

    2014-03-06

    Oxides of molybdenum and tungsten are an important class of catalytic materials with applications ranging from isomerization of alkanes and alkenes, partial oxidation of alcohols, selective reduction of nitric oxide and metathesis of alkeness.[1-10] While many studies have focused on the structure - function relationships, the nature of high catalytic activity is still being extensively investigated. There is a general agreement that the activity of supported MOx (M = W, Mo) catalysts is correlated with the presence of acidic sites, where the catalytic activity is strongly affected by the type of oxide support, delocalization of electron density, structures of tungsten oxide domains and presence of protons

  3. Co-Mo Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Co-Mo Electric Cooperative provides rebates to its residential and commercial members who install air source, dual fuel, and/or geothermal heat pumps, and certain energy efficient appliances. Heat...

  4. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  5. Structural Insights into FeMo Cofactor Biosynthesis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    a catalytic component and a specific reductase, which, in the standard system, are referred to as the MoFe protein and the Fe protein. At the active site of the...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Petrolite Corp - MO 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Materials Handled: Uranium Flouride & Thorium Oxide MO.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): ... of operations at sites used by National Lead Company of Ohio; July 28, 1986. Attachments. ...

  7. CO2ReMoVe | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of industrial, research and service organizations with experience in CO2 geological storage. References: CO2ReMoVe1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  8. Anisotropy of heat conduction in Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, V. V.; Yakshin, A. E.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Bijkerk, F.; Yang, J.; Schmidt, A. J.; Zoethout, E.

    2015-08-28

    This paper reports on the studies of anisotropic heat conduction phenomena in Mo/Si multilayers with individual layer thicknesses selected to be smaller than the mean free path of heat carriers. We applied the frequency-domain thermoreflectance technique to characterize the thermal conductivity tensor. While the mechanisms of the cross-plane heat conduction were studied in detail previously, here we focus on the in-plane heat conduction. To analyze the relative contribution of electron transport to the in-plane heat conduction, we applied sheet-resistance measurements. Results of Mo/Si multilayers with variable thickness of the Mo layers indicate that the net in-plane thermal conductivity depends on the microstructure of the Mo layers.

  9. Distributed Production of Radionuclide Mo-99 Charles A. Gentile...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    This invention is for the production of Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), a widely used medical isotope in a distributed and in-situ fashion. Tc-99m results when Molybdenum 99 (Mo-99) ...

  10. 9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-11-27

    One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

  11. M.O. Wascko, LSU NuInt05...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    O. Wascko, LSU NuInt05 26 September, 2005 MiniBooNE CC + CCQE Ratio M.O. Wascko, LSU J.R. Monroe, Columbia CC interactions Quasi-Elastic (CCQE) Inclusive Single +...

  12. Microstructures in rapidly solidified Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, N.; Tewari, S.N.; Hemker, K.J.; Glasgow, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    Ni-Mo alloys of compositions ranging from pure Ni to Ni-40 at % Mo were rapidly solidified by chill block melt spinning in vacuum and were examined by optical metallography, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Rapid solidification resulted in an extension of molybdenum solubility in nickel from 28 to 37.5 at %. A number of different phases and microstructures were seen at different depths (solidification conditions) from the quenched surface of the melt spun ribbons.

  13. Regional Purchasing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Partnerships Regional Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent

  14. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Module Regions (NERC Region map) Table 73. Texas Regional Entity Table 74. Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Table 75. Midwest Reliability Council East Table 76. Midwest...

  15. Synthesis of novel MoS{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts with enhanced hydrogen evolution activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yuming; Ge, Lei; Wang, Kaiyue; Chai, Yuesheng

    2014-01-15

    Novel MoS{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} heterojunction photocatalysts were synthesized via a simple impregnation and heating methods. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra. The photocatalytic activities of MoS{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} samples were evaluated based on the hydrogen evolution experiments under visible light irradiation (? > 400 nm). The UVvis diffuse reflectance spectra revealed that the MoS{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalysts had strong absorption in the visible light region. The photocatalytic results indicated that the highest H{sub 2} evolution rate of 23.10 ?molh{sup ?1} was achieved on the 0.5 wt.% MoS{sub 2}g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample, which was enhanced by 11.3 times compared to pure g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}. This study may provide an approach to the development of novel heterojunction photocatalysts for hydrogen production under visible light irradiation. - Highlights: MoS{sub 2}/g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} photocatalyst is obtained by simple impregnation and heating methods. and determined by XRD, TEM, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra. the photocatalysts had strong absorption in the visible light region. the highest H2 evolution rate was achieved on the 0.5wt% samples.

  16. Figure F8. Coal demand regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2016 Regional maps Figure F8. Coal demand regions Figure F7. Coal Demand Regions CT,MA,ME,NH,RI,VT OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP Region Content Region Code NY,PA,NJ VA,NC,SC GA,FL IN,IL,MI,WI Region Content Region Code 14. CU 13. MT 16. PC 15. ZN 12. WS 11. C2 9. AM 5. GF 8. KT 4. S2 7. EN 6. OH 2. YP

  17. Coated U(Mo) Fuel: As-Fabricated Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Ann Leenaers; Sven Van den Berghe; Tom Wiencek

    2014-04-01

    As part of the development of low-enriched uranium fuels, fuel plates have recently been tested in the BR-2 reactor as part of the SELENIUM experiment. These fuel plates contained fuel particles with either Si or ZrN thin film coating (up to 1 µm thickness) around the U-7Mo fuel particles. In order to best understand irradiation performance, it is important to determine the starting microstructure that can be observed in as-fabricated fuel plates. To this end, detailed microstructural characterization was performed on ZrN and Si-coated U-7Mo powder in samples taken from AA6061-clad fuel plates fabricated at 500°C. Of interest was the condition of the thin film coatings after fabrication at a relatively high temperature. Both scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed. The ZrN thin film coating was observed to consist of columns comprised of very fine ZrN grains. Relatively large amounts of porosity could be found in some areas of the thin film, along with an enrichment of oxygen around each of the the ZrN columns. In the case of the pure Si thin film coating sample, a (U,Mo,Al,Si) interaction layer was observed around the U-7Mo particles. Apparently, the Si reacted with the U-7Mo and Al matrix during fuel plate fabrication at 500°C to form this layer. The microstructure of the formed layer is very similar to those that form in U-7Mo versus Al-Si alloy diffusion couples annealed at higher temperatures and as-fabricated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with Al-Si alloy matrix fabricated at 500°C.

  18. The cluster compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} containing Mo{sub 14} clusters and the new mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters: Synthesis, crystal structure, and electrical and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, Philippe; Guizouarn, Thierry; Gougeon, Patrick

    2015-07-15

    Single crystals of the new quaternary compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} were obtained by solid state reaction. The crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with unit-cell parameters a=9.4432(14) Å, b=11.4828(12) Å, c=20.299(4) Å and Z=4. Full-matrix least-squares refinement on F{sup 2} using 3807 independent reflections for 219 refinable parameters resulted in R{sub 1}=0.0259 and wR{sub 2}=0.0591. The crystal structure contains in addition to Mo{sub 14} clusters the first examples of mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 14} i.e. Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters. The oxygen framework derives from a stacking along the a direction of close-packed layers with sequence (…ABAC…). The Mo–Mo distances range between 2.6938(5) and 2.8420(6) Å and the Mo–O distances between 1.879(5) and 2.250(3) Å, as usually observed in molybdenum oxide clusters. The indium atoms form In{sub 4}{sup 6+} bent chains with In–In distances of 2.6682(5) and 2.6622(8) Å and the Ti atoms are in highly distorted octahedral sites of oxygen atoms with Ti–O distances ranging between 1.865(4) and 2.161(4) Å. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the presence of Ti{sup 4+} cations and the absence of localized moments on the Mo network. Electrical resistivity measurements on a single crystal of In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} show a semimetallic behavior. - Graphical abstract: We present here the synthesis, the crystal structure, and the electrical and magnetic properties of the new compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} in which Mo{sub 14} clusters coexist statistically with mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 14} that is Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters. - Highlights: • Single crystals of In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} were obtained by solid state

  19. Nanoforging Single Layer MoSe2 Through Defect Engineering with Focused Helium Ion Beams

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Iberi, Vighter; Liang, Liangbo; Ievlev, Anton V.; Stanford, Michael G.; Lin, Ming-Wei; Li, Xufan; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Jesse, Stephen; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; et al

    2016-08-02

    Development of devices and structures based on the layered 2D materials critically hinges on the capability to induce, control, and tailor the electronic, transport, and optoelectronic properties via defect engineering, much like doping strategies have enabled semiconductor electronics and forging enabled introduction of iron age. Here, we demonstrate the use of a scanning helium ion microscope (HIM) for tailoring the functionality of single layer MoSe2 locally, and decipher associated mechanisms at atomic level. We demonstrate He+ beam bombardment that locally creates vacancies, shifts the Fermi energy landscape and thereby increases the Young s modulus of elasticity. Furthermore, we observe formore » the first time, an increase in the B-exciton photoluminescence signal from the nanoforged regions at room temperature. In conclusion, the approach for precise defect engineering demonstrated here opens opportunities for creating functional 2D optoelectronic devices with a wide range of customizable properties that include operating in the visible region.« less

  20. A novel Bi-based phosphomolybdate photocatalyst K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}): Crystal structure, electronic structure and photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hongwei; Chen, Gong; Wang, Shuobo; Kang, Lei; Lin, Zheshuai; Zhang, Yihe

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: A new type of phosphomolybdate K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}) photocatalyst was successfully synthesized. The products synthesized at 600 C were mainly composed of nano-cubes. The indirect band gap of K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}) has been determined to be 2.93 eV. K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}) synthesized at 600 C exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. The electronic structure was calculated by density functional calculations. - Abstract: A novel phosphomolybdate photocatalyst K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}) has been successfully developed via a solid-state reaction. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), diffuse reflectance spectrum (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The photocatalytic activities of the samples prepared at different temperature were determined by the photooxidative decomposition of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution. The results revealed that K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}) can be used as an effective photocatalyst under UVvis irradiation and the nanocubes obtained at 600 C exhibits the highest photocatalytic activity. The photodegradation of MB by K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}) nanocrystals followed the first-order kinetics. Theoretical calculations on electronic structure confirmed the indirect optical transitions property in the absorption edge region of K{sub 2}Bi(PO{sub 4})(MoO{sub 4}), and the orbital constitutions of CB and VB were also analyzed.

  1. Multiphonon resonant Raman scattering in MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gołasa, K. Grzeszczyk, M.; Wysmołek, A.; Babiński, A.; Leszczyński, P.; Faugeras, C.; Nicolet, A. A. L.; Potemski, M.

    2014-03-03

    Optical emission spectrum of a resonantly (λ = 632.8 nm) excited molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) is studied at liquid helium temperature. More than 20 peaks in the energy range spanning up to 1400 cm{sup −1} from the laser line, which are related to multiphonon resonant Raman scattering processes, are observed. The attribution of the observed lines involving basic lattice vibrational modes of MoS{sub 2} and both the longitudinal (LA(M)) and the transverse (TA(M) and/or ZA(M)) acoustic phonons from the vicinity of the high-symmetry M point of the MoS{sub 2} Brillouin zone is proposed.

  2. Ligand Bridging-Angle-Driven Assembly of Molecular Architectures Based on Quadruply Bonded Mo-Mo Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian-Rong; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Lu, Weigang; Timmons, Daren J; Zhuang, Wenjuan; Yuan, Daqiang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-12-15

    A systematic exploration of the assembly of Mo?(O?C-)?-based metalorganic molecular architectures structurally controlled by the bridging angles of rigid organic linkers has been performed. Twelve bridging dicarboxylate ligands were designed to be of different sizes with bridging angles of 0, 60, 90, and 120 while incorporating a variety of nonbridging functional groups, and these ligands were used as linkers. These dicarboxylate linkers assemble with quadruply bonded MoMo clusters acting as nodes to give 13 molecular architectures, termed metalorganic polygons/polyhedra with metal cluster node arrangements of a linear shape, triangle, octahedron, and cuboctahedron/anti-cuboctahedron. The syntheses of these complexes have been optimized and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results have shown that the shape and size of the resulting molecular architecture can be controlled by tuning the bridging angle and size of the linker, respectively. Functionalization of the linker can adjust the solubility of the ensuing molecular assembly but has little or no effect on the geometry of the product. Preliminary gas adsorption, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties of selected members were also studied. The present work is trying to enrich metal-containing supramolecular chemistry through the inclusion of well-characterized quadruply bonded MoMo units into the structures, which can widen the prospect of additional electronic functionality, thereby leading to novel properties.

  3. U-Mo Plate Blister Anneal Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francine J. Rice; Daniel M. Wachs; Adam B. Robinson; Dennis D. Keiser Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Danielle M. Perez; Ross Finlay

    2010-10-01

    Blister thresholds in fuel elements have been a longstanding performance parameter for fuel elements of all types. This behavior has yet to be fully defined for the RERTR U-Mo fuel types. Blister anneal studies that began in 2007 have been expanded to include plates from more recent RERTR experiments. Preliminary data presented in this report encompasses the early generations of the U-Mo fuel systems and the most recent but still developing fuel system. Included is an overview of relevant dispersion fuel systems for the purposes of comparison.

  4. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  5. Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS...

    Energy Saver

    Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H...

  6. Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production, with virtually no losses in Mo-99 yields or uranium recovery. May 13, 2013 From left, Los ...

  7. Letter on the Office of Science M&O Contract Study and the Univerisity...

    Energy Saver

    of Science M&O Contract Study and the Univerisity of Minnesota 's Institute for Mathematics and its Applications Letter on the Office of Science M&O Contract Study and the ...

  8. Reaction synthesis of MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite using MoO{sub 3}, Al and Si powders

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Deevi, S.

    1995-10-01

    In-situ synthesis of a composite of MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was carried out by reacting a thermite mixture consisting of MoO{sub 3}, Al, and Si powders. The reaction was found to be extremely fast and violent, and a diluent was required to moderate the reaction. Thermal behavior of the thermite mixture was studied using DTA at different heating rates, and DTA was interrupted at different temperatures to determine the reaction mechanism. X-ray characterization of the products obtained at different temperatures reveals that the mechanism consists of a reduction of MoO{sub 3} by Al to MoO{sub 2} followed by a simultaneous oxidation of Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and synthesis reaction between reduced Mo and Si to form MoSi{sub 2}. The rate determining step is found to be reduction of MoO{sub 2} by Al and oxidation of Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The thermite reaction was moderated by adding Mo and Si to the mixture of MoO{sub 3}, Al, and Si such that the ratio of MoSi{sub 2} to the thermite was in the range of 60:40 to 90:10.

  9. Corrosion report for the U-Mo fuel concept

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Doherty, Ann L.; Fuller, E. S.; Hardy, John S.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2014-08-28

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum (U-Mo) metal fuel for Light Water Reactors (LWR)s. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties, which includes high thermal conductivity for less stored heat energy. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water industry with a melt-resistant accident tolerant fuel with improved safety response. However, the corrosion of this fuel in reactor water environments needs to be further explored and optimized by additional alloying. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of U-Mo fuel. This report documents the results of the effort to characterize and develop the U-Mo metal fuel concept for LWRs with regard to corrosion testing. The results of a simple screening test in buffered water at 30°C using surface alloyed U-10Mo is documented and discussed. The screening test was used to guide the selection of several potential alloy improvements that were found and are recommended for further testing in autoclaves to simulate PWR water conditions more closely.

  10. Investigating the Nexus of Climate, Energy, Water, and Land at Decision-Relevant Scales: The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Kraucunas, Ian P.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dirks, James A.; Hathaway, John E.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Huang, Maoyi; Jin, Chunlian; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C.W.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Hongyi; Moss, Richard H.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Voisin, Nathalie; West, Tristram O.

    2015-04-01

    The Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) is an innovative modeling system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to simulate interactions among natural and human systems at scales relevant to regional decision making. PRIMA brings together state-of-the-art models of regional climate, hydrology, agriculture, socioeconomics, and energy systems using a flexible coupling approach. The platform can be customized to inform a variety of complex questions and decisions, such as the integrated evaluation of mitigation and adaptation options across a range of sectors. Research into stakeholder decision support needs underpins the platform's application to regional issues, including uncertainty characterization. Ongoing numerical experiments are yielding new insights into the interactions among human and natural systems on regional scales with an initial focus on the energy-land-water nexus in the upper U.S. Midwest. This paper focuses on PRIMA’s functional capabilities and describes some lessons learned to date about integrated regional modeling.

  11. Tuning magnetism of monolayer MoS{sub 2} by doping vacancy and applying strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Huiling; Yang, Baishun; Han, Ruilin; Du, Xiaobo; Yan, Yu; Wang, Dingdi

    2014-03-31

    In view of important role of inducing and manipulating the magnetism in two-dimensional materials for the development of low-dimensional spintronic devices, the influences of strain on electronic structure and magnetic properties of commonly observed vacancies doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} are investigated using first-principles calculations. It is shown that unstrained V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} systems are nonmagnetic, while the ground state of unstrained V{sub MoS6} doped system is magnetic and the magnetic moment is contributed mainly by six Mo atoms around V{sub MoS6}. In particular, tensile strain can induce magnetic moments in V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} due to the breaking of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around the vacancies, while the magnetization induced by V{sub MoS6} can be effectively manipulated by equibiaxial strain due to the change of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around V{sub MoS6} under strains.

  12. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ye, Gonglan; Gong, Yongji; Lin, Junhao; Li, Bo; He, Yongmin; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2016-01-13

    MoS2 is a promising, low-cost material for electrochemical hydrogen production due to its high activity and stability during the reaction. Our work represents an easy method to increase the hydrogen production in electrochemical reaction of MoS2 via defect engineering, and helps to understand the catalytic properties of MoS2.

  13. Regional Partnerships

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  14. Structure and electronic properties of Cu nanoclusters supported on Mo2C(001) and MoC(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Viñes, Francesc; Rodríguez, José A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-09-15

    In this study, the atomic structure and electronic properties of Cun nanoclusters (n = 4, 6, 7, and 10) supported on cubic nonpolar δ-MoC(001) and orthorhombic C- or Mo-terminated polar β-Mo2C(001) surfaces have been investigated by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations. The electronic properties have been analyzed by means of the density of states, Bader charges, and electron localization function plots. The Cu nanoparticles supported on β-Mo2C(001), either Mo- or C-terminated, tend to present a two-dimensional structure whereas a three-dimensional geometry is preferred when supported on δ-MoC(001), indicating that the Mo:C ratio and the surface polarity play a key role determining the structure of supported clusters. Nevertheless, calculations also reveal important differences between the C- and Mo-terminated β-Mo2C(001) supports to the point that supported Cu particles exhibit different charge states, which opens a way to control the reactivity of these potential catalysts.

  15. Structure and electronic properties of Cu nanoclusters supported on Mo{sub 2}C(001) and MoC(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Viñes, Francesc; Illas, Francesc

    2015-09-21

    The atomic structure and electronic properties of Cu{sub n} nanoclusters (n = 4, 6, 7, and 10) supported on cubic nonpolar δ-MoC(001) and orthorhombic C- or Mo-terminated polar β-Mo{sub 2} C(001) surfaces have been investigated by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations. The electronic properties have been analyzed by means of the density of states, Bader charges, and electron localization function plots. The Cu nanoparticles supported on β-Mo{sub 2} C(001), either Mo- or C-terminated, tend to present a two-dimensional structure whereas a three-dimensional geometry is preferred when supported on δ-MoC(001), indicating that the Mo:C ratio and the surface polarity play a key role determining the structure of supported clusters. Nevertheless, calculations also reveal important differences between the C- and Mo-terminated β-Mo{sub 2} C(001) supports to the point that supported Cu particles exhibit different charge states, which opens a way to control the reactivity of these potential catalysts.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly ionized Ge, Kr and Mo emitted by imploding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.; Feldman, U.; Cohen, L.; Behring, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    Spectra of highly ionized Ge, Kr and Mo in the spectral region of 10 to 80A were excited in laser-produced plasmas. The plasma was obtained by focusing the energy of the 24 laser beams of the University of Rochester Omega system on 0.4 mm diameter microballoon targets. The laser pulse duration was in the range of 0.87 to 1.09 ns, with total energy in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 kJ. The observed spectral lines include n = 2-2 transitions in the oxygen and fluorine isoelectronic sequences and n = 3 to 4 transitions in the sodium, magnesium and aluminum isoelectronic sequences. The present observations are compared with previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  17. High reflectance-low stress Mo-Si multilayer reflective coatings

    DOEpatents

    Montcalm, Claude; Mirkarimi, Paul B.

    2000-01-01

    A high reflectance-low stress Mo-Si multilayer reflective coating particularly useful for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. While the multilayer reflective coating has particular application for EUV lithography, it has numerous other applications where high reflectance and low stress multilayer coatings are utilized. Multilayer coatings having high near-normal incidence reflectance (R.gtoreq.65%) and low residual stress (.ltoreq.100 MPa) have been produced using thermal and non-thermal approaches. The thermal approach involves heating the multilayer coating to a given temperature for a given time after deposition in order to induce structural changes in the multilayer coating that will have an overall "relaxation" effect without reducing the reflectance significantly.

  18. Process for fabricating high reflectance-low stress Mo--Si multilayer reflective coatings

    DOEpatents

    Montcalm, Claude; Mirkarimi, Paul B.

    2001-01-01

    A high reflectance-low stress Mo--Si multilayer reflective coating particularly useful for the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. While the multilayer reflective coating has particular application for EUV lithography, it has numerous other applications where high reflectance and low stress multilayer coatings are utilized. Multilayer coatings having high near-normal incidence reflectance (R.gtoreq.65%) and low residual stress (.ltoreq.100 MPa) have been produced using thermal and non-thermal approaches. The thermal approach involves heating the multilayer coating to a given temperature for a given time after deposition in order to induce structural changes in the multilayer coating that will have an overall "relaxation" effect without reducing the reflectance significantly.

  19. Promotional Effects of In on Non-Oxidative Methane Transformation Over Mo-ZSM-5

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang; Kidder, Michelle; Ruther, Rose E.; Nanda, Jagjit; Foo, Guo Shiou; Wu, Zili; Narula, Chaitanya K.

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we present a new class of catalysts, InMo-ZSM-5, which can be prepared by indium impregnation of Mo-ZSM-5. The incorporation of indium dramatically decreases coke formation during methane dehydroaromatization. The benzene and C2 hydrocarbons selectivity among total hydrocarbons over InMo-ZSM-5 remains comparable to that of Mo-ZSM-5 despite reduced methane conversion due to decreased coke formation. We found 1 wt% indium to be optimal loading for reducing coke selectivity to half that of Mo-ZSM-5. Characterization methods were not helpful in discerning the interaction of In with Mo but experiments with bimetallic 1In2Mo-ZSM-5 and mechanical mixture 1In+2Mo-ZSM-5 suggest that Inmore » and Mo need to be in close proximity to suppress coke formation. Finally, this is supported by temperature programmed reduction experiments which show that In incorporation leads to lower Mo reduction temperature in In2Mo-ZMS-5.« less

  20. Thermal transport properties of metal/MoS{sub 2} interfaces from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Rui; Kong, Byoung Don; Kim, Ki Wook, E-mail: kwk@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7911 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    Thermal transport properties at the metal/MoS{sub 2} interfaces are analyzed by using an atomistic phonon transport model based on the Landauer formalism and first-principles calculations. The considered structures include chemisorbed Sc(0001)/MoS{sub 2} and Ru(0001)/MoS{sub 2}, physisorbed Au(111)/MoS{sub 2}, as well as Pd(111)/MoS{sub 2} with intermediate characteristics. Calculated results illustrate a distinctive dependence of thermal transfer on the details of interfacial microstructures. More specifically, the chemisorbed case with a stronger bonding exhibits a generally smaller interfacial thermal resistance than the physisorbed. Comparison between metal/MoS{sub 2} and metal/graphene systems suggests that metal/MoS{sub 2} is significantly more resistive. Further examination of lattice dynamics identifies the presence of multiple distinct atomic planes and bonding patterns at the interface as the key origins of the observed large thermal resistance.

  1. MoS2 Heterojunctions by Thickness Modulation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Tosun, Mahmut; Fu, Deyi; Desai, Sujay B.; Ko, Changhyun; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Lien, Der-Hsien; Najmzadeh, Mohammad; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao; Javey, Ali

    2015-06-30

    In this work, we report lateral heterojunction formation in as-exfoliated MoS2 flakes by thickness modulation. Kelvin probe force microscopy is used to map the surface potential at the monolayer-multilayer heterojunction, and consequently the conduction band offset is extracted. Scanning photocurrent microscopy is performed to investigate the spatial photocurrent response along the length of the device including the source and the drain contacts as well as the monolayer-multilayer junction. The peak photocurrent is measured at the monolayer-multilayer interface, which is attributed to the formation of a type-I heterojunction. Finally, the work presents experimental and theoretical understanding of the band alignment andmore » photoresponse of thickness modulated MoS2 junctions with important implications for exploring novel optoelectronic devices.« less

  2. Undercooled and rapidly quenched Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, S.N.; Glasgow, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic nickel-molybdenum alloys were rapidly solidified by both bulk undercooling and melt spinning techniques. Alloys were undercooled in both electromagnetic levitation and differential thermal analysis equipment. The rate of recalescence depended upon the degree of initial undercooling and the nature (faceted or nonfaceted) of the primary nucleating phase. Alloy melts were observed to undercool more in the presence of primary Beta (NiMo intermetallic) phase than in gamma (fcc solid solution) phase. Melt spinning resulted in an extension of molybdenum solid solubility in gamma nickel, from 28 to 37.5 at % Mo. Although the microstructures observed by undercooling and melt spinning were similar the microsegregation pattern across the gamma dendries was different. The range of microstructures evolved was analyzed in terms of the nature of the primary phase to nucleate, its subsequent dendritic growth, coarsening and fragmentation, and final solidification of interfenderitic liquid.

  3. Development of uranium metal targets for {sup 99}Mo production

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A substantial amount of high enriched uranium (HEU) is used for the production of medical-grade {sup 99}Mo. Promising methods of producing irradiation targets are being developed and may lead to the reduction or elimination of this HEU use. To substitute low enriched uranium (LEU) for HEU in the production of {sup 99}Mo, the target material may be changed to uranium metal foil. Methods of fabrication are being developed to simplify assembly and disassembly of the targets. Removal of the uranium foil after irradiation without dissolution of the cladding is a primary goal in order to reduce the amount of liquid radioactive waste material produced in the process. Proof-of-concept targets have been fabricated. Destructive testing indicates that acceptable contact between the uranium foil and the cladding can be achieved. Thermal annealing tests, which simulate the cladding/uranium diffusion conditions during irradiation, are underway. Plans are being made to irradiate test targets.

  4. Transmission Expansion in the Midwest

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    At this unique forum, participants will hear top executives from the area's RTOs, utilities, transmission developers, and state regulatory agencies discuss and debate the most critical issues...

  5. IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    M.K. Meyer; J. Gan; J.-F. Jue; D.D. Keiser; E. Perez; A. Robinson; D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G.L. Hofman; Y.-S. Kim

    2014-04-01

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  6. Production of Thin Walled Mo Tubing using FBCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Usov, Igor Olegovich

    2015-06-02

    The goal of this report is to demonstrate our progress towards producing free standing Mo tubing with length up to 12” and wall thickness of 250 µm. Fabrication conditions corresponding to growth of fine grain and high purity Mo material were chosen based on previous work. We focused our effort on execution of prolonged deposition processes and optimization of the FBCVD set up. Our results demonstrated that 12” long Mo tubing can be fabricated by our process. At this point the 12” tube fractured in the middle and resulted in two pieces. Further improvement in one of the fabrication steps will eliminate this drawback. We were not able to produce a tube with 250 µm wall thickness so far. The deposition rate was intentionally kept low (5-6 µm/hr) to form material with fine grain microstructure. Therefore a ~50 hour long deposition run is required to achieve such a wall thickness value, which is quite challenging for the current manually operated FBCVD apparatus. Automation of the set-up is now underway to overcome this problem.

  7. Single Phase Melt Processed Powellite (Ba,Ca) MoO{sub 4} For The Immobilization Of Mo-Rich Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Marra, James; Fox, Kevin; Reppert, Jason; Crum, Jarrod; Tang, Ming

    2012-09-17

    Crystalline and glass composite materials are currently being investigated for the immobilization of combined High Level Waste (HLW) streams resulting from potential commercial fuel reprocessing scenarios. Several of these potential waste streams contain elevated levels of transition metal elements such as molybdenum (Mo). Molybdenum has limited solubility in typical silicate glasses used for nuclear waste immobilization. Under certain chemical and controlled cooling conditions, a powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO{sub 4} crystalline structure can be formed by reaction with alkaline earth elements. In this study, single phase BaMoO{sub 4} and CaMoO{sub 4} were formed from carbonate and oxide precursors demonstrating the viability of Mo incorporation into glass, crystalline or glass composite materials by a melt and crystallization process. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy indicated a long range ordered crystalline structure. In-situ electron irradiation studies indicated that both CaMoO{sub 4} and BaMoO{sub 4} powellite phases exhibit radiation stability up to 1000 years at anticipated doses with a crystalline to amorphous transition observed after 1 X 10{sup 13} Gy. Aqueous durability determined from product consistency tests (PCT) showed low normalized release rates for Ba, Ca, and Mo (<0.05 g/m{sup 2}).

  8. Single phase melt processed powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO4 for the immobilization of Mo-rich nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Marra, James C.; Reppert, Jason; Crum, Jarrod V.; Tang, Ming

    2012-10-02

    Crystalline and glass composite materials are currently being investigated for the immobilization of combined High Level Waste (HLW) streams resulting from potential commercial fuel reprocessing scenarios. Several of these potential waste streams contain elevated levels of transition metal elements such as molybdenum (Mo). Molybdenum has limited solubility in typical silicate glasses used for nuclear waste immobilization. Under certain chemical and controlled cooling conditions, a powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO4 crystalline structure can be formed by reaction with alkaline earth elements. In this study, single phase BaMoO4 and CaMoO4 were formed from carbonate and oxide precursors demonstrating the viability of Mo incorporation into glass, crystalline or glass composite materials by a melt and crystallization process. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy indicated a long range ordered crystalline structure. In situ electron irradiation studies indicated that both CaMoO4 and BaMoO4 powellite phases exhibit radiation stability up to 1000 years at anticipated doses with a crystalline to amorphous transition observed after 1 x 1013 Gy. Aqueous durability determined from product consistency tests (PCT) showed low normalized release rates for Ba, Ca, and Mo (<0.05 g/m2).

  9. Regional REC and RPS Best Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Alvarado

    2009-09-30

    The Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association conducted a program to explore the development of Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards and Renewable Energy Certificate Markets in the Midwest. The initiative represented the collaboration between the four state energy offices of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio, the Great Lakes Renewable Energy Association (GLREA) and the Clean Energy State Alliance (CESA). The multi-state project explored the opportunities in the Midwest to expand the renewable energy market through Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards (RPS) and the trading of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs).

  10. Photoluminescence properties of a new orange–red emitting Sm{sup 3+}-doped Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15} phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Huajuan; Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jing; Hei, Zhoufei; Li, Mengxue; Noh, Hyeon Mi; Jeong, Jung Hyun; Yu, Ruijin

    2015-08-15

    A series of novel Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15}:xSm{sup 3+} ( (0.01 ≤ x ≤ 0.20) phosphors for white light-emitting (W-LEDs) were successfully prepared by the solid state reaction technology at 973 K for 12 h. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectra were utilized to characterize the structure and luminescence properties of the as-synthesized phosphors. The emission spectra of the Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors consisted of some sharp emission peaks of Sm{sup 3+} ions centered at 565 nm, 605 nm, 650 nm, and 712 nm. The strongest one is located at 605 nm due to {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}–{sup 6}H{sub 7/2} transition of Sm{sup 3+}, generating bright orange–red light. The optimum dopant concentration of Sm{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15}:xSm{sup 3+} is around 5 mol% and the critical transfer distance of Sm{sup 3+} is calculated as 23.32 Å. The CIE chromaticity coordinates of the Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15}:0.05Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were located in the orange reddish region. The Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors may be potentially used as red phosphors for white light-emitting diodes. - Graphical abstract: The excitation spectrum of Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15}:Sm{sup 3+} is composed of a broad band and some sharp f–f transitions. Under 407 nm excitation, the phosphor presents some sharp emission peaks of Sm{sup 3+} ions. - Highlights: • An orange–red emitting Y{sub 2}Mo{sub 4}O{sub 15}:Sm{sup 3+} phosphor has been firstly synthesized. • Their structures, luminescent properties have also been investigated. • The optical absorption edge for the molybdate lies around 325 nm. • The CIE chromaticity coordinates were located in the orange reddish region.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Highly-Irradiated UMo Dispersion Fuel Plates with Al and AlSi Alloy Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Brandon D. Miller; Jian Gan; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; Mitch Meyer

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifially, samples from irradiated U7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al2Si and AA4043 (~4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission-gas bubbles. Additionally, solid-fission-product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with AlSi matrices.

  12. Regional Information

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Information There is plenty to do and see in the cities of Golden and Denver, Colorado. Here you'll find links to general information about these areas, plus hospitals, local universities and colleges, entertainment, sports, amusement parks, and more. Golden City of Golden Golden's 2-Hour Vacation Denver www.denver.com www.denver.org Denver Public Library Colorado State of Colorado Colorado tourism Transportation (Bus and Light Rail) RTD Hospitals Largest Hospitals in Metro Denver

  13. Figure F7. Coal supply regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8 Appendix F Figure F7. Coal supply regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin Wyoming, Southern Powder River Basin Western Wyoming OTHER WEST Rocky

  14. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-07-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

  15. Price Changes in the Gasoline Market - Are Midwestern Gasoline Prices Downward Sticky?

    Reports and Publications

    1999-01-01

    The report concentrates on regional gasoline prices in the Midwest from October 1992 through June 1998.

  16. Design and experimental activities supporting commercial U.S. electron accelerator production of Mo-99

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Woloshun, Keith A.; Kelsey IV, Charles T.; Olivas, Eric R.; Holloway, Michael A.; Hurtle, Ken P.; Romero, Frank P.; Dalmas, Dale A.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Vandegrift, George F.; Tkac, Peter; Makarashvili, Vakho; Jonah, Charles D.; Harvey, James T.

    2013-04-19

    {sup 99m}Tc, the daughter isotope of {sup 99}Mo, is the most commonly used radioisotope for nuclear medicine in the United States. Under the direction of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are partnering with North Star Medical Technologies to demonstrate the viability of large-scale {sup 99}Mo production using electron accelerators. In this process, {sup 99}Mo is produced in an enriched {sup 100}Mo target through the {sup 100}Mo({gamma},n){sup 99}Mo reaction. Five experiments have been performed to date at ANL to demonstrate this process. This paper reviews the current status of these activities, specifically the design and performance of the helium gas target cooling system.

  17. Characterization of intergranular fission gas bubbles in U-Mo fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Rest, J.; Shevlyakov, G. V.; Nuclear Engineering Division; SSCR RIAR

    2008-04-14

    This report can be divided into two parts: the first part, which is composed of sections 1, 2, and 3, is devoted to report the analyses of fission gas bubbles; the second part, which is in section 4, is allocated to describe the mechanistic model development. Swelling data of irradiated U-Mo alloy typically show that the kinetics of fission gas bubbles is composed of two different rates: lower initially and higher later. The transition corresponds to a burnup of {approx}0 at% U-235 (LEU) or a fission density of {approx}3 x 10{sup 21} fissions/cm{sup 3}. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that gas bubbles appear only on the grain boundaries in the pretransition regime. At intermediate burnup where the transition begins, gas bubbles are observed to spread into the intragranular regions. At high burnup, they are uniformly distributed throughout fuel. In highly irradiated U-Mo alloy fuel large-scale gas bubbles form on some fuel particle peripheries. In some cases, these bubbles appear to be interconnected and occupy the interface region between fuel and the aluminum matrix for dispersion fuel, and fuel and cladding for monolithic fuel, respectively. This is a potential performance limit for U-Mo alloy fuel. Microscopic characterization of the evolution of fission gas bubbles is necessary to understand the underlying phenomena of the macroscopic behavior of fission gas swelling that can lead to a counter measure to potential performance limit. The microscopic characterization data, particularly in the pre-transition regime, can also be used in developing a mechanistic model that predicts fission gas bubble behavior as a function of burnup and helps identify critical physical properties for the future tests. Analyses of grain and grain boundary morphology were performed. Optical micrographs and scanning electron micrographs of irradiated fuel from RERTR-1, 2, 3 and 5 tests were used. Micrographic comparisons between as-fabricated and as-irradiated fuel revealed

  18. Characterization of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel extruded pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Hart, M.D.

    1985-04-01

    The fabrication of hot-extruded pipe of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at Cameron Iron Works is described. The report also deals with the tempering response; tensile, Charpy impact, and creep properties; and microstructure of the hot-extruded pipe. The tensile properties of the pipe are compared with the average and average -1.65 standard error of estimate curves for various product forms of several commercial heats of this alloy. The creep-rupture properties are compared with the average curve for various product forms of the commercial heats.

  19. Recovery of Mo/Si multilayer coated optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Baker, S.L.; Vernon, S.P.; Stearns, D.G.

    1997-12-16

    Mo/Si multilayers are removed from superpolished ZERODUR and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. The two step dry etching process removes SiO{sub 2} overlayer with a fluroine-containing gas and then moves molybdenum and silicon multilayers with a chlorine-containing gas. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates. 5 figs.

  20. Recovery of Mo/Si multilayer coated optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Sherry L.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Stearns, Daniel G.

    1997-12-16

    Mo/Si multilayers are removed from superpolished ZERODUR and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. The two step dry etching process removes SiO.sub.2 overlayer with a fluroine-containing gas and then moves molybdenum and silicon multilayers with a chlorine-containing gas. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  1. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  2. Synthesis of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) for lithium ion battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Chuanqi; Ma Jun; Li Hua; Zeng Rong; Guo Zaiping; Liu Huakun

    2009-09-15

    This paper reports the use of a rheological phase reaction method for preparing MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction indicated that MoS{sub 2} had been formed. High resolution electron microscopy observation revealed that the as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes had started to curve and partly form MoS{sub 2} nanotubes. The lithium intercalation/de-intercalation behavior of as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanoflake electrode was also investigated. It was found that the MoS{sub 2} nanoflake electrode exhibited higher specific capacity, with very high cycling stability, compared to MoS{sub 2} nanoparticle electrode. The possible reasons for the high electrochemical performance of the nanoflakes electrodes are also discussed. The outstanding electrochemical properties of MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes obtained by this method make it possible for MoS{sub 2} to be used as a promising anode material.

  3. Acquisition Guide Chapter 7.3:Acquisition Planning in the M&O Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Acquisition Letter 2013-03, Acquisition Planning Considerations for M&O Contracts, has been moved to the Acquisition Guide as chapter (7.3).

  4. First-principles characterization of potassium intercalation in the hexagonal 2H-MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

    2012-01-12

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structural and electronic properties of potassium intercalated into hexagonal MoS{sub 2} (2H-MoS{sub 2}). Metallic potassium (K) atoms are incrementally loaded in the hexagonal sites of the interstitial spaces between MoS2 sheets of the 2H-MoS{sub 2} bulk structure generating 2H-KxMoS2 (0.125 {<=} x {<=} 1.0) structures. To accommodate the potassium atoms, the interstitial spacing c parameter in the 2H-MoS{sub 2} bulk expands from 12.816 {angstrom} in 2H-MoS{sub 2} to 16.086 {angstrom} in 2H-K{sub 0.125}MoS{sub 2}. The second lowest potassium loading concentration (K{sub 0.25}MoS{sub 2}) results in the largest interstitial spacing expansion (to c = 16.726 {angstrom}). Our calculations show that there is a small gradual contraction of the interstitial spacing as the potassium loading increases with c = 14.839 {angstrom} for KMoS{sub 2}. This interstitial contraction is correlated with an in-plane expansion of the MoS{sub 2} sheets, which is in good agreement with experimental X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The electronic analysis shows that potassium readily donates its 4s electron to the conduction band of the 2H-K{sub x}MoS{sub 2}, and is largely ionic in character. As a result of the electron donation, the 2H-K{sub x}MoS{sub 2} system changes from a semiconductor to a more metallic system with increasing potassium intercalation. For loadings 0.25 {<=} x {<=} 0.625, triangular Mo-Mo-Mo moieties are prominent and tend to form rhombitrihexagonal motifs. Intercalation of H{sub 2}O molecules that solvate the K atoms is likely to occur in catalytic conditions. The inclusion of two H{sub 2}O molecules per K atom in the K{sub 0.25}MoS{sub 2} structure shows good agreement with XRD measurements.

  5. Experimental activities supporting commercial U.S. accelerator production of 99-Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Chemerisov, Sergey D; Vandegrift, George F

    2010-01-01

    {sup 99m}Tc, the daughter product of {sup 99}Mo, is the most commonly used radioisotope for nuclear medicine in the U.S. Experiments are being performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to demonstrate production of {sup 99}Mo using accelerators. The {sup 100}Mo({gamma},n){sup 99}Mo reaction in an enriched {sup 100}Mo target is currently under investigation. Three scaled low-power production experiments using a 20-MeV electron linac at Argonne have been performed to date. Two of these experiments used natural Mo targets and produced a total of 613 {mu}C of {sup 99}Mo. The third experiment used an enriched {sup 100}Mo target and produced 10.5 mCi of {sup 99}Mo. Following irradiation the targets were dissolved and the low specific activity solution was processed through an ARSII generator from NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes. Yields of {sup 99m}Tc >95% have been observed.

  6. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen Evolution Reaction This content will become publicly available on January 13, 2017 Prev Next Title: Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen ...

  7. Mechanically Activated Combustion Synthesis of MoSi2-Based Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shafirovich, Evgeny

    2015-09-30

    The thermal efficiency of gas-turbine power plants could be dramatically increased by the development of new structural materials based on molybdenum silicides and borosilicides, which can operate at temperatures higher than 1300 °C with no need for cooling. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. One approach is based on the fabrication of MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites that combine high oxidation resistance of MoSi2 and good mechanical properties of Mo5Si3. Another approach involves the addition of boron to Mo-rich silicides for improving their oxidation resistance through the formation of a borosilicate surface layer. In particular, materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase are promising materials that offer favorable combinations of high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. However, the synthesis of Mo-Si-B multi-phase alloys is difficult because of their extremely high melting temperatures. Mechanical alloying has been considered as a promising method, but it requires long milling times, leading to large energy consumption and contamination of the product by grinding media. In the reported work, MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites and several materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase have been obtained by mechanically activated self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (MASHS). Short-term milling of Mo/Si mixture in a planetary mill has enabled a self-sustained propagation of the combustion front over the mixture pellet, leading to the formation of MoSi2-T1 composites. Combustion of Mo/Si/B mixtures for the formation of T2 phase becomes possible if the composition is designed for the addition of more exothermic reactions leading to the formation of MoB, TiC, or TiB2. Upon ignition, Mo/Si/B and Mo/Si/B/Ti mixtures exhibited spin combustion, but the products were porous, contained undesired secondary phases, and had low oxidation resistance. It has been shown that use of

  8. State and Regional Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Reitze, Arnold; Durrant, Marie

    2011-03-01

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Carbon capture and geologic sequestration offer one method to reduce carbon emissions from coal and other hydrocarbon energy production. While the federal government is providing increased funding for carbon capture and sequestration, recent congressional legislative efforts to create a framework for regulating carbon emissions have failed. However, regional and state bodies have taken significant actions both to regulate carbon and facilitate its capture and sequestration. This article explores how regional bodies and state government are addressing the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. Several regional bodies have formed regulations and model laws that affect carbon capture and storage, and three bodies comprising twenty-three states—the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Midwest Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord, and the Western Climate initiative—have cap-­and-trade programs in various stages of development. State property, land use and environmental laws affect the development and implementation of carbon capture and sequestration projects, and unless federal standards are imposed, state laws on torts and renewable portfolio requirements will directly affect the liability and viability of these projects. This paper examines current state laws and legislative efforts addressing carbon capture and sequestration.

  9. Evaluation of Mo catalyst precursors for hydrotreating coal derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.K.; Gibb, D.R.; Kimber, G.M.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1997-04-01

    Numerous studies have examined the use of dispersed catalysts for promoting the dissolution of coal and upgrading high-boiling and residual liquids. Catalysts have been added in various forms, including oil soluble organometallics and carbonyls, with industrial interest for application to a spectrum of residual feedstocks, and demonstration in coal liquefaction at the pilot plant scale. Dispersed catalysts offer certain advantages over supported catalysts for hydroprocessing such feedstocks. Because of their large molecular size, many of the feed constituents cannot access the internal pore structure of supported catalysts, and hence upgrading must proceed by an indirect process, probably involving H-transfer via lower molecular weight species. Another major deficiency of supported catalysts is their susceptibility to deactivation by reactions which cause the deposition of carbon and metals. Dispersed catalysts can overcome the first of these obstacles and may be less susceptible to deactivation. At the same time, there are also difficulties in the utilization of dispersed catalysts. These include: attaining and maintaining adequate dispersion; and converting the precursor to the active phase. Moreover, the effective catalyst metals, such as Mo, are expensive and their application is only economically viable if they can be used at very low concentrations or efficiently recycled. In direct coal liquefaction, the presence of mineral matter and undissolved coal in the products of coal solubilization mean that a solids separation step is necessary and, inevitably, catalyst will be removed with the reject stream. This program studied the effectiveness of dispersed Mo catalysts for hydroprocessing solids-free residual coal liquids.

  10. Characterization of U-Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Danny J.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Henager, Charles H.; Burkes, Douglas; Senor, David J.

    2012-11-07

    Twelve AFIP in-process foil samples, fabricated by either Y-12 or LANL, were shipped from LANL to PNNL for potential characterization using optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Of these twelve, nine different conditions were examined to one degree or another using both techniques. For this report a complete description of the results are provided for one archive foil from each source of material, and one unirradiated piece of a foil of each source that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Additional data from two other LANL conditions are summarized in very brief form in an appendix. The characterization revealed that all four characterized conditions contained a cold worked microstructure to different degrees. The Y-12 foils exhibited a higher degree of cold working compared to the LANL foils, as evidenced by the highly elongated and obscure U-Mo grain structure present in each foil. The longitudinal orientations for both of the Y-12 foils possesses a highly laminar appearance with such a distorted grain structure that it was very difficult to even offer a range of grain sizes. The U-Mo grain structure of the LANL foils, by comparison, consisted of a more easily discernible grain structure with a mix of equiaxed and elongated grains. Both materials have an inhomogenous grain structure in that all of the characterized foils possess abnormally coarse grains.

  11. Broadband ultra-high transmission of terahertz radiation through monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xue-Yong; Deng, Xin-Hua; Su, Fu-Hai; Liu, Nian-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2015-12-14

    In this study, the terahertz (THz) absorption and transmission of monolayer MoS{sub 2} with different carrier concentrations were investigated theoretically. The calculation shows that the THz absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is very low even under high carrier concentrations and large incident angles. The sum of reflection and absorption losses of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is lower than that of graphene by one to three orders of magnitude. The transmission of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is higher than that of two-dimensional electron gases in traditional GaAs and InAs. The field-effect tube structure formed by monolayer MoS{sub 2}-insulation-layer-graphene is also studied. The THz absorption of graphene can reach saturation under low voltage by tuning the voltage between MoS{sub 2} and graphene layers in the structure. The maximum THz absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is approximately 5%. Thus, monolayer MoS{sub 2} is a promising candidate for THz transparent electrodes.

  12. New Generation of MoSx Based Solid Lubricant Coatings: Recent Developments and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Julfikar; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2011-01-17

    In recent times, there is a growing interest in applying Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub x}) solid lubricant coatings on components to improve the tribological performance (i.e. lower friction coefficient and wear rate). The tribological performance of MoS{sub x} coating is strongly dependent on coating properties and tribological environment. MoS{sub x} coatings are highly successful in certain applications such as in space/vacuum technology, but its effectiveness is questioned in other terrestrial applications such as in cutting tool industry due to its lower hardness and poor oxidation resistance leading to shorter life. In order to circumvent this drawback, the paper identifies that current research is being concentrated on developing MoS{sub x} based coatings using three different approaches: (1) Metal or compound addition in MoS{sub x} coating (2)MoS{sub x} layer on hard coating and (3)MoS{sub x} addition in hard coating matrix. Although the primary objective is same in all three cases, the third approach is considered to be more effective in improving the tribological properties of the coating. Finally, the potential applications of MoS{sub x} based coatings in different industrial sectors have been briefly outlined.

  13. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Youker, Amanda J.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Kalensky, Michael; Tkac, Peter; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration onmore » Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.« less

  14. Photo-oxidation method using MoS2 nanocluster materials

    DOEpatents

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.

    2001-01-01

    A method of photo-oxidizing a hydrocarbon compound is provided by dispersing MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters in a solvent containing a hydrocarbon compound contaminant to form a stable solution mixture and irradiating the mixture to photo-oxide the hydrocarbon compound. Hydrocarbon compounds of interest include aromatic hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbons. MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters with an average diameter less than approximately 10 nanometers are shown to be effective in decomposing potentially toxic aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as phenol, pentachlorophenol, chlorinated biphenols, and chloroform, into relatively non-toxic compounds. The irradiation can occur by exposing the MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters and hydrocarbon compound mixture with visible light. The MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters can be introduced to the toxic hydrocarbons as either a MoS.sub.2 solution or deposited on a support material.

  15. Thermal properties of U–Mo alloys irradiated to moderate burnup and power

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Pool, Karl N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Smith, Frances N.

    2015-09-01

    A variety of physical and thermal property measurements as a function of temperature and fission density were performed on irradiated U-Mo alloy monolithic fuel samples with a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061. The U-Mo alloy density, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are strongly influenced by increasing burnup, mainly as the result of irradiation induced recrystallization and fission gas bubble formation and coalescence. U-Mo chemistry, specifically Mo content, and specific heat capacity was not as sensitive to increasing burnup. Measurements indicated that thermal conductivity of the U-Mo alloy decreased approximately 30% for a fission density of 2.88 × 1021 fissions cm-3 and approximately 45% for a fission density of 4.08 × 1021 fissions cm-3 from unirradiated values at 200 oC. An empirical thermal conductivity degradation model developed previously and summarized here agrees well with the experimental measurements.

  16. Detection of a MoSe{sub 2} secondary phase layer in CZTSe by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Demircioğlu, Özden; Riedel, Ingo; Gütay, Levent; Mousel, Marina; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Weiss, Thomas; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2015-11-14

    We demonstrate the application of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) for identification of secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} in polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) samples. A MoSe{sub 2} reference sample was analyzed, and its optical constants (ε{sub 1} and ε{sub 2}) were extracted by SE analysis. This dataset was implemented into an optical model for analyzing SE data from a glass/Mo/CZTSe sample containing MoSe{sub 2} at the back side of the absorber. We present results on the n and k values of CZTSe and show the extraction of the thickness of the secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} layer. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm the SE results.

  17. Regional biomass fired power plant siting Wisconsin project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    The use of alternative fuels such as wood chips, wood products industry residues, refuse derived fuel, tire derived fuel and processed manufacturing paper waste fuel pellets has been practiced for a number of years in the state of Wisconsin. At present a relatively small quantity of the non-forestry urban wood waste is reclaimed for a variety of uses such as architectural mulch, animal bedding, nature trails in parks and recreational areas. Most is disposed of by landfills. This wood waste has low bulky density, depletes valuable landfill space, and in the Milwaukee area, currently costs $35-$50 per ton for hauling and disposal. This paper reviews the technical and economic feasibility of processing urban wood wastes using existing scrap processing facilities and transporting and supplying the wood fuel to existing stream and power generating facilities at state of Wisconsin institutions. The paper is based on a recent study funded by The Great Lakes Regional Biomass Energy Program. The capability of a large midwest auto shredding/scrap processing facility, one of 200 such facilities in the US, to serve as a central urban waste fuels processor is reviewed.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of model MgO supported catalyst with Pt-Mo interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Gates, B.C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Shelef, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1996-01-04

    MgO supported platinum and platinum-molybdenum catalysts were prepared from organometallic precursors and charaterized structurally to determine how the nature of the bimetallic precursors and the treatment conditions affected the interaction between the two metals. Samples were prepared from [PtCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}], [PtCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}] + [Mo(CO){sub 6}], and [C@Pt[Mo(CO){sub 3}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})]{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}] BC@ characterized by infrared and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies, tranmission electron microscopy, and chemisorption of H{sub 2}, CO, and O{sub 2}. The samples were treated in H{sub 2} at 400{degree}C prior to most of the characterizatons. Incorporation of Mo reduced the chemisorption of CO and of H{sub 2}. EXAFS spectra measured at the Pt L{sub III} edge and at the Mo K edge showed substantial Pt-Mo contributions with a Pt-Mo cordination number of about 2 and an average distance of 2.63 A for the sample prepared from [C@Pt[Mo(CO){sub 3}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})]{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}] BC@. In constract, no significant Pt-Mo contribution was observed for the sample prepared from [PtCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}]+ [Mo(CO){sub 6}]. Electron micrographs and EXAFS results show that interaction between Pt and Mo ions in the former sample helped to maintain the platinum in a highly dispersed form, with supported platinum clusters being smaller than about 10 A. 53 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Efficient Interlayer Relaxation and Transition of Excitons in Epitaxial and Non-epitaxial MoS2/WS2 Heterostructures

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yu, Yifei; Hu, Shi; Su, Liqin; Huang, Lujun; Liu, Yi; Jin, Zhenghe; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Kim, Ki Wook; Zhang, Yong; et al

    2014-12-03

    Semiconductor heterostructurs provide a powerful platform for the engineering of excitons. Here we report on the excitonic properties of two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures that consist of monolayer MoS2 and WS2 stacked epitaxially or non-epitaxially in the vertical direction. We find similarly efficient interlayer relaxation and transition of excitons in both the epitaxial and non-epitaxial heterostructures. This is manifested by a two orders of magnitude decrease in the photoluminescence and an extra absorption peak at low energy region of both heterostructures. The MoS2/WS2 heterostructures show weak interlayer coupling and essentially act as an atomic-scale heterojunction with the intrinsic band structures of themore » two monolayers largely preserved. They are particularly promising for the applications that request efficient dissociation of excitons and strong light absorption, including photovoltaics, solar fuels, photodetectors, and optical modulators. Our results also indicate that 2D heterostructures promise to provide capabilities to engineer excitons from the atomic level without concerns of interfacial imperfection.« less

  20. Efficient Interlayer Relaxation and Transition of Excitons in Epitaxial and Non-epitaxial MoS2/WS2 Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yifei; Hu, Shi; Su, Liqin; Huang, Lujun; Liu, Yi; Jin, Zhenghe; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Kim, Ki Wook; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Linyou

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor heterostructurs provide a powerful platform for the engineering of excitons. Here we report on the excitonic properties of two-dimensional (2D) heterostructures that consist of monolayer MoS2 and WS2 stacked epitaxially or non-epitaxially in the vertical direction. We find similarly efficient interlayer relaxation and transition of excitons in both the epitaxial and non-epitaxial heterostructures. This is manifested by a two orders of magnitude decrease in the photoluminescence and an extra absorption peak at low energy region of both heterostructures. The MoS2/WS2 heterostructures show weak interlayer coupling and essentially act as an atomic-scale heterojunction with the intrinsic band structures of the two monolayers largely preserved. They are particularly promising for the applications that request efficient dissociation of excitons and strong light absorption, including photovoltaics, solar fuels, photodetectors, and optical modulators. Our results also indicate that 2D heterostructures promise to provide capabilities to engineer excitons from the atomic level without concerns of interfacial imperfection.

  1. Search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of Mo 100 with the NEMO-3 detector

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Baker; A. J. Caffrey

    2014-06-01

    We report the results of a search for the neutrinoless double- decay (0? ) of Mo 100 , using the NEMO-3 detector to reconstruct the full topology of the final state events. With an exposure of 34.7??kgy , no evidence for the 0? signal has been found, yielding a limit for the light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism of T 1/2 (0?)>1.110 24 years (90% C.L.) once both statistical and systematic uncertainties are taken into account. Depending on the nuclear matrix elements this corresponds to an upper limit on the Majorana effective neutrino mass of ?m ? ?<0.30.9??eV (90% C.L.). Constraints on other lepton number violating mechanisms of 0? decays are also given. Searching for high-energy double electron events in all suitable sources of the detector, no event in the energy region [3.210] MeV is observed for an exposure of 47??kgy .

  2. Nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution: comparison with the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Morrison, Christine N.; Kaiser, Jens T.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-02-01

    Determination of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from C. pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution and comparison to its distinct ortholog from A. vinelandii at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp1) has been determined at 1.08 Å resolution by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Cp1 and the ortholog from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av1) represent two distinct families of nitrogenases, differing primarily by a long insertion in the α-subunit and a deletion in the β-subunit of Cp1 relative to Av1. Comparison of these two MoFe protein structures at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The FeMo cofactors defining the active sites of the MoFe protein are essentially identical between the two proteins. The surrounding environment is also highly conserved, suggesting that this structural arrangement is crucial for nitrogen reduction. The P clusters are likewise similar, although the surrounding protein and solvent environment is less conserved relative to that of the FeMo cofactor. The P cluster and FeMo cofactor in Av1 and Cp1 are connected through a conserved water tunnel surrounded by similar secondary-structure elements. The long α-subunit insertion loop occludes the presumed Fe protein docking surface on Cp1 with few contacts to the remainder of the protein. This makes it plausible that this loop is repositioned to open up the Fe protein docking surface for complex formation.

  3. Figure F5. Oil and gas supply model regions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    6 Appendix F Figure F5. Oil and gas supply model regions Figure F4. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions Atlantic WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA VT Northeast (1) Gulf of Mexico Gulf Coast (2) Midcontinent (3) Rocky Mountain (5) West Coast (6) Pacific Offshore North Slope AK TX TX NM TX Southwest (4) Onshore North Slope Other Alaska Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of

  4. Electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons under both external strain and electric field, studied by first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming; Zhou, Jian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-08-14

    The electronic and magnetic properties of armchair edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons (MoS{sub 2}-ANRs) underboth the external strain and transverse electric field (E{sub t}) have been systematically investigated by using the first-principles calculations. It is found that: (1) If no electric field is applied, an interesting structural phase transition would appear under a large tensile strain, leading to a new phase MoS{sub 2}-A'NR, and inducing a big jump peak of the band gap in the transition region. But, the band gap response to compressive strains is much different from that to tensile strain, showing no the structural phase transition. (2) Under the small tensile strains (<10%), the combined E{sub t} and tensile strain give rise to a positive superposition (resonant) effect on the band gap reduction at low E{sub t} (<3 V/nm), and oppositely a negative superposition (antiresonant) one at high E{sub t} (>4 V/nm). On the other hand, the external compressive strains have always presented the resonant effect on the band gap reduction, induced by the electric field. (3) After the structural phase transition, an external large tensile strain could greatly reduce the critical field E{sub tc} causing the band gap closure, and make the system become a ferromagnetic (FM) metal at a relative low E{sub t} (e.g., <4 V/nm), which is very helpful for its promising applications in nano-mechanical spintronics devices. (4) At high E{sub t} (>10 V/nm), the magnetic moments of both the MoS{sub 2}-ANR and MoS{sub 2}-A'NR in their FM states could be enhanced greatly by a tensile strain. Our numerical results of effectively tuning physical properties of MoS{sub 2}-ANRs by combined external strain and electric field may open their new potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  5. Microstructural characterization of a thin film ZrN diffusion barrier in an As-fabricated U7Mo/Al matrix dispersion fuel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Perez, Emmanuel; Wiencek, Tom; Leenaers, Ann; Van den Berghe, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The United States High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development program is developing low enriched uranium fuels for application in research and test reactors. One concept utilizes U7 wt.% Mo (U7Mo) fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix, where the fuel particles are coated with a 1 ?m-thick ZrN coating. The ZrN serves as a diffusion barrier to eliminate a deleterious reaction that can occur between U7Mo and Al when a dispersion fuel is irradiated under aggressive reactor conditions. To investigate the final microstructure of a physically-vapor-deposited ZrN coating in a dispersion fuel plate after it was fabricated using a rolling process, characterization samples were taken from a fuel plate that was fabricated at 500 C using ZrN-coated U7Mo particles, Al matrix and AA6061 cladding. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy analysis were performed. Data from these analyses will be used to support future microstructural examinations of irradiated fuel plates, in terms of understanding the effects of irradiation on the ZrN microstructure, and to determine the role of diffusion barrier microstructure in eliminating fuel/matrix interactions during irradiation. The as-fabricated coating was determined to be cubic-ZrN (cF8) phase. It exhibited a columnar microstructure comprised of nanometer-sized grains and a region of relatively high porosity, mainly near the Al matrix. Small impurity-containing phases were observed at the U7Mo/ZrN interface, and no interaction zone was observed at the ZrN/Al interface. The bonding between the U7Mo and ZrN appeared to be mechanical in nature. A relatively high level of oxygen was observed in the ZrN coating, extending from the Al matrix in the ZrN coating in decreasing concentration. The above microstructural characteristics are discussed in terms of what may be most optimal for a diffusion barrier in a dispersion fuel plate application.

  6. Surface Structures of Cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo Catalyst Nanoparticles from Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guofeng; Van Hove, M.A.; Ross, P.N.; Baskes, M.I.

    2005-03-31

    The surface structures of cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles have been investigated using the Monte Carlo method and modified embedded atom method potentials that we developed for Pt-Mo alloys. The cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles are constructed with disordered fcc configurations, with sizes from 2.5 to 5.0 nm, and with Pt concentrations from 60 to 90 at. percent. The equilibrium Pt-Mo nanoparticle configurations were generated through Monte Carlo simulations allowing both atomic displacements and element exchanges at 600 K. We predict that the Pt atoms weakly segregate to the surfaces of such nanoparticles. The Pt concentrations in the surface are calculated to be 5 to 14 at. percent higher than the Pt concentrations of the nanoparticles. Moreover, the Pt atoms preferentially segregate to the facet sites of the surface, while the Pt and Mo atoms tend to alternate along the edges and vertices of these nanoparticles. We found that decreasing the size or increasing the Pt concentration leads to higher Pt concentrations but fewer Pt-Mo pairs in the Pt-Mo nanoparticle surfaces.

  7. Life assessment of a C-1/2Mo petroleum refinery pressure vessel operating in the creep regime

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.G.; Osage, D.A.; Buchheim, G.M.; Dobis, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive fitness-for-service assessment was conducted to evaluate a C-1/2Mo pressure vessel which has operated at temperatures in the creep range for almost 45 years. An initial damage assessment based on elastic stress analysis results indicated that this vessel was approaching its predicted failure life and thus there was little potential for increasing the operating temperature. Creep tests were conducted on samples removed from high stress regions of the vessel according to the MPC Omega Program protocol. The creep test results indicated that the material possesses creep strength superior to average new material and therefore has substantial remaining life. A nonlinear finite element analysis incorporating the MPC Project Omega creep law was performed to assess creep and fatigue damage. The results of this assessment indicated that future operation at increased temperatures was indeed feasible.

  8. Quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes in MoS{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Z. X.; Liu, L. Z.; Wu, H. Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Shan, Y.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-06-08

    The low quantum yield (∼10{sup −5}) has restricted practical use of photoluminescence (PL) from MoS{sub 2} composed of a few layers, but the quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes are believed to be able to boost the PL intensity. In this work, PL from 2 to 9 nm MoS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) is excluded from the solvent and the absorption and PL spectra are shown to be consistent with the size distribution. PL from MoS{sub 2} QDs is also found to be sensitive to aggregation due to the size effect.

  9. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Xie, Ya -Hong

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  10. Density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of layered MoS{sub 2}, MoSe{sub 2} and their mixed-layer compound

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhoon; Hong, Jisook; Lee, Wang Ro; Kim, Dae Yeon; Shim, Ji Hoon

    2014-03-15

    First principles density functional theory calculations were carried out for the 2H-MoQ{sub 2} (Q=S and Se) and their hypothetical mixed-layer compound. Due to the different electronegativities of S and Se atoms on MoQ{sub 2}, the band gap size could be adjusted in mixed-layer compound MoS{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2}. Also, the indirect band gap in pure MoQ{sub 2} compounds is changed to the pseudo direct band gap in mixed-layer MoS{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} which is similar to the monolayer compound. The layer mixing enhances the thermoelectric properties because of the increased density of states around the Fermi level and the decreased band gap size. Therefore, we suggest that this layer mixing approach should be regarded as a useful way to modulate their electronic structures and to improve their thermoelectric properties. -- Graphical abstract: On the basis of density functional calculations we predict that the mixed-layer compounds 2H-MoS{sub 2}/2H-MoSe{sub 2}, in which two different layers 2H-MoS{sub 2} and 2H-MoSe{sub 2}, have enhanced thermoelectric properties because of the increased density of states around the Fermi level and the decreased band gap size. Highlights: • We explored a way of improving TE properties of 2H-MoQ{sub 2} on DFT methods. • The mixed-layer compounds MoS{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} have enhanced thermoelectric properties. • This is caused by modulated electronic structure of mixed layer compound. • Layer mixing approach should be regarded as a useful way to improve TE properties.

  11. Electrochemical Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Lister; R. E. Mizia; H. Tian

    2005-10-01

    The waste package site recommendation design specified a boron-containing stainless steel, Neutronit 976/978, for fabrication of the internal baskets that will be used as a corrosion-resistant neutron-absorbing material. Recent corrosion test results gave higher-than-expected corrosion rates for this material. The material callout for these components has been changed to a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ASTM-B 932-04, UNS N06464) that is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. This report discusses the results of initial corrosion testing of this material in simulated in-package environments that could contact the fuel baskets after breach of the waste package outer barrier. The corrosion test matrix was executed using the potentiodynamic and potentiostatic electrochemical test techniques. The alloy performance shows low rates of general corrosion after initial removal of a gadolinium-rich second phase that intersects the surface. The high halide-containing test solutions exhibited greater tendencies toward initiation of crevice corrosion.

  12. Thermo-physical Properties of DU-10 wt.% Mo Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Cynthia A. Papesch; Andrew P. Maddison; Thomas Hartmann; Francine J. Rice

    2010-08-01

    Low-enriched uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum is under consideration by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative reactor convert program as a very high density fuel to enable the conversion of high-performance research reactors away from highly-enriched uranium fuels. As with any fuel development program, the thermophysical properties of the fuel as a function of temperature are extremely important and must be well characterized in order to effectively model and predict fuel behavior under normal and off-normal irradiation conditions. For the alloy system under investigation, there is a lack of thermophysical property data, and in most cases, the data is relatively inconsistent and lacks sufficient explanation. Available literature on this alloy system comes mainly from studies done during the 1960s and 1970s, and often does not include sufficient information on fabrication history or conditions to draw conclusions for the current application. The current paper has investigated specific heat capacity, coefficient of linear thermal expansion, density, and thermal diffusivity that were then used to calculate alloy thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. The data obtained from this investigation was compared to available literature on similar U-Mo alloys, and in most cases are in good agreement.

  13. MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons as promising thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D. D.; Liu, H. J. Cheng, L.; Jiang, P. H.; Shi, J.; Tang, X. F.

    2014-09-29

    The thermoelectric properties of MoS{sub 2} armchair nanoribbons with different width are studied by using first-principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory, where the relaxation time is predicted from deformation potential theory. Due to the dangling bonds at the armchair edge, there is obvious structure reconstruction of the nanoribbons which plays an important role in governing the electronic and transport properties. The investigated armchair nanoribbons are found to be semiconducting with indirect gaps, which exhibit interesting width-dependent oscillation behavior. The smaller gap of nanoribbon with width N = 4 (Here, N represents the number of dimer lines or zigzag chains across the ribbon width) leads to a much larger electrical conductivity at 300 K, which outweighs the relatively larger electronic thermal conductivity when compared with those of N = 5, 6. As a result, the ZT values can be optimized to 3.4 (p-type) and 2.5 (n-type) at room temperature, which significantly exceed the performance of most laboratory results reported in the literature.

  14. Elevated temperature stability of a 6% Mo superaustenitic stainless alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Grubb, J.F.

    1996-11-01

    A 6% Mo superaustenitic stainless alloy (UNS N08367) was exposed at temperatures in the 1,000 to 1,900 F (538 to 1,038 C) range for times up to 10,000 hours. The effect of these exposures on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance has been examined. Exposure of N08367 alloy at 1,900 F (1,056 C) for 1 to 10 hours does not result in precipitation of intermetallic phases, does not embrittle it, and does not degrade its corrosion resistance. Exposure of N08367 alloy at 1,300 to 1,800 F (704 to 982 C) does precipitate intermetallic phases, does embrittle it, and does degrade its corrosion resistance. Short-term exposure of N08367 alloy at 1,000 or 1,100 F (538 to 593 C) does not cause precipitation of intermetallic phases, with consequent embrittlement and loss of corrosion resistance, but long-term exposures do. Extrapolation of the embrittlement time vs. temperature curves shows that the current 800 F (427 C) use temperature limit for N08367 alloy is safe.

  15. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MO.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MO.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Missouri Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  16. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O J-8 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O J-9 Draft PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) OCTOBER 1 (2012) through SEPTEMBER 30, (2013) Contract No. ...

  17. Microscopic origin of low frequency noise in MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhamoy; Jain, Manish; Ghosh, Arindam; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Sarma, D. D.

    2014-09-01

    We report measurement of low frequency 1/f noise in molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors in multiple device configurations including MoS{sub 2} on silicon dioxide as well as MoS{sub 2}-hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructures. All as-fabricated devices show similar magnitude of noise with number fluctuation as the dominant mechanism at high temperatures and density, although the calculated density of traps is two orders of magnitude higher than that at the SiO{sub 2} interface. Measurements on the heterostructure devices with vacuum annealing and dual gated configuration reveals that along with the channel, metal-MoS{sub 2} contacts also play a significant role in determining noise magnitude in these devices.

  18. Large theoretical thermoelectric power factor of suspended single-layer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Babaei, Hasan E-mail: babaei@auburn.edu; Khodadadi, J. M.; Sinha, Sanjiv

    2014-11-10

    We have calculated the semi-classical thermoelectric power factor of suspended single-layer (SL)- MoS{sub 2} utilizing electron relaxation times derived from ab initio calculations. Measurements of the thermoelectric power factor of SL-MoS{sub 2} on substrates reveal poor power factors. In contrast, we find the thermoelectric power factor of suspended SL-MoS{sub 2} to peak at ∼2.8 × 10{sup 4} μW/m K{sup 2} at 300 K, at an electron concentration of 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. This figure is higher than that in bulk Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, for example. Given its relatively high thermal conductivity, suspended SL-MoS{sub 2} may hold promise for in-plane thin-film Peltier coolers, provided reasonable mobilities can be realized.

  19. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O J-15 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    15 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J ATTACHMENT D: ... WIPP M&O J-16 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION ...

  20. Exceptionally high glass-forming ability of an FeCoCrMoCBY alloy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exceptionally ... Here we report the exceptionally high GFA of an FeCoCrMoCBY ... OSTI Identifier: 20702296 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  1. A pseudo binary y-Gd solidification diagram for Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: A pseudo binary y-Gd solidification diagram for Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys. No abstract prepared. Authors: Dupont, John Neuman 1 ; Minicozzi, Michael J. 1 ; Robino, Charles ...

  2. Surface confined quantum well state in MoS{sub 2}(0001) thin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Our findings of scQWS in MoSsub 2 shed some light on understanding the electronic properties of 2D materials with implications in future 2D electronic devices. Authors: Sun, ...

  3. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  4. Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography. ... Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase ...

  5. Giant and tunable valley degeneracy splitting in MoTe 2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on September 7, 2016 Title: Giant and tunable valley degeneracy splitting in MoTe 2 Authors: Qi, Jingshan ; Li, Xiao ; Niu, Qian ; Feng, ...

  6. Bonding between graphene and MoS{sub 2} monolayers without and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    layer and in-gap states with linear dispersion contributed mostly by the graphene layer. ... Moreover, we calculate the dielectric function of the Li intercalated grapheneMoSsub 2 ...

  7. AB INITIO Modeling of Thermomechanical Properties of Mo-Based Alloys for Fossil Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2013-12-31

    In this final scientific/technical report covering the period of 3.5 years started on July 1, 2011, we report the accomplishments on the study of thermo-mechanical properties of Mo-based intermetallic compounds under NETL support. These include computational method development, physical properties investigation of Mo-based compounds and alloys. The main focus is on the mechanical and thermo mechanical properties at high temperature since these are the most crucial properties for their potential applications. In particular, recent development of applying ab initio molecular dynamic (AIMD) simulations to the T1 (Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}) and T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}) phases are highlighted for alloy design in further improving their properties.

  8. NNSA Works to Establish a Reliable Supply of Mo-99 Produced Without...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOENNSA's objective is to accelerate the establishment of a reliable, commercial Mo-99 supply network that avoids a single point of failure and does not use proliferation-sensitiv...

  9. Monolayers of MoS{sub 2} as an oxidation protective nanocoating material

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, H. Sener; Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.; Durgun, E.

    2014-08-28

    First-principle calculations are employed to investigate the interaction of oxygen with ideal and defective MoS{sub 2} monolayers. Our calculations show that while oxygen atoms are strongly bound on top of sulfur atoms, the oxygen molecule only weakly interacts with the surface. The penetration of oxygen atoms and molecules through a defect-free MoS{sub 2} monolayer is prevented by a very high diffusion barrier indicating that MoS{sub 2} can serve as a protective layer for oxidation. The analysis is extended to WS{sub 2} and similar coating characteristics are obtained. Our calculations indicate that ideal and continuous MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} monolayers can improve the oxidation and corrosion-resistance of the covered surface and can be considered as an efficient nanocoating material.

  10. U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-10

    An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

  11. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO (Technical Report)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Nine different streetlighting products were installed on various streets in Kansas City, Missouri during February, 2011, to evaluate their performance relative to the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting. The applications investigated included 100 W, 150 W, 250 W, and 400 W HPS installations. Initial measurements

  12. Dan E. Arvizu Named Director of National Renewable Energy Laboratory and

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Senior Vice President at Midwest Research Institute - News Releases | NREL Dan E. Arvizu Named Director of National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Senior Vice President at Midwest Research Institute January 4, 2005 Golden, CO and Kansas City, MO - The appointment of Dan E. Arvizu as Director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, CO, and Senior Vice President at Midwest Research Institute was announced today by James L. Spigarelli, President and CEO of Midwest

  13. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.

  14. High reflectance and low stress Mo2C/Be multilayers

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2001-01-01

    A material for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayers that will reflect at about 11.3 nm, have a high reflectance, low stress, and high thermal and radiation stability. The material consists of alternating layers of Mo.sub.2 C and Be deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on a substrate, such as silicon. In one example a Mo.sub.2 C/Be multilayer gave 65.2% reflectance at 11.25 nm measured at 5 degrees off normal incidence angle, and consisted of 70 bilayers with a deposition period of 5.78 nm, and was deposited at 0.83 mTorr argon (Ar) sputtering pressure, with the first and last layers being Be. The stress of the multilayer is tensile and only +88 MPa, compared to +330 MPa of a Mo/Be multilayers of the same thickness. The Mo.sub.2 C/Be multilayer was capped with carbon which produced an increase in reflectivity of about 7% over a similar multilayer with no carbon capping material, thus raising the reflectivity from 58.3% to over 65%. The multilayers were formed using either Mo.sub.2 C or Be as the first and last layers, and initial testing has shown the formation of beryllium carbide at the interfaces between the layers which both stabilizes and has a smoothing effect, and appear to be smoother than the interfaces in Mo/Be multilayers.

  15. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.

  16. MoS{sub 2} nanotube exfoliation as new synthesis pathway to molybdenum blue

    SciTech Connect

    Visic, B.; Gunde, M. Klanjsek; Kovac, J.; Iskra, I.; Jelenc, J.; Remskar, M.; Centre of Excellence Namaste, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: ? New synthesis approach to obtaining molybdenum blue via exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes. ? Material is prone to self assembly and is stable in high vacuum. ? Molecules are as small as 2 nm and their clusters are up to tens of nanometers. ? Change in absorption and oxidation states from the precursor MoS{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Molybdenum blue-type materials are usually obtained by partially reducing Mo{sup VI+} in acidic solutions, while in the presented method it is formed in ethanol solution of exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes, where the MoS{sub 2} flakes are the preferential location for their growth. Material was investigated by means of scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, showing the structure and self assembly, while also confirming that it is stable in high vacuum with molecules as small as 1.6 nm and the agglomerates of few tens of nanometres. The ultravioletvisible and photoelectron spectrometry show the change in absorption properties and oxidation states from MoS{sub 2} structure to molybdenum blue, while the presence of sulphur suggests that this is a new type of molybdenum blue material.

  17. Effects of thermal treatment on the co-rolled U-Mo fuel foils

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Cynthia R. Breckenridge; Brady L. Mackowiak; Glenn A. Moore; Barry H. Rabin; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2014-11-01

    A monolithic fuel type is being developed to convert US high performance research and test reactors such as Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). The interaction between the cladding and the U-Mo fuel meat during fuel fabrication and irradiation is known to have negative impacts on fuel performance, such as mechanical integrity and dimensional stability. In order to eliminate/minimize the direct interaction between cladding and fuel meat, a thin zirconium diffusion barrier was introduced between the cladding and U-Mo fuel meat through a co-rolling process. A complex interface between the zirconium and U-Mo was developed during the co-rolling process. A predictable interface between zirconium and U-Mo is critical to achieve good fuel performance since the interfaces can be the weakest link in the monolithic fuel system. A post co-rolling annealing treatment is expected to create a well-controlled interface between zirconium and U-Mo. A systematic study utilizing post co-rolling annealing treatment has been carried out. Based on microscopy results, the impacts of the annealing treatment on the interface between zirconium and U-Mo will be presented and an optima annealing treatment schedule will be suggested. The effects of the annealing treatment on the fuel performance will also be discussed.

  18. Stability of precipitate phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the and phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the phase at lowmoretemperature. The other is that both the and phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.less

  19. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed intomore » the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.« less

  20. Atomic oxygen interaction with nickel multilayer and antimony oxide doped MoS{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.

    1994-12-31

    Sputtered MoS{sub 2} is a solid lubricant capable of ultralow friction coefficients (below 0.05) load-bearing capacity. Since it exhibits low friction in vacuum, low outgassing rate, is non-migrating and lacks organic binders, this material is an attractive lubricant for space mechanisms. To exploit these new materials to their fullest potential, designers of space-based motion systems require data on the effects of atomic oxygen exposure on dense, sputtered MoS{sub 2}. This paper describes the effects of atomic oxygen in low earth orbit on the friction and surface composition of sputtered MoS{sub 2} films. Sputtered multilayer films of MoS{sub 2} with nickel (0.7 nm Ni per 10 nm MoS{sub 2}, for 1 {mu}m total film thickness), and MoS{sub 2} cosputtered with antimony oxide (nominally 2 {mu}m thick) were exposed to 2.2 to 2.5 x 10{sup 20} oxygen/cm{sup 2} over a period of 42.25 hours in earth orbit on the United States space shuttle. Identical specimens were kept as controls in desiccated storage for the duration of the mission, and another set was exposed to an equivalent fluence of atomic oxygen in the laboratory. The friction coefficient in air and vacuum, and the composition of worn surfaces, were determined prior to the shuttle flight and again after the shuttle flight. Results are described.

  1. Synthesis of MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles for azo dye degradation by catalytic ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Manivel, Arumugam; Lee, Gang-Juan; Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Jing-Heng; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Horng, Tzzy-Leng; Wu, Jerry J.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of one-dimensional MoO{sub 3} nanostructures using hydrothermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. • Sonochemical synthesized MoO{sub 3} presents the best efficiency for the dye removal by catalytic ozonation. • Efficient environmental remediation process. - Abstract: One-dimensional molybdenum trioxide nanostructures were prepared in three different approaches, including thermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. The physicochemical properties of the obtained MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated by diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Among the methods as investigated, sonochemical synthesis gave well-dispersed fine MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles compared with the other approaches. All the synthesized MoO{sub 3} nanostructures were examined for the catalytic ozonation to degrade azo dye in aqueous environment. Different performances were obtained for the catalyst prepared in different methods and the catalytic efficiencies were found to be the order of sonochemical, microwave, and then thermal methods. The sonochemical MoO{sub 3} catalyst allowed the total dye removal within 20 min and its good performance was justified according to their higher surface area with higher number of active sites that provide effective dye interaction for better degradation.

  2. Collective electronic behaviors of laterally heterostructured armchair MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Nannan; Zhou, Wenzhe; Zou, Hui; Chen, Yu; Yang, Zhixiong; Xiong, Xiang; Ouyang, Fangping

    2015-08-28

    Based on density functional theory, we have investigated the electronic properties of molybdenum disulfide-niobium disulfide hybrid nanoribbons (MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NRs). It is found that the MoS{sub 2} edge, MoS{sub 2} center, NbS{sub 2} edge, and NbS{sub 2} center have distinct contributions to the collective electronic behaviors of MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NRs. Its behavior, metallic or semiconductor, depends on whether the central area of NR contains NbS{sub 2} chain or not. This dependence has been also revealed in the electronic structures of NbS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NR and MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} NR, of which the former is semiconductor and the latter is metal. In comparison with MoS{sub 2} NR of the same width, the hybrid has a different bandgap that was caused by the coupled effects between NbS{sub 2} edge and MoS{sub 2} edge. This fact makes MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NRs a possible candidate for nanoelectronic devices based on heterostructured transition-metal dichalcogenide.

  3. Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Junhao; Feng, Wei; Xiao, Kai; Qiu, Yunfeng; Chen, XiaoShuang; Liu, Guangbo; Cao, Wenwu; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; et al

    2016-07-19

    2D layered MoS2 has drawn intense attention for its applications in flexible electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. Most of the MoS2 atomic layers grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition techniques are n-type due to the abundant sulfur vacancies. Facile production of MoS2 atomic layers with p-type behavior, however, remains challenging. Here, a novel one-step growth has been developed to attain p-type MoS2 layers in large scale by using Mo-containing sol–gel, including 1% tungsten (W). Atomic-resolution electron microscopy characterization reveals that small tungsten oxide clusters are commonly present on the as-grown MoS2 film due to the incomplete reduction of W precursormore » at the reaction temperature. These omnipresent small tungsten oxide clusters contribute to the p-type behavior, as verified by density functional theory calculations, while preserving the crystallinity of the MoS2 atomic layers. The Mo containing sol–gel precursor is compatible with the soft-lithography techniques, which enables patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers into regular arrays with different shapes, holding great promise for highly integrated device applications. Lastly, an atomically thin p–n junction is fabricated by the as-prepared MoS2, which shows strong rectifying behavior.« less

  4. Microstructure evolution of Li uptake/removal in MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles with high lithium storage performance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Pan; Chen, Wenhao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhchli@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: The carbon-coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) ultra fine nanoparticles are synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method. MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles have high specific capacity, excellent cycling performance and rate performance. Phase transformations for lithium ion uptake/removal are examined carefully by TEM. Phase transformations are highly reversible during the redox process. - Abstract: A facile one pot strategy of a hydrothermal methodology was applied to synthesize the carbon coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) nanostructured particles, which are composed of ultra fine nanoparticles with homogeneous carbon coating about several nanometers. As an electrode in lithium ion batteries, the MoO{sub 2}@C shows a high specific capacity and reversible capacity (730 mA h g{sup ?1} after 60 cycles). Microstructure investigations, by using a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, of the MoO{sub 2}@C based electrodes employed at various states during the first discharge/charge cycle were conducted to elucidate the lithium ion uptake/removal mechanism and cycling behavior. In the lithium uptake process, the original MoO{sub 2} phase transfers into Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} through an addition type reaction, and then nanosized metallic Mo emerges as a result of a conversion reaction. In turn, Mo could be oxidized to the intermediate Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} before converting to hyperfine MoO{sub 2} phase on upcoming lithium removal process.

  5. Doping against the native propensity of MoS₂: Degenerate hole doping by cation substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Joonki; Park, Tae-Eon; Lin, Der-Yuh; Fu, Deyi; Park, Joonsuk; Jung, Hee Joon; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Jang, Chaun; Sun, Yinghui; Sinclair, Robert; Chang, Joonyeon; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-12-10

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) draw much attention as the key semiconducting material for two-dimensional electrical, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. For most of these applications, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction. However, typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) is natively an n-type presumably due to omnipresent electron-donating sulfur vacancies, and stable/controllable p-type doping has not been achieved. The lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p–n junctions of MoS₂, as well as limits carrier conduction to spin-degenerate conduction bands instead of the more interesting, spin-polarized valence bands. Traditionally, extrinsic p-type doping in TMDs has been approached with surface adsorption or intercalation of electron-accepting molecules. However, practically stable doping requires substitution of host atoms with dopants where the doping is secured by covalent bonding. In this work, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS₂ by substitutional niobium (Nb) doping, leading to a degenerate hole density of ~3 × 10¹⁹ cm⁻³. Structural and X-ray techniques reveal that the Nb atoms are indeed substitutionally incorporated into MoS₂ by replacing the Mo cations in the host lattice. van der Waals p–n homojunctions based on vertically stacked MoS₂ layers are fabricated, which enable gate-tunable current rectification. A wide range of microelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices can be envisioned from the demonstrated substitutional bipolar doping of MoS₂. From the miscibility of dopants with the host, it is also expected that the synthesis technique demonstrated here can be generally extended to other TMDs for doping against their native unipolar propensity.

  6. MCNPX-CINDER'90 Simulation of Photonuclear Mo-99 Production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chemerizov, Sergey D. [Argonne National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, James T. [NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes; Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory; Vandegrift, George R III [Argonne National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    The MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes were used to support design of experiments investigating Mo-99 production with a 20-MeV electron beam. Bremsstrahlung photons produced by the electron beam interacting with the target drive the desired Mo-100({gamma},n)Mo-99 reaction, as well as many undesired reactions important to accurate prediction of radiation hazards. MCNPX is a radiation transport code and CINDER'90 is a transmutation code. They are routinely used together for accelerator activation calculations. Low energy neutron fluxes and production rates for nonneutron and high energy neutron induced reactions computed using MCNPX are inputs to CINDER'90. CINDER'90 presently has only a neutron reaction cross section library up to 25 MeV and normally the other reaction rates come from MCNPX physics models. For this work MCNPX photon flux tallies modified by energy response functions prepared from evaluated photonuclear cross section data were used to tally the reaction rates for CINDER'90 input. The cross section evaluations do not provide isomer to ground state yield ratios so a spin based approximation was used. Post irradiation dose rates were calculated using MCNPX with CINDER'90 produced decay photon spectra. The sensitivity of radionuclide activities and dose rates to beam parameters including energy, position, and profile, as well as underlying isomer assumptions, was investigated. Three experimental production targets were irradiated, two natural Mo and one Mo-100 enriched. Natural Mo foils upstream of the targets were used to analyze beam position and profile by exposing Gafchromic film to the foils after each irradiation. Activation and dose rate calculations were rerun after the experiments using measured beam parameters for comparison with measured Mo-99 activities and dose rates.

  7. Lessons from Iowa : development of a 270 megawatt compressed air energy storage project in midwest Independent System Operator : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Holst, Kent; Huff, Georgianne; Schulte, Robert H.; Critelli, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Park was an innovative, 270 Megawatt, $400 million compressed air energy storage (CAES) project proposed for in-service near Des Moines, Iowa, in 2015. After eight years in development the project was terminated because of site geological limitations. However, much was learned in the development process regarding what it takes to do a utility-scale, bulk energy storage facility and coordinate it with regional renewable wind energy resources in an Independent System Operator (ISO) marketplace. Lessons include the costs and long-term economics of a CAES facility compared to conventional natural gas-fired generation alternatives; market, legislative, and contract issues related to enabling energy storage in an ISO market; the importance of due diligence in project management; and community relations and marketing for siting of large energy projects. Although many of the lessons relate to CAES applications in particular, most of the lessons learned are independent of site location or geology, or even the particular energy storage technology involved.

  8. In Situ Time-Resolved Characterization of Ni-MoO2 Catalysts for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wen,W.; Calderon, J.; Brito, J.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriquez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Active catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS, CO + H2O ? H2 + CO2) reaction were synthesized from nickel molybdates ({beta}-NiMoO4 and nH2O{center_dot}NiMoO4) as precursors, and their structural transformations were monitored using in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. In general, the nickel molybdates were not stable and underwent partial reduction in the presence of CO or CO/H2O mixtures at high temperatures. The interaction of {beta}-NiMoO4 with the WGS reactants at 500 C led to the formation of a mixture of Ni (24 nm particle size) and MoO2 (10 nm particle size). These Ni-MoO2 systems displayed good catalytic activity at 350, 400, and 500 C. At 350 and 400 C, catalytic tests revealed that the Ni-MoO2 system was much more active than isolated Ni (some activity) or isolated MoO2 (negligible activity). Thus, cooperative interactions between the admetal and oxide support were probably responsible for the high WGS activity of Ni-MoO2. In a second synthetic approach, the NiMoO4 hydrate was reduced to a mixture of metallic Ni, NiO, and amorphous molybdenum oxide by direct reaction with H2 gas at 350 C. In the first pass of the water-gas shift reaction, MoO2 appeared gradually at 500 C with a concurrent increase of the catalytic activity. For these catalysts, the particle size of Ni (4 nm) was much smaller than that of the MoO2 (13 nm). These systems were found to be much more active WGS catalysts than Cu-MoO2, which in turn is superior to commercial low-temperature Cu-ZnO catalysts.

  9. Regional Education Partners

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico...

  10. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 7): Weldon Spring Quarry/Plant/Pits (USDOE), St. Charles, MO, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Weldon Spring Quarry is one of two noncontiguous areas that constitute the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weldon Spring site. The main area of the site is the chemical plant. Both areas are located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) listed the quarry on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1987, and the chemical plant area was added to the list in 1989. The quarry is about 6.4 km (4 mi) south-southwest of the chemical plant area; it is accessible from State Route 94 and is currently fenced and closed to the public. The quarry is approximately 300 m (1,000 ft) long by 140 m (450 ft) wide and covers an area of approximately 3.6 ha (9 acres). The quarry was used by the Army for disposal of chemically contaminated (explosive) materials in the 1940s and was later used for the disposal of radioactively contaminated material by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in the 1960s. Approximately 110,000 m{sup 3} (144,000 yd{sup 3}) of soil and waste material was removed from the quarry and transported to the chemical plant area as part of completing the remedial action stipulated in the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Quarry Bulk Waste Operable Unit (DOE 1990). Bulk waste removal was completed in October 1995. These wastes have been placed in the disposal cell at the chemical plant. Prior to bulk waste removal, contaminated water contained in the quarry pond was also removed; approximately 170 million liters (44 million gal) have been treated as of March 1998.

  11. EV Community Readiness projects: Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (PA); Metropolitan Energy Information Center, Inc. (KS, MO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Lake City Army Ammunition Plant (NW Lagoon), Independence, MO, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-03-01

    This decision document describes the selected Interim Remedial Action (IRA) for the Northeast Corner Operable Unit (NECOU), Lake City Army Ammunition Plant (LCAAP). The major components of the selected IRA for the NECOU include: Installation of a subsurface permeable reactive wall (PRW) to treat contaminated ground water in place (in-situ); A monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of The PRW in treating the contaminated ground water and to determine the replacement period of the reactive media; and Installation of a soil cover over the Area 17 Oil and Solvent Pits (a principal threat waste) located adjacent to the current sanitary landfill in the NECOU to minimize infiltration of water through the pits and subsequently into ground water.

  13. Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Ralph G.; Christian, Jerry D.; Grover, S. Blaine; Petti, David A.; Terry, William K.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1998-01-01

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

  14. Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1998-09-01

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

  15. Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2017 Title: Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor 2D layered MoS2 has drawn intense attention for its applications in flexible electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. Most of the MoS2 atomic layers grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition techniques are n-type due to the abundant

  16. Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2017 Title: Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor 2D layered MoS2 has drawn intense attention for its applications in flexible electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. Most of the MoS2 atomic layers grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition

  17. Surface oxidation energetics and kinetics on MoS{sub 2} monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    KC, Santosh; Longo, Roberto C.; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-04-07

    In this work, surface oxidation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} (one of the representative semiconductors in transition-metal dichalcogenides) has been investigated using density functional theory method. Oxygen interaction with MoS{sub 2} shows that, thermodynamically, the surface tends to be oxidized. However, the dissociative absorption of molecular oxygen on the MoS{sub 2} surface is kinetically limited due to the large energy barrier at low temperature. This finding elucidates the air stability of MoS{sub 2} surface in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the presence of defects significantly alters the surface stability and adsorption mechanisms. The electronic properties of the oxidized surface have been examined as a function of oxygen adsorption and coverage as well as substitutional impurities. Our results on energetics and kinetics of oxygen interaction with the MoS{sub 2} monolayer are useful for the understanding of surface oxidation, air stability, and electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides at the atomic scale.

  18. FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

    2003-04-22

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  19. Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Medford, Andrew

    2012-02-16

    Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

  20. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-08-10

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near a critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.

  1. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels after low fluence irradiation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this work is the determination of the possible effect of the simultaneous formation of helium and displacement damage during irradiation on the Charpy impact behavior. Subsize Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and 12Cr-1MoVW with 2%Ni (12Cr-1MOVW-2Ni) were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 300 and 400{degree}C to damage levels up to 2.5 dpa. The objective was to study the effect of the simultaneous formation of displacement damage and transmutation helium on impact toghness. Despite the low fluence relative to previous irradiations of these steels, significant increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) occurred. The 12Cr-1MoVW-2Ni steel irradiated at 400{degree}C had the largest increase in DBTT and displayed indications of intergranular fracture. A mechanism is proposed to explain how helium can affect the fracture behaviour of this latter steel in the present tests, and how it affected all three steels in previous experiments, where the steels were irradiated to higher fluences.

  2. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  3. Incorporating Stakeholder Decision Support Needs into an Integrated Regional Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Jennie S.; Moss, Richard H.; Runci, Paul J.; Anderson, K. L.; Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2012-03-21

    A new modeling effort exploring the opportunities, constraints, and interactions between mitigation and adaptation at regional scale is utilizing stakeholder engagement in an innovative approach to guide model development and demonstration, including uncertainty characterization, to effectively inform regional decision making. This project, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), employs structured stakeholder interactions and literature reviews to identify the most relevant adaptation and mitigation alternatives and decision criteria for each regional application of the framework. The information is used to identify important model capabilities and to provide a focus for numerical experiments. This paper presents the stakeholder research results from the first iRESM pilot region. The pilot region includes the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwest portion of the United States as well as other contiguous states. This geographic area (14 states in total) permits cohesive modeling of hydrologic systems while also providing gradients in climate, demography, land cover/land use, and energy supply and demand. The results from the stakeholder research indicate that iRESM should prioritize addressing adaptation alternatives in the water resources, urban infrastructure, and agriculture sectors, such as water conservation, expanded water quality monitoring, altered reservoir releases, lowered water intakes, urban infrastructure upgrades, increased electric power reserves in urban areas, and land use management/crop selection changes. Regarding mitigation alternatives, the stakeholder research shows a need for iRESM to focus on policies affecting the penetration of renewable energy technologies, and the costs and effectiveness of energy efficiency, bioenergy production, wind energy, and carbon capture and sequestration.

  4. Toward Improving the Type IV Cracking Resistance in Cr-Mo Steel Weld Through Thermo-Mechanical Processing

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Shassere, Benjamin A.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-02-23

    Detailed microstructure characterization of Grade 91 (Modified 9Cr-1Mo, ASTM A387) steel subjected to a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) process was performed to rationalize the cross-weld creep properties. A series of thermo-mechanical processing in the austenite phase region, followed by isothermal aging at temperatures at 973 to 1173 K (700 to 900ºC) was applied to the Grade 91 steel to promote precipitation kinetics of MX (M: Nb and V, X: C and N) in the austenite matrix. Detailed characterization of the base metals after standard tempering confirmed the presence of fine MX dispersion within the tempered martensitic microstructure in steels processed at/andmore » above 1073 K (800 ºC). Relatively low volume fraction of M23C6 precipitates was observed after processing at 1073 K (800 ºC). The cross-weld creep strength after processing was increased with respect to the increase of MX dispersion, indicating that these MX precipitates maintained during weld thermal cycles in the fine grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ) region and thereby contribute to improved creep resistant of welds in comparison to the welds made with the standard “normalization and tempering” processes. Lastly, the steels processed in this specific processing condition showed improved cross-weld creep resistance and sufficient room-temperature toughness. The above data is also analysed based on existing theories of creep deformation based on dislocation climb mechanism.« less

  5. Institutional constraints on alternative water for energy: a guidebook for regional assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Basic information is presented about the legal, political, and social constraints faced by energy developers in the acquisition of water from underground, irrigation return flow, municipal waste, and saline sources. It is a guide to those institutional constraints which are general and pronounced enough to be important for regional assessments. First, attention was focused on the acquisition phase of the water use cycle. Second, constraints were analyzed primarily from a regional, rather than state-by-state, perspective. Emphasis was placed generally on the West - particularly the synfuel-rich Rocky Mountain states, the East, and Mid-West, in that order. Alaska and Hawaii were not surveyed. Third, the study focuses on the constraints associated with groundwater, municipal waste, irrigation return flow, and sea water, in that order. The phrase, institutional constraints, as used in the study, means legal, social, economic, and political restrictions, requirements, circumstances, or conditions that must be anticipated or responded to in order to acquire water for energy development. The study focuses primarily on legal constraints and secondarily on political constraints, because they tend to encompass or reflect other forms of institutional constraints.

  6. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He<mo stretchy='true'>?mo>3<mo stretchy='false'>(mo>e<mo stretchy='false'>?mo><mo>,mo>e<mo>'d stretchy='false'>)mo> Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  7. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He<mo stretchy='true'>→mo>3<mo stretchy='false'>(mo>e<mo stretchy='false'>→mo><mo>,mo>e<mo>'d stretchy='false'>)mo> Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  8. Controlling the metal to semiconductor transition of MoS2 and WS2 in solution

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chou, Stanley Shihyao; Yi-Kai Huang; Kim, Jaemyung; Kaehr, Bryan James; Foley, Brian M.; Lu, Ping; Conner Dykstra; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Jiaxing Huang; et al

    2015-01-22

    Lithiation-exfoliation produces single to few-layered MoS2 and WS2 sheets dispersible in water. However, the process transforms them from the pristine semiconducting 2H phase to a distorted metallic phase. Recovery of the semiconducting properties typically involves heating of the chemically exfoliated sheets at elevated temperatures. Therefore, it has been largely limited to sheets deposited on solid substrates. We report the dispersion of chemically exfoliated MoS2 sheets in high boiling point organic solvents enabled by surface functionalization and the controllable recovery of their semiconducting properties directly in solution. Ultimately, this process connects the scalability of chemical exfoliation with the simplicity of solutionmore » processing, enabling a facile method for tuning the metal to semiconductor transitions of MoS2 and WS2 within a liquid medium.« less

  9. Electronic and magnetic properties of Mo doped graphene; full potential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, Jyoti Kashyap, Manish K.; Singh, Mukhtiyar; Saini, Hardev S.

    2015-05-15

    The electronic and magnetic properties of Pristine and Mo doped Graphene have been calculated using WIEN2k implementation of full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). The exchange and correlation (XC) effects were taken into account by generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated results show that Mo doping creates magnetism in Graphene by shifting the energy levels at E{sub F} and opens up a channel for Graphene to be used in real nanoscale device applications. The unpaired d-electrons of Mo atom are responsible for induced magnetism in Graphene. Magnetic ordering created in Graphene in this way makes it suitable for recording media, magnetic sensors, magnetic inks and spintronic devices.

  10. Observation of localized states in atomically thin MoS{sub 2} field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhamoy; Pal, Atindra Nath; Ghosh, Arindam

    2013-12-04

    We present electrical transport and low frequency (1/f) noise measurements on mechanically exfoliated single, bi and trilayer MoS{sub 2}-based FET devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate. We find that the electronic states in MoS{sub 2} are localized at low temperatures (T) and conduction happens through variable range hopping (VRH). A steep increase of 1/f noise with decreasing T, typical for localized regime was observed in all of our devices. From gate voltage dependence of noise, we find that the noise power is inversely proportional to square of the number density (? 1/n{sup 2}) for a wide range of T, indicating number density fluctuations to be the dominant source of 1/f noise in these MoS{sub 2} FETs.

  11. Thermal stability of fission gas bubble superlattice in irradiated U10Mo fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Robinson, A. B.; Wachs, D. M.; Meyer, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated U-7Mo dispersion and U-10Mo monolithic fuel plates, a FIB-TEM sample of the irradiated U-10Mo fuel with a local fission density of 3.51021 fissions/cm3 was used for an in-situ heating TEM experiment. The temperature of the heating holder was raised at a ramp rate of approximately 10 C/min up to ~700 C, kept at that temperature for about 34 min, continued to 850 C with a reduced rate of 5 C/min. The result shows a high thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of this observation on the fuel microstructural evolution and performance under irradiation is discussed.

  12. Highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3} thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Radetinac, Aldin Mani, Arzhang; Ziegler, Jürgen; Alff, Lambert; Komissinskiy, Philipp; Melnyk, Sergiy; Nikfalazar, Mohammad; Zheng, Yuliang; Jakoby, Rolf

    2014-09-15

    We have measured the microwave resistance of highly conducting perovskite oxide SrMoO{sub 3} thin film coplanar waveguides. The epitaxial SrMoO{sub 3} thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition and showed low mosaicity and smooth surfaces with a root mean square roughness below 0.3 nm. Layer-by-layer growth could be achieved for film thicknesses up to 400 nm as monitored by reflection high-energy electron diffraction and confirmed by X-ray diffraction. We obtained a constant microwave resistivity of 29 μΩ·cm between 0.1 and 20 GHz by refining the frequency dependence of the transmission coefficients. Our result shows that SrMoO{sub 3} is a viable candidate as a highly conducting electrode material for all-oxide microwave electronic devices.

  13. Exciton-dominant electroluminescence from a diode of monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Yu; Ye, Ziliang; Gharghi, Majid; Zhu, Hanyu; Wang, Yuan; Zhao, Mervin; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-05-12

    In two-dimensional monolayer MoS{sub 2}, excitons dominate the absorption and emission properties. However, the low electroluminescent efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio limit our understanding of the excitonic behavior of electroluminescence. Here, we study the microscopic origin of the electroluminescence from a diode of monolayer MoS{sub 2} fabricated on a heavily p-type doped silicon substrate. Direct and bound-exciton related recombination processes are identified from the electroluminescence. At a high electron-hole pair injection rate, Auger recombination of the exciton-exciton annihilation of the bound exciton emission is observed at room temperature. Moreover, the efficient electrical injection demonstrated here allows for the observation of a higher energy exciton peak of 2.255?eV in the monolayer MoS{sub 2} diode, attributed to the excited exciton state of a direct-exciton transition.

  14. Research update: Spin transfer torques in permalloy on monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei; Sklenar, Joseph; Hsu, Bo; Jiang, Wanjun; Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Xiao, Jiao; Fradin, Frank Y.; Liu, Yaohua; Pearson, John E.; Ketterson, John B.; et al

    2016-03-03

    We observe current induced spin transfertorque resonance in permalloy (Py) grown on monolayer MoS2. By passing rf current through the Py/MoS2 bilayer, field-like and damping-like torques are induced which excite the ferromagnetic resonance of Py. The signals are detected via a homodyne voltage from anisotropic magnetoresistance of Py. In comparison to other bilayer systems with strong spin-orbit torques, the monolayer MoS2 cannot provide bulk spin Hall effects and thus indicates the purely interfacial nature of the spin transfer torques. Furthermore, our results indicate the potential of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide for the use of interfacial spin-orbitronics applications.

  15. Thermal aging modeling and validation on the Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamics of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical knowledge to understand thermal aging effect on the phase stability of Mo-containing austenitic steels, which subsequently facilitates alloy design/improvement and degradation mitigation of these materials for reactor applications. Among the intermetallic phases, Chi (χ), Laves, and Sigma (σ) are often of concern because of their tendency to cause embrittlement of the materials. The focus of this study is thermal stability of the Chi and Laves phases as they were less studied compared to the Sigma phase. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Mo containing Fe-Cr-Ni alloys was investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing times. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the precipitates of the intermetallic phases were carefully examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Three key findings resulted from this study. First, the Chi phase is stable at high temperature, and with decreasing temperature it transforms into the Laves phase that is stable at low temperature. Secondly, Cr, Mo, Ni are soluble in both the Chi and Laves phases, with the solubility of Mo playing a major role in the relative stability of the intermetallic phases. Thirdly, in situ transformation from Chi phase to Laves phase was directly observed, which increased the local strain field, generated dislocations in the intermetallic phases, and altered the precipitate phase orientation relationship with the austenitic matrix. The thermodynamic models that were developed and validated were then applied to evaluating the effect of Mo on the thermal stability of intermetallic phases in type 316 and NF709 stainless steels.

  16. Electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of MoS{sub 2}/Si p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Lanzhong Liu, Yunjie Gao, Wei; Han, Zhide; Xue, Qingzhong; Zeng, Huizhong; Wu, Zhipeng; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Wanli

    2015-03-21

    Bulk-like molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) thin films were deposited on the surface of p-type Si substrates using dc magnetron sputtering technique and MoS{sub 2}/Si p-n junctions were formed. The vibrating modes of E{sup 1}{sub 2g} and A{sub 1g} were observed from the Raman spectrum of the MoS{sub 2} films. The current density versus voltage (J-V) characteristics of the junction were investigated. A typical J-V rectifying effect with a turn-on voltage of 0.2 V was shown. In different voltage range, the electrical transporting of the junction was dominated by diffusion current and recombination current, respectively. Under the light illumination of 15 mW cm{sup −2}, the p-n junction exhibited obvious photovoltaic characteristics with a short-circuit current density of 3.2 mA cm{sup −2} and open-circuit voltage of 0.14 V. The fill factor and energy conversion efficiency were 42.4% and 1.3%, respectively. According to the determination of the Fermi-energy level (∼4.65 eV) and energy-band gap (∼1.45 eV) of the MoS{sub 2} films by capacitance-voltage curve and ultraviolet-visible transmission spectra, the mechanisms of the electrical and photovoltaic characteristics were discussed in terms of the energy-band structure of the MoS{sub 2}/Si p-n junctions. The results hold the promise for the integration of MoS{sub 2} thin films with commercially available Si-based electronics in high-efficient photovoltaic devices.

  17. SEM and TEM Characterization of As-Fabricated U-7Mo Disperson Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Keiser, Jr.; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2009-11-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate can have a dramatic impact on the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of dispersion fuel plates, SEM and TEM analysis have been performed on RERTR-9A archive fuel plates, which went through an additional hot isostatic procsssing (HIP) step during fabrication. The fuel plates had depleted U-7Mo fuel particles dispersed in either Al-2Si or 4043 Al alloy matrix. For the characterized samples, it was observed that a large fraction of the ?-phase U-7Mo alloy particles had decomposed during fabrication, and in areas near the fuel/matrix interface where the transformation products were present significant fuel/matrix interaction had occurred. Relatively thin Si-rich interaction layers were also observed around the U-7Mo particles. In the thick interaction layers, (U)(Al,Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were identified, and in the thin interaction layers U(Al,Si)3, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and USi1.88-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this work, exposure of dispersion fuel plates to relatively high temperatures during fabrication impacts the overall microstructure, particularly the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. The time and temperature of fabrication should be carefully controlled in order to produce the most uniform Si-rich layers around the U-7Mo particles.

  18. Neutrino-nucleus scattering of {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd

    SciTech Connect

    Ydrefors, E.; Almosly, W.; Suhonen, J.

    2013-12-30

    Accurate knowledge about the nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos for relevant nuclear targets is important both for neutrino detection and for astrophysical applications. In this paper we discuss the cross sections for the charged-current neutrino-nucleus scatterings off {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd. The microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model is adopted for the odd-even nuclei {sup 95,97}Mo. In the case of {sup 116}Cd we present cross sections both for the Bonn one-boson-exchange potential and self-consistent calculations based on modern Skyrme interactions.

  19. Primary arm spacing in chill block melt spun Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, S.N.; Glasgow, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Chill block melt spun ribbons of Ni-Mo binary alloys containing 8.0 to 41.8 wt % Mo have been prepared under carefully controlled processing conditions. The growth velocity has been determined as a function of distance from the quench surface from the observed ribbon thickness dependence on the melt puddle residence time. Primary arm spacings measured at the midribbon thickness locations show a dependence on growth velocity and alloy composition which is expected from dendritic growth models for binary alloys directionally solidified in a positive temperature gradient.

  20. Highly efficient, high speed vertical photodiodes based on few-layer MoS 2

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Highly efficient, high speed vertical photodiodes based on few-layer MoS 2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 26, 2017 Title: Highly efficient, high speed vertical photodiodes based on few-layer MoS 2 Authors: Li, Zhen Search SciTech Connect for author "Li, Zhen" Search SciTech Connect for ORCID "0000000308862994" Search orcid.org for ORCID

  1. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-03

    Low-enrichment (U-235 < 20%) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing was comprised of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates that were tested in INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. Adjacent to the AA6061 cladding were Mg-rich precipitates, which was in close proximity to the region where Xe is observed to be enriched. In samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface were possible indications of porosity/debonding, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  2. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-03

    Low-enrichment (U-235 < 20%) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing was comprised of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates that were tested inmore » INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. Adjacent to the AA6061 cladding were Mg-rich precipitates, which was in close proximity to the region where Xe is observed to be enriched. In samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface were possible indications of porosity/debonding, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.« less

  3. Persistent photoconductivity in two-dimensional Mo1-xW xSe2–MoSe2 van der Waals heterojunctions

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Puretzky, Alexander A.; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai; Li, Xufan; Lin, Ming -Wei; Wang, Kei

    2016-02-16

    Van der Waals (vdW) heterojunctions consisting of vertically-stacked individual or multiple layers of two-dimensional (2D) layered semiconductors, especially the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), are fascinating new artificial solids just nanometers-thin that promise novel optoelectronic functionalities due to the sensitivity of their electronic and optical properties to strong quantum confinement and interfacial interactions. Here, monolayers of n-type MoSe2 and p-type Mo1-xW xSe2–MoSe2 are grown by vapor transport methods, then transferred and stamped to form artificial vdW heterostructures with different interlayer orientations. Atomic-resolution Z-contrast electron microscopy and electron diffraction are used to characterize both the individual monolayers and the atomic registry betweenmore » layers in the bilayer vdW heterostructures. These measurements are compared with photoluminescence and low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which indicates strong interlayer coupling in heterostructures. Remarkably, the heterojunctions exhibit an unprecedented photoconductivity effect that persists at room temperature for several days. This persistent photoconductivity is shown to be tunable by applying a gate bias that equilibrates the charge distribution. Furthermore, these measurements indicate that such ultrathin vdW heterojunctions can function as rewritable optoelectronic switches or memory elements under time-dependent photo-illumination, an effect which appears promising for new monolayer TMDs-based optoelectronic devices applications.« less

  4. Catalytic activity in lithium-treated core–shell MoOx/MoS2 nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Kappera, Rajesh; Voiry, Damien; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Jasinski, Jacek; Kelly, Dan; Chhowalla, Manish; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Gupta, Gautam

    2015-09-22

    Significant interest has grown in the development of earth-abundant and efficient catalytic materials for hydrogen generation. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides present opportunities for efficient electrocatalytic systems. Here, we report the modification of 1D MoOx/MoS2 core–shell nanostructures by lithium intercalation and the corresponding changes in morphology, structure, and mechanism of H2 evolution. The 1D nanowires exhibit significant improvement in H2 evolution properties after lithiation, reducing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) onset potential by ~50 mV and increasing the generated current density by ~600%. The high electrochemical activity in the nanowires results from disruption of MoS2 layers in the outer shell, leading to increased activity and concentration of defect sites. This is in contrast to the typical mechanism of improved catalysis following lithium exfoliation, i.e., crystal phase transformation. As a result, these structural changes are verified by a combination of Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  5. Photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of MoC{sup −} and NbN{sup −} diatomic anions: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qing-Yu; Li, Zi-Yu; He, Sheng-Gui E-mail: chenh@iccas.ac.cn; Hu, Lianrui; Chen, Hui E-mail: chenh@iccas.ac.cn; Ning, Chuan-Gang; Ma, Jia-Bi

    2015-04-28

    The isoeletronic diatomic MoC{sup −} and NbN{sup −} anions have been prepared by laser ablation and studied by photoelectron imaging spectroscopy combined with quantum chemistry calculations. The photoelectron spectra of NbN{sup −} can be very well assigned on the basis of literature reported optical spectroscopy of NbN. In contrast, the photoelectron spectra of MoC{sup −} are rather complex and the assignments suffered from the presence of many electronically hot bands and limited information from the reported optical spectroscopy of MoC. The electron affinities of NbN and MoC have been determined to be 1.450 ± 0.003 eV and 1.360  ±  0.003 eV, respectively. The good resolution of the imaging spectroscopy provided a chance to resolve the Ω splittings of the X{sup 3}Σ{sup −} (Ω = 0 and 1) state of MoC and the X{sup 4}Σ{sup −} (Ω = 1/2 and 3/2) state of MoC{sup −} for the first time. The spin-orbit splittings of the X{sup 2}Δ state of NbN{sup −} and the a{sup 2}Δ state of MoC{sup −} were also determined. The similarities and differences between the electronic structures of the NbN and MoC systems were discussed.

  6. The influence of MoO{sub x} gap states on hole injection from aluminum doped zinc oxide with nanoscale MoO{sub x} surface layer anodes for organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Jitendra Kumar; Santos-Ortiz, Reinaldo; Du, Jincheng; Shepherd, Nigel D.

    2015-08-14

    The effective workfunction of Al doped ZnO films (AZO) increased from 4.1 eV to 5.55 eV after surface modification with nanoscale molybdenum sub-oxides (MoO{sub x}). Hole only devices with anodes consisting of 3 nm of MoO{sub x} on AZO exhibited a lower turn-on voltage (1.5 vs 1.8 V), and larger charge injection (190 vs 118 mA/cm{sup 2}) at the reference voltage, compared to indium tin oxide (ITO). AZO devices with 10 nm of MoO{sub x} exhibited the highest workfunction but performed poorly compared to devices with 3 nm of MoO{sub x}, or standard ITO. Ultraviolet photoelectron, X-ray photoelectron, and optical spectroscopies indicate that the 3 nm MoO{sub x} films are more reduced and farther away from MoO{sub 3} stoichiometry than their 10 nm equivalents. The vacancies associated with non-stoichiometry result in donor-like gap states which we assign to partially occupied Mo 4d levels. We propose that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling from these levels is responsible for the reduction in threshold voltage measured in devices with 3 nm of MoO{sub x}. A schematic band diagram is proposed. The thicker MoO{sub x} layers are more stoichiometric and resistive, and the voltage drop across these layers dominates their electrical performance, leading to an increase in threshold voltage. The results indicate that AZO with MoO{sub x} layers of optimal thickness may be potential candidates for anode use in organic light emitting diodes.

  7. Small non-polar complexes exhibiting significant piezoelectric properties: Solvothermal synthesis and crystal structures of MO{sub 5}V(tren){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Mo and W; tren=tris(2-aminoethyl)amine)

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, M.; Naether, C.; Bismayer, U.; Bensch, W.

    2012-11-15

    The two isostructural complexes MO{sub 5}V(tren){center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Mo (1) and W (2)) were synthesized under solvothermal conditions at pH Almost-Equal-To 12 crystallizing in the non-centrosymmetric space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. The structures are constructed by a distorted tetrahedral [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anion bound via one shared oxygen atom to a severely distorted [V{sup IV}N{sub 4}O]{sup 2+} complex completing the octahedral coordination around the V centre. The two O atoms in the VN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedron are in cis position. The two compounds represent rare examples where the [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} anion is acting as a ligand. Both compounds exhibit a piezoelectric effect which is more pronounced for M=Mo. The samples are further characterized with IR and UV/Vis spectroscopy and thermal analysis. - Graphical abstract: The complexes [(V(tren)O)(MO4)]{center_dot}H2O (M = Mo, W; tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine)) composed of vertex-linked [MO4]{sup 2-} tetrahedron and [VN4O6]{sup 2+}octahedron. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [MO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} tetrahedron (M=Mo, W) acting as ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jahn-Teller and steric distortion of the [VN{sub 4}O{sub 2}]{sup 2+} octahedron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-centrosymmetric complexes exhibiting pronounced piezoelectric effect.

  8. Single-layer MoS{sub 2} roughness and sliding friction quenching by interaction with atomically flat substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Quereda, J.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Agrat, N.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.

    2014-08-04

    We experimentally study the surface roughness and the lateral friction force in single-layer MoS{sub 2} crystals deposited on different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, mica, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Roughness and sliding friction measurements are performed by atomic force microscopy. We find a strong dependence of the MoS{sub 2} roughness on the underlying substrate material, being h-BN the substrate which better preserves the flatness of the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The lateral friction also lowers as the roughness decreases, and attains its lowest value for MoS{sub 2} flakes on h-BN substrates. However, it is still higher than for the surface of a bulk MoS{sub 2} crystal, which we attribute to the deformation of the flake due to competing tip-to-flake and flake-to-substrate interactions.

  9. h:prjq496 ext intext.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    0a. Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ____________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | Midwest Census Region | | |___________________________________| | | | | | | | Census Division | | | |_______________________| | | | | | | Total | | East North| West North| Usage Indicators | U.S. | Total | Central | Central | |___________|___________|___________|___________| RSE | | | | | Row RSE Column Factor: | 0.5 |

  10. file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-10a

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0a. Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ____________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | Midwest Census Region | | |___________________________________| | | | | | | | Census Division | | | |_______________________| | | | | | | Total | | East North| West North| Usage Indicators | U.S. | Total | Central | Central | |___________|___________|___________|___________| RSE | | | | | Row RSE Column Factor: | 0.5 |

  11. The Microstructure of Rolled Plates from Cast Billets of U-10Mo Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Burkes, Douglas; Lavender, Curt A.

    2015-03-01

    This report covers the examination of 13 samples of rolled plates from three separate castings of uranium, alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) which were sent from the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y12) to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

  12. Effect of mechanical strain on electronic properties of bulk MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep Kumar, Jagdish Sastri, O. S. K. S.

    2015-05-15

    Ab-initio density functional theory based calculations of electronic properties of bulk and monolayer Molybdenum di-Sulfide (MoS{sub 2}) have been performed using all electron Full Potential Linearised Augmentad Plane Wave (FPLAPW) method using Elk code. We have used Generalised Gradient Approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation functionals and performed calculaitons of Lattice parameters, Density Of States (DOS) and Band Structure (BS). Band structure calculations revealed that bulk MoS{sub 2} has indirect band gap of 0.97 eV and mono-layer MoS{sub 2} has direct band gap which has increased to 1.71 eV. These are in better agreement with experimental values as compared with the other calculations using pseudo-potential code. The effect of mechanical strain on the electronic properties of bulk MoS{sub 2} has also been studied. For the different values of compressive strain (varying from 2% to 8% in steps of 2%) along the c-axis, the corresponding DOS and BS are obtained. We observed that the band gap decreases by about 15% for every 2% increase in strain along the c-axis.

  13. Electric contributions to magnetic force microscopy response from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lu Hua Chen, Ying

    2014-12-07

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) signals have recently been detected from whole pieces of mechanically exfoliated graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanosheets, and magnetism of the two nanomaterials was claimed based on these observations. However, non-magnetic interactions or artefacts are commonly associated with MFM signals, which make the interpretation of MFM signals not straightforward. A systematic investigation has been done to examine possible sources of the MFM signals from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets and whether the MFM signals can be correlated with magnetism. It is found that the MFM signals have significant non-magnetic contributions due to capacitive and electrostatic interactions between the nanosheets and conductive cantilever tip, as demonstrated by electric force microscopy and scanning Kevin probe microscopy analyses. In addition, the MFM signals of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets are not responsive to reversed magnetic field of the magnetic cantilever tip. Therefore, the observed MFM response is mainly from electric artefacts and not compelling enough to correlate with magnetism of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets.

  14. M&O Contract 2008-2013, Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 M&O Contract 2008-2013, between the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC and the U.S. Department Of Energy. Part I, Section B, Supplies and Services and Price/Costs.

  15. On the combined gradient-stochastic plasticity model: Application to Mo-micropillar compression

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, A. A.; Zhang, X.; Aifantis, E. C.

    2015-02-17

    A formulation for addressing heterogeneous material deformation is proposed. It is based on the use of a stochasticity-enhanced gradient plasticity model implemented through a cellular automaton. The specific application is on Mo-micropillar compression, for which the irregularities of the strain bursts observed have been experimentally measured and theoretically interpreted through Tsallis' q-statistics.

  16. Ferromagnetic superexchange in insulating Cr2MoO6 by controlling orbital hybridization

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhu, M.; Do, D.; Dela Cruz, Clarina R.; Dun, Zhiling; Cheng, J. -G.; Goto, H.; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Zou, T.; Zhou, Haidon D.; Mahanti, Subhendra D.; et al

    2015-09-11

    We report the magnetic and electronic structures of the newly synthesized inverse-trirutile compound Cr2MoO6. Despite the same crystal symmetry and similar bond-lengths and bond-angles to Cr2TeO6, Cr2MoO6 possesses a magnetic structure of the Cr2MoO6 type, different from that seen in Cr2TeO6. Ab-initio electronic structure calculations show that the sign and strength of the Cr-O-Cr exchange coupling is strongly influenced by the hybridization between Mo 4d and O 2p orbitals. This result further substantiates our recently proposed mechanism for tuning the exchange interaction between two magnetic atoms by modifying the electronic states of the non-magnetic atoms in the exchange path throughmore » orbital hybridization. This approach is fundamentally different from the conventional methods of controlling the exchange interaction by either carrier injection or through structural distortions.« less

  17. Equation of state of bcc-Mo by static volume compression to 410 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Akahama, Yuichi; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Singh, Anil K.

    2014-12-14

    Unit cell volumes of Mo and Pt have been measured simultaneously to ≈400 GPa by x-ray powder diffraction using a diamond anvil cell and synchrotron radiation source. The body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of Mo was found to be stable up to 410 GPa. The equation of state (EOS) of bcc-Mo was determined on the basis of Pt pressure scale. A fit of Vinet EOS to the volume compression data gave K{sub 0} = 262.3(4.6) GPa, K{sub 0}′ = 4.55(16) with one atmosphere atomic volume V{sub 0} = 31.155(24) A{sup 3}. The EOS was in good agreement with the previous ultrasonic data within pressure difference of 2.5%–3.3% in the multimegabar range, though the EOS of Mo proposed from a shock compression experiment gave lower pressure by 7.2%–11.3% than the present EOS. The agreement would suggest that the Pt pressure scale provides an accurate pressure value in an ultra-high pressure range.

  18. MoSi 2 Oxidation in 670-1498 K Water Vapor

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Sooby Wood, Elizabeth; Parker, Stephen S.; Nelson, Andrew T.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Butt, D.

    2016-03-08

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) has well documented oxidation resistance at high temperature (T > 1273 K) in dry O2 containing atmospheres due to the formation of a passive SiO2 surface layer. But, its behavior under atmospheres where water vapor is the dominant species has received far less attention. Oxidation testing of MoSi2 was performed at temperatures ranging from 670–1498 K in both 75% water vapor and synthetic air (Ar-O2, 80%–20%) containing atmospheres. Here the thermogravimetric and microscopy data describing these phenomena are presented. Over the temperature range investigated, MoSi2 displays more mass gain in water vapor than in air. The oxidationmore » kinetics observed in water vapor differ from that of the air samples. Two volatile oxides, MoO2(OH)2 and Si(OH)4, are thought to be the species responsible for the varied kinetics, at 670–877 K and at 1498 K, respectively. Finally, we observed an increase in oxidation (140–300 mg/cm2) from 980–1084 K in water vapor, where passivation is observed in air.« less

  19. MoS{sub 2} functionalization for ultra-thin atomic layer deposited dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Azcatl, Angelica; McDonnell, Stephen; Santosh, K.C.; Peng, Xin; Dong, Hong; Qin, Xiaoye; Addou, Rafik; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M.; Mordi, Greg I.; Kim, Jiyoung

    2014-03-17

    The effect of room temperature ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O{sub 3}) exposure of MoS{sub 2} on the uniformity of subsequent atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is investigated. It is found that a UV-O{sub 3} pre-treatment removes adsorbed carbon contamination from the MoS{sub 2} surface and also functionalizes the MoS{sub 2} surface through the formation of a weak sulfur-oxygen bond without any evidence of molybdenum-sulfur bond disruption. This is supported by first principles density functional theory calculations which show that oxygen bonded to a surface sulfur atom while the sulfur is simultaneously back-bonded to three molybdenum atoms is a thermodynamically favorable configuration. The adsorbed oxygen increases the reactivity of MoS{sub 2} surface and provides nucleation sites for atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The enhanced nucleation is found to be dependent on the thin film deposition temperature.

  20. A New Molybdenum Nitride Catalyst with Rhombohedral MoS2 Structure for Hydrogenation Applications

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanmin; Ge, Hui; Sun, Shouli; Zhang, Jianzhong; Liu, Fangming; Wen, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaohui; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Hongwu; et al

    2015-03-23

    Nitrogen-rich transition-metal nitrides hold great promise to be the next-generation catalysts for clean and renewable energy applications. However, incorporation of nitrogen into the crystalline lattices of transition metals is thermodynamically unfavorable at atmospheric pressure; most of the known transition metal nitrides are nitrogen-deficient with molar ratios of N:metal less than a unity. In this work, we have formulated a high-pressure route for the synthesis of a nitrogen-rich molybdenum nitride through a solid-state ion-exchange reaction. The newly discovered nitride, 3R-MoN2, adopts a rhombohedral R3m structure, isotypic with MoS2. This new nitride exhibits catalytic activities that are three times more active thanmore » the traditional catalyst MoS2 for the hydrodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene and more than twice as high in the selectivity to hydrogenation. The nitride is also catalytically active in sour methanation of syngas with >80% CO and H2 conversion at 723 K. Lastly, our formulated route for the synthesis of 3R-MoN2 is at a moderate pressure of 3.5 GPa and, thus, is feasible for industrial-scale catalyst production.« less

  1. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  2. EIS-0475: Disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NNSA/DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS for the disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO. NNSA previously decided in a separate NEPA review (EA-1592) to relocate its operations from the Bannister Federal Complex to a newly constructed industrial campus eight miles from the current location.

  3. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kundrát, Vojtěch; Sullivan, John; Ye, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoling; Cooke, Kevin; Sun, Hailin

    2015-04-15

    Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42) substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo) – tungsten (W) interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  4. Effect of Na-doped Mo on Selenization Pathways for CuGa/In Metallic Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Rangarajan; Tong, Gabriel; Kim, Woo Kyoung; Payzant, E Andrew; Adelhelm, Christoph; Franzke, Enrico; Winkler, Jörg; Anderson, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Reaction pathways were followed for selenization of CuGa/In precursor structures using in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD). Precursor films were deposited on Na-free and Na-doped Mo (3 and 5 at %)/Na-free glass. The precursor film was constituted with CuIn, In, Cu9Ga4, Cu3Ga, Cu16In9 and Mo. HTXRD measurements during temperature ramp selenization showed CIS formation occurs first, followed by CGS formation, and then mixing on the group III sub-lattice to form CIGS. CIGS formation was observed to be complete at ~450 C for samples deposited on 5 at % Na-doped Mo substrates. MoSe2 formation was evidenced after the CIGS synthesis reaction was complete. The Ga distribution in the annealed CIGS was determined by Rietveld refinement. Isothermal reaction studies were conducted for CIGS (112) formation in the temperature range 260-320 C to estimate the rate constants.

  5. Regional Education Partners

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Education Partners Regional Education Partners One of the Laboratory's STEM education objectives is centered on strengthening the future workforce of Northern New Mexico and the Laboratory through effective partnerships with regional secondary and higher education organizations, businesses and industry. Contact Executive Office Director Kathy Keith Community Partnerships Office (505) 665-4400 Email Regional Partners Charlie McMillan talking with Rick Ulibarri and Dr. Fries, President of

  6. Interaction Layer Characteristics in U-xMo Dispersion/Monolithic Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Porter

    2010-11-01

    Published data concerning the interaction layer (IL) formed between U-xMo fuel alloy and aluminum (Al)-based matrix or cladding materials was reviewed, including the effects of silicon (Si) content in the matrix/cladding, molybdenum (Mo) content in the fuel, pre irradiation thermal treatments, irradiation, and test temperature. The review revealed that tests conducted in the laboratory produce results different from those conducted in an irradiation environment. However, the laboratory testing relates well to thermal treatments performed prior to irradiation and helps in understanding the effects that these pre irradiation treatments have on in reactor performance. A pre-formed, Si-enriched IL seems to be important in delaying the onset of rapid growth of fission gas bubbles at low irradaiiation temperatures. Several other conclusions can be drawn: 1. An IL with phases akin to UAl3 is desired for optimum fuel performance, but at low temperatures, and especially in an irradiation atmosphere, the desired (Al+Si)/(U+Mo) ratio of three is difficult to produce. When the fuel operating temperature is low, it is important to create a pre-irradiation IL, enriched in Si. This pre-formed IL is relatively stable, performs well in terms of swelling resistance, and prevents rapid IL growth during irradiation. 2. At higher operating temperatures (>150–170°C), IL formation in reactor may not be so dependent on pre-irradiation IL formation, especially at high burnup; a pre-fabricated IL seems to be less stable at high burnup and high operating temperature. Moreover, the (Al+SI)/(U+Mo) ratio of three occurs more often at higher temperature. For these two reasons, it is important at high operating temperature to also have a matrix with significant Si content to create an IL in reactor with the right characteristics. 3. Out-of-reactor testing seems to indicate that Si in the matrix material is required in some concentration (2%, 5%, ?) to provide for a thin, Si-enriched IL formed

  7. Novel Processing of mo-si-b Intermetallics for improved efficiency of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. Kramer; O. Degirmen; A.J. Thom; M. Akinc

    2004-09-30

    Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing applications such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. Alloys based on the Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} phase (Tl phase) possess excellent oxidation resistance to at least 1600 C in synthetic air atmospheres. However, the ability of Tl-based alloys to resist aggressive combustion environments has not yet been determined. The present work seeks to investigate the resistance of these Mo-Si-B alloys to simulated combustion atmospheres. Material was pre-alloyed by combustion synthesis, and samples for testing were prepared by classic powder metallurgical processing techniques. Precursor material synthesized by self-heating-synthesis was sintered to densities exceeding 98% in an argon atmosphere at 1800 C. The approximate phase assemblage of the material was 57% Tl, 29% MoB, 14% MoSi{sub 2} (wt%). The alloy was oxidized from 1000-1100 C in flowing air containing water vapor at 18 Torr. At 1000 C the material achieved a steady state mass loss, and at 1100 C the material undergoes a steady state mass gain. The oxidation rate of these alloys in this temperature regime was accelerated by the presence of water vapor compared to oxidation in dry air. The results of microstructural analysis of the tested alloys will be discussed. Techniques and preliminary results for fabricating near-net-shaped parts will also be presented.

  8. Modeling of Interaction Layer Growth Between U-Mo Particles and an Al Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Yeon Soo Kim; G. L. Hofman; Ho Jin Ryu; Jong Man Park; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2013-12-01

    Interaction layer growth between U-Mo alloy fuel particles and Al in a dispersion fuel is a concern due to the volume expansion and other unfavorable irradiation behavior of the interaction product. To reduce interaction layer (IL) growth, a small amount of Si is added to the Al. As a result, IL growth is affected by the Si content in the Al matrix. In order to predict IL growth during fabrication and irradiation, empirical models were developed. For IL growth prediction during fabrication and any follow-on heating process before irradiation, out-of-pile heating test data were used to develop kinetic correlations. Two out-of-pile correlations, one for the pure Al matrix and the other for the Al matrix with Si addition, respectively, were developed, which are Arrhenius equations that include temperature and time. For IL growth predictions during irradiation, the out-of-pile correlations were modified to include a fission-rate term to consider fission enhanced diffusion, and multiplication factors to incorporate the Si addition effect and the effect of the Mo content. The in-pile correlation is applicable for a pure Al matrix and an Al matrix with the Si content up to 8 wt%, for fuel temperatures up to 200 degrees C, and for Mo content in the range of 6 10wt%. In order to cover these ranges, in-pile data were included in modeling from various tests, such as the US RERTR-4, -5, -6, -7 and -9 tests and Koreas KOMO-4 test, that were designed to systematically examine the effects of the fission rate, temperature, Si content in Al matrix, and Mo content in U-Mo particles. A model converting the IL thickness to the IL volume fraction in the meat was also developed.

  9. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO?, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO? hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo?C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu?(MoO?)?(OH)?, a-NiMoO? and CoMoO?nH?O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was ?-Mo?C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu?, Ni? and Co? cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo?C, Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C catalysts were highly active for the hydrogenation of CO?. The metal/Mo?C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo?C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo?C and Co/Mo?C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO?, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH?n?? (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).

  10. Twisted MoSe2 bilayers with variable local stacking and interlayer coupling revealed by low-frequency Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Puretzky, Alexander A.; Liang, Liangbo; Li, Xufan; Xiao, Kai; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Meunier, Vincent; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-01-14

    Unique twisted bilayers of MoSe2 with multiple stacking orientations and interlayer couplings in the narrow range of twist angles, 60 ± 3°, are revealed by low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and theoretical analysis. The slight deviation from 60 allows the concomitant presence of patches featuring all three high-symmetry stacking configurations (2H or AA', AB', A'B) in one unique bilayer system. In this case, the periodic arrangement of the patches and their size strongly depend on the twist angle. Ab initio modeling predicts significant changes in frequencies and intensities of low-frequency modes versus stacking and twist angle. Experimentally, the variable stacking and couplingmore » across the interface is revealed by the appearance of two breathing modes corresponding to the mixture of the high-symmetry stacking configurations and unaligned regions of monolayers. Only one breathing mode is observed outside the narrow range of twist angles. This indicates a stacking transition to unaligned monolayers with mismatched atom registry without the in-plane restoring force required to generate a shear mode. As a result, the variable interlayer coupling and spacing in transition metal dichalcogenide bilayers revealed in this study may provide a new platform for optoelectronic applications of these materials.« less

  11. Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region

    SciTech Connect

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

  12. Buildings*","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... of Hot Water ......",567,30,63,80,55,111,39,56,47,86 "Separate Computer Area ......",553,29,69,84,51,104,29,57,37,93 "HVAC Conservation Features" "(more than one may apply)" ...

  13. DOE Recognizes Midwest Industrial Efficiency Leaders | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    began last night and continued today, Governor Granholm and DOE announced 11 Save Energy Now awards recognizing industry leaders for their exemplary energy saving accomplishments. ...

  14. Midwest Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Inc Address: 1330 Canterbury Road Place: Hays, Kansas Zip: 67601 Product: Electricity Natural Gas Number of Employees: 201-500 Phone Number: 785-625-3437 Website:...

  15. PROJECT PROFILE: Midwest Renewable Energy Association (Solar...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This effort showcases the potential of university solar photovoltaic (PV) investments, advances favorable board policies to govern PV investments, and provides a roadmap for ...

  16. Midwest Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 Energy Information Administration Form 8262 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 12539 Utility Location Yes Ownership C...

  17. Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...3,47,202,90,203,69,139 "Building Shell Conservation" "Features (more than one" "may ...30,97,168,96,195,114,199,138,245 "HVAC Conservation Features" "(more than one may apply)" ...

  18. Buildings","Northeast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...37,1576,2276,1009,2405 "Building Shell Conservation" "Features (more than one" "may ...34,2130,5279,2330,3637,2337,5443 "HVAC Conservation Features" "(more than one may apply)" ...

  19. Midwest Forensics Resource Center | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    (shot sequence, direction of fire, etc.); examination of the projectile penetration, perforation, and deflection characteristics of: sheet metal, glass, wall materials, wood,...

  20. Midwest (PADD 2) Weekly Inputs & Utilization

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    M068(2011) The Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System Model Documentation Report July 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 ii U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electricity Market Module Documentation Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear and Renewables Analysis, U.S. Energy Information Administration. General

  1. Midwest Renewable Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Renewable Energy LLC Place: Sutherland, Nebraska Zip: 69165 Product: 25mmgy (94.6m litrey) ethanol producer. Coordinates: 37.19651, -77.561418 Show Map Loading map......

  2. EA-1835: Environmental Assessment Determination | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    35: Environmental Assessment Determination EA-1835: Environmental Assessment Determination Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project ...

  3. Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Quadrennial Energy Review Second Installment Electricity: Generation to End Use ... Midwest and Florida Regions, Duke Energy Corporation * Mike Langford, National ...

  4. Microstructural Characterization of U-7Mo/Al-Si Alloy Matrix Dispersion Fuel Plates Fabricated at 500°C

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Bo Yao; Emmanuel Perez; Yongho Sohn; Curtis R. Clark

    2011-05-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate will impact the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of U–Mo dispersion fuel plates, particularly the interaction layers that can form between the fuel particles and the matrix, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses have been performed on samples from depleted U–7Mo (U–7Mo) dispersion fuel plates with either Al–2 wt.% Si(Al–2Si) or AA4043 alloy matrix. It was observed that in the thick interaction layers, U(Al, Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were present, and in the thin interaction layers, (U, Mo) (Al, Si)3, U(Al, Si)4, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and possibly USi-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this investigation, the time that a dispersion fuel plate is exposed to a relatively high temperature during fabrication will impact the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. Uniformly thin, Si-rich layers will develop around the U–7Mo particles for shorter exposure times, and thicker, Si-depleted layers will develop for the longer exposure times.

  5. MoS{sub 2}@ZnO nano-heterojunctions with enhanced photocatalysis and field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Ying-Hua; Yu, Ke Li, Jin-Zhu; Fu, Hao; Zhu, Zi-Qiang

    2014-08-14

    The molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2})@ZnO nano-heterojunctions were successfully fabricated through a facile three-step synthetic process: prefabrication of the ZnO nanoparticles, the synthesis of MoS{sub 2} nanoflowers, and the fabrication of MoS{sub 2}@ZnO heterojunctions, in which ZnO nanoparticles were uniformly self-assembled on the MoS{sub 2} nanoflowers by utilizing polyethyleneimine as a binding agent. The photocatalytic activities of the composite samples were evaluated by monitoring the photodegradation of methylene blue (MB). Compared with pure MoS{sub 2} nanoflowers, the composites show higher adsorption capability in dark and better photocatalytic efficiency due to the increased specific surface area and improved electron-hole pair separation. After irradiation for 100?min, the remaining MB in solution is about 7.3%. Moreover, the MoS{sub 2}@ZnO heterojunctions possess enhanced field emission properties with lower turn-on field of 3.08?V ?m{sup ?1}and lower threshold field of 6.9?V ?m{sup ?1} relative to pure MoS{sub 2} with turn-on field of 3.65?V ?m{sup ?1} and threshold field of 9.03?V ?m{sup ?1}.

  6. Western Regional Partnership Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regional Partnership Overview June 2013 Briefing Overview  WRP Background  Importance of Region  WRP Tribal Relations Committee  WRP Energy Committee WRP Region's Uniqueness  5 states stretching from the Great Plains to the Pacific Ocean  Diverse terrain ranging from desert valleys to forested mountains  Significant State Trust Landholdings  Approximately 188 Federally recognized Tribes  Significant amounts of Federally managed land  According to GSA 2004 study, WRP

  7. Theoretical study on strain induced variations in electronic properties of 2H-MoS{sub 2} bilayer sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Liang; Dongare, Avinash M.; Namburu, Raju R.; O'Regan, Terrance P.; Dubey, Madan

    2014-02-03

    The strain dependence of the electronic properties of bilayer sheets of 2H-MoS{sub 2} is studied using ab initio simulations based on density functional theory. An indirect band gap for bilayer MoS{sub 2} is observed for all variations of strain along the basal plane. Several transitions for the indirect band gap are observed for various strains for the bilayer structure. The variation of the band gap and the carrier effective masses for the holes and the electrons for the bilayer MoS{sub 2} structure under conditions of uniaxial strain, biaxial strain, as well as uniaxial stress is investigated.

  8. Regional Workforce Study - SRSCRO

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    delved into four of the region's key economic drivers - nuclear, manufacturing, cybersecurityIT, and healthcare. TIP Strategies conducted a comprehensive analysis of the...

  9. Regional Energy Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydroelectric Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine Fossil Fuel Turbines Alaska Energy Statistics, 2011 4 Energy Costs Vary 5 Regional Energy Planning * Energy Pathways led to ...

  10. ERHIC INTERACTION REGION DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.PARKER,B.PTITSYN,V.TEPIKIAN,S.WANG,D.WANG,F.

    2003-10-13

    This paper presents the current interaction region design status of the ring-ring version of the electron-ion collider eRHIC (release 2.0).

  11. CEMI Western Regional Summit

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Join Assistant Secretary of Energy Dr. David Danielson for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative's Western Regional Summit. Register now for this free event.

  12. AMoRE: Collaboration for searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the isotope of {sup 100}Mo with the aid of {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} as a cryogenic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbekov, N. D., E-mail: xanbekov@gmail.com [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) Collaboration is planning to employ {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} single crystals as a cryogenic Scintillation detector for studying the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the isotope {sup 100}Mo. A simultaneous readout of phonon and scintillation signals is performed in order to suppress the intrinsic background. The planned sensitivity of the experiment that would employ 100 kg of {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} over five years of data accumulation would be T{sub 1/2}{sup 0{nu}} = 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 26} yr, which corresponds to values of the effective Majorana neutrino mass in the range of Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket m{sub {nu}} Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket {approx} 0.02-0.06 eV.

  13. Determination of the direct double- β -decay Q value of Zr 96 and atomic masses of Zr 90 <mo>-> 92 <mo>,> 94 <mo>,> 96 and Mo 92 <mo>,> 94 <mo>-> 98 <mo>,> 100

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyuz, K.; Ariche, J.; Bollen, G.; Bustabad, S.; Eibach, M.; Izzo, C.; Novario, S. J.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Valverde, A. A.

    2015-05-06

    Experimental searches for neutrinoless double-β decay offer one of the best opportunities to look for physics beyond the standard model. Detecting this decay would confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino, and a measurement of its half-life can be used to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. Important to both tasks is an accurate knowledge of the Q value of the double-β decay. The LEBIT Penning trap mass spectrometer was used for the first direct experimental determination of the ⁹⁶Zr double-β decay Q value: Qββ=3355.85(15) keV. This value is nearly 7 keV larger than the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation [M. Wang et al., Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012)] value and one order of magnitude more precise. The 3-σ shift is primarily due to a more accurate measurement of the ⁹⁶Zr atomic mass: m(⁹⁶Zr)=95.90827735(17) u. Using the new Q value, the 2νββ-decay matrix element, |M|, is calculated. Improved determinations of the atomic masses of all other zirconium (90-92,94,96Zr) and molybdenum (92,94-98,100Mo) isotopes using both ¹²C₈ and ⁸⁷Rb as references are also reported.

  14. Handbook for electron beam welding of 8-inch thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Charles M.

    1980-08-01

    Purpose of this handbook is to provide a detailed procedure for electron beam welding 8 in. thick SA387 Grade 22 Class 2. Adherence to the procedure will allow others to produce electron beam welds in 8 in. thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo. A justification or description of the effects of alterations of the welding procedure is not included in this report. These effects, along with a metallographic characterization and the mechanical properties produced by the welding procedure, etc., are described in report DOE/10244-10, Electron Beam Welding of 8-in. thick 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, Final Report under Contract DE-AC05-77OR10244.

  15. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-04-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends whenmore » comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. Here, the results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.« less

  16. Bimetallic Nb-Mo carbide hydroprocessing catalysts: Synthesis, characterization, and activity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.C.; Ramanathan, S.; Dhandapani, B.; Oyama, S.T.; Chen, J.G.

    1997-01-23

    A series of bimetallic carbides, Nb{sub 1.0}Mo{sub x}OC (x = 0.67-2.0), hydroprocessing catalysts, were synthesized from oxide precursors and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, elemental analysis, CO chemisorption, surface area measurements, and temperature-programmed reduction. The catalysts were active for quinoline hydrodenitrogenation and showed highest hydrodesulfurization at Nb{sub 1.0}Mo{sub 1.75}OC. The bimetallic compounds showed enhancement in activity and stability as compared with their monometallic carbides. The spent catalysts did not show any sulfide, oxide, or metal peaks, indicating that the catalysts were stable and tolerant to sulfur. 35 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Improved performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel by Si addition in Al matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y S; Hofman, G L

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to collect in one publication and fit together work fragments presented in many conferences in the multi-year time span starting 2002 to the present dealing with the problem of large pore formation in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel plates first observed in 2002. Hence, this report summarizes the excerpts from papers and reports on how we interpreted the relevant results from out-of-pile and in-pile tests and how this problem was dealt with. This report also provides a refined view to explain in detail and in a quantitative manner the underlying mechanism of the role of silicon in improving the irradiation performance of U-Mo/Al.

  18. A multiscale method for the analysis of defect behavior in MO during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.; Insepov, Z.; Ye, B.; Yun, D.

    2014-10-01

    In order to overcome a lack of experimental information on values for key materials properties and kinetic coefficients, a multiscale modeling approach is applied to defect behavior in irradiated Mo where key materials properties, such as point defect (vacancy and interstitial) migration enthalpies as well as kinetic factors such as dimer formation, defect recombination, and self interstitial–interstitial loop interaction coefficients, are obtained by molecular dynamics calculations and implemented into rate-theory simulations of defect behavior. The multiscale methodology is validated against interstitial loop growth data obtained from electron irradiation of pure Mo. It is shown that the observed linear behavior of the loop diameter vs. the square root of irradiation time is a direct consequence of the 1D migration of self-interstitial atoms.

  19. Regional Analysis Briefs

    Reports and Publications

    2028-01-01

    Regional Analysis Briefs (RABs) provide an overview of specific regions that play an important role in world energy markets, either directly or indirectly. These briefs cover areas that are currently major producers (Caspian Sea), have geopolitical importance (South China Sea), or may have future potential as producers or transit areas (East Africa, Eastern Mediterranean).

  20. Chemical isolation of .sup.82 Sr from proton-irradiated Mo targets

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick M.; Kahn, Milton; O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.

    1976-01-01

    Spallation reactions are induced in Mo targets with 200-800 MeV protons to produce microcurie to millicurie amounts of a variety of radionuclides. A six-step radiochemical procedure, incorporating precipitation, solvent extractions, and ion exchange techniques, has been developed for the separation and purification of Sr radioactivities from other spallation products and the bulk target material. Radiostrontium can be quantitatively recovered in a sufficiently decontaminated state for use in biomedical generator development.

  1. High strength Sn-Mo-Nb-Zr alloy tubes and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Cheadle, Brian A.

    1977-01-01

    Tubes for use in nuclear reactors fabricated from a quaternary alloy comprising 2.5-4.0 wt% Sn, 0.5-1.5 wt% Mo, 0.5-1.5 wt% Nb, balance essentially Zr. The tubes are fabricated by a process of hot extrusion, heat treatment, cold working to size and age hardening, so as to produce a microstructure comprising elongated .alpha. grains with an acicular transformed .beta. grain boundary phase.

  2. Production and Characterization of Atomized U-Mo Powder by the Rotating Electrode Process

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; B.R. Muntifering; J.F. Jue

    2007-09-01

    In order to produce feedstock fuel powder for irradiation testing, the Idaho National Laboratory has produced a rotating electrode type atomizer to fabricate uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. Operating with the appropriate parameters, this laboratory-scale atomizer produces fuel in the desired size range for the RERTR dispersion experiments. Analysis of the powder shows a homogenous, rapidly solidified microstructure with fine equiaxed grains. This powder has been used to produce irradiation experiments to further test adjusted matrix U-Mo dispersion fuel.

  3. Co-Rolled U10Mo/Zirconium-Barrier-Layer Monolithic Fuel Foil Fabrication Process

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; M. C. Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Integral to the current UMo fuel foil processing scheme being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the incorporation of a zirconium barrier layer for the purpose of controlling UMo-Al interdiffusion at the fuel-meat/cladding interface. A hot “co-rolling” process is employed to establish a ~25-µm-thick zirconium barrier layer on each face of the ~0.3-mm-thick U10Mo fuel foil.

  4. Crystal structure of the spin-glass pyrochlore, Y/sub 2/Mo/sub 2/O/sub 7/

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, J.N.; Greedan, J.E.; Sato, M.

    1988-02-01

    The crystal structure of the spin-glass material, Y/sub 2/Mo/sub 2/O/sub 7/, has been determined from powder neutron diffraction data using profile (Rietveld) methods. The data are consistent with the fully ordered cubic pyrochlore structure, a/sub 0/ = 10.230(1) A with Y in 16d, Mo in 16c, O in 48f(x = 0.3382(1), and O' in 8b of Fd3m. Attempts to refine models with O' disordered over the 32e sites or between the 8a and 8b sites resulted in convergence to the 8b positions. Derived Y-O and Mo-O distances are in excellent agreement with those found in isostructural materials giving indirect evidence for Y-Mo ordering over the cation sites.

  5. Direct fabrication of thin layer MoS{sub 2} field-effect nanoscale transistors by oxidation scanning probe lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Espinosa, Francisco M.; Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo; Marinov, Kolyo; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis, Andras

    2015-03-09

    Thin layer MoS{sub 2}-based field effect transistors (FET) are emerging candidates to fabricate very fast and sensitive devices. Here, we demonstrate a method to fabricate very narrow transistor channel widths on a single layer MoS{sub 2} flake connected to gold electrodes. Oxidation scanning probe lithography is applied to pattern insulating barriers on the flake. The process narrows the electron path to about 200 nm. The output and transfer characteristics of the fabricated FET show a behavior that is consistent with the minimum channel width of the device. The method relies on the direct and local chemical modification of MoS{sub 2}. The straightforward character and the lack of specific requirements envisage the controlled patterning of sub-100 nm electron channels in MoS{sub 2} FETs.

  6. Exciton-dominated dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yiling; Yu, Yifei; Cai, Yongqing; Li, Wei; Gurarslan, Alper; Peelaers, Hartwin; Aspnes, David E.; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Zhang, Yong -Wei; Cao, Linyou

    2015-11-24

    We systematically measure the dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films with different layer numbers and demonstrate that excitonic effects play a dominant role in the dielectric function when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick. The dielectric function shows an anomalous dependence on the layer number. It decreases with the layer number increasing when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick but turns to increase with the layer number for thicker films. We show that this is because the excitonic effect is very strong in the thin MoS2 films and its contribution to the dielectric function may dominate over the contribution of the band structure. We also extract the value of layer-dependent exciton binding energy and Bohr radius in the films by fitting the experimental results with an intuitive model. The dominance of excitonic effects is in stark contrast with what reported at conventional materials whose dielectric functions are usually dictated by band structures. Lastly, the knowledge of the dielectric function may enable capabilities to engineer the light-matter interactions of atomically thin MoS2 films for the development of novel photonic devices, such as metamaterials, waveguides, light absorbers, and light emitters.

  7. Exciton-dominated dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yu, Yiling; Yu, Yifei; Cai, Yongqing; Li, Wei; Gurarslan, Alper; Peelaers, Hartwin; Aspnes, David E.; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Nguyen, Nhan V.; Zhang, Yong -Wei; et al

    2015-11-24

    We systematically measure the dielectric function of atomically thin MoS2 films with different layer numbers and demonstrate that excitonic effects play a dominant role in the dielectric function when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick. The dielectric function shows an anomalous dependence on the layer number. It decreases with the layer number increasing when the films are less than 5–7 layers thick but turns to increase with the layer number for thicker films. We show that this is because the excitonic effect is very strong in the thin MoS2 films and its contribution to the dielectric function maymore » dominate over the contribution of the band structure. We also extract the value of layer-dependent exciton binding energy and Bohr radius in the films by fitting the experimental results with an intuitive model. The dominance of excitonic effects is in stark contrast with what reported at conventional materials whose dielectric functions are usually dictated by band structures. Lastly, the knowledge of the dielectric function may enable capabilities to engineer the light-matter interactions of atomically thin MoS2 films for the development of novel photonic devices, such as metamaterials, waveguides, light absorbers, and light emitters.« less

  8. Temperature-Dependent Friction and Wear Behavior of PTFE and MoS2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Babuska, T. F.; Pitenis, A. A.; Jones, M. R.; Nation, B. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Argibay, N.

    2016-06-16

    We present an investigation of the temperature-dependent friction behavior of PTFE, MoS2, and PTFE-on- MoS2. Friction behavior was measured while continuously varying contact temperature in the range -150 to 175°C while sliding in dry nitrogen, as well as for self-mated PTFE immersed in liquid nitrogen. These results contrast with previous reports of monotonic inverse temperature dependent friction behavior, as well as reported high-friction transitions and plateaus at temperatures below about -20°C that were not observed, providing new insights about the molecular mechanisms of macro-scale friction. The temperature-dependent friction behavior characteristic of self-mated PTFE was found also on the PTFE-on-MoS2 slidingmore » contact, suggesting that PTFE friction was defined by sub-surface deformation mechanisms and internal friction even when sliding against a lamellar lubricant with extremely low friction coefficient (μ ~ 0.02). The various relaxation temperatures of PTFE were found in the temperature-dependent friction behavior, showing excellent agreement with reported values acquired using torsional techniques measuring internal friction. Additionally, hysteresis in friction behavior suggests an increase in near-surface crystallinity at upon exceeding the high temperature relaxation, Tα~ 116°C.« less

  9. Study on Shielding Requirements for Radioactive Waste Transportation in a Mo-99 Production Plant - 13382

    SciTech Connect

    Melo Rego, Maria Eugenia de; Kazumi Sakata, Solange; Vicente, Roberto; Hiromoto, Goro

    2013-07-01

    Brazil is currently planning to produce {sup 99}Mo from fission of low enriched uranium (LEU) targets. The planned end of irradiation activity of {sup 99}Mo is about 185 TBq (5 kCi) per week to meet the present domestic demand of {sup 99m}Tc generators. The radioactive wastes from the production plant will be transferred to a waste treatment facility at the same site. The total activity of the actinides, fission and activation products present in the wastes can be predicted based on the yields of fission and activation data for the irradiation conditions, such as composition and mass of uranium targets, irradiation time, neutron flux, production schedule, etc., which were in principle already established by the project management. The transportation of the wastes from the production plant to the treatment facility will be done by means of special shielded packages. An assessment of the shielding required for the packages has been done and the results are presented here, aiming at contributing to the design of the waste management facility for the {sup 99}Mo production plant. (authors)

  10. Supercondutivity at 9K in Mo5PB2 with evidence for multiple gaps

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    McGuire, Michael A.; Parker, David S.

    2016-02-09

    Superconductivity is observed with critical temperatures near 9 K in the tetragonal compound Mo5PB2. This material adopts the Cr5B3 structure type common to superconducting Nb5Si3–xBx, Mo5SiB2, and W5SiB2, which have critical temperatures of 5.8–7.8 K. We have synthesized polycrystalline samples of the compound, made measurements of electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity, and performed first-principles electronic structure calculations. The highest Tc value (9.2 K) occurs in slightly phosphorus rich samples, with composition near Mo5P1.1B1.9, and the upper critical field Hc2 at T = 0 is estimated to be ≈17 kOe. Together, the measurements and band-structure calculations indicate intermediate couplingmore » (λ=1.0), phonon mediated superconductivity. Here, the temperature dependence of the heat capacity and upper critical field Hc2 below Tc suggest multiple superconducting gaps may be present.« less

  11. Tribological properties of self-lubricating NiAl/Mo-based composites containing AgVO{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Eryong; Gao, Yimin; Bai, Yaping; Yi, Gewen; Wang, Wenzhen; Zeng, Zhixiang; Jia, Junhong

    2014-11-15

    Silver vanadate (AgVO{sub 3}) nanowires were synthesized by hydrothermal method and self-lubricating NiAl/Mo-AgVO{sub 3} composites were fabricated by powder metallurgy technique. The composition and microstructure of NiAl/Mo-based composites were characterized and the tribological properties were investigated from room temperature to 900 C. The results showed that NiAl/Mo-based composites were consisted of nanocrystalline B2 ordered NiAl matrix, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mo{sub 2}C, metallic Ag and vanadium oxide phase. The appearance of metallic Ag and vanadium oxide phase can be attributed to the decomposition of AgVO{sub 3} during sintering. Wear testing results confirmed that NiAl/Mo-based composites have excellent tribological properties over a wide temperature range. For example, the friction coefficient and wear rate of NiAl/Mo-based composites containing AgVO{sub 3} were significantly lower than the composites containing only metallic Mo or AgVO{sub 3} lubricant when the temperature is above 300 C, which can be attributed to the synergistic lubricating action of metallic Mo and AgVO{sub 3} lubricants. Furthermore, Raman results indicated that the composition on the worn surface of NiAl-based composites was self-adjusted after wear testing at different temperatures. For example, Ag{sub 3}VO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} lubricants were responsible for the improvement of tribological properties at 500 C, AgVO{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3}VO{sub 4} and molybdate for 700 C, and AgVO{sub 3} and molybdate for 900 C of NiAl-based composites with the addition of metallic Mo and AgVO{sub 3}. - Highlights: NiAl/Mo-AgVO{sub 3} nanocomposites were prepared by mechanical alloying and sintering. AgVO{sub 3} decomposed to metallic Ag and vanadium oxide during the sintering process. NiAl/Mo-AgVO{sub 3} exhibited superior tribological properties at a board temperature range. Phase composition on the worn surface was varied with temperatures. Self-adjusted action was responsible

  12. Superconducting and structural properties of {delta}-MoC{sub 0.681} cubic molybdenum carbide phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, C.I. [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan) [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Yanfeng, E-mail: GUO.Yanfeng@nims.go.jp [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Wang, Xia [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan) [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Li, Jun [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan) [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Zhang, Shoubao [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shi, Youguo; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Yamaura, Kazunari, E-mail: YAMAURA.Kazunari@nims.go.jp [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan) [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    The superconducting and lattice properties of {delta}-MoC{sub 0.681} were studied by electromagnetic measurements, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and electron diffraction. The superconducting properties (T{sub c}=12 K) of {delta}-MoC{sub 0.681} were well characterized by a weak coupling model. The carbon vacancies present in the host cubic structure were found to be robust, although the material was synthesized from stoichiometric carbon and Mo powder under a high-pressure of 6 GPa. A thermodynamically-stable structure with ordered vacancies did not account for the robust features of {delta}-MoC{sub 0.681} since the vacancies are unlikely to be ordered in long range in the host structure. A model based on inherent phonon instability theoretically predicted for a stoichiometric MoC phase might be responsible for the robust features of {delta}-MoC{sub 0.681}. - Graphical Abstract: The cubic molybdenum carbide shows an excellent superconductivity with robust carbon vacancies. Inherent phonon instability theoretically predicted for a stoichiometric MoC phase might be responsible for the vacancies rather than a thermodynamically-stable structure with vacancies ordering. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 12 K superconductivity is well characterized by a weakly coupling model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon vacancies are robust and disordered in the cubic host structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inherent phonon instability might be responsible for the robust carbon vacancies in {delta}-MoC{sub 0.681}.

  13. Electrical properties of a-C:Mo films produced by dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Yodsombat, Banchob

    2008-01-20

    Molybdenum-containing amorphous carbon (a-C:Mo) thin films were prepared using a dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma source with a molybdenum and a carbon (graphite) cathode. The Mo content in the films was controlled by varying the deposition pulse ratio of Mo and C. Film sheet resistance was measured in situ at process temperature, which was close to room temperature, as well as ex situ as a function of temperature (300-515 K) in ambient air. Film resistivity and electrical activation energy were derived for different Mo and C ratios and substrate bias. Film thickness was in the range 8-28 nm. Film resistivity varied from 3.55x10-4 Omega m to 2.27x10-6 Omega m when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased from 0.05 to 0.4, with no substrate bias applied. With carbon-selective bias, the film resistivity was in the range of 4.59x10-2 and 4.05 Omega m at a Mo/C pulse ratio of 0.05. The electrical activation energy decreased from 3.80x10-2 to 3.36x10-4 eV when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased in the absence of bias, and from 0.19 to 0.14 eV for carbon-selective bias conditions. The resistivity of the film shifts systematically with the amounts of Mo and upon application of substrate bias voltage. The intensity ratio of the Raman D-peak and G-peak (ID/IG) correlated with the pre-exponential factor (sigma 0) which included charge carrier density and density of states.

  14. Regional Science Bowl

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    January » Regional Science Bowl Regional Science Bowl WHEN: Jan 23, 2016 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM WHERE: Highland High School 4700 Coal SE, Albuquerque, NM CONTACT: Janelle Vigil-Maestas (505) 665-4329 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Five teams from Northern New Mexico area schools are among 16 participating in the middle school Regional Science Bowl competition. Northern area teams participating are from Los Alamos, Española, Cuba and Santa Fe. The winning team at this

  15. Low-frequency 1/f noise in MoS{sub 2} transistors: Relative contributions of the channel and contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Renteria, J.; Jiang, C.; Samnakay, R.; Rumyantsev, S. L.; Goli, P.; Balandin, A. A.; Shur, M. S.

    2014-04-14

    We report on the results of the low-frequency (1/f, where f is frequency) noise measurements in MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors revealing the relative contributions of the MoS{sub 2} channel and Ti/Au contacts to the overall noise level. The investigation of the 1/f noise was performed for both as fabricated and aged transistors. It was established that the McWhorter model of the carrier number fluctuations describes well the 1/f noise in MoS{sub 2} transistors, in contrast to what is observed in graphene devices. The trap densities extracted from the 1/f noise data for MoS{sub 2} transistors, are 2??10{sup 19}?eV{sup ?1}cm{sup ?3} and 2.5??10{sup 20}?eV{sup ?1}cm{sup ?3} for the as fabricated and aged devices, respectively. It was found that the increase in the noise level of the aged MoS{sub 2} transistors is due to the channel rather than the contact degradation. The obtained results are important for the proposed electronic applications of MoS{sub 2} and other van der Waals materials.

  16. Preparation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Mo nanocomposite powder via chemical route and spray drying

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, M.; Cheng, F.; Wei, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    A route to prepare nanometer-sized Mo particulates in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was attempted by a combination of solution reactions in molecular scale and forcing precipitation by a spray-drying technique. MoO{sub 3} was first dissolved in ammonia water and then added in the slurry with high purity, submicrometer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder. Mixed suspension was spray-dried, and then the dried granules were reduced by hydrogen gas and further hot-pressing to a bulky composite at various temperatures. Dissolution of Mo oxide, adsorption reactions on alumina surface, and surface potential of alumina particles in homogeneous ammonia suspension were studied. Characterization of the granules, including compactability, flowing properties, surface morphology, grain growth of Mo and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and mixing homogeneity, were examined. Homogeneity of the spray-dried granules was determined by the calculation of mixing index and the observation of the microstructure of sintered body. The existence of intergranular, intragranular, and nanosized Mo particulates within Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). All the evidences revealed that homogeneous composites with nanometer-sized Mo had been successfully prepared by this attempt with the proposed chemical route and following spray-drying process. {copyright}{ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  17. Kinetic study of hydrogen evolution reaction on Ni{sub 30} Mo{sub 70}, Co{sub 30}Mo{sub 70}, Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70} and Co{sub 10}Ni{sub 20}Mo{sub 70} alloy electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A.; Plata-Torres, M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.; Arce-Estrada, E.M. . E-mail: earce@ipn.mx; Hallen-Lopez, J.M.

    2005-07-15

    The hydrogen evolution reaction on nanocrystalline Ni{sub 30}Mo{sub 70}, Co{sub 30}Mo{sub 70}, Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, and Co{sub 10}Ni{sub 20}Mo{sub 70}, metallic powders prepared by mechanical alloying was investigated with linear polarization and ac impedance methods, in 30 wt.% KOH aqueous solution at room temperature. The formation process and structural properties of these nanocrystalline materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Alloyed powders showed the presence of two phases: an fcc solid solution and intermetallic compounds of Ni, Co and Mo. Based on polarization and ac impedance measurements, an improved electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction was observed in mechanically alloyed Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70} powders, which is slightly higher than milled metallic Ni powders.

  18. Delineating coal market regions

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, B.D.; Pyrdol, J.J.

    1986-04-01

    This study addresses the delineation of US coal market regions and their evolution since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Dichotomizing into compliance (low sulfur) and high sulfur coal deliveries, market regions are generated for 1973, 1977, and 1983. Focus is restricted to steam coal shipments to electric utilities, which currently account for over 80% of the total domestic market. A two-stage method is used. First, cluster analyses are performed on the origin-destination shipments data to generate baseline regions. This is followed by multiple regression analyses on CIF delivered price data for 1983. Sensitivity analysis on the configuration of the regions is also conducted, and some thoughts on the behavior of coal markets conclude the paper. 37 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Regional Standards Enforcement

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Central air conditioners are now subject to a base national standard in the North and different, regional standards in the Southeast and Southwest. This page provides information about those standards and how DOE enforces them.

  20. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  1. CEMI Southeast Regional Summit

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative (CEMI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) organizes regional summits around the country to expand its partnerships, share resources and...

  2. Regional companies eye growth

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional companies eye growth Regional companies eye growth Adaptive Radio Technologies, Los Alamos Visualization Associates, Mesa Tech International Inc., and ThermaSun Inc. were awarded from the Venture Acceleration Fund. August 21, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new

  3. Characterization of few-layer 1T-MoSe{sub 2} and its superior performance in the visible-light induced hydrogen evolution reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Uttam; Naidu, B. S.; Maitra, Urmimala; Rao, C. N. R.; Singh, Anjali; Shirodkar, Sharmila N.; Waghmare, Umesh V.

    2014-09-01

    Based on earlier results on the photocatalytic properties of MoS{sub 2}, the 1T form of MoSe{sub 2}, prepared by lithium intercalation and exfoliation of bulk MoSe{sub 2}, has been employed for the visible-light induced generation of hydrogen. 1T-MoSe{sub 2} is found to be superior to both 2H and 1T MoS{sub 2} as well as 2H-MoSe{sub 2} in producing hydrogen from water, the yield being in the 6075 mmol?h{sup ?1}?g{sup ?1} range with a turn over frequency of 1519 h{sup ?1}. First principles calculations reveal that 1T-MoSe{sub 2} has a lower work function than 2H-MoSe{sub 2} as well as 1T and 2H-MoS{sub 2}, making it easier to transfer an electron from 1T-MoSe{sub 2} for the production of H{sub 2}.

  4. In-situ synthesis of MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite by a thermite reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Deevi, S.

    1995-08-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the reaction mechanism involved in the thermite reaction leading to the synthesis of a composite since in an actual combustion synthesis, the reaction propagates at a velocity of 10 to 20 mm/sec. Reaction mechanism was determined by using a differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). During the combustion synthesis of MoSi{sub 2}-{alpha}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, reaction of MoO{sub 3}, Al and Si occurs rapidly and the reactants and products are expected to be in the liquid state at the combustion temperature. MoO{sub 3} is first reduced to MoO{sub 2}, and the reaction between MoO{sub 2}, Al and Si leads to a composite of MoSi{sub 2}-{alpha}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Differential thermal analysis reveals that the onset of exothermic reactions is preceded by melting indicating the necessity of molten Al for the synthesis of the composite. The reaction between MoO{sub 2} + 2Al +2Si can be moderated with Mo-Si mixtures such that the ratio of MoSi{sub 2} to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be increased in the composite of MoSi{sub 2}-{alpha}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  5. Li3Mo4P5O24: A two-electron cathode for lithium-ion batteries with three-dimensional diffusion pathways

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Wen, Bohua; Khalifah, Peter G.; Liu, Jue; Chernova, Natasha A.; Wang, Xiaoya; Janssen, Yuri; Omenya, Fredrick; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2016-03-05

    The structure of the novel compound Li3Mo4P5O24 has been solved from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. The Mo cations in Li3Mo4P5O24 are present in four distinct types of MoO6 octahedra, each of which has one open vertex at the corner participating in a Mo=O double bond and whose other five corners are shared with PO4 tetrahedra. On the basis of a bond valence sum difference map (BVS-DM) analysis, this framework is predicted to support the facile diffusion of Li+ ions, a hypothesis that is confirmed by electrochemical testing data, which show that Li3Mo4P5O24 can be utilized as a rechargeable batterymore » cathode material. It is found that Li can both be removed from and inserted into Li3Mo4P5O24. The involvement of multiple redox processes occurring at the same Mo site is reflected in electrochemical plateaus around 3.8 V associated with the Mo6+/Mo5+ redox couple and 2.2 V associated with the Mo5+/Mo4+ redox couple. The two-electron redox properties of Mo cations in this structure lead to a theoretical capacity of 198 mAh/g. When cycled between 2.0 and 4.3 V versus Li+/Li, an initial capacity of 113 mAh/g is observed with 80% of this capacity retained over the first 20 cycles. Lastly, this compound therefore represents a rare example of a solid state cathode able to support two-electron redox capacity and provides important general insights about pathways for designing next-generation cathodes with enhanced specific capacities.« less

  6. A practical grinding-assisted dry synthesis of nanocrystalline NiMoO{sub 4} polymorphs for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Miao; Wu Jialing; Liu Yongmei; Cao Yong; Guo Li; He Heyong; Fan Kangnian

    2011-12-15

    A practical two-stage reactive grinding-assisted pathway waste-free and cost-effective for the synthesis of NiMoO{sub 4} has been successfully developed. It was demonstrated that proper design in synthetic strategy for grinding plays a crucial role in determining the ultimate polymorph of NiMoO{sub 4}. Specifically, direct grinding (DG) of MoO{sub 3} and NiO rendered {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} after annealing, whereas sequential grinding (SG) of the two independently pre-ground oxides followed by annealing generated {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4} solid solution. Characterizations in terms of Raman and X-ray diffraction suggest the creation of {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4} precursor in the latter alternative is the key aspect for the formation of {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4}. The DG-derived {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} tested by oxidative dehydrogenation of propane exhibited superior activity in contrast to its analog synthesized via conventional coprecipitation. It is suggested that the favorable chemical composition facilely obtained via grinding in contrast to that by coprecipitation was essential for achieving a more selective production of propylene. - Graphical Abstract: Grinding-assisted synthesis of NiMoO{sub 4} offers higher and more reproducible activities in contrast to coprecipitation for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, and both {alpha}- and {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4} can be synthesized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiMoO{sub 4} was prepared through grinding-assisted pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct/sequential grinding rendered {alpha}-, {beta}-NiMoO{sub 4}, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grinding-derived {alpha}-NiMoO{sub 4} showed high and reproducible activity for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane.

  7. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; McCreary, V.; Robertson, Ian M.; Phani, P. Sudaharshan; Bei, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; et al

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations inmore » the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  8. Characterization of dislocation structures and deformation mechanisms in as-grown and deformed directionally solidified NiAl–Mo composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.; Bowers, M. L.; Brandes, M. C.; McCreary, V.; Robertson, Ian M.; Phani, P. Sudaharshan; Bei, H.; Gao, Y. F.; Pharr, George M.; George, Easo P.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-02-26

    In this paper, directionally solidified (DS) NiAl–Mo eutectic composites were strained to plastic strain values ranging from 0% to 12% to investigate the origin of the previously observed stochastic versus deterministic mechanical behaviors of Mo-alloy micropillars in terms of the development of dislocation structures at different pre-strain levels. The DS composites consist of long, [1 0 0] single-crystal Mo-alloy fibers with approximately square cross-sections embedded in a [1 0 0] single-crystal NiAl matrix. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and computational stress state analysis were conducted for the current study. STEM of the as-grown samples (without pre-straining) reveal no dislocations in the investigated Mo-alloy fibers. In the NiAl matrix, on the other hand, a(1 0 0)-type dislocations exist in two orthogonal orientations: along the [1 0 0] Mo fiber axis, and wrapped around the fiber axis. They presumably form to accommodate the different thermal contractions of the two phases during cool down after eutectic solidification. At intermediate pre-strain levels (4–8%), a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are present in the Mo-alloy fibers and the pre-existing dislocations in the NiAl matrix seem to be swept toward the interphase boundary. Some of the dislocations in the Mo-alloy fibers appear to be transformed from a(1 0 0)-type dislocations present in the NiAl matrix. Subsequently, the transformed dislocations in the fibers propagate through the NiAl matrix as a(1 1 1) dislocations and aid in initiating additional slip bands in adjacent fibers. Thereafter, co-deformation presumably occurs by (1 1 1) slip in both phases. With a further increase in the pre-strain level (>10%), multiple a/2(1 1 1)-type dislocations are observed in many locations in the Mo-alloy fibers. Interactions between these systems upon subsequent deformation could lead to stable junctions and persistent dislocation sources. Finally, the transition from stochastic to

  9. Northeast Regional Biomass Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  10. Effects of Potassium Doping on CO Hydrogenation Over MoS2 Catalysts: A First-Principles Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

    2014-07-01

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the effects of doping potassium (K) on the reactivity of CO hydrogenation to mixed higher alcohols over MoS2 catalysts. We found that the doped K species over the model MoS2(100) catalyst surface acts as a unique site for CO adsorption where either the K-C or the K-O bonding is allowed. The charge transfer from the K 4s electron to the conduction band of the MoS2(100) surface slightly enhances CO adsorption at the edge Mo sites. Due to the large electropositive nature, the presence of the surface K species, however, will hinder the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. As a result, the doping K species drive CO hydrogenation selectivity toward the C2+ alcohols instead of hydrocarbons by increasing CO and decreasing hydrogen coverages on the MoS2 catalysts. To further elucidate the effect of doping K on the shifting of the selectivity toward CO hydrogenation, we calculated several key reaction steps leading to the H2CCO precursor formation, i.e., CO hydrogenation, the C-O bond scission and the C-C coupling (CH2+CO). The C-C coupling step is favorable for both the Mo and S edges. However, the undoped S edge has an overall more thermodynamically favorable reaction profile up to C-O scission compared with the Mo edge. This work was funded by a CRADA project (No. PNNL/297) with Range Fuels. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The work involving the results analysis and mansucript writing was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences.

  11. NV PFA Regional Data

    SciTech Connect

    James Faulds

    2015-10-28

    This project focused on defining geothermal play fairways and development of a detailed geothermal potential map of a large transect across the Great Basin region (96,000 km2), with the primary objective of facilitating discovery of commercial-grade, blind geothermal fields (i.e. systems with no surface hot springs or fumaroles) and thereby accelerating geothermal development in this promising region. Data included in this submission consists of: structural settings (target areas, recency of faulting, slip and dilation potential, slip rates, quality), regional-scale strain rates, earthquake density and magnitude, gravity data, temperature at 3 km depth, permeability models, favorability models, degree of exploration and exploration opportunities, data from springs and wells, transmission lines and wilderness areas, and published maps and theses for the Nevada Play Fairway area.

  12. MO: ZL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2. "Radiological Survey of the Ashland Oil Co. (Former Waist Property), Tonewanda, Kew ... It should be noted that a nearby second property belonging to Ashland Oil Company is not ...

  13. Martensitic transformation behaviors of rapidly solidified TiNiMo powders

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon-wook

    2012-10-15

    For the fabrication of bulk near-net-shape shape memory alloys and porous metallic biomaterials, consolidation of TiNiMo alloy powders is more useful than that of elemental powders of Ti, Ni and Mo. Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 49.9}Mo{sub 0.1} shape memory alloy powders were prepared by gas atomization, and transformation temperatures and microstructures of those powders were investigated as a function of powder size. XRD analysis showed that the B2RB19 martensitic transformation occurred in powders smaller than 150 ?m. According to DSC analysis of the as-atomized powders, the B2R transformation temperature (T{sub R}) of the 2550 ?m powders was 18.4 C. The T{sub R} decreased with increasing powder size, however, the difference in T{sub R} between 2550 ?m powders and 100150 ?m powders is only 1 C. Evaluation of powder microstructures was based on SEM examination of the surface and the polished and etched powder cross sections and the typical images of the rapidly solidified powders showed cellular morphology. Porous cylindrical foams of 10 mm diameter and 1.5 mm length were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 800 C and 5 MPa. Finally these porous TiNi alloy samples are heat-treated for 1 h at 850 C, and then quenched in ice water. The bulk samples have 23% porosity and 4.6 g/cm{sup 3} density and their T{sub R} is 17.8 C.

  14. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of γγ<mo stretchy='false'>→mo>π<mo>+mo>π<mo>-,>π0π0 and K<mo accent='true' stretchy='true'>¯mo>K below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the

  15. Corrosion and degradation of a polyurethane/Co-Ni-Cr-Mo pacemaker lead

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, P.; Fraker, A.C.

    1987-12-01

    An investigation to study changes in the metal surfaces and the polyurethane insulation of heart pacemaker leads under controlled in vitro conditions was conducted. A polyurethane (Pellethane 2363-80A)/Co-Ni-Cr-Mo (MP35N) wire lead was exposed in Hanks' physiological saline solution for 14 months and then analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray energy dispersive analysis, and small angle x-ray scattering. Results showed that some leakage of solution into the lead had occurred and changes were present on both the metal and the polyurethane surfaces.

  16. Stability and Lifetime of K-CoMoSx Mixed Alcohol Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, J. E.; Ruddy, D.; Schaidle, J.; Ferrell, J.; Thibodeaux, J.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have studied sulfide-type catalysts for the production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas for several decades. Despite many advances in the art, these processes are not yet commercial, due in large part to mediocre economics and the added risk associated with uncertainty in catalyst lifetime. This talk will outline some recent studies in the lifetime and stability of K-CoMoSx-type mixed alcohol catalysts. Specifically, studies of long term operation (> 3000h), sulfiding agents, simulated methanol recycle, and morphology (probed via XRD and XPS) will be discussed, with the conclusion that these materials are likely to exhibit acceptable lifetimes in continuous operation.

  17. Pairing correlations and thermodynamical quantities in {sup 96,97}Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Kargar, Z.

    2007-06-15

    The nuclear level densities of {sup 96,97}Mo are calculated in the framework of superconducting theory. The parameters of nuclear level density are so chosen that the saddle point conditions are satisfied and the best fit to the experimental data yields. Then, using these parameters the energy, the entropy and the spin cut-off factor are calculated as a function of temperature. The curves show structures, reflecting the phase transition from a correlated to an uncorrelated phase. The critical temperature for quenching of pairing correlations is found at T{sub c}{approx}0.7-0.9 MeV.

  18. Hydrofining of Athabasca derived heavy gas oil over Ni-W and Co-Mo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, R.S.; Diaz-real, R.

    1987-01-01

    The hydrotreatment of heavy gas oil derived from Athabasca bitumen was studied in a trickle bed reactor over Ni-W and Co-Mo zeolite catalyst at 350-425/sup 0/C, 3.55 to 10.44 MPa, and LHSV of 1-4. The effects of temperature and liquid flow rates on the product were investigated. ASTM distillation, aniline point, viscosities and densities of the product oil were measured and correlated with various parameters. Activity of the catalysts for hydrodenitrogenation is compared.

  19. FULL SIZE U-10MO MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL AND FUEL PLATE FABRICATION-TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    G. A. Moore; J-F Jue; B. H. Rabin; M. J. Nilles

    2010-03-01

    Full-size U10Mo foils are being developed for use in high density LEU monolithic fuel plates. The application of a zirconium barrier layer too the foil is applied using a hot co-rolling process. Aluminum clad fuel plates are fabricated using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) or a Friction Bonding (FB) process. An overview is provided of ongoing technology development activities, including: the co-rolling process, foil shearing/slitting and polishing, cladding bonding processes, plate forming, plate-assembly swaging, and fuel plate characterization. Characterization techniques being employed include, Ultrasonic Testing (UT), radiography, and microscopy.

  20. Re-evaluation of the eutectic region of the LiBr-KBr-LiF system

    SciTech Connect

    Redey, L.; Guidotti, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The separator pellet in a thermal battery consists of electrolyte immobilized by a binder (typically, MgO powder). The melting point of the electrolyte determines the effective operating window for its use in a thermal battery. The development of a two-hour thermal battery required the use of a molten salt that had a lower melting point and larger liquidus range than the LiCl-KCl eutectic which melts at 352 C. Several candidate eutectic electrolyte systems were evaluated for their suitability for this application. One was the LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic used at Argonne National Laboratories for high-temperature rechargeable batteries for electric-vehicle applications. Using a custom-designed high-temperature conductivity cell, the authors were able to readily determine the liquidus region for the various compositions studied around the original eutectic for the LiBr-KBr-LiF system. The actual eutectic composition was found to be 60.0 m/o LiBr-37.5 m/o KBr-2.5 m/o LiF with a melting point of 324 {+-} 0.5 C.

  1. Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CTC Team 1 Pennsylvania Regional Infrastructure Project Presentation by: The Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) Team January 6, 2004 The CTC Team 2 Presentation Outline Introduction of CTC Team CTC Background Technical Approach - CTC Team Member Presentations Conclusions The CTC Team 3 The CTC Project Team Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program Management and Coordination Hydrogen Delivery and Storage Material Development Hydrogen Sensors Concurrent Technologies Corporation Program

  2. Extraordinary selectivity of CoMo{sub 3}S{sub 13} chalcogel for C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and CO{sub 2} adsorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Shafaei-Fallah, M.; Rothenberger, Z.; Katsoulidis, A. P.; He, J.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2011-11-09

    The chalcogel CoMo{sub 3}S{sub 13} is obtained from the reaction of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[Mo{sub 3}S{sub 13}] with cobalt acetate in solution. The chalcogel has a BET surface area of 570 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and pair distribution function analysis (PDF) and infrared spectroscopy indicate that the [Mo{sub 3}S{sub 13}]{sup 2-} cluster is a building block in the porous network. The CoMo{sub 3}S{sub 13} chalcogel exhibits high selectivity for separating ethane and carbon dioxide from hydrogen and methane.

  3. In-plane heterojunctions enable multiphasic two-dimensional (2D) MoS2 nanosheets as efficient photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution from water reduction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Peng, Rui; Liang, Liangbo; Hood, Zachary D.; Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Puretzky, Alexander; Ievlev, Anton V.; Come, Jeremy; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Wang, Hui; Ma, Cheng; et al

    2016-08-30

    Two-dimensional (2D) single-layer MoS2 nanosheets are demonstrated as efficient photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) from water reduction, thanks to specific in-plane heterojunctions constructed in the MoS2 monolayer. These functional heterojunctions are formed among the different phases of chemically exfoliated MoS2 monolayers: semiconducting 2H, metallic 1T, and quasi-metallic 1T' phases. The proportion of the three MoS2 phases can be systematically controlled via thermal annealing of the nanosheets. Interestingly, a volcano relationship is observed between the photocatalytic HER activity and the annealing temperature with an optimum activity obtained after annealing at 60 °C. First-principles calculations were integrated with experimental studies tomore » shed light on the role of the multiphases of MoS2 and reveal that optimum photocatalytic HER activity results from the formation of the in-plane heterojunctions between 1T' MoS2 and 2H MoS2. Importantly, this facilitates not only balanced light absorption and charge generation by the 2H phase, efficient charge separation at the 1T'/2H interface, but also favorable HER over the basal sites of 1T' MoS2. Furthermore, our work manifests how the confluence of the optical, electronic and chemical properties of 2D MoS2 monolayers can be fully captured for efficient photocatalytic water reduction.« less

  4. In Situ Time-Resolved Characterization of Novel Cu-MoO2 Catalysts During the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wen ,W.; Liu, J.; White, M.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2007-01-01

    A novel and active Cu-MoO{sub 2} catalyst was synthesized by partial reduction of a precursor CuMoO{sub 4} mixed-metal oxide with CO or H{sub 2} at 200-250 C. The phase transformations of Cu-MoO{sub 2} during H{sub 2} reduction and the water-gas shift reaction could be followed by In situ time resolved XRD techniques. During the reduction process the diffraction pattern of the CuMoO{sub 4} collapsed and the copper metal lines were observed on an amorphous material background that was assigned to molybdenum oxides. During the first pass of water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, diffraction lines for Cu{sub 6}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 18} and MoO{sub 2} appeared around 350 C and Cu{sub 6}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 18} was further transformed to Cu/MoO{sub 2} at higher temperature. During subsequent passes, significant WGS catalytic activity was observed with relatively stable plateaus in product formation around 350, 400 and 500 C. The interfacial interactions between Cu clusters and MoO{sub 2} increased the water-gas shift catalytic activities at 350 and 400 C.

  5. Defect-mediated transport and electronic irradiation effect in individual domains of CVD-grown monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Durand, Corentin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Fowlkes, Jason; Najmaei, Sina; Lou, Jun; Li, An -Ping

    2015-01-16

    We study the electrical transport properties of atomically thin individual crystalline grains of MoS2 with four-probe scanning tunneling microscopy. The monolayer MoS2 domains are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on SiO2/Si substrate. Temperature dependent measurements on conductance and mobility show that transport is dominated by an electron charge trapping and thermal release process with very low carrier density and mobility. The effects of electronic irradiation are examined by exposing the film to electron beam in the scanning electron microscope in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. The irradiation process is found to significantly affect the mobility and the carrier density of themore » material, with the conductance showing a peculiar time-dependent relaxation behavior. It is suggested that the presence of defects in active MoS2 layer and dielectric layer create charge trapping sites, and a multiple trapping and thermal release process dictates the transport and mobility characteristics. The electron beam irradiation promotes the formation of defects and impact the electrical properties of MoS2. Finally, our study reveals the important roles of defects and the electron beam irradiation effects in the electronic properties of atomic layers of MoS2.« less

  6. Spin and valley transport in monolayers of MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. F.; Cheng, F.

    2014-04-07

    We investigate theoretically quantum transport and Goos-Hnchen (GH) effect of electrons in a p-n-p junction on monolayers of MoS{sub 2}. We find that the transmission properties of spin-up (spin-down) electrons in K valley are the same with spin-down (spin-up) electrons in K? valley due to the time-reversal symmetry. The GH shifts for the transmitted K and K? beams in the n-p interface are in the opposite direction, and GH shifts for the spin-up and spin-down electron beams at the same valley have different values in the same direction due to the different group velocities. Therefore, the spin-up and spin-down electrons can be separated after passing a sufficiently long channel created by a p-n-p junction. These features provide us a new way to generate a fully spin- and valley-polarized current in monolayers of MoS{sub 2}.

  7. Experimental study of the electric dipole strength in the even Mo nuclei and its deformation dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Nair, C.; Schwengner, R.; Beyer, R.; Klug, J.; Kosev, K.; Wagner, A.; Grosse, E.

    2010-03-15

    Two methods based on bremsstrahlung were applied to the stable even Mo isotopes for the experimental determination of the photon strength function covering the high excitation energy range above 4 MeV with its increasing level density. Photon scattering was used up to the neutron separation energies S{sub n} and data up to the maximum of the isovector giant resonance (GDR) were obtained by photoactivation. After a proper correction for multistep processes the observed quasicontinuous spectra of scattered photons show a remarkably good match to the photon strengths derived from nuclear photoeffect data obtained previously by neutron detection and corrected in absolute scale by using the new activation results. The combined data form an excellent basis to derive a shape dependence of the E1 strength in the even Mo isotopes with increasing deviation from the N=50 neutron shell (i.e., with the impact of quadrupole deformation and triaxiality). The wide energy coverage of the data allows for a stringent assessment of the dipole sum rule and a test of a novel parametrization developed previously which is based on it. This parametrization for the electric dipole strength function in nuclei with A>80 deviates significantly from prescriptions generally used previously. In astrophysical network calculations it may help to quantify the role the p-process plays in cosmic nucleosynthesis. It also has impact on the accurate analysis of neutron capture data of importance for future nuclear energy systems and waste transmutation.

  8. Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Endrino, Jose L.; Horwat, David; Gago, Raul; Andersson, Joakim; Liu, Y.S.; Guo, Jinghua; Anders, Andre

    2008-05-14

    In this work, we study the influence of the incorporation of different metals (Me = Au, Ag, Cu, Mo) on the electronic structure of amorphous carbon (a-C:Me) films. The films were produced at room temperature using a novel pulsed dual-cathode arc deposition technique. Compositional analysis was performed with secondary neutral mass spectroscopy whereas X-ray diffraction was used to identify the formation of metal nanoclusters in the carbon matrix. The metal content incorporated in the nanocomposite films induces a drastic increase in the conductivity, in parallel with a decrease in the band gap corrected from Urbach energy. The electronic structure as a function of the Me content has been monitored by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the C K-edge. XANES showed that the C host matrix has a dominant graphitic character and that it is not affected significantly by the incorporation of metal impurities, except for the case of Mo, where the modifications in the lineshape spectra indicated the formation of a carbide phase. Subtle modifications of the spectral lineshape are discussed in terms of nanocomposite formation.

  9. Consent to Subcontracts on Management and Operating (M&O) Contracts

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is to provide notice that an Acquisition Letter (AL) will be issued addressing the establishment of subcontract review thresholds on M&O contracts. Currently, DEAR 970.4401-1 and 970.4401-2 require Heads of the Contracting Activities (HCAs) to establish thresholds, by subcontract type and dollar level, for the review and approval of proposed subcontracting actions by each M&O contractor under their cognizance. The AL will seek to improve Consent to Subcontract efficiency and to ensure we apply our resources to those subcontract actions that truly pose the most risk. The AL will state that the HCA should determine appropriate tiers for subcontract review thresholds, as a result of a risk assessment. This tiered approach may result in different thresholds being established for different sites as well as different thresholds at a given site, taking into consideration the best interests of DOE and the following factors: approval status of the contractor's purchasing system results of Independent Peer Review Program for Contractors' Purchasing Systems (e.g., PERT results) results of Contractor Balanced Scorecard Self-assessment size, experience, ability, reliability, and organization of the contractor's purchasing function internal controls, procedures, and organizational stature of the contractor's purchasing function subcontract type (fixed price vs. cost reimbursement) degree of competition value nature of the work/complexity whether the subcontract needs special surveillance

  10. Raman shifts in electron-irradiated monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Parkin, William M.; Balan, Adrian; Liang, Liangbo; Das, Paul Masih; Lamparski, Michael; Naylor, Carl H.; Rodríguez-Manzo, Julio A.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Meunier, Vincent; Drndic, Marija

    2016-03-21

    Here, we report how the presence of electron-beam-induced sulfur vacancies affects first-order Raman modes and correlate the effects with the evolution of the in situ transmission-electron microscopy (TEM) two-terminal conductivity of monolayer MoS2 under electron irradiation. We observe a redshift in the E Raman peak and a less pronounced blueshift in the A'1 peak with increasing electron dose. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), we show that irradiation causes partial removal of sulfur and correlate the dependence of the Raman peak shifts with S vacancy density (a few %), which is confirmed by first-principles density functional theory calculations. In situ devicemore » current measurements show exponential decrease in channel current upon irradiation. Our analysis demonstrates that the observed frequency shifts are intrinsic properties of the defective systems and that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a quantitative diagnostic tool to characterize MoS2-based transport channels.« less

  11. On the bonding nature of electron states for the Fe-Mo double perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Carvajal, E.; Cruz-Irisson, M.; Oviedo-Roa, R.; Navarro, O.

    2014-05-15

    The electronic transport as well as the effect of an external magnetic field has been investigated on manganese-based materials, spinels and perovskites. Potential applications of double perovskites go from magnetic sensors to electrodes in solid-oxide fuel cells; besides the practical interests, it is known that small changes in composition modify radically the physical properties of double perovskites. We have studied the Sr{sub 2}FeMoO{sub 6} double perovskite compound (SFMO) using first-principles density functional theory. The calculations were done within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) scheme with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional. We have made a detailed analysis of each electronic state and the charge density maps around the Fermi level. For the electronic properties of SFMO it was used a primitive cell, for which we found the characteristic half-metallic behavior density of states composed by e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} electrons from Fe and Mo atoms. Those peaks were tagged as bonding or antibonding around the Fermi level at both, valence and conduction bands.

  12. Spatially Resolved Photoexcited Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Phase-Engineered Monolayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yamaguchi, Hisato; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Kappera, Rajesh; Lei, Sidong; Najmaei, Sina; Mangum, Benjamin D.; Gupta, Gautam; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; et al

    2014-12-18

    A fundamental understanding of the intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) is crucial for its integration into high performance semiconductor devices. We investigate the transport properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) under photo-excitation using correlated scanning photocurrent microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. We examined the effect of local phase transformation underneath the metal electrodes on the generation of photocurrent across the channel length with diffraction-limited spatial resolution. While maximum photocurrent generation occurs at the Schottky contacts of semiconducting (2H-phase) MoS2, after the metallic phase transformation (1T-phase), the photocurrent peak is observed towardsmore » the center of the device channel, suggesting a strong reduction of native Schottky barriers. Analysis using the bias and position dependence of the photocurrent indicates that the Schottky barrier heights are few meV for 1T- and ~200 meV for 2H-contacted devices. We also demonstrate that a reduction of native Schottky barriers in a 1T device enhances the photo responsivity by more than one order of magnitude, a crucial parameter in achieving high performance optoelectronic devices. The obtained results pave a pathway for the fundamental understanding of intrinsic optoelectronic properties of atomically thin TMDs where Ohmic contacts are necessary for achieving high efficiency devices with low power consumption.« less

  13. Localized Corrosion of a Neutron Absorbing Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Mizia; T. E. Lister; P. J. Pinhero; T. L. Trowbridge

    2005-04-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has developed a new nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium structural alloy for storage and long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The new alloy will be used for SNF storage container inserts for nuclear criticality control. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This alloy must be resistant to localized corrosion when exposed to postulated Yucca Mountain in-package chemistries. The corrosion resistance properties of three experimental heats of this alloy are presented. The alloys performance are be compared to Alloy 22 and borated stainless steel. The results show that initially the new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is less resistant to corrosion as compared to another Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (Alloy 22); but when the secondary phase that contains gadolinium (gadolinide) is dissolved, the alloy surface becomes passive. The focus of this work is to qualify these gadolinium containing materials for ASME code qualification and acceptance in the Yucca Mountain Repository.

  14. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Xie, Ya -Hong

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  15. Analysis of a new MoO transition in the near-IR: A combined theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Jack C.; Womack, Kaitlin A.; O’Brien, Leah C.; Zou, Wenli

    2014-10-07

    The near-infrared electronic spectrum of MoO has been recorded in emission using the Fourier transform spectrometer associated with the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak, AZ. The gas phase MoO molecules were produced in a neon-based electric discharge using a molybdenum hollow cathode and a trace amount of oxygen. One MoO molecular band was observed in the spectrum with a red-degraded bandhead at 6735 cm{sup −1} and is assigned as the (0,0) band of the c {sup 3}Π{sub 1} − a {sup 3}Σ{sup −}{sub 0+} transition. The assignment is based upon isotopologue shifts and ab initio calculations. Results from the ab initio calculations and analysis are presented. The new calculations support the assignment of the observed transition and have led to reassignment of several electronic states from previous work.

  16. Review of time-dependent fatigue behavior and life prediction for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, M.K.; Majumdar, S.

    1982-01-01

    Available data on creep-fatigue life and fracture behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel are reviewed. Whereas creep-fatigue interaction is important for Type 304 stainless steel, oxidation effects appear to dominate the time-dependent fatigue behavior of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Four of the currently available predictive methods - the Linear Damage Rule, Frequency Separation Equation, Strain Range Partitioning Equation, and Damage Rate Equation - are evaluated for their predictive capability. Variations in the parameters for the various predictive methods with temperature, heat of material, heat treatment, and environment are investigated. Relative trends in the lives predicted by the various methods as functions of test duration, waveshape, etc., are discussed. The predictive methods will need modification in order to account for oxidation and aging effects in the 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. Future tests that will emphasize the difference between the various predictive methods are proposed.

  17. Regions for Select Spot Prices

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    are used to represent the following regions: Region Gas Point Used Power Point Used New England Algonquin Citygate Massachusetts Hub (ISONE) New York City Transco Zone 6-NY...

  18. Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction: Regional Dialogue Contract Templates October 17, 2007 1. Summary * BPA invites comments on the first draft of the Regional Dialogue Master Template by Friday,...

  19. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an ... August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National ...

  20. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, Michael B.; Dennison, Deborah; Kane, Jave; Walker, Hoyt; Miller, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The fallout from a nuclear explosion has the potential to injure or kill 100,000 or more people through exposure to external gamma (fallout) radiation. Existing buildings can reduce radiation exposure by placing material between fallout particles and exposed people. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was tasked with developing an operationally feasible methodology that could improve fallout casualty estimates. The methodology, called a Regional Shelter Analysis, combines the fallout protection that existing buildings provide civilian populations with the distribution of people in various locations. The Regional Shelter Analysis method allows the consideration of (a) multiple building types and locations within buildings, (b) country specific estimates, (c) population posture (e.g., unwarned vs. minimally warned), and (d) the time of day (e.g., night vs. day). The protection estimates can be combined with fallout predictions (or measurements) to (a) provide a more accurate assessment of exposure and injury and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of various casualty mitigation strategies. This report describes the Regional Shelter Analysis methodology, highlights key operational aspects (including demonstrating that the methodology is compatible with current tools), illustrates how to implement the methodology, and provides suggestions for future work.

  1. Preparation and immunoreactivity of high specific activity indium-111-DTPA labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) using ultrapure indium-111

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, S.S.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1986-10-01

    The preparation of high-specific activity /sup 111/In-DTPA-MoAb without increasing the number of DTPA molecules per Ab was investigated. Instant thin layer chromatography was used to assay the relationship between labeling efficiencies and specific activities. With ultrapurified /sup 111/In, the specific activity of the radiolabeled MoAb approached the expected theoretic maximum of 100 muCi/microgram. The bioactivity of such high-specific activity preparation showed no degradation as measured by in vitro cell binding assay.

  2. Comparison of Two Preparation Methods on Catalytic Activity and Selectivity of Ru-Mo/HZSM5 for Methane Dehydroaromatization

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic performance of Mo/HZSM5 and Ru-Mo/HZSM5 catalysts prepared by vaporization-deposition of molybdenum trioxide and impregnation with ammonium heptamolybdate was analyzed in terms of catalyst activity and selectivity, nitrogen physisorption analyses, temperature-programmed oxidation of carbonaceous residues, and temperature-programmed reduction. Vaporization-deposition rendered the catalyst more selective to ethylene and coke than the catalyst prepared by impregnation. This result was assigned to lower interaction of molybdenum carbide with the zeolite acidic sites.

  3. The influence of working gas pressure on interlayer mixing in magnetron-deposited Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Pershyn, Yuriy; Gullikson, Erik; Artyukov, Igor; Kondratenko, Valeriy; Sevryukova, Victoriya; Voronov, Dmitriy; Zubarev, Evgeniy; Vinogradov, Alexander

    2011-08-08

    Impact of Ar gas pressure (1-4 mTorr) on the growth of amorphous interlayers in Mo/Si multilayers deposited by magnetron sputtering was investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering ({lambda} = 0.154 nm) and methods of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Some reduction of thickness of the amorphous inter-layers with Ar pressure increase was found, while composition of the layers was enriched with molybdenum. The interface modification resulted in raise of EUV reflectance of the Mo/Si multilayers.

  4. Enhancing the photocurrent and photoluminescence of single crystal monolayer MoS{sub 2} with resonant plasmonic nanoshells

    SciTech Connect

    Sobhani, Ali [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Lauchner, Adam [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Najmaei, Sina; Lou, Jun [Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Wen, Fangfang [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Halas, Naomi J., E-mail: halas@rice.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2014-01-20

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) produced by controlled vapor-phase synthesis is a commercially promising new two-dimensional material for optoelectronics because of its direct bandgap and broad absorption in the visible and ultraviolet regimes. By tuning plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles to the direct bandgap of monolayer MoS{sub 2} and depositing them sparsely (<1% coverage) onto the material's surface, we observe a threefold increase in photocurrent and a doubling of photoluminescence signal for both excitonic transitions, amplifying but not altering the intrinsic spectral response.

  5. MoO3 as combined hole injection layer and tapered spacer in combinatorial multicolor microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, R.; Xu, Chun; Biswas, Rana; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2011-09-01

    Multicolor microcavity ({mu}C) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) arrays were fabricated simply by controlling the hole injection and spacer MoO{sub 3} layer thickness. The normal emission was tunable from {approx}490 to 640 nm and can be further expanded. A compact, integrated spectrometer with two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of {mu}C OLEDs was realized. The MoO{sub 3} yields more efficient and stable devices, revealing a new breakdown mechanism. The pixel current density reaches {approx}4 A/cm{sup 2} and a maximal normal brightness {approx}140 000 Cd/m{sup 2}, which improves photoluminescence-based sensing and absorption measurements.

  6. Instant Gelation Synthesis of 3D Porous MoS2%40C Nanocomposites for Lithium

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ion Batteries. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Instant Gelation Synthesis of 3D Porous MoS2%40C Nanocomposites for Lithium Ion Batteries. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Instant Gelation Synthesis of 3D Porous MoS2%40C Nanocomposites for Lithium Ion Batteries. Abstract not provided. Authors: Fan, Hongyou ; Ling Fei ; Yun Xu ; XiaoFei Wu ; Gen Chen ; Yuling Li ; Shuguang Deng ; Sergei Smirnov ; Hongmei Luo ; Li, Binsong Publication Date: 2014-02-01 OSTI

  7. In situ phase transformation of Laves phase from Chi-phase in Mo-containing Fe–Cr–Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.; Yang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    For an in situ phase transformation of the Chi (χ) phase to the Laves phase we observed in a Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo model alloy. The morphology, composition, and crystal structure of the χ and Laves phases, and their orientation relationship with the matrix austenite phase were investigated. The resulted Laves phase has larger lattice mismatch with the matrix phase than the χ phase, leading to the increase of local strain fields and the formation of dislocations. Moreover, this finding is helpful to understand the precipitation behavior of the intermetallic phases in the Mo-containing austenitic stainless steels.

  8. Potential impact of releases from a new Molybdenum-99 production facility on regional measurements of airborne xenon isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, Ted W.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Cameron, Ian M.; Friese, Judah I.; Hayes, James C.; Metz, Lori A.; Miley, Harry S.

    2014-03-01

    The monitoring of the radioactive xenon isotopes 131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe is important for the detection of nuclear explosions. While backgrounds of the xenon isotopes are short-lived, they are constantly replenished from activities dominated by the fission-based production of 99Mo used for medical procedures. One of the most critical locations on earth for the monitoring of nuclear explosions is the Korean peninsula, where the Democratic Republic of North Korea (DPRK) has announced that it had conducted three nuclear tests between 2009 and 2013. This paper explores the backgrounds that would be caused by the medium to large scale production of 99Mo in the region of the Korean peninsula.

  9. Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12}: Solid-state synthesis, structure determination, and characterization of two new quaternary mixed metal oxides containing asymmetric coordination environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, Seong-eun; Pan, Zhi; Kim, Yeong Hun; Lee, Dong Woo; Ok, Kang Min

    2013-12-15

    Two new quaternary yttrium molybdenum selenium/tellurium oxides, Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} and Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12} have been prepared by standard solid-state reactions using Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, and SeO{sub 2} (or TeO{sub 2}) as reagents. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction was used to determine the crystal structures of the reported materials. Although both of the materials contain second-order Jahn–Teller (SOJT) distortive cations and are stoichiometrically similar, they reveal different structural features: while Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} shows a three-dimensional framework consisting of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 6}, and SeO{sub 3} groups, Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12} exhibits a layered structure composed of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, and TeO{sub 4} polyhedra. With the Mo{sup 6+} cations in Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12}, a C{sub 3}-type intraoctahedral distortion toward a face is observed, in which the direction of the out-of-center distortion for Mo{sup 6+} is away from the oxide ligand linked to a Se{sup 4+} cation. The Se{sup 4+} and Te{sup 4+} cations in both materials are in asymmetric coordination environment attributed to the lone pairs. Elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, intraoctahedral distortions, and dipole moment calculations for the compounds are also presented. - Graphical abstract: Y{sub 2}MoSe{sub 3}O{sub 12} reveals a three-dimensional framework consisting of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 6}, and SeO{sub 3} polyhedra, whereas Y{sub 2}MoTe{sub 3}O{sub 12} exhibits a layered structure composed of YO{sub 8}, MoO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, and TeO{sub 4} groups. - Highlights: • Two new selenite and tellurite (Y{sub 2}MoQ{sub 3}O{sub 12}; Q=Se and Te) are synthesized. • Y{sub 2}MoQ{sub 3}O{sub 12} contain second-order Jahn–Teller distortive cations in asymmetric environments. • The intra-octahedral distortion of the Mo{sup 6+} is influenced by the Se{sup 4+}.

  10. Highly active Au/δ-MoC and Cu/δ-MoC catalysts for the conversion of CO2: The metal/C ratio as a key factor defining activity, selectivity, and stability

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Ramírez, Pedro J.; Evans, Jaime; Viñes, Francesc; Liu, Ping; Illas, Francesc; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-06-16

    The ever growing increase of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere is one of the main causes of global warming. Thus, CO2 activation and conversion toward valuable added compounds is a major scientific challenge. A new set of Au/δ-MoC and Cu/δ-MoC catalysts exhibits high activity, selectivity, and stability for the reduction of CO2 to CO with some subsequent selective hydrogenation toward methanol. Sophisticated experiments under controlled conditions and calculations based on density functional theory have been used to study the unique behavior of these systems. A detailed comparison of the behavior of Au/β-Mo2C and Au/δ-MoC catalysts provides evidence of the impactmore » of the metal/carbon ratio in the carbide on the performance of the catalysts. The present results show that this ratio governs the chemical behavior of the carbide and the properties of the admetal, up to the point of being able to switch the rate and mechanism of the process for CO2 conversion. Here, a control of the metal/carbon ratio paves the road for an efficient reutilization of this environmental harmful greenhouse gas.« less

  11. Preparation and structural study from neutron diffraction data of Pr{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Lope, M.J.; Alonso, J.A.; Sheptyakov, D.; Pomjakushin, V.

    2010-12-15

    The title compound has been prepared as polycrystalline powder by thermal treatments of mixtures of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} and MoO{sub 2} in air. In the literature, an oxide with a composition Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} has been formerly described to present interesting catalytic properties, but its true stoichiometry and crystal structure are reported here for the first time. It is cubic, isostructural with CdTm{sub 4}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16} (space group Pn-3n, Z=8), with a=11.0897(1) A. The structure contains MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, with Mo-O distances of 1.788(2) A, fully long-range ordered with PrO{sub 8} polyhedra; in fact it can be considered as a superstructure of fluorite (M{sub 8}O{sub 16}), containing 32 MO{sub 2} fluorite formulae per unit cell, with a lattice parameter related to that of cubic fluorite (a{sub f}=5.5 A) as a{approx}2a{sub f}. A bond valence study indicates that Mo exhibits a mixed oxidation state between 5+ and 6+ (perhaps accounting for the excellent catalytic properties). One kind of Pr atoms is trivalent whereas the second presents a mixed Pr{sup 3+}-Pr{sup 4+} oxidation state. The similarity of the XRD pattern with that published for Ce{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} suggests that this compound also belongs to the same structural type, with an actual stoichiometry Ce{sub 5}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 16}. -- Graphical Abstract: Formerly formulated as Pr{sub 2}MoO{sub 6}, the title compound is a cubic superstructure of fluorite (a=11.0897(1) A, space group Pn-3n) due to the long-range ordering of PrO{sub 8} scalenohedra and MoO{sub 4} tetrahedral units, showing noticeable shifts of the oxygen positions in order to provide a tetrahedral coordination for Mo ions. A mixed valence Mo{sup 5+}-Mo{sup 6+} is identified, which could account for the excellent catalytic properties of this material. Display Omitted

  12. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Toward epitaxially grown two-dimensional crystal hetero-structures: Single and double MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structures by chemical vapor depositions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Meng-Yu [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chung-En [Department of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Wang, Cheng-Hung [Institute of Display, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Su, Chen-Fung; Chen, Chi [Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Si-Chen [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Shih-Yen, E-mail: shihyen@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Applied Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Photonics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-18

    Uniform large-size MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structures fabricated directly on sapphire substrates are demonstrated with layer-number controllability by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images provide the direct evidences of layer numbers of MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structures. Photo-excited electron induced Fermi level shift of the graphene channel are observed on the single MoS{sub 2}/graphene hetero-structure transistors. Furthermore, double hetero-structures of graphene/MoS{sub 2}/graphene are achieved by CVD fabrication of graphene layers on top of the MoS{sub 2}, as confirmed by the cross-sectional HRTEM. These results have paved the possibility of epitaxially grown multi-hetero-structures for practical applications.

  14. H-point exciton transitions in bulk MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, Nihit; Ghosh, Sandip

    2015-05-04

    Reflectance and photoreflectance spectrum of bulk MoS{sub 2} around its direct bandgap energy have been measured at 12?K. Apart from spectral features due to the A and B ground state exciton transitions at the K-point of the Brillouin zone, one observes additional features at nearby energies. Through lineshape analysis the character of two prominent additional features are shown to be quite different from that of A and B. By comparing with reported electronic band structure calculations, these two additional features are identified as ground state exciton transitions at the H-point of the Brillouin zone involving two spin-orbit split valance bands. The excitonic energy gap at the H-point is 1.965?eV with a valance bands splitting of 185?meV. While at the K-point, the corresponding values are 1.920?eV and 205?meV, respectively.

  15. Insulator to correlated metal transition in V_1-xMo_xO_2

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczuk, Tomasz; Ronning, Filip; Holman, Katherine; Mcqueen, Tyrel M; Williams, Anthony J; Stephens, P W; Zandbergen, Henny W; Xu, Q; Cava, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    The change from metallic to insulating states is one of the most dramatic transitions that solids undergo on cooling or chemical doping. Many materials display this transition, but only a handful have the right combination of crystal structure and physical properties to serve as model systems. VO{sub 2} is one of those materials. Using Mo as a chemical dopant in VO{sub 2}, we find unanticipated phenomenology for both the electronic and structural characteristics of the resulting insulator to metal transition. The results support a complex, previously proposed scenario involving the coexistence of both electron repulsion and electron pairing for yielding an insulator in VO{sub 2}, but not simply; many issues are raised about local versus itinerant behavior and structure-property correlations in this most iconic ofdoped correlated electron systems.

  16. Weldability of a RS-PM Al-8Fe-2Mo alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, K. ); Baeslack, W.A. III )

    1993-08-01

    The weldability of a dispersion-strengthened Al-8Fe-2Mo (wt-%) alloy produced via rapid solidification-powder metallurgy (RS-PM) processing was investigated. Electron beam (EB) and pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding conditions were found to have a significant effect on weld solidification behavior, microstructural development and mechanical properties. Microstructural analysis revealed an influence of local thermal conditions (i.e., temperature gradient and cooling rate), macroscopic solid/liquid interface growth rate and the presence of undissolved/unmelted base metal dispersoid particles on solidification phenomena in the fusion zone. Three different types of solidification microstructures, each of which could be observed to varying degrees within a single weld fusion zone, were observed. Superior weld mechanical properties, including joint efficiencies of 100% in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds, were achieved when high energy density welding conditions produced increasingly refined microstructures.

  17. UPDATE ON FRICTION BONDING OF MONOLITHIC U-MO FUEL PLATES

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Burkes; N. P. Hallinan; J. M. Wight; M. D. Chapple

    2007-09-01

    Friction Bonding (FB), formerly referred to as Friction Stir Welding, is an alternative plate fabrication technique to encapsulate monolithic U-Mo fuel foils inside 6061-T6 aluminum alloy cladding. Over the past year, significant progress has been made in the area of FB, including improvements in tool material, tool design, process parameters, cooling capability and capacity and modeling, all of which improve and enhance the quality of fabricated fuel plates, reproducibility of the fabrication process and bond quality of the fuel plates. Details of this progress and how it relates to the observed improvements and enhancements are discussed. In addition, details on how these improvements have been implemented into the last two RERTR mini-plate irradiation campaigns are also discussed.

  18. Intense femtosecond photoexcitation of bulk and monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Paradisanos, I.; Fotakis, C.; Kymakis, E.; Kioseoglou, G.; Stratakis, E.

    2014-07-28

    The effect of femtosecond laser irradiation on bulk and single-layer MoS{sub 2} on silicon oxide is studied. Optical, field emission scanning electron microscopy and Raman microscopy were used to quantify the damage. The intensity of A{sub 1g} and E{sub 2g}{sup 1} vibrational modes was recorded as a function of the number of irradiation pulses. The observed behavior was attributed to laser-induced bond breaking and subsequent atoms removal due to electronic excitations. The single-pulse optical damage threshold was determined for the monolayer and bulk under 800 nm and 1030 nm pulsed laser irradiation, and the role of two-photon versus one photon absorption effects is discussed.

  19. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  20. Microstructural Characterization of Irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si Dispersion to High Fission Density

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B. D. Miller; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; A. B. Robinson; J. W. Madden; P. G. Medvedev; D. M. Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The fuel development program for research and test reactors calls for improved knowledge on the effect of microstructure on fuel performance in reactors. This work summarizes the recent TEM microstructural characterization of an irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plate (R3R050) irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory to 5.21021 fissions/cm3. While a large fraction of the fuel grains is decorated with large bubbles, there is no evidence showing interlinking of these large bubbles at the specified fission density. The attachment of solid fission product precipitates to the bubbles is likely the result of fission product diffusion into these bubbles. The process of fission gas bubble superlattice collapse appears through bubble coalescence. The results are compared with the previous TEM work of the dispersion fuels irradiated to lower fission density from the same fuel plate.