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Sample records for micronesia niue panama

  1. Federated States of Micronesia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Profile Name Federated States of Micronesia Population 106,104 GDP 277,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FM 3-letter ISO code FSM Numeric ISO code...

  2. The Panama Canal: It's all about connectivity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Panama Canal: It's all about connectivity Panama at a glance GDP growth rate - last 10 years 7.5% GDP estimated- 2013 (dollars) 38,6b GDP per capita - 2013 estimated (in dollars) 13,032 Population (million) 3.5 Unemployment rate (in %) 4.0 Inflation rate - 2013 (in %) 4.08 It's all about Connectivity * 144 trade routes * 1,700 ports * 160 countries The Panama Canal's value added service The Panama Canal Service Package Reliability Sustainability Connectivity Economies of Scale * Opens 24 hours a

  3. Panama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Country Profile Name Panama Population 3,608,431 GDP 49,142,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.24 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code PA 3-letter ISO code PAN Numeric ISO...

  4. Panama Begins Radiation Detection Efforts at Two Ports | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    "We are working closely with the Panamanian National Customs Authority and with the private terminal operators in Panama to prevent nuclear terrorism and the proliferation of ...

  5. --No Title--

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda...

  6. Accelerated sea level rise on Yap (Federated States of Micronesia): Cause for concern

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, M.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Army Corps of Engineers, Pacific Ocean Division, participated in the interagency case study of sea level rise for Yap State in the Federated States of Micronesia. The study, on behalf of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, was in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Engineering and environmental analyses indicate that resources within Yap State at risk from a 1.0 meter rise in sea level by the year 2100 are substantial, including coral reefs, sea grass beds, wetlands, native mangrove forests, groundwater, archaeological and cultural resources, and shoreline infrastructure. Severe constraints associated with land ownership patterns have helped prevent the potential for greater impact. Yet these same constraints will likely hinder future decisions regarding retreat, accommodation, or protection strategies. As a result, there are special institutional and cultural challenges that face Yap in developing and implementing appropriate responses to accelerated sea level rise. These are made more difficult with the many uncertainties associated with current predictions regarding the greenhouse effect.

  7. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Federated States of Micronesia; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Federated States of Micronesia, a sovereign nation and U.S.-associated state in the western Pacific Ocean. The Federated States of Micronesia’s electricity rates for residential customers exceed $0.48 U.S. dollars (USD)/per kilowatt-hour (kWh), nearly four times the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  8. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    SciTech Connect

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  9. Electrical power systems (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, Panama and Peru)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This 12-part set of reports contains market information on the following countries and topics: Brazil - potentiometers, steam turbines, gas turbines, electric generators; Chile - power systems; Colombia - electric generators; Dominican Republic - electric generators; Guatemala - power generation and distribution equipment, non-current carriers, electric generators, and turbines; Jamaica - power systems; Panama - power generation and control equipment; and Peru - power generation equipment. These reports have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Electric power generation expansion and integration, Micronesia (Yap, Kosrae, Pohnpei, Chuuk) power plants project. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The State of Yap in the Federated States of Micronesia is now entirely dependent on oil for electric power generation. The present high costs and limited capacity for electric power generation are major disincentives to the economic development of Yap. Preliminary proposals from two U.S. companies regarding waste-to-energy plants might furnish electricity to Yap below present costs. Yap and its sister state of Kosrae have agreed to jointly seek a grant from the U.S. Trade and Development Program (TDP) to cover three areas: An assessment of projected power generating requirements; A review of generating alternatives with emphasis on waste to energy generation; and An environmental analysis of the waste to energy alternatives. The government in Yap has two objectives: reduce the amount of money spent for diesel fuel now and in the future and make sufficient electricity available at a reasonable price to attract development for the economy of Yap. Officials on both Pohnpei and Kosrae echoed these objectives.

  11. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  12. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 2: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  13. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium sp. Tv2a.2, a microsymbiont of Tachigali versicolor discovered in Barro Colorado Island of Panama

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Tian, Rui; Parker, Matthew; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, TBK; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Baeshen, Mohammed N.; Baeshen, Nabih A.; et al

    2015-05-17

    Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from an effective nitrogen-fixing root nodule of Tachigali versicolor collected in Barro Colorado Island of Panama. Here we describe the features of Bradyrhizobiumsp. Tv2a.2, together with high-quality permanent draft genome sequence information and annotation. The 8,496,279 bp high-quality draft genome is arranged in 87 scaffolds of 87 contigs, contains 8,109 protein-coding genes and 72 RNA-only encoding genes. In conclusion, this rhizobial genome was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project.

  14. A guidebook to alternative energy projects on American Samoa, The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, The Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, and The Republics of the Marshall Islands and Palau. [Contains bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Case, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this guidebook is to help transfer information concerning alternative energy projects that have been tried on the Pacific islands affiliated with the US. These islands include those in American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia (Kosrae, Pohnpei, Truk, and Yap), Guam, and the Republics of the Marshall Islands and Palau. Distances are long between islands and populations are sparse, making communication and the transfer of information particularly difficult. A project that works on American Samoa might be appropriate for Yap, but to get this information to the proper people on Yap in a reasonable period of time is extremely difficult. This book describes 100 alternative energy projects that have been tried on the islands since the mid-1970's. This description and record of what has been done to date should be a source of ideas for energy workers, reduce duplication of work, and help encourage successes by describing other successes and failures. Alternative energy projects are projects that use indigenous, renewable resources in order to reduce local dependency on imported petroleum for electricity or liquid fuels. The islands have an apparent abundance of natural resources for this purpose such as the sun, rivers, vegetation, the ocean, and wind; and, ideally, it should be relatively simple to convert these resources to electricity or fuel. However, there are problems unique to the remote, tropical Pacific that often appear insurmountable, and successes to date are the results of unusual persistence, hard work, and ingenuity of those on the islands. Projects are confined to those that actually develop or demonstrate hardware. These projects use the complete spectrum of alternative technologies such as biomass conversion, wind electric, solar water heating, photovoltaics, wind water pumping, hydroelectric, water desalination, and integrated systems. 381 refs., 85 figs.

  15. The Federated States of Micronesia - Renewable Energy Target...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Kosrae) put in place an energy policy, which calls for a 30 percent reduction in use of fossil fuels and 50 percent increase in energy efficiency by 2020. In addition, it sets...

  16. Panama-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of Energy Thailand, Ministry of Industry Thailand, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment Thailand, Pollution Control Department, Ministry of Natural Resources and...

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... Myanmar (Burma), Nauru, Nepal, New Caledonia, Niue, North Korea, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, ...

  18. Panama-Low-Carbon Energy for Central America: Building a Regional...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    AgencyCompany Organization World Watch Institute Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Background analysis, Implementation, Low emission development planning,...

  19. Land use change and carbon exchange in the tropics. I. Detailed estimates for Costa Rice, Panama, Peru, and Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.A.S.; Detwiler, R.P.; Bogdonoff, P.; Underhill, S.

    1985-01-01

    This group, composed of modelers working in conjunction with tropical ecologists, has produced a simulation model that quantifies the net carbon exchange between tropical vegetation and the atmosphere due to land use change. The model calculates this net exchange by combining estimates of land use change with several estimates of the carbon stored in tropical vegetation and general assumptions about the fate of cleared vegetation. In this report, the authors use estimates of land use and carbon of land use and carbon storage organized into six life zone (sensu Holdridge) categories to calculate the exchange between the atmosphere and the vegetation of four tropical countries. Their analyses of these countries indicate that this life zone approach has several advantages because (a) the carbon content of vegetation varies significantly among life zones, (b) much of the land use change occurs in life zones of only moderate carbon storage, and (c) the fate of cleared vegetation varies among life zones. Their analyses also emphasize the importance of distinguishing between temporary and permanent land use change, as the recovery of vegetation on abandoned areas decreases the net release of carbon due to clearing. They include sensitivity analysis of those factors that they found to be important but are difficult to quantify at present.

  20. Gateway:América Latina | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Haiti Haiti Honduras Honduras Mexico Mexico Nicaragua Nicaragua Panama Panama Paraguay Paraguay Peru Peru Republica Dominicana Dominican Republic Uruguay Uruguay Venezuela...

  1. Climate Information for Development Needs: An Action Plan for...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property. Climate Information for Development...

  2. Low-Emission Development Strategies and National Appropriate...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property. Low-Emission Development Strategies...

  3. Africa - CCS capacity building | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property. References CCS Africa1 Funded by the...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    State All Alabama Alaska American Samoa Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Federal Federated States of Micronesia Florida Georgia Guam...

  5. CX-004419: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Panama City Lighting Replacement ProgramCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 12/07/2009Location(s): Panama City, FloridaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  6. OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  7. Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  8. OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  9. Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica,...

  10. EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    inventorycapacitybuildingswtoo Country: Nicaragua, Panama, Guatemala, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Belize Cost: Free Central America, Central America, Central America,...

  11. Lancaster County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Bennet, Nebraska Davey, Nebraska Denton, Nebraska Firth, Nebraska Hallam, Nebraska Hickman, Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska Malcolm, Nebraska Panama, Nebraska Raymond, Nebraska...

  12. U.S. Global Change Research Program Recommended Citation: Global...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... A billboard on Pohnpei, in the Fed- erated States of Micronesia, encour- ages water conservation in prepara- tion for the 1997 to 1998 El Nio. Extreme Sea-Level Days: Honolulu, ...

  13. Posters Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Radiative

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Takahashi, T., and K. Kuhara. 1993. Precipitation mechanisms of cumulonimbus clouds at Pohnpei, Micronesia. Meteor. Soc. Japan 71:21-31. Takano, Y., and K. N. Liou. 1989. Radiative ...

  14. Power Projects Limited | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: Power Projects Limited Address: PO Box 25456 Panama Street Place: Wellington Zip: 6146 Region: New Zealand Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  15. Wave Energy Technology New Zealand | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Zealand Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wave Energy Technology New Zealand Address: PO Box 25456 Panama St Place: Wellington Zip: 6146 Region: New Zealand Sector: Marine and...

  16. Category:Countries | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway O Oman P Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Q Qatar R Republic of Macedonia...

  17. LUG 2015 | Registration

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territory, Occupied Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian...

  18. Utility Rate Database | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestinian Territories Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Islands Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia...

  19. Andean Development Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Bolivia Chile Colombia Costa Rica Dominican Republic Ecuador Jamaica Mexico Panama Paraguay Peru Spain Trinidad & Tobago Uruguay Venezuela and 14 private banks in the region....

  20. Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam...

  1. Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas Western Hemisphere Clean Energy Initiative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Ministers of Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru, Panama and the United States announced the creation of a new Western Hemisphere Clean Energy Initiative.

  2. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL...

    Energy Saver

    ... Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. ... at issue here; and (ii) the Alaska North Slope, with natural gas derived from the ...

  3. REDD+ Country Readiness Preparation Proposals | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    getting-ready Country: Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guyana, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mexico, Suriname, Panama Middle Africa, Western Africa, South America,...

  4. Shelby County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Places in Shelby County, Iowa Defiance, Iowa Earling, Iowa Elk Horn, Iowa Harlan, Iowa Irwin, Iowa Kirkman, Iowa Panama, Iowa Portsmouth, Iowa Shelby, Iowa Tennant, Iowa...

  5. Christopher Smith Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. There also are two countries - Israel and Costa Rica...

  6. Energy News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Clean Energy Initiative Energy Ministers of Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru, Panama and the United States announced the creation of a new Western Hemisphere Clean...

  7. EIA-814

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... ,,,"Panama",710,"PM",3205 ,,,"Papua New Guinea",712,"PP",3203 ,,,"Paraguay",715,"PA",3204 ,,,"Peru",720,"PE",3201 ,,,"Philippines",725,"RP",3295 ...

  8. DOE/EA-1976 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR PROPOSED CNG...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. ...

  9. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF FOSSIL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, Republic of Korea, and Singapore. ...

  10. Microsoft Word - DE-SOL-0006851 FINAL Amended 9-5-14.rtf

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, or ...

  11. downloadForm.asp

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Korea (Republic of), Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru, or ...

  12. USAID Central America and Mexico Regional Climate Program (E...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    analysis Website http:www.usaid.govourwork Country Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Belize, Costa Rica, Panama, Honduras Central America, Central America,...

  13. How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    natural gas with Australia, Bahrain, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Mexico, Morocco, Nicaragua, Oman, Panama, Peru,...

  14. Center for Clean Air Policy (CCAP) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in the Cement Sector Mexico-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Pakistan-The Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Panama-The Mitigation Action...

  15. A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    submitted by Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guyana, Indonesia, Madagascar, Mexico, Panama and Suriname can be accessed online at: http:www.wri.orggfi ." To access...

  16. Solicitations (Issue 210) 3/27/11

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The place of performance will be Belize, Panama, and possibly Mexico. Contract objectives include providing: Support for Renewable Energy Generation: Uniform Procurement Processes; ...

  17. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Palau; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Palau, an independent island nation geographically located in the Micronesia region. Palau’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.28 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  18. Category:Latin America Region | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Guatemala Guyana H Haiti Honduras J Jamaica M Martinique Mexico N Nicaragua P Panama Paraguay Peru S Saint Barthlemy Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the...

  19. FE Clean Coal News | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil Energy for coal-fueled central power generation is being adapted to power UUVs....

  20. BPA-2014-00122-FOIA Response

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    a campaign or expedition for which a campaign medal has been authorized, such as El Salvador, Lebanon, Granada, Panama, Southwest Asia, Somalia, and Haiti. You must submit a copy...

  1. Nicaragua: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    imported 63.95 million kWh from its neighbours Panama and Honduras.Nicaragua has no oil production; in 2001, its consumption was of 24,500 bblday. There is one oil refinery...

  2. Genomics of Climate Resilience (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    2013-03-27

    Eldredge Bermingham of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-Panama on "Genomics of climate resilience" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 27, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  3. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Exports to Panama of Petroleum Coke (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Exports to Papua New Guinea of Petroleum Coke (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Exports to Peru of Petroleum Coke ...

  4. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Panama of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Exports to Papua New Guinea of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Exports to Paracel ...

  5. ,"U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Panama of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Imports from Papua New Guinea of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels)","U.S. Imports from Peru ...

  6. BPA-2014-00617-FOIA Response

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 In reply refer to: NN-1 Jorge Hernan Jaramillo Restrepo Interconexion Electrica Colombia-Panama S.A. Av. Aquilino de la Guardia, Torre Banesco Piso 11 Officina 1111 Ciudad de...

  7. Susan Martindale

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    710 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 132 / Wednesday, July 10, 2002 / Notices ADDRESSES: Written objections are to be filed with Coastal Systems Station, Dahlgren Div, NSWC, 6703 W. Hwy 98, Code XP01L, Panama City, FL 32407- 7001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Harvey A. Gilbert, Counsel, Coastal Systems Station, 6703 W. Hwy 98, Code XP01L, Panama City, FL 32407-7001, telephone (850) 234-4646, fax (850) 235-5497, or E-Mail at gilbertha@ncsc.navy.mil. Authority: 35 U.S.C. 207, 37 CFR Part

  8. Central American update

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, S.F.

    1987-07-01

    The Central American Energy Resources Project is designed to help the countries of Honduras, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama develop their geothermal resources. Auxiliary project goals are to increase economic development and employment in Central America; to provide a scientific basis for the private sector to develop natural resources; and to provide scientific training to in-country scientists, engineers, and technicians. The energy resources project began in March 1985. The progress being made in El Salvador (production well logging and geophysical operations), Panama (site selection for the first temperature-gradient well), and Honduras (well drilling of temperature-gradient wells) is summarized.

  9. Supplemental Record of Decision for Interim Management of Nuclear Materials, DOE/EIS-0220 (7/10/01)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    710 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 132 / Wednesday, July 10, 2002 / Notices ADDRESSES: Written objections are to be filed with Coastal Systems Station, Dahlgren Div, NSWC, 6703 W. Hwy 98, Code XP01L, Panama City, FL 32407- 7001. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Harvey A. Gilbert, Counsel, Coastal Systems Station, 6703 W. Hwy 98, Code XP01L, Panama City, FL 32407-7001, telephone (850) 234-4646, fax (850) 235-5497, or E-Mail at gilbertha@ncsc.navy.mil. Authority: 35 U.S.C. 207, 37 CFR Part

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7, 2016 | Release date: July 28, 2016 | Next release: August 4, 2016 | Previous weeks JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Supply/Demand | Storage In the News: First LNG tanker through expanded Panama Canal is traveling from Sabine Pass On July 25, the liquefied natural gas (LNG) vessel Maran Gas Apollonia became the first-ever LNG vessel to transit the recently expanded Panama Canal. The vessel is carrying LNG sourced from the U.S.-based Sabine Pass liquefaction terminal located in

  11. S.2058: This act may be cited as the Department of Energy National Security Act for Fiscal Year 1999, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, May 11, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This bill is to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1999 for defense activities of the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. Topics addressed in the bill include DOE national security programs including recurring general provisions and program authorizations, restrictions,and limitations; defense nuclear facilities safety board; national defense stockpile; naval petroleum reserves; and Panama Canal commission.

  12. Energy and development in Central America. Volume I: Regional assessment. Final report October 1979-February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Ackerman, E.; Gallagher, W.

    1980-02-01

    This report presents an energy assessment of six Central American countries - Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama - to assist these countries in defining, planning, and meeting energy requirements implicit in their economic and social development goals and also to assist the U.S. Agency for International Development and other development organizations in defining energy programs in Central America.

  13. Energy and development in Central America. Volume I: regional assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Ackerman, E.; Gallagher, W.

    1980-02-01

    This report presents an energy assessment of six Central American countries - Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama - to assist these countries in defining, planning, and meeting energy requirements implicit in their economic and social development goals and also to assist the U.S. Agency for International Development and other development organizations in defining energy programs in Central America.

  14. Energy and development in Central America. Volume II: Country assessments. Final report October 1979-February 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Ackerman, E.; Gallagher, W.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents an energy assessment of six Central American countries - Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama - to assist these countries in defining, planning, and meeting energy requirements implicit in their economic and social development goals and also to assist the U.S. Agency for International Development and other development organizations in defining energy programs in Central America.

  15. Conclusions and recommendations of the Latin America and Caribbean Regional Energy Conservation Seminar, Alajuela, Costa Rica, January 14-17, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-29

    Reports were given on active energy-conservation projects in the region (Barbados, Jamaica, Central American region and Panama, Peru, Ecuador, the Dominican Republic, and Costa Rica). In addition, there were presentations on energy auditing, fuel substitution, and financing energy conservation. Although the seminar concentrated on the industrial sector, it also explored opportunities for energy-efficiency improvements in the building and transportation sectors.

  16. Solar-Powered, Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Low-Electricity Humidity Control: Report and Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.; Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Miller, J.; Lowenstein, A.; Barker, G.; Slayzak, S.

    2012-11-01

    The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the capabilities of a new high-performance, liquid-desiccant dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) to enhance cooling efficiency and comfort in humid climates while substantially reducing electric peak demand at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), which is 12 miles east of Panama City, Florida.

  17. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  18. Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles | Department of Energy Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles Fossil Energy-Developed Fuel Cell Technology Being Adapted by Navy for Advanced Unmanned Undersea Vehicles January 31, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) being deployed during a U.S. Office of Naval Research demonstration near Panama City. Solid oxide fuel cell technology being developed by the Office of Fossil

  19. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  20. Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

  1. Geothermal activities in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, J.T.; Hanold, R.J.

    1985-09-11

    The Agency for International Development is funding a new program in energy and minerals for Central America. Geothermal energy is an important component. A country-wide geothermal assessment has started in Honduras, and other assessment activities are in progress or planned for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama. Instrumentation for well logging has been provided to Costa Rica, and a self-contained logging truck will be made available for use throughout Central America. An important objective of this program is to involve the private sector in resource development. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  2. (Mid-term evaluation of the Central America Rural Electrification Support program)

    SciTech Connect

    Perlack, R.D.

    1990-03-30

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested by Regional Office for Central America and Panama (ROCAP) to conduct a mid-term evaluation of the CARES project. Numerous meetings were held with National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) staff, ROCAP staff, and local officials in Guatemala, Honduras, and Belize. In general, the CARES project has been quite successful in a number of key areas as well as in soliciting support from utilities and US Agency for International Development (USAID) Missions. Changes were recommended in the area of report writing and some management activities. It was also recommended that any new activities be considered in the light of the availability of local personnel.

  3. Energy and development in Central America. Volume II. country assesments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, W.; Neves, C.; Trehan, R.; Ackerman, E.; Gallagher, W.

    1980-03-01

    This volume presents a country-by-country energy assessment of six Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. For each country it includes an assessment of geographic, social, and economic aspects of energy development, an assessment of energy resources, current and projected energy use, potential strategies for energy development, and finally recommendations to USAID for the orientation of its energy development programs. Each country assessment is supplemented with a summary of energy R and D activities and a description of each country's energy-related institutions.

  4. The status of energy planning in five Central American countries

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, S.R.; Fonseca, M.G.

    1991-08-01

    This report examines the current status of national energy planning in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama. A framework is provided that divides energy planning activities into two broad categories: the fundamental tasks'' and the bounding conditions.'' The fundamental tasks of energy planning include the gathering and systematizing of data, conducting energy situation analyses and short- or long-term planning for the country, and defining and implementing national energy plans. While the bonding conditions are situations that preclude completion of fundamental tasks, such as level of technical expertise. 20 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Mid-term evaluation of the NRECA (National Rural Electric Cooperative Association) Central America Rural Electrification Support Program (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Perlack, R.D. ); Jones, H.G. ); Garcia, A. III . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Flores, E. , Guatemala City )

    1990-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory was requested by the Regional Office for Central America and Panama to conduct a mid-term evaluation of the Cares Project, which is being implemented by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. This evaluation was conducted over a three week period by a four person team. Overall, the project has had numerous successes and is highly valued by local counterpart utilities and USAID Missions. Notwithstanding the significant results of the project, changes can be made in certain operating procedures and in the direction of some programmatic activities that can lead to an even more effective project.

  6. Central American resource studies

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working with five Central American countries to assist in the development of their energy and mineral resources. Since 1985, mineral resources in Costa Rica, peat resources in Costa Rica and Panama, geothermal energy resources in Honduras and Guatemala, and geothermal field development in El Salvador and Costa Rica have been topics of study. This paper presents an overview of this work -- within these proceedings are papers that deal with specific aspects of each topic, and these will be duly noted. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Precise Relative Earthquake Magnitudes from Cross Correlation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cleveland, K. Michael; Ammon, Charles J.

    2015-04-21

    We present a method to estimate precise relative magnitudes using cross correlation of seismic waveforms. Our method incorporates the intercorrelation of all events in a group of earthquakes, as opposed to individual event pairings relative to a reference event. This method works well when a reliable reference event does not exist. We illustrate the method using vertical strike-slip earthquakes located in the northeast Pacific and Panama fracture zone regions. Our results are generally consistent with the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog, which we use to establish a baseline for the relative event sizes.

  8. World frontiers beckon oil finders

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    7, 2016 | Release date: August 18, 2016 | Next release: August 25, 2016 | Previous weeks JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Supply/Demand | Storage In the News: Asian LNG imports increase in 2016, led by India and China The first shipment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) through the recently expanded Panama Canal is on its way to Japan, according to Reuters shipping data. This shipment was sourced from the U.S.-based Sabine Pass liquefaction terminal in Louisiana. Asian countries may see

  10. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992--April 1993)

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, S.; Goddard, J.G.; Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, S.C.; Reid, J.L.; Swift, J.H.; Talley, L.D.

    1998-06-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide concentration (TCO{sub 2}) and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in discrete water samples collected during three expeditions of the Research Vessel (R/V) Knorr in the South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the first cruise (WOCE Section P16A/P17A) began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on October 6, 1992, and returned to Papeete on November 25, 1992. The second cruise (WOCE Section P17E/P19S) began in Papeete on December 4, 1992, and finished in Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 22, 1993. The third expedition (WOCE Section P19C) started in Punta Arenas, on February 22 and finished in Panama City, Panama, on April 13, 1993. During the three expeditions, 422 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], as well as discrete measurements of salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, and pCO{sub 2} measured at 4 and 20 C. In addition, potential temperatures were calculated from the measured variables.

  11. Feasibility studies of a power interconnection system for Central American countries: SIEPAC project

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, T.; Enamorado, J.C. . Inst. de Investigacion Tecnologica); Vela, A. )

    1994-06-01

    The electrical systems of the Central American countries are linked by 230 kV ac weak border interconnections forming two separated subsystems. The first one includes Guatemala and El Salvador, and the other one comprises the systems of Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. As a consequence, unrestricted energy exchanges among all countries are not possible. This article describes the SIEPAC project which consists of a 1,678 km long 500 kV ac power transmission line that would link the six electrical systems of the region through seven power substations (one for each country and two in Panama), installed close to the highest demand national centers and six control centers of energy (one for each country) to allow coordinated operation of the interconnection.This project also considers a set of complementary assets (230 ac power transmission lines into some countries and the border transmission line between El Salvador and Honduras, and various other equipment). The power transmission line will greatly reinforce the actual border interconnections, which have a reduced capacity of exchange and technical problems associated with the stability of a weak longitudinal system. On the other hand, economic savings for the region would be achieved, coming from a higher coordination level in the operation and planning of their systems.

  12. Central America and Cuba in the new world order

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.; Gilbert, L.

    1994-03-01

    In Central America and the Caribbean, as in many other parts of the world, military institutions are being forced to define new roles for themselves in the post-Cold War era. In recent times, developments throughout the region, including the dismantling of Panama`s military, the downsizing of the armed forces in El Salvador and Nicaragua, a call by the new Honduran president for military reform and renewed peace talks in Guatemala, suggest that the time may be ripe to reinvigorate earlier regional political organizations and to press for a new round of talks to achieve regional arms control. During the 1980s, the ideological struggle between East and West, reignited by the Nicaraguan revolution in 1979, dragged the entire region into conflicts that devastated the isthmus in terms of human lives and economic infrastructure. Indigenous struggles that had developed during the 1970s were suddenly thrust upon the international stage, becoming part of a larger drama between the superpowers. Conflicts in El Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala provided impetus for larger armed forces throughout the region. This growth was justified as necessary to defend the state from external intervention and the established order from internal subversion, goals which were seen as complementary.

  13. Central America and the Caribbean: No place for the unwary

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, L.M.

    1994-11-15

    Central America and the Caribbean have not enjoyed the same high profile as more prominent independent power markets like India and China. Indeed, only one country in the region appeared in a recent survey of the 20 most promising markets: Panama, with a projected demand for 2,040 megawatts (MW) of new capacity, was ranked twentieth. Nevertheless, taken as a whole, Central America and the Caribbean offer significant opportunities for new development. Projected incremental capacity needs in some of the larger markets in the region include: Costa Rica (700-1,000 MW), Dominican Republic (1,100 MW), Guatemala (450 MW), Honduras (225 MW), Jamaica (729 MW), Panama (2,040 MW), and Trinidad & Tobago (200 MW). These markets represent an aggregate potential demand of 5,750 MW - more than the projected demand in Colombia, one of South America`s most active markets. Yet although its need for capacity is significant, the region presents developers with unique challenges because it comprises so many relatively small countries, each with its own special needs and characteristics.

  14. United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Beredjick, N.

    1987-07-01

    The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

  15. An energy atlas of five Central American countries. Un atlas energetico de cinco paises Centroamericanos

    SciTech Connect

    Trocki, L.; Newman, C.K.; Gurule, F.; Aragon, P.C.; Peck, C.

    1988-08-01

    In a series of maps and figures, this atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.

  16. The energy situation in five Central American countries

    SciTech Connect

    Trocki, L.; Booth, S.R.; Umana Q, A.

    1987-06-01

    This study describes the energy resources and the changes that have taken place in energy supply and demand in five Central American countries between 1970 and 1984. Economic changes are also reviewed because they influence and are affected by changes in the energy sector. The work was performed under the auspices of the US Agency for International Development. The Central American countries of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama are highly dependent on fuel wood as a source of energy, particularly in the residential sector. They also rely upon imported oil products to supply a growing modern sector. Most countries have significant hydroelectric and geothermal resources, and most countries produce a large portion of their electricity from hydroelectric projects. Demand for electricity has grown rapidly. Relative shares of primary versus secondary energy in the five countries vary significantly and strongly correlate with average per capita income. Consumption of secondary energy has declined during the recent economic recession suffered by the region.

  17. (Power sector integrated efficiency program): Foreign trip report, August 1--11, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Waddle, D.B.

    1989-08-18

    I traveled to Guatemala City to discuss host country and US Agency for International Development (USAID) Mission interest in an AID/Washington sponsored integrated utility efficiency initiative and to participate in a cogeneration conference. Discussions were held with USAID/Regional Office for Central America Panama (ROCAP), USAID/Guatemala City, the Ministry of Energy and Mines (MEM), the Empresa Electrica de Guatemala, and several members of the private sector regarding interest and the appropriateness of the proposed efficiency initiative. I then traveled to San Jose, Costa Rica to participate in a small scale hydro assessment study with a National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) engineer for a newly formed generation and transmission consortium. Data were gathered both on member cooperative annual, seasonal and diurnal energy demand, as well as engineering data for the site analyses. Meetings were held with the cooperative members; USAID/San Jose; and the Ministry of Natural Resources, Energy and Mines to inform them of our progress.

  18. San Jose Accord: energy aid or petroleum-marketing strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-30

    The San Jose Accord was signed in San Jose, Costa Rica on August 3, 1980 by the Presidents of Venezuela and Mexico, whereby the two countries mutually committed to supply the net imported domestic oil consumption of several Central American and Caribbean countries. Countries initially participating in the program are: Barbados, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Seven eastern Caribbean countries were to meet on October 7 to petition for inclusion in the Accord, namely: Antigua, St. Kitt/Nevis, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Grenada. The official language of the Accord is presented, and the operative status of the Accord two years after signing is discussed. Specific briefs about some of the individual countries in the Accord are included. The fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries is updated.

  19. International energy outlook. Volume 3. North and South America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Petroleum, coal, and hydropower resources are found, in varying degrees, throughout the Americas. Struggling to maintain or achieve energy self-sufficiency, many North and South American countries are undertaking major projects to develop these, and other, energy sources. This volume, Volume 3 is a compilation of official US government intelligence reports examining the development projects and energy trends in 12 countries of North and South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the United States and Venezuela. The range and detail of country coverage varies, due to availability of reports. Although the book details current energy situations and provides some historical background, its main emphasis is on estimates of future consumption and production, and descriptions of energy programs and plans. Plans in the Americas call for exploiting oil and gas where possible, and making major efforts to develop sources such as coal and hydropower that can be alternatives to imported petroleum. 33 references, 1 figure, 73 tables.

  20. Ecological effects of a major oil spill on Panamanian coastal marine communities

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.B.C.; Cubit, J.D.; Keller, B.D.; Batista, V.; Burns, K.; Caffey, H.M.; Caldwell, R.L.; Garrity, S.D.; Getter, C.D.; Gonzalez, C.; Guzman, H.M.; Kaufmann, K.W.; Knap, A.H.; Levings, S.C.; Marshall, M.J.; Steger, R.; Thompson, R.C.; Weil, E. )

    1989-01-06

    In 1986 more than 8 million liters of crude oil spilled into a complex region of mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs just east of the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal. This was the largest recorded spill into coastal habitats in the tropical Americas. Many populations of plants and animals in both oiled and unoiled sites had been studied previously, thereby providing an unprecedented measure of ecological variation before the spill. Documentation of the spread of oil and its biological effects begun immediately. Intertidal mangroves, seagrasses, algae, and associated invertebrates were covered by oil and died soon after. More surprisingly, there was also extensive mortality of shallow subtidal reef corals and infauna of seagrass beds. After 1.5 years only some organisms in areas exposed to the open sea have recovered.

  1. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  2. Geothermal initiatives in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Hanold, R.J.; Loose, V.W.; Laughlin, A.W.; Wade, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    The US Agency for International Development is supporting a new project in energy and resources exploitation for Central America. One of the largest components of the project involves exploration and reservoir development investigations directed at enhancing the production of electricity from the region's geothermal resources. An assessment of the geothermal resources of Honduras is in progress, and interesting geothermal regions in the Guanacaste Province of Costa Rica are being explored. Well-logging activities are in progress in the production wells at the Miravalles geothermal field in Costa Rica, and preparations are being made for logging critical wells at Ahuachapan in El Salvador. A self-contained logging truck, complete with high-temperature logging cable and logging tools designed for geothermal service, is being fabricated and will be made available for dedicated use throughout Central America. Geochemical and isotopic analyses of water samples collected in Panama are being evaluated to select a high-priority geothermal site in that country. Application of low- and medium-enthalpy geothermal fluids for industrial and agricultural processes is being investigated in Guatemala.

  3. Tidal constituent database. West Coast of the United States and Eastern North pacific ocean. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This technical note describes a database of tidal elevation boundary condition information generated in support of the `Long-Term Fate of Dredged Material Disposed in Open Water` research of the Dredging Research Program (DRP), being conducted at the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station. The database, described in detail by Hench and others (1994), allows the user to manually generate time series of tidal elevations or to use a program to access the full database to generate time series of both tidal elevations and currents for any location along the West Coast of the United States and Eastern North Pacific Ocean, extending from Seal Cape on Unimak Island, Alaska, in the North to Punta Parada, Peru, in the South. The land boundary includes the Pacific shorelines of Alaska, Canada, mainland United States, Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Columbia, and Northern Peru. Although the capability to generate these time series was developed to provide input to the Long-Term Fate and Stability Model (LTFATE), the generated time series can be used for any application requiring tidal forcing data.

  4. A limited assessment and characterization of the solar radiation energy resources in the Caribbean region

    SciTech Connect

    Hulstrom, R.L.

    1988-02-01

    The objective of our work was to produce a preliminary assessment and characterization of the Caribbean region (Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, and Panama) solar radiation energy resources. Such information will be used to estimate the performance of, and identify the most promising applications of, solar heat technologies in the Caribbean region. We expect the solar radiation resources in the Caribbean region to be very location specific. Sunny areas will have an annual direct-beam resource of about 3,000 kWhm/sup /minus 2// and a global solar radiation resource of about 2,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2//. Cloud-covered areas will have annual solar radiation resources of about 1,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2/ for both the direct-beam and the global solar radiation. Monthly levels of solar radiaion will vary markedly, ranging from an average of 9 to 3 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the direct-beam and from an average of 7 to 4 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the global solar radiation. The Caribbean region is comparable to the Great Plains region of the US, in terms of annual solar radiation resources; however, thorough ''prospecting'' is required to avoid areas having very low amounts of solar radiation.

  5. Energy-conservation-investment decision making in developing countries: A review of project implementation in industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Despite recent efforts in a number of developing countries to promote energy conservation (EC) and efficiency, only a fraction of EC potential has been captured, especially for projects that require significant investments. The document analyzes EC efforts in 11 countries where energy audit and/or feasibility study programs have been carried out (Bangladesh, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jordan, Pakistan, Panama, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka), covering some 1,500 EC projects involving 242 industrial companies. Cost and length of payback seem to be the determining factors for companies considering EC measures; no-cost or low-cost projects with paybacks of less than a year (such as power factor improvement projects) had the highest rate of implementation, while expensive, complicated projects (e.g., cogeneration or fuel substitution projects) were most often rejected. The document concludes, however, that the rate of implementation of EC programs has been quite high, and recommends that inexpensive, short-term projects be featured in future EC programs and increased levels of TA and financial assistance be made available to companies implementing long-term EC measures.

  6. High resolution capillary column development for selective separations in gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Przybyciel, M.

    1985-01-01

    A review of techniques for the preparation of high resolution capillary columns for gas chromatography is presented. Surface roughing, surface deactivation, stationary phase coating, and stationary phase crosslinking are discussed. Criteria for the selection of GC stationary phases and procedures for column evaluation are presented. A method is proposed for the isolation and determination of crude oil contamination in tropical plants and sediments. The method uses Florisil (TM) chromatography for the simultaneous clean-up and fractionation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Crosslinked SE-54 fused silica capillary columns prepared in our laboratory were employed for all GC separations. Mass spectrometry was used to help locate and identify specific oil components despite the intense background of the chromatogram. Crude oil components were identified in extracts of mangrove plant samples collected from the Peck Slip oil spill site at Media Munda, Puerto Rico. Crude oil components were also identified in sediment samples from controlled oil spill of Prudhoe Bay oil at Laguna de Chiriqui, Panama.

  7. Mineral accretion technology for coral reef restoration, shore protection, and adaptation to rising sea level

    SciTech Connect

    Goreau, T.J.; Hilbertz, W.

    1997-12-31

    Electrolysis of seawater is used to precipitate limestone on top of underwater steel structures to create growing artificial reefs to enhance coral growth, restore coral reef habitat, provide shelter for fish, shellfish, and other marine organisms, generate white sand for beach replenishment, and protect shore lines from wave erosion. Films and slides will be shown of existing structures in Jamaica, Panama, and the Maldives, and projects being developed in these and other locations will be evaluated. The method is unique because it creates the only artificial reef structures that generate the natural limestone substrate from which corals and coral reefs are composed, speeding the settlement and growth of calcareous organisms, and attracting the full range of other reef organisms. The structures are self-repairing and grow stronger with age. Power sources utilized include batteries, battery chargers, photovoltaic panels, and windmills. The cost of seawalls and breakwaters produced by this method is less than one tenth that of conventional technology. Because the technology is readily scaled up to build breakwaters and artificial islands able to keep pace with rising sea level it is capable of playing an important role in protecting low lying coastal areas from the effects of global climate change.

  8. FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF MEXICO, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nicholas; Watson, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Mexico, GTRI first made contact in 2005. The project then lost momentum and stalled. At the same time, GTRI’s cooperation with the Republic of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRI’s interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Mexico and to facilitate this cooperation, they offered to invite their Mexican counterparts to Colombia to observe its successful cooperation with GTRI. Shortly after that visit, the Government of Mexico agreed to move forward and requested that the cooperative efforts in Mexico be performed in a tripartite manner, leveraging the skills, experience, and resources of the Colombians. As a result, 22 of Mexico’s largest radioactive sites have had security upgrades in place within 18 months of cooperation.

  9. EIA cites importance of key world shipping routes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-07

    A disruption of crude oil or products shipments through any of six world chokepoints would cause a spike in oil prices, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) warns. The strategic importance of each major shipping lane varies because of differing oil volumes and access to other transportation routes. But nearly half of the 66 million b/d of oil consumed worldwide flows through one or more of these key tanker routes, involving: 14 million b/d through the Strait of Hormuz from the Persian Gulf to the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea; 7 million b/d through the Strait of Malacca from the northern Indian Ocean into the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean; 1.6 million b/d through the Bosporus from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 900,000 b/d through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea; 600,000 b/d through Rotterdam Harbor from the North Sea to Dutch and German refineries on or near the Rhine River; and 500,000 b/d through the Panama Canal from the Pacific Ocean to the Caribbean Sea. In today's highly interdependent oil markets, the mere perception of less secure oil supplies is enough to boost oil prices, EIA said. Growing oil and product tanker traffic is increasing the likelihood of supply disruptions through oil arteries because of bad weather, tanker collisions, or acts of piracy, terrorism, or war. What's more, the increasing age of the world tanker fleet and dependability of navigational equipment could increase chances of accidents and, therefore, oil supply disruptions.

  10. Contrasting impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, K.A.; Codi, S.

    1996-12-31

    A localised oil spill was observed on the wetland marshes bordering a tidal creek near Cairns, Queensland in January 1994. Pollution and conservation issues are of paramount public concern in this region which boarders World Heritage Areas of coral reefs and coastal habitats. Local residents observed oil being dumped from a truck which was contracted to of oil the surface of the roads in the contiguous sugar cane farm for dust control. During this incident several truckloads of mixed waste oil were dumped onto a short section of road and into the wetlands. The oil contaminated a band of marsh 15-30 m wide along approximately 200 m of road. Impacted marsh included Melaleuca forest on the high side of the road and intertidal mangroves on the seaward side. The Queensland Department of Environment (QDE) initiated an impact assessment and directed the trucking company to clean up impacted areas. The extent of damage to wetlands from oil spills is related to the amount and type of oil spilled and the sensitivity of the habitats oiled. QDE asked the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences to assist with their study on the fate of the oil in this localised spill. The initial levels of petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sediments reached 17% of the dry weight in heavily impacted areas. Thus levels were similar to those reached after the catastrophic oil spill in Panama. Clean up efforts and natural dissipation processes reduced sediment hydrocarbon loads to nonacutely toxic levels in only 1.5 years in the intertidal mangroves. High levels remain in the Melaleuca sediments. We used internal molecular markers to detail hydrocarbon dissipation vs degradation. This study provides a contrast between impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in deep mud coastal habitats.

  11. FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nicholas; McCaw, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.; Medina, Maximo

    2009-10-06

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Dominican Republic, the GTRI first received contact in 2008 from the Government of Dominican Republic. They requested cooperation that was similar to the tri-partite cooperation between Colombia, Mexico and the United States. Throughout the region it was widely known that the GTRI’s cooperation with the Government of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The Government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. In 2007, Colombia was an integral component of GTRI multi-lateral cooperation initiation in Mexico. As a result, twenty two of Mexico’s largest radioactive sites have been upgraded in the past eighteen months. These two endeavors served as catalysts for cooperation opportunities in the Dominican Republic. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRI’s interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Dominican Republic and to facilitate this cooperation, they

  12. Central American geologic map project

    SciTech Connect

    Dengo, G.

    1986-07-01

    During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

  13. The Enemy Below - The Global Diffusion of Submarines and Related Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, K G

    2002-09-05

    The end of the Cold War seemed to create a more peaceful international environment. September 11 reminded us of the dangers of complacency. Indeed, even before September 11 US forces had intervened in a number of wars and crises, including Panama, the Persian Gulf War, Somalia, Rwanda, Bosnia, Kosovo, several Taiwan Straits crises, the North Korea nuclear weapons crisis, and most recently Afghanistan. US ability to intervene in remote areas of the world is often dependent on the Navy's ability to project power ashore. As a result, US ability to influence events in crisis situations, especially between or among nuclear powers, may become more difficult along with our ability to conduct littoral warfare. Although the numbers of potentially hostile submarines have declined with the end of the Cold War, US anti-submarine warfare capabilities have also declined. Moreover, foreign submarines and related technologies are likely to diffuse globally. New technologies like Air Independent Propulsion (AIP), improved weapons and sensors will make conventional submarines more dangerous, and the spread of nuclear submarines even to a few more countries raise political, military, environmental, and safety concerns. Submarines are one of the key weapon systems used alone or in combination with other weapon systems such as coastal defense missiles, aircraft, and other sea-based missile platforms to deny US ability to project power ashore, Thus, other countries who wish to deny the US the ability to interfere with their regional or even global ambitions may emphasize the acquisition and/or development of submarines. As the world become more multipolar over the longer term, as the Chinese believe it will, countries such as Russia, China. etc., may be able to acquire the submarine capabilities to challenge us not just regionally, but in blue waters. To the extent that our alliance relationships require US naval access or superiority to sustain them, then our erstwhile friendly allies