National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for mckenzie hl wyman

  1. Michelle Wyman

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the former Director of Intergovernmental Affairs in the Office of Congressional & Intergovernmental Affairs at the U.S. Department of Energy, Michelle Wyman lead the Department...

  2. 1,"William F Wyman","Petroleum","FPL Energy Wyman LLC",811.3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Maine" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"William F Wyman","Petroleum","FPL Energy Wyman LLC",811.3 2,"Westbrook Energy Center Power Plant","Natural gas","Westbrook Energy Center",506 3,"Maine Independence Station","Natural gas","Casco Bay Energy Co LLC",490 4,"Bucksport Generation LLC","Natural

  3. McKenzie Solar Power Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Solar Power Facility Facility McKenzie Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Facility Status In Service Owner Recurrent Energy Developer Recurrent Energy Energy...

  4. McKenzie River Subbasin Assessment, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsea Geospatial, Inc.

    2000-02-01

    This document details the findings of the McKenzie River Subbasin Assessment team. The goal of the subbasin assessment is to provide an ecological assessment of the McKenzie River Floodplain, identification of conservation and restoration opportunities, and discussion of the influence of some upstream actions and processes. This Technical Report can be viewed in conjunction with the McKenzie River Subbasin Summary or as a stand-alone document. The purpose of the technical report is to detail the methodology and findings of the consulting team that the observations and recommendations in the summary document are based on. This part, Part I, provides an introduction to the subbasin and a general overview. Part II details the specific findings of the science team. Part III provides an explanation and examples of how to use the data that has been developed through this assessment to aid in prioritizing restoration activities. Part III also includes the literature cited and appendices.

  5. Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie & Truesdell, 1977)...

  6. Massachusetts Beryllium Screening Program for Former Workers of Wyman-Gordon, Norton Abrasives, and MIT/Nuclear Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, L. D.

    2008-05-21

    The overall objective of this project was to provide medical screening to former workers of Wyman-Gordon Company, Norton Abrasives, and MIT/Nuclear Metals (NMI) in order to prevent and minimize the health impact of diseases caused by site related workplace exposures to beryllium. The program was developed in response to a request by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that had been authorized by Congress in Section 3162 of the 1993 Defense Authorization Act, urging the DOE to carry out a program for the identification and ongoing evaluation of current and former DOE employees who are subjected to significant health risks during such employment." This program, funded by the DOE, was an amendment to the medical surveillance program for former DOE workers at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This program's scope included workers who had worked for organizations that provided beryllium products or materials to the DOE as part of their nuclear weapons program. These organizations have been identified as Beryllium Vendors.

  7. McKenzie River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrailkil, Jim

    2003-12-01

    BPA funding, in conjunction with contributions from numerous partners organizations, supports the McKenzie Watershed Council's efforts to coordinate restoration and monitoring programs of federal, state, local government, and residents within the watershed. A primary goal of the Council's program is to improve resource stewardship and conserve fish, wildlife, and water quality resources. The MWC will always have a baseline program centered on relationship building and information sharing. This watershed program is strengthened by the completion of the BPA funded Sub-basin Assessment, Conservation Strategy and the establishment of a Benchmarks system, thus, providing the MWC a prioritized framework for restoration efforts. Objectives for FY03 included: (1) Continued coordination of McKenzie Watershed activities among diverse groups that restore fish and wildlife habitat in the watershed, with a focus on the lower McKenzie, including private lands and the McKenzie-Willamette confluence area; (2) Influence behavior of watershed residents to benefit watershed function though a strategic and comprehensive outreach and education program, utilizing Assessment and Conservation Strategy information to provide a context for prioritized action; (3) Continue to maintain and sustain a highly functional watershed council; (4) Maintain and improve water quality concerns through the continuation of Council-sponsored monitoring and evaluation programs; and (5) Continue to secure other funding for watershed restoration and protection projects and council operations.

  8. McKenzie River Focus Watershed Coordination: Year-End Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrailkil, Jim

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments of the McKenzie River Focus Watershed Council (MWC) in the areas of coordination and administration during Fiscal Year 2000. Coordination and administration consist of prioritization and planning for projects; project management and implementation; procurement of funding for long-term support of the Council; and watershed education/outreach program for residents and local schools. Key accomplishments in the area of project planning include coordinating: monthly Council and executive committee meetings; staffing the Upper Willamette Spring Chinook Working Group; staffing the water quality technical committee; and guiding education and stewardship projects. Key accomplishments in the area of project management include the completion of the McKenzie-Willamette Confluence Assessment; securing funds for project planning in the confluence area; near completion of the BPA funded McKenzie sub-basin assessment; development of a framework for a McKenzie Watershed Conservation Strategy; an evaluation of Council's monitoring programs - ambient water quality, storm-event water quality, Tier III water quality, and macroinvertebrate monitoring. The Council, in cooperation with the McKenzie River Cooperative, completed habitat enhancements in the Gate Creek and Deer Creek sub-watersheds. This partnership recently submitted Bring Back the Natives grant for initiation of projects in other McKenzie tributaries. The Council will also be working with a local business to develop a river-side riparian enhancement and native landscaping project on the lodge grounds. This will serve as a demonstration project for blending fish and wildlife habitat concerns with maintaining grounds for business opportunities. Accomplishments in the area of procurement of funding included developing the FY2000 Scope of Work and budget for approval by the Council and BPA; providing quarterly budget and work program progress reports to the Council; and securing additional

  9. HL Green Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Gyeonggi-do, Korea (Republic) Product: Korea(Republic)-based JV aimed at manufacturing Lithium ion car batteries for Hybrid and Electric cars. References: HL Green Power Co1 This...

  10. Experimental programme of HL-1 tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, S.; and HL-1 Group

    1995-09-01

    The experimental programme of HL-1 was divided into two parts. In the first period, the expansion of the HL-1 operation regime connected with wall conditioning and MHD studies was successfully finished in 1989. The lowest {ital q}({ital a}) of 1.8 has been successfully obtained. The reproducibility of the plasma is quite good for detailed research. The program of the second part was to address the improvement of plasma confinement with the emphasis on boundary plasma studies. The typical improvement factors of confinement are: particle confinement time is increased by a factor of 2 to 3 and plasma energy confinement time is increased by 1.7. The ECRH, LHCD at several kilowatts and Pellet Injection experiments have been carried out on the HL-1 Tokamak. The improvement of confinement has been observed in all investigated cases except during ECRH and the LHCD/plasma biasing combined experiments. In the latter case, the plasma confinement results to be poor for unknown reasons. The results of inert-gas-filled discharged cleaning and molecular injection using the Laval Nozzle are also reported in this paper. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. The Discharge Design of HL-2M with the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yudong Pan, S.C. Jardin, and C. Kes

    2007-10-10

    We present results on the discharge design of the HL-2M tokamak, which is to be an upgrade to the existing HL-2A tokamak. We present simulation results for complete 5-sec. discharges, both double null and lower single null, for both ohmic and auxiliary heated discharges. We also discuss the vertical stability properties of the device. __________________________________________________

  12. Minimum Fisher regularization of image reconstruction for infrared imaging bolometer on HL-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Lu, J.; Dong, Y. B.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2013-09-15

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been developed recently for the HL-2A tokamak to measure the temporal and spatial distribution of plasma radiation. The three-dimensional tomography, reduced to a two-dimensional problem by the assumption of plasma radiation toroidal symmetry, has been performed. A three-dimensional geometry matrix is calculated with the one-dimensional pencil beam approximation. The solid angles viewed by the detector elements are taken into account in defining the chord brightness. And the local plasma emission is obtained by inverting the measured brightness with the minimum Fisher regularization method. A typical HL-2A plasma radiation model was chosen to optimize a regularization parameter on the criterion of generalized cross validation. Finally, this method was applied to HL-2A experiments, demonstrating the plasma radiated power density distribution in limiter and divertor discharges.

  13. Optics of ion beams for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, G. Q.; Lei, G. J.; Cao, J. Y.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-07-15

    The ion beam optics for the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak is studied by two- dimensional numerical simulation program firstly, where the emitting surface is taken at 100 Debye lengths from the plasma electrode. The mathematical formulation, computation techniques are described. Typical ion orbits, equipotential contours, and emittance diagram are shown. For a fixed geometry electrode, the effect of plasma density, plasma potential and plasma electron temperature on ion beam optics is examined, and the calculation reliability is confirmed by experimental results. In order to improve ion beam optics, the application of a small pre-acceleration voltage ({approx}100 V) between the plasma electrode and the arc discharge anode is reasonable, and a lower plasma electron temperature is desired. The results allow optimization of the ion beam optics in the neutral beam injection system on HL-2A Tokomak and provide guidelines for designing future neutral beam injection system on HL-2M Tokomak.

  14. HL-217, a new topical anti-angiogenic agent, inhibits retinal vascular leakage and pathogenic subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Junghyun; Kim, Chan-Sik; Jo, Kyuhyung; Cho, Yun-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Geun-Hyeog; Lee, Yun Mi; Sohn, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Sook

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: HL-217 is a new synthetic topical anti-angiogenic agent. HL-217 attenuated subretinal neovascularization in Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice. HL-217 blocked the binding of PDGF-BB to PDGFR?. - Abstract: HL-217 is a new synthetic angiogenesis inhibitor. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is a vasoactive factor and has been implicated in proliferative retinopathies. In this study, we examined the mechanism of action and efficacy of topical application of HL-217 on subretinal neovascularization in very low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Vldlr{sup ?/?}) mice. In three-week-old male Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice, HL-217 (1.5 or 3 mg/ml) was administered twice per day for 4 weeks by topical eye drop instillation. Neovascular areas were then measured. We used a protein array to evaluate the expression levels of angiogenic factors. The inhibitory effect of HL-217 on the PDGF-BB/PDGFR? interaction was evaluated in vitro. The neovascular area in the Vldlr{sup ?/?} mice was significantly reduced by HL-217. Additionally, HL-217 decreased the expression levels of PDGF-BB protein and VEGF mRNA. Moreover, HL-217 dose-dependently inhibited the PDGF-BB/PDGFR? interaction (IC{sub 50} = 38.9 0.7 ?M). These results suggest that HL-217 is a potent inhibitor of PDGF-BB. HL-217, when applied topically, is an effective inhibitor of subretinal neovascularization due to its ability to inhibit the pro-angiogenic effects of PDGF-BB.

  15. A new neutral particle analyzer diagnostic and its first commissioning on HL-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Xia, Z. W.; Lu, J.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.

    2012-10-15

    A new neutral particle analyzer diagnostic has been developed for HuanLiuqi-2A (commonly referred to as HL-2A), which can provide the neutral particle flux measurement along 11 separate sightlines, simultaneously, within a wider energy range (1-70 keV). It is an electrostatic type analyzer with a removable pinhole and special-shape condenser. The energy analysis can be flexibly achieved by controlling a preset stepwise high voltage on the condenser. It is compact and its field of view covers HL-2A cross section from -33 cm to 33 cm without 'cross-talk.' The energy spectra and ion temperature profile have been obtained during its commissioning.

  16. Numerical studies of electron cyclotron wave current drive on HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Song, S. D.; Gao, Q. D.; Zheng, P. W.; Du, D.

    2015-06-15

    The electron cyclotron wave (ECW) current drive (CD) for the HL-2A tokamak is investigated numerically with a new ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck code. The code is benchmarked with other well-tested linear and quasilinear codes and is then used to study the electron cyclotron current drive on the HL-2A tokamak. The wave propagation, power deposition, and driven-current profiles are presented. The effect of electron trapping is also assessed. It is found that quasilinear effects are negligible at the present ECW power levels and that when both waves are injected at an angle of 20° on the plasma equatorial plane, the CD efficiency for the HL-2A saturates at ∼0.029 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} and ∼0.020 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} for the 0.5 MW/68 GHz first harmonic ordinary (O1) and 1 MW/140 GHz second harmonic extraordinary (X2) modes, respectively. The effects of the plasma density, temperature, and wave-launching position on the driven current are also investigated analytically and numerically.

  17. L1 track triggers for ATLAS in the HL-LHC

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Lipeles, E.

    2012-01-01

    The HL-LHC, the planned high luminosity upgrade for the LHC, will increase the collision rate in the ATLAS detector approximately a factor of 5 beyond the luminosity for which the detectors were designed, while also increasing the number of pile-up collisions in each event by a similar factor. This means that the level-1 trigger must achieve a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment. This presentation discusses the challenges that arise in this environment and strategies being considered by ATLAS to include information from the tracking systems in the level-1 decision. The main challenges involve reducing the data volumemore » exported from the tracking system for which two options are under consideration: a region of interest based system and an intelligent sensor method which filters on hits likely to come from higher transverse momentum tracks.« less

  18. The motional Stark effect polarimeter in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, D. L. Wei, Y. L.; Xia, F.; Cao, J. Y.; Chen, C. Y.; Liu, L.; Chen, W. J.; Ji, X. Q.; Liu, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2014-05-15

    A 7-channel motional Stark effect polarimeter based on four polarizers and a spectrometer has been developed in the HL-2A tokamak, which is the first time successful utilizing this kind of polarimeter on a tokamak. The accuracy of the angle can reach ±0.25° in the calibration experiments. Pilot experiments of measuring the magnetic pitch angle have been successfully carried out in the weak motional Stark effect plasma discharge with toroidal magnetic field of ∼1.3 T and beam energy of ∼25 keV/amu. The pitch angles of magnetic field are obtained for 7 spatial points covering 24 cm along major radius with time resolution of 40 ms; the profiles of safety factor are obtained by combining with the Equilibrium and Reconstruction Fitting Code. The core value of safety factor (q) is less than 1 during the sawtooth oscillation and the position of q = 1 surface is well consistent with the results measured by soft X-ray array.

  19. Laboratory and testbeam results for thin and epitaxial planar sensors for HL-LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bubna, M.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Shipsey, I.; Manfra, M.; Khan, K.; Arndt, K.; Hinton, N.; Godshalk, A.; Kumar, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Chramowicz, J.; Lei, C. M.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Uplegger, L.; Vetere, Maurizio Lo; Robutti, Enrico; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Costa, Marco

    2015-08-03

    The High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade of the CMS pixel detector will require the development of novel pixel sensors which can withstand the increase in instantaneous luminosity to L = 5 × 1034 cm–2s–1 and collect ~ 3000fb–1 of data. The innermost layer of the pixel detector will be exposed to doses of about 1016 neq/ cm2. Hence, new pixel sensors with improved radiation hardness need to be investigated. A variety of silicon materials (Float-zone, Magnetic Czochralski and Epitaxially grown silicon), with thicknesses from 50 μm to 320 μm in p-type and n-type substrates have been fabricated using single-sided processing. The effect of reducing the sensor active thickness to improve radiation hardness by using various techniques (deep diffusion, wafer thinning, or growing epitaxial silicon on a handle wafer) has been studied. Furthermore, the results for electrical characterization, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution of various n-on-p pixel sensors with different substrates and different pixel geometries (different bias dot gaps and pixel implant sizes) will be presented.

  20. Laboratory and testbeam results for thin and epitaxial planar sensors for HL-LHC

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Bubna, M.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Shipsey, I.; Manfra, M.; Khan, K.; Arndt, K.; Hinton, N.; Godshalk, A.; Kumar, A.; et al

    2015-08-03

    The High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrade of the CMS pixel detector will require the development of novel pixel sensors which can withstand the increase in instantaneous luminosity to L = 5 × 1034 cm–2s–1 and collect ~ 3000fb–1 of data. The innermost layer of the pixel detector will be exposed to doses of about 1016 neq/ cm2. Hence, new pixel sensors with improved radiation hardness need to be investigated. A variety of silicon materials (Float-zone, Magnetic Czochralski and Epitaxially grown silicon), with thicknesses from 50 μm to 320 μm in p-type and n-type substrates have been fabricated using single-sided processing. The effect ofmore » reducing the sensor active thickness to improve radiation hardness by using various techniques (deep diffusion, wafer thinning, or growing epitaxial silicon on a handle wafer) has been studied. Furthermore, the results for electrical characterization, charge collection efficiency, and position resolution of various n-on-p pixel sensors with different substrates and different pixel geometries (different bias dot gaps and pixel implant sizes) will be presented.« less

  1. Development of the scintillator-based probe for fast-ion losses in the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. P. Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Song, X. Y.; Yang, J. W.; Li, X.; Chen, W.; Li, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Song, X. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Luo, X. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Hua, Y.; Isobe, M.

    2014-05-15

    A new scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) has been developed and operated in the HL-2A tokamak [L. W. Yan, X. R. Duan, X. T. Ding, J. Q. Dong, Q. W. Yang, Yi Liu, X. L. Zou, D. Q. Liu, W. M. Xuan, L. Y. Chen, J. Rao, X. M. Song, Y. Huang, W. C. Mao, Q. M. Wang, Q. Li, Z. Cao, B. Li, J. Y. Cao, G. J. Lei, J. H. Zhang, X. D. Li, W. Chen, J. Chen, C. H. Cui, Z. Y. Cui, Z. C. Deng, Y. B. Dong, B. B. Feng, Q. D. Gao, X. Y. Han, W. Y. Hong, M. Huang, X. Q. Ji, Z. H. Kang, D. F. Kong, T. Lan, G. S. Li, H. J. Li, Qing Li, W. Li, Y. G. Li, A. D. Liu, Z. T. Liu, C. W. Luo, X. H. Mao, Y. D. Pan, J. F. Peng, Z. B. Shi, S. D. Song, X. Y. Song, H. J. Sun, A. K. Wang, M. X. Wang, Y. Q. Wang, W. W. Xiao, Y. F. Xie, L. H. Yao, D. L. Yu, B. S. Yuan, K. J. Zhao, G. W. Zhong, J. Zhou, J. C. Yan, C. X. Yu, C. H. Pan, Y. Liu, and the HL-2A Team , Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)] to measure the losses of neutral beam ions. The design of the probe is based on the concept of the ?-particle detectors on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) using scintillator plates. The probe is capable of traveling across an equatorial plane port and sweeping the aperture angle rotationally with respect to the axis of the probe shaft by two step motors, in order to optimize the radial position and the collimator angle. The energy and the pitch angle of the lost fast ions can be simultaneously measured if the two-dimensional image of scintillation light intensity due to the impact of the lost fast ions is detected. Measurements of the fast-ion losses using the probe have been performed during HL-2A neutral beam injection discharges. The clear experimental evidence of enhanced losses of beam ions during disruptions has been obtained by means of the SLIP system. A detailed description of the probe system and the first experimental results are reported.

  2. Metabolic profiling using HPLC allows classification of drugs according to their mechanisms of action in HL-1 cardiomyocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strigun, Alexander; Wahrheit, Judith; Beckers, Simone; Heinzle, Elmar; Noor, Fozia

    2011-04-15

    Along with hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxic side effects remain one of the major reasons for drug withdrawals and boxed warnings. Prediction methods for cardiotoxicity are insufficient. High content screening comprising of not only electrophysiological characterization but also cellular molecular alterations are expected to improve the cardiotoxicity prediction potential. Metabolomic approaches recently have become an important focus of research in pharmacological testing and prediction. In this study, the culture medium supernatants from HL-1 cardiomyocytes after exposure to drugs from different classes (analgesics, antimetabolites, anthracyclines, antihistamines, channel blockers) were analyzed to determine specific metabolic footprints in response to the tested drugs. Since most drugs influence energy metabolism in cardiac cells, the metabolite 'sub-profile' consisting of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and amino acids was considered. These metabolites were quantified using HPLC in samples after exposure of cells to test compounds of the respective drug groups. The studied drug concentrations were selected from concentration response curves for each drug. The metabolite profiles were randomly split into training/validation and test set; and then analysed using multivariate statistics (principal component analysis and discriminant analysis). Discriminant analysis resulted in clustering of drugs according to their modes of action. After cross validation and cross model validation, the underlying training data were able to predict 50%-80% of conditions to the correct classification group. We show that HPLC based characterisation of known cell culture medium components is sufficient to predict a drug's potential classification according to its mode of action.

  3. McKenzie Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    (THOUSAND ) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 4.139 55.309 113 0.083 0.047 2 4.222 55.356 115 2009-02 5.066 56.074 114 0.083 0.044 2 5.149 56.118 116 2009-01 4.899 69.559 114...

  4. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    published in 1976 (Mariner and Willey, 1976). Details of sampling practices and field treatment are detailed in the text. Water samples were passed through a 0.7x4 cm column...

  5. Cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolites on HL-60 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, G.H.; Shen, Y.; Shen, H.M.

    1996-12-31

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used oxygenate in unleaded gasoline; however, few studies have been conducted on the toxicity of this compound. This study evaluates the cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of MTBE and its metabolites in a human haemopoietic cell line, HL-60. The metabolites of MTBE studied include tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA), and formaldehyde. Comet assay is used to assess DNA damage, and the cytotoxicity is investigated by lactate dehydrogenease (LDH) release. The results show no significant cytotoxic effects of MTBE, TBA, and HIBA over a concentration ranging from 1 to 30 mM. Formaldehyde, in contrast, causes a substantial LDH release at a concentration of 5 {mu}M. Hydrogen peroxide, a known oxidative agent, at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, produces a significant dose-related increase in DNA damage, whereas a much higher concentration of MTBE (1 to 30 mM) is required to produce a similar observation. The genotoxic effects of TBA and HIBA appear to be identical to that of MTBE. Conversely, DNA damage is observed for formaldehyde at a relatively low concentration range (5 to 100 {mu}M). These findings suggest that MTBE and its metabolites, except formaldehyde, have relatively low cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  6. McKenzie Electric Coop Inc (North Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    5,465 2008-05 234.004 3,303.675 4,254 772.018 9,666.371 1,171 601.01 12,565.92 13 1,607.032 25,535.966 5,438 2008-04 238.126 3,728.13 4,235 774.02 9,821.245 1,173 566.761...

  7. HL Power Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  8. HL Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Sector: Biomass Product: A power company located in California, the company main focus of energy is directed to biomass production. Coordinates: 40.293339, -79.687036...

  9. Synthesis and physicochemical characterization of a porous coordination polymer of Sn-Cu xylarate: The structure of [Sn{sub 4}Cu{sub 8.5}(HL){sub 2}(L){sub 4}O{sub 2}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 12.5}] {center_dot} 17.2H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergienko, V. S.; Chebanenko, E. A.; Martsinko, E. E.; Ilyukhin, A. B.; Seifullina, I. I.

    2013-03-15

    A porous coordination polymer of Sn-Cu xylarate [Sn{sub 4}Cu{sub 8.5}(HL){sub 2}(L){sub 4}O{sub 2}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 12.5}] {center_dot} 17.2H{sub 2}O (H{sub 5}L is xylaric acid) is synthesized for the first time and characterized by chemical analysis, IR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Centrosymmetric heterometallic fragments [Sn{sub 4}Cu{sub 6}(HL){sub 2}(L){sub 4}O{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}] (A) including copper Cu1-3 and tin Sn1,2 atoms are distinguished in the structure. The Cu4(OH){sub 0.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2.5} bridges connect A units into chains running along the c axis, and the Cu5(OH)(H{sub 2}O) bridges connect A fragments into layers perpendicular to the c axis. The Cu4,5 atoms form a framework whose voids accommodate the crystallization water molecules.

  10. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND ...

  11. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Map created May 2008; projection is UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) ...

  12. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). ...

  13. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration ...

  14. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Study Area Outline Basin Number of Fields Total Liquid Reserves (Mbbls) Total Gas Reserves (MMcf) Total BOE Reserves (Mbbls) WILLISTON BASIN 955 769,007 840,561 909,101 The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies

  15. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING

  16. EIS-0478: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    USDA Rural Utilities Service prepared an EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of constructing, operating, and maintaining a proposed transmission line and associated facilities in western North Dakota. DOE’s Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency, would modify its existing Williston Substation to allow a connection of the proposed new transmission line to Western’s transmission system.

  17. Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 Choose one Successful Marketing Strategies (Lessons ... Connecting the Dots Among Real Estate Stakeholders ... Mark Wyman, New York State Research & Development ...

  18. EIS-0478: Notice of Intent and Notice of Floodplains and Wetland Action

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota

  19. EIS-0478: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota

  20. EIS-0478: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota

  1. EIS-0478: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota

  2. EIS-0478: Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota

  3. Millimeter image of the HL Tau Disk: gaps opened by planets?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui

    2015-10-20

    Several observed features which favor planet-induced gaps in the disk are pointed out. Parameters of a two-fluid simulation model are listed, and some model results are shown. It is concluded that (1) interaction between planets, gas, and dust can explain the main features in the ALMA observation; (2) the millimeter image of a disk is determined by the dust profile, which in turn is influenced by planetary masses, viscosity, disk self-gravity, etc.; and (3) models that focus on the complex physics between gas and dust (and planets) are crucial in interpreting the (sub)millimeter images of disks.

  4. Designing computing system architecture and models for the HL-LHC era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauerdick, L.; Bockelman, B.; Elmer, P.; Gowdy, S.; Tadel, M.; Wurthwein, F.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a programme to study the computing model in CMS after the next long shutdown near the end of the decade.

  5. Technical report 348 Fann, H.L.; Detenbeck, R.W. PHYSICS; ANGULAR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the measurements. (auth) Maryland. Univ., College Park, MD (United States) US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) United States 1964-01-01 English Conference Conference: American...

  6. Millimeter image of the HL Tau Disk: gaps opened by planets?...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: Chinese Astronomical Society meeting ; 2015-10-20 - 2015-10-20 ; Beijing, China Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: ...

  7. Design and prototyping of HL-LHC double quarter wave crab cavities for SPS test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdu-Andres, S.; Skaritka, J.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Alberty, L.; Artoos, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Leuxe, R.; Kuder, N.; Zanoni, C.; Li, Z.; Ratti, A.

    2015-05-03

    The LHC high luminosity project envisages the use of the crabbing technique for increasing and levelling the LHC luminosity. Double Quarter Wave (DQW) resonators are compact cavities especially designed to meet the technical and performance requirements for LHC beam crabbing. Two DQW crab cavities are under fabrication and will be tested with beam in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN by 2017. This paper describes the design and prototyping of the DQW crab cavities for the SPS test.

  8. L.-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Wang Dimis J. Wyman Jing-Yea Yang B.S. Biology 12 yr experience in environmental ... 5 yr in environmental assessment M.S. Biology (environmental emphasis) 10 yr experience ...

  9. Self Assembly of Boronic Acid-Functionalized Peptides. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Self Assembly of Boronic Acid-Functionalized Peptides. Abstract not provided. Authors: Jones, Brad Howard ; Martinez, Alina Marissa ; Wheeler, Jill S. ; McKenzie, Bonnie B. ...

  10. EIS-0478: Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplemental Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota To address an increase in the electric load forecast for western North ...

  11. EIS-0478: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota EPA announces the availability of the...

  12. Notice of Intent (NOI) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota June 25, 2013 EIS-0498: Notice of...

  13. Trapping in irradiated p-on-n silicon sensors at fluences anticipated at the HL-LHC outer tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, W.

    2015-05-08

    The degradation of signal in silicon sensors is studied under conditions expected at the CERN High-Luminosity LHC. 200μm thick n-type silicon sensors are irradiated with protons of different energies to fluences of up to 3 • 1015 neq/cm2. Pulsed red laser light with a wavelength of 672 nm is used to generate electron-hole pairs in the sensors. The induced signals are used to determine the charge collection efficiencies separately for electrons and holes drifting through the sensor. The effective trapping rates are extracted by comparing the results to simulation. The electric field is simulated using Synopsys device simulation assuming two effective defects. The generation and drift of charge carriers are simulated in an independent simulation based on PixelAV. The effective trapping rates are determined from the measured charge collection efficiencies and the simulated and measured time-resolved current pulses are compared. Furthermore, the effective trapping rates determined for both electrons and holes are about 50% smaller than those obtained using standard extrapolations of studies at low fluences and suggests an improved tracker performance over initial expectations.

  14. The dependence of extracted current on discharge gas pressure in neutral beam ion sources on HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, H. L.; Cao, J. Y.; Rao, J.; Lei, G. J.; Jiang, S. F.; Liu, H.; Yu, L. M.; Xie, W. M.; Li, M.; Yang, X. F.; Zou, G. Q.; Lu, D. L.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-02-15

    The discharge gas pressure is a key factor to influence the extracted current of ion source. In this paper, the dependence of extracted current on discharge gas pressure was investigated in detail at different arc discharge currents. The discharge gas pressure with a very broad range (0.1 Pa-2.7 Pa) was scanned for the first time. It is turned out that, with the increasing of discharge gas pressure, the extracted current increases and the arc voltage decreases at different arc currents; however, when the discharge gas pressure exceeds a certain value, the extracted current decreases. For the same discharge gas pressure, the higher the arc current, the higher the arc voltage and the extracted current are. The arc efficiency was also calculated, and its dependence on gas pressure was almost the same with the dependence of extracted current on gas pressure, but at the same discharge gas pressure, the lower the arc current, the higher the arc efficiency is and the lower the extracted current is.

  15. Trapping in irradiated p+-n-n- silicon sensors at fluences anticipated at the HL-LHC outer tracker

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Adam, W.

    2016-04-22

    The degradation of signal in silicon sensors is studied under conditions expected at the CERN High-Luminosity LHC. 200μm thick n-type silicon sensors are irradiated with protons of different energies to fluences of up to 3 x 1015 neq/cm2. Pulsed red laser light with a wavelength of 672 nm is used to generate electron-hole pairs in the sensors. The induced signals are used to determine the charge collection efficiencies separately for electrons and holes drifting through the sensor. The effective trapping rates are extracted by comparing the results to simulation. The electric field is simulated using Synopsys device simulation assuming twomore » effective defects. The generation and drift of charge carriers are simulated in an independent simulation based on PixelAV. The effective trapping rates are determined from the measured charge collection efficiencies and the simulated and measured time-resolved current pulses are compared. Furthermore, the effective trapping rates determined for both electrons and holes are about 50% smaller than those obtained using standard extrapolations of studies at low fluences and suggests an improved tracker performance over initial expectations.« less

  16. Self Assembly of Boronic Acid-Functionalized Peptides

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    500 nm Self Assembly of Boronic Add-Functionalized Peptides Brad H. Jones, Alina M. Martinez, Jill S. Wheeler, Bonnie B. McKenzie, David R. Wheeler, and Erik D. Spoerke October ...

  17. Main Features for the Conceptualization of the Post-Closure Evolution Scenario of the Cigeo LIL-HL Waste Repository - 13105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landais, Patrick; Giffaut, Eric; Pepin, Guillaume; Plas, Frederic; Schumacher, S.

    2013-07-01

    In France, in order to commission the planned geological repository by 2025, a license application for the industrial project of this geological repository called Cigeo (Centre Industriel de Stockage Geologique) must be submitted and reviewed by the competent authorities by 2015. On the basis of its preliminary design set up in 2009 and on the associated requirements for long-term safety, an overall conceptual model has been developed in order to prepare the performance and safety analysis. The Cigeo repository makes use of the passive safety response characteristics of both the engineered and geological barriers that allow: - resisting water ingress, with repository designs favoring the limitation of the water flows; - limiting the release of radionuclides and chemical toxics; - delaying and mitigating the spread of radionuclides and chemical toxics. In order to evaluate the performance of the various elements, a conceptual model of the thermo-hydro-chemico-mechanical (THMC) evolution of the different components of the repository has been designed. It takes stock of a 20 years research effort which allowed data to be obtained from various surface geological campaigns, in-situ experiments in URLs and wastes characterization, and advances in numerical simulation to be utilised. Based on the best available knowledge to date, this conceptual model constitutes a robust basis for the definition and development of the long-term safety scenarios. It also helps identifying the residual uncertainties, and provides guidelines for additional research and system optimizations. (authors)

  18. (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G{sub 2}/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magalhães, Hemerson I.F.; Wilke, Diego V.; Bezerra, Daniel P.; Cavalcanti, Bruno C.; Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson; Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo; Pessoa, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis.

  19. Understanding the Chemistry of the Actinides in HL Waste Tank Systems: Actinide Speciation in Oxalic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Significant Quantities of Aluminum, Iron, and Manganese

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Sue

    2006-07-30

    The overall goal of this research plan is to provide a thermodynamic basis for describing actinide speciation over a range of tank-like conditions, including elevated temperature, elevated OH- concentrations, and the presence of various organic ligands. With support from DOE's EMSP program, we have made significant progress towards measuring thermodynamic parameters for actinide complexation as a function of temperature. We have used the needs of the ESP modelers to guide our work to date, and we have made important progress defining the effect of temperature for actinide complexation by organic, and for hydrolysis of the hexa- and pentvalent oxidation states.

  20. AmeriFlux US-Ses Sevilleta shrubland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvak, Marcy

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ses Sevilleta shrubland. Site Description - The Sevilleta Desert Shrubland site is located within the McKenzie Flats area of the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), central New Mexico. Historically, this area has been used for livestock grazing; however, the McKenzie Flats have not been grazed since 1973 and the effects of this previous grazing are considered negligible for the purposes of this study. As the name suggests, McKenzie Flats is an extensive (~130 km2), nearly flat, mixed-species desert grassland bounded on the east by Los Pinos Mountains and on the west by the Rio Grande.

  1. AmeriFlux US-Seg Sevilleta grassland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvak, Marcy

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Seg Sevilleta grassland. Site Description - The Sevilleta Desert Grassland site is located within the McKenzie Flats area of the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), central New Mexico. Historically, this area has been used for livestock grazing; however, the McKenzie Flats have not been grazed since 1973 and the effects of this previous grazing are considered negligible for the purposes of this study. As the name suggests, McKenzie Flats is an extensive (~130 km2), nearly flat, mixed-species desert grassland bounded on the east by Los Pinos Mountains and on the west by the Rio Grande.

  2. THE PHYSICS OF HIGH-DENSITY, HIGH-β REVERSED-FIELD PINCH PLASMAS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAT, MA-70 THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAT, MA-70 Organization chart for the Office of the Executive Secretariat, MA-70 Office of the Executive Secretariat (49.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Office of Management Organization Chart Correspondence Style Guide EDOCS PIA, Office of the Executive Secretariate

    PHYSICS OF HIGH-DENSITY, HIGH-β REVERSED-FIELD PINCH PLASMAS by Max D. Wyman A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor

  3. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    260 Electric Power Researc Charlotte, NC Structural Integrity Associates - Huntersville, NC (Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN and Wyman-Gordon - Houston, TX were approved under a previous CX for this award) FE/TDIC/Coal/ETAP Vito Cedro III Optimization of Advanced Steels for Cyclic Operation through an Integration of.. This project will develop an improved version of P92 creep resistant steel that has better creep fatigue resistance for use in current and future power plants. VITO

  4. Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks Charles E. Wyman, PhD President and CEO Vertimass LLC Irvine, California DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Bioenergy 2015 Washington, DC June 24, 2015 1" Vertimass Transformative fungible biofuels Vertimass Overview * Vertimass catalyst converts ethanol into gasoline blend stock that eliminates blend wall as obstacle to market growth * Hydrocarbon products also

  5. High-speed

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    speed three-wave polarimeter-interferometer diagnostic for Madison symmetric torus B. H. Deng, D. L. Brower, and W. X. Ding Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 M. D. Wyman, B. E. Chapman, and J. S. Sarff Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 5 May 2006; presented on 10 May 2006; accepted 11 June 2006; published online 27 September 2006͒ A high-speed three-wave polarimeter-interferometer

  6. CX-002527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provision of funds to McKenzie River Trust for purchase of Big Island Addition (Hunsaker) PropertyCX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 05/27/2010Location(s): Lane County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-004465: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provision of funds to The McKenzie River Trust (MRT) for purchase of Melevin PropertyCX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 11/08/2010Location(s): Lane County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST) Qualified Specialists June 2016 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Alaras, Art art_alaras@hillspet.com 785-231-2872 KS Atreya, Arvind aatreya@umich.edu 734-647-4790 MI Avagyan, Ruben ravagyan@mix.wvu.edu 304-906-1401 WV B Baesel, Bryan bbaesel@cec-consultants.com 216-749-2992 OH Baker, Mike mike.baker@hollyfrontier.com 801-643-3770 UT Balster, Nick nbalster@wyman.com 508-839-8103 MA Banta, Larry Larry.Banta@mail.wvu.edu 304-293-3375 WV

  9. High

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    confinement plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch a... B. E. Chapman, b) A. F. Almagri, J. K. Anderson, T. M. Biewer, P. K. Chattopadhyay, C.-S. Chiang, D. Craig, D. J. Den Hartog, G. Fiksel, C. B. Forest, A. K. Hansen, D. Holly, N. E. Lanier, R. O'Connell, S. C. Prager, J. C. Reardon, J. S. Sarff, and M. D. Wyman Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 D. L. Brower, W. X. Ding, Y. Jiang, and S. D. Terry Department of Electrical

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers CSP: LDPD_Ambrosini_A Duration: 3 years (ending Dec. 2015) DOE Funding: $2,517,000 Andrea Ambrosini, Sandia National Laboratories energy.gov/sunshot energy.gov/sunshot CSP Program Summit 2016 2 Team and Acknowledgments Clifford Ho Aaron Hall Timothy Lambert Antoine Boubault John Lewis Lam Banh James Pacheco Cheryl Ghanbari David Adams David Saiz Danae Davis Andrew Hunt Marlene Knight Bonnie McKenzie Landon Davis Pylin

  11. EIS-0478: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8: Record of Decision EIS-0478: Record of Decision Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota DOE's Western Area Power Administration issued a record of decision to grant Basin Electric Power Cooperative's request to interconnect the Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project to Western's Williston Substation and Williston to Charlie Creek transmission line. EIS-0478-ROD-2014.pdf (195.66 KB)

  12. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8/2010 WTB & SPECTRUM ACCESS OVERVIEW Michael McKenzie Roger Noel Department of Energy December 8, 2010 12/8/2010 Wireless Telecommunications Bureau 2 Wireless Telecommunications Bureau (WTB) * Second largest FCC Bureau * Develops and administers U.S. wireless telecommunications programs and policies * Key WTB roles and responsibilities: * Executes FCC's spectrum auction authority * Licenses and oversees U.S. commercial wireless services * Provides analysis of wireless industry competition *

  13. Participants

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Participants Participants Requirements for High Energy Physics A Joint ASCR / HEP / NERSC Workshop November 12-13, 2009 Richard Gerber, John Bell, Julian Borrill, John Shalf, Peter Nugent, Craig Tull, Cameron Geddes, Amber Boehnlein, Michael Norman, David Bruhwiler, Stan Woosley, Harvey Wasserman, Alex Szalay, Panagiotis Spentzouris, Doug Toussaint, Lie-Quan Lee, Chengkun Huang, Paul McKenzie, Alan Stone. Not pictured: Katherine Yelick, Yukiko Sekine Participants Name Organization Area Email

  14. Lighting in Commercial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (CEC), March 1990. Advanced Lighting Technologies Application Guidelines (ALTAG), Building and Appliance Efficiency Office. 3. Dubin, F.S., Mindell, H.L., and Bloome, S., 1976....

  15. SECTION I. NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS Splitting of the GMR and GQR in 154Sm D.H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui and H.L. Clark Giant Monopole Strength in 58Ni Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark and D.H. Youngblood Folding Model Analysis of the Giant Resonance Region of 116Sn H.L. Clark, Y.-W. Lui and D.H. Youngblood Double Folding Optical Model Potentials for Weakly Bound p-shell Nuclei L. Trache, A. Azhari, H.L. Clark, C.A. Gagliardi, Y.-W. Lui, A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, R.E. Tribble and F.

  16. Aquafuel Research | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Research Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aquafuel Research Place: Kent, England, United Kingdom Zip: ME9 8HL Sector: Renewable Energy Product: England-based renewable...

  17. Highlights Highlights

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuel Oil Crude Oil RAC Figure HL1. Crude Oil and Petroleum Product Wholesale Prices Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 xi pressure came from...

  18. Infrastructure Security

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    legacy of nuclear Waste Management Snl is the only national laboratory that has ... Some of these applications include: * Environmental assessment of proposed hlW repository ...

  19. Microsoft Word - Chapman-EX-S-Synopsis.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    EX-S High Beta Plasmas Exceeding Dual Stability Thresholds in the MST RFP B.E. Chapman, 1 M.D. Wyman, 1 J.W. Ahn, 1 A.F. Almagri, 1 J.K. Anderson, 1 F. Bonomo, 2 D.L. Brower, 3 S.K. Combs, 4 D. Craig, 1,5 D.J. Den Hartog, 1 B.H. Deng, 3 W.X. Ding, 3 F. Ebrahimi, 1 D.A. Ennis, 1 G.Fiksel, 1 C.R. Foust, 4 P. Franz, 2 S. Gangadhara, 1 J.A. Goetz, 1 R. O'Connell, 1 S.P. Oliva, 1 S.C. Prager, 1 J.A. Reusch, 1 J.S. Sarff, 1 H.D. Stephens, 1 and T. Yates 3 1 UW-Madison and the CMSO, Madison, Wisconsin,

  20. High-␤,

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ␤, improved confinement reversed-field pinch plasmas at high density M. D. Wyman, 1,a͒ B. E. Chapman, 1 J. W. Ahn, 1 A. F. Almagri, 1 J. K. Anderson, 1 F. Bonomo, 2 D. L. Brower, 3 S. K. Combs, 4 D. Craig, 1,5 D. J. Den Hartog, 1 B. H. Deng, 3 W. X. Ding, 3 F. Ebrahimi, 1 D. A. Ennis, 1 G. Fiksel, 1 C. R. Foust, 4 P. Franz, 2 S. Gangadhara, 1 J. A. Goetz, 1 R. O'Connell, 1 S. P. Oliva, 1 S. C. Prager, 1 J. A. Reusch, 1 J. S. Sarff, 1 H. D. Stephens, 1 and T. Yates 3 1 Department of Physics,

  1. 2014-2015 SectionI IV: Superconducting Cyclotron, Instrumentation...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    P. May, G.J. Kim, B.T. Roeder, H.L. Clark, and F.P. Abegglen Texas A&M cyclotron radiation ... Texas A&M cyclotron K150 broad beams for foil irradiation L.E. Henderson and H.L. Clark A ...

  2. High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalytic Antibody High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Catalytic Antibody Xueyong Zhu1, Tobin J. Dickerson2,3, Claude J. Rogers2,3, Gunnar F. Kaufmann2,3, Jenny M. Mee2,3, Kathleen M. McKenzie2,3, Kim D. Janda2,3,4,* and Ian A. Wilson1,4,* Departments of Molecular Biology1 and Chemistry2 and Immunology3, and The Skaggs Institute for Chemical Biology4, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Cocaine is a

  3. Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs This page intentionally left blank WELL INSTALLATION BLANK CASING: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.0 to 0.35 METHOD WELL SCREEN: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.35 to 3.27 DATE DEVELOPED SUMPIEND CAP: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 3.27 to 3.58 WATER LEVEL (FT BGS) SURFACE SEAL: LOGGED BY P. McKenzie REMARKS Drillers hit water at 5 fl: well point removed. LITHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION LOCATION SHIPROCK, NM SURFACE ELEV. ( FT NGVD) 4890.00 SITE SHIPROCK TOP OF CASING (FT)

  4. Microsoft Word - 7A1.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Figure 1 Crystal structure of the 7A1 Fab' cocaine complex with the secondary structure of the antibody light (L) and heavy (H) chains colored in cyan. Substrate cocaine is also shown in spheres with yellow carbons, blue nitrogen, and red oxygens in the active site. High Resolution Snapshots for the Complete Reaction Cycle of a Cocaine Catalytic Antibody Xueyong Zhu 1 , Tobin J. Dickerson 2,3 , Claude J. Rogers 2,3 , Gunnar F. Kaufmann 2,3 , Jenny M. Mee 2,3 , Kathleen M. McKenzie 2,3 , Kim D.

  5. Extreme high-head portables provide more pumping options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2006-10-15

    Three years ago, Godwin Pumps, one of the largest manufacturers of portable pumps, introduced its Extreme Duty High Lift (HL) series of pumps and more mines are finding unique applications for these pumps. The Extreme HL series is a range single-stage Dri-Prime pumps with heads up to 600 feet and flows up to 5,000 gallons per minute. The American Coal Co.'s Galatia mine, an underground longwall mine in southern Illinois, used an HL 160 to replace a multiple-staged centrifugal pump. It provided Galatia with 1,500 gpm at 465 ft. 3 photos.

  6. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2004 Isoscalar Multipole Strength in 110 cd and 116 Cd, Y.-W. Lui, D.H. Youngblood, Y. Tokimoto, H.L. Clark, and B. John, Phys. Rev. C 69, 034611 (2004). Isoscalar E0-E3 Strength in 116 Sn, 144 Sm, 154 Sm, and 208 Pb, D.H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, B. John, Y. Tokimoto and X. Chen, Phys. Rev. C 69, 034315 (2004). Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance for Several Nuclei with A ≥ 90, Y.-W. Lui, X. Chen, H.L. Clark, B. John, Y. Tokimoto, and D.H. Youngblood, Nucl. Phys. A731,

  7. 2010-2011 Section V: Superconducting Cyclotron, Instrumentation, and RIB

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrade P. May, G.J. Kim, H.L. Clark, and F.P. Abegglen Texas A&M cyclotron radiation effects facility April 1, 2011 - March 31, 2012 H.L. Clark, J. Brinkley, G. Chubarian, V. Horvat, B. Hyman, B. Roeder and G. Tabacaru Cyclotron computing R. Burch and K. Hagel Cyclotron Institute upgrade project H.L. Clark, F. Abegglen, G. Chubarian, G. Derrig, G. Kim, D. May, and G. Tabacaru The charge breeding ECR ion source at the Cyclotron Institute G. Tabacaru and D.P. May Radiation monitor data

  8. Highly selective fusion and accumulation of hybrid liposomes into primary effusion lymphoma cells along with induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Towata, Tomomi; Division of Hematopoiesis, Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 ; Komizu, Yuji; Suzu, Shinya; Ueoka, Ryuichi; Okada, Seiji

    2010-03-12

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by human herpes virus-8 infection, and is generally resistant to chemotherapy. Hybrid liposomes, composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and polyoxyethylene (21) dodecyl ether (C{sub 12}(EO){sub 21}) (HL-21), were rapidly accumulated in the membrane of PEL cells. HL-21 also increased membrane fluidity of PEL cells, and induced caspase-3 activation along with cell death. These results suggest that HL-21 should be an effective and attractive regent for PEL treatment.

  9. SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ...V-1 D.P. May, G.J. Kim, H.L. Clark, F.P. Abegglen, G.J. Derrig, R.S. Olsen and W.H. Peeler Progress on ECR2...

  10. Novera Energy UK Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    UK Ltd Place: Warrington, United Kingdom Zip: WA4 6HL Product: Novera was a landfill gas-to-power business in the UK acquired by Primergy in 2002 and folded into Novera...

  11. EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Greenhouse...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor and H.L. Miller (eds.). ...

  12. "GREENHOUSE GAS NAME","GREENHOUSE GAS CODE","FORMULA","GWP"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M. Tignor and H.L. Miller (eds.). ...

  13. UNIRIB Publications: 2012 Bibliography

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Bolla, M.P. Carpenter, L. Cartegni, C.J. Chiara, H.L. Crawford, I.G. Darby, R.Grzywacz, G. Gurdal, S. Ilyushkin, N. Larson, M. Madurga, E.A. McCutchan, D. Miller, S. ...

  14. SITE NAME: CITY: L~dL:&lvad:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    EQUIPMENT ORE OR Rr,W MATL FINAL PRODUCT PI WASTE 8, RESIDUE q c-CjMEIJ INVOLVE?T' RT SITE 2%-----...----... .Control c H&l th Physics Protectinn . fl AECMED ...

  15. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Program Overview Richard Farmer Richard Farmer ... 2 t t F l ll ff hi hl ffi i di f l d Fuel Cells Address Our Key Energy Challenges ...

  16. New Detector Technologies for the LHC Experiments: Prospects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We review the prospects, strategies and technologies for the High Luminosity (HL-LHC) upgrades of the ATLAS and CMS detectors, in the light of a very successful two year-long first ...

  17. Fermilab Today

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tuesday, Aug. 21 10:30 a.m. Research Techniques Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Roger Rusack, University of Minnesota Title: What Type of Forward Detector for CMS at the HL-LHC? 3:30 ...

  18. Accurate ab initio vibrational energies of methyl chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, Alec; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Yachmenev, Andrey; Tennyson, Jonathan; Thiel, Walter

    2015-06-28

    Two new nine-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been generated using high-level ab initio theory for the two main isotopologues of methyl chloride, CH{sub 3}{sup 35}Cl and CH{sub 3}{sup 37}Cl. The respective PESs, CBS-35{sup  HL}, and CBS-37{sup  HL}, are based on explicitly correlated coupled cluster calculations with extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit, and incorporate a range of higher-level (HL) additive energy corrections to account for core-valence electron correlation, higher-order coupled cluster terms, scalar relativistic effects, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections. Variational calculations of the vibrational energy levels were performed using the computer program TROVE, whose functionality has been extended to handle molecules of the form XY {sub 3}Z. Fully converged energies were obtained by means of a complete vibrational basis set extrapolation. The CBS-35{sup  HL} and CBS-37{sup  HL} PESs reproduce the fundamental term values with root-mean-square errors of 0.75 and 1.00 cm{sup −1}, respectively. An analysis of the combined effect of the HL corrections and CBS extrapolation on the vibrational wavenumbers indicates that both are needed to compute accurate theoretical results for methyl chloride. We believe that it would be extremely challenging to go beyond the accuracy currently achieved for CH{sub 3}Cl without empirical refinement of the respective PESs.

  19. SIMULATION OF DESCENDING MULTIPLE SUPRA-ARCADE RECONNECTION OUTFLOWS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cecere, M.; Schneiter, M.; Costa, A.; Elaskar, S.; Maglione, S.

    2012-11-10

    After recent Atmospheric Imaging Assembly observations by Savage, McKenzie, and Reeves, we revisit the scenario proposed by us in previous papers. We have shown that sunward, generally dark plasma features that originated above posteruption flare arcades are consistent with a scenario where plasma voids (which we identify as supra-arcade reconnection outflows, SAROs) generate the bouncing and interfering of shocks and expansion waves upstream of an initial localized deposition of energy that is collimated in the magnetic field direction. In this paper, we analyze the multiple production and interaction of SAROs and their individual structures that make them relatively stable features while moving. We compare our results with observations and with the scenarios proposed by other authors.

  20. Thyroid Malignancies in Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaelson, Evan M.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Silver, Barbara; Tishler, Roy B.; Marcus, Karen J.; Stevenson, Mary Ann; Ng, Andrea K.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the incidence of thyroid cancer after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and determine disease characteristics, risk factors, and treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thyroid cancer cases were retrospectively identified from a multi-institutional database of 1981 HL patients treated between 1969 and 2008. Thyroid cancer risk factors were evaluated by a Poisson regression model. Results: With a median follow-up duration of 14.3 years (range, 0-41.2 years), 28 patients (1.4%) developed a thyroid malignancy. The overall incidence rate (expressed as the number of cases per 10,000 person-years) and 10-year cumulative incidence of thyroid cancer were 9.6 and 0.26%, respectively. There were no observed cases of thyroid malignancy in patients who received neck irradiation for HL after age 35 years. Age <20 years at HL diagnosis and female sex were significantly associated with thyroid cancer. The incidence rates of females aged <20 at HL diagnosis in the first 10 years, ≥10 years, ≥15 years, and ≥20 years after treatment were 5, 31, 61, and 75 cases per 10,000 person-years of follow-up, respectively. At a median follow-up of 3.5 years after the thyroid cancer diagnosis, 26 patients (93%) were alive without disease, 1 (4%) was alive with metastatic disease, and 1 (4%) died of metastatic disease, at 6 and 3.6 years after the thyroid cancer diagnosis, respectively. Conclusions: Although HL survivors have an increased risk for thyroid cancer, the overall incidence is low. Routine thyroid cancer screening may benefit females treated at a young age and ≥10 years from HL treatment owing to their higher risk, which increases over time.

  1. Low-Dose Chest Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening Among Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wattson, Daniel A.; Hunink, M.G. Myriam; DiPiro, Pamela J.; Das, Prajnan; Hodgson, David C.; Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors face an increased risk of treatment-related lung cancer. Screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) may allow detection of early stage, resectable cancers. We developed a Markov decision-analytic and cost-effectiveness model to estimate the merits of annual LDCT screening among HL survivors. Methods and Materials: Population databases and HL-specific literature informed key model parameters, including lung cancer rates and stage distribution, cause-specific survival estimates, and utilities. Relative risks accounted for radiation therapy (RT) technique, smoking status (>10 pack-years or current smokers vs not), age at HL diagnosis, time from HL treatment, and excess radiation from LDCTs. LDCT assumptions, including expected stage-shift, false-positive rates, and likely additional workup were derived from the National Lung Screening Trial and preliminary results from an internal phase 2 protocol that performed annual LDCTs in 53 HL survivors. We assumed a 3% discount rate and a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Results: Annual LDCT screening was cost effective for all smokers. A male smoker treated with mantle RT at age 25 achieved maximum QALYs by initiating screening 12 years post-HL, with a life expectancy benefit of 2.1 months and an incremental cost of $34,841/QALY. Among nonsmokers, annual screening produced a QALY benefit in some cases, but the incremental cost was not below the WTP threshold for any patient subsets. As age at HL diagnosis increased, earlier initiation of screening improved outcomes. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to the lung cancer incidence and mortality rates and expected stage-shift from screening. Conclusions: HL survivors are an important high-risk population that may benefit from screening, especially those treated in the past with large radiation fields including mantle or involved-field RT. Screening

  2. Memo, "Incorporation of HLW Glass Shell V2.0 into the Flowsheets," to ED Lee, CCN: 184905, October 20, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gimpel, Rodney F.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2013-12-18

    Efforts are being made to increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of vitrifying radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The compositions of acceptable and processable high-level waste (HL W) glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to reduce cost. A database of glass properties of waste glass and associated simulated waste glasses was collected and documented in PNNL 18501, Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume and glass property models were curve-fitted to the glass compositions. A routine was developed that estimates HL W glass volumes using the following glass property models: II Nepheline, II One-Percent Crystal Temperature (T1%), II Viscosity (11) II Product Consistency Tests (PCT) for boron, sodium, and lithium, and II Liquidus Temperature (TL). The routine, commonly called the HL W Glass Shell, is presented in this document. In addition to the use of the glass property models, glass composition constraints and rules, as recommend in PNNL 18501 and in other documents (as referenced in this report) were incorporated. This new version of the HL W Glass Shell should generally estimate higher waste loading in the HL W glass than previous versions.

  3. 2014-2015 SectionI IV: Superconducting Cyclotron, Instrumentation, and RIB

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrade 4 - March 31, 2015 H.L. Clark, J. Brinkley, L. Chen, G. Chubarian, V. Horvat, B. Hyman, B. Roeder, and G. Tabacaru Plans for new ECR4 ion source D.P. May and L.E. Henderson Axially-mounted, high-temperature oven for ECR2 H. Peeler, F.P. Abegglen, B.T. Roeder, and D.P. May Texas A&M cyclotron K150 broad beams for foil irradiation L.E. Henderson and H.L. Clark A new radiation effects facility beam line B. Hyman, H.L. Clark, G.J. Kim, B. Roeder, and S. Russell Repair of the H- ion

  4. MGR External Events Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Booth

    1999-11-06

    The purpose and objective of this analysis is to apply an external events Hazards Analysis (HA) to the License Application Design Selection Enhanced Design Alternative 11 [(LADS EDA II design (Reference 8.32))]. The output of the HA is called a Hazards List (HL). This analysis supersedes the external hazards portion of Rev. 00 of the PHA (Reference 8.1). The PHA for internal events will also be updated to the LADS EDA II design but under a separate analysis. Like the PHA methodology, the HA methodology provides a systematic method to identify potential hazards during the 100-year Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) operating period updated to reflect the EDA II design. The resulting events on the HL are candidates that may have potential radiological consequences as determined during Design Basis Events (DBEs) analyses. Therefore, the HL that results from this analysis will undergo further screening and analysis based on the criteria that apply during the performance of DBE analyses.

  5. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at Intermediate Energies, T

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 - March 31, 2006 Systematic of Giant Monopole Energy and the Isotopic Dependence, Y.-W. Lui, D.H. Youngblood, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto and B. John, Invited Talk, Workshop on Nuclear Imcompressibility, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana, (July 2005). Giant Resonance Study by 6 Li Scattering, X. Chen, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto, and D.H. Youngblood, 2005 2 nd Joint Meeting of the Nuclear Physics Divisions of the APS and the Physical Society of Japan, Maui, Hawaii, (September

  6. 2014-2015 SectionI IV: Superconducting Cyclotron, Instrumentation, and RIB

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Upgrade 5 - March 31, 2016 H.L. Clark, J. Brinkley, L. Chen, G. Chubarian, S. Gerlt, V. Horvat, B. Hyman, B. Roeder, and G. Tabacaru K150 operations and development G.J. Kim, B.T. Roeder, F. Abegglen, H. Clark, L. Gathings, D.P. May, and H. Peeler Texas A&M Cyclotron K150 radiation effects facility April 1, 2015 - March 31, 2016 B. Hyman, H.L. Clark, S. Gerlt, V. Horvat, G.J. Kim, B. Roeder, and S. Russell Status of ECR2: Development of aluminum beam using the ECR2 high-temperature oven

  7. Open Issues

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2012 Resolved -- "cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp" compiler error with C++ code using hdf5 January 24, 2012 by Helen He Symptom: After the 1/18 system maintenance, C++ code compilation gets an error if the default hdf5/1.8.5.0 module is loaded: "/usr/bin/ld: cannot find -lhdf5_hl_cpp". Read the full post "module: command not found" in batch jobs January 6, 2012 by Helen He Sympotom: Users with csh/tcsh as default login shells will get this error when trying to use

  8. PAPERS PUBLISHED / 2007-2008 Progress in Research / Cyclotron Institute /

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008 (links to abstracts and/or full text provided where possible) Folding model analysis of 240 MeV 6Li elastic scattering on 116Sn and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of 116Sn X. Chen, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto, and D.H. Youngblood Phys. Rev. C 76, 054606 (2007) Isoscalar giant resonance strength in 28Si D.H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui, and H.L. Clark Phys. Rev. C 76, 027304 (2007) Decay of 10C excited states above the 2p+2α

  9. SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    SECTION V: SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION K500 Operations and Development ................................................................................................................................................................V-1 D.P. May, G.J. Kim, H.L. Clark, F.P. Abegglen, G.J. Derrig, R.S. Olsen and W.H. Peeler Progress on ECR2

  10. Fact #598: November 23, 2009 Hybrid Vehicle Sales by Model |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8,388 8,819 17,207 Saturn Vue 4,403 2,920 7,323 Lexus LS600hL 937 907 1,844 Saturn Aura 772 285 1,057 Chevy Tahoe 3,745 3,745 GMC Yukon 1,610 1,610 Chevy Malibu 2,093 2,093 ...

  11. Section I

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    F. Carstoiu, C.A. Gagliardi, V. Kroha, A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, L. Trache, R.E. Tribble Rainbow Elastic Scattering of 16O on 12C at 300 MeV L. Trache, H.L. Clark, A. Azhari, C.A....

  12. Beamline 4-ID-C Publications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    double exchange interactions and pressure tuning of magnetism in 3d-5d double perovskite Sr2FeOsO6," LS.I. Veiga, G. Fabbris, M. van Veenendaal, N.M. Souza-Neto, H.L. Feng,...

  13. Fracture-enhanced porosity and permeability trends in Bakken Formation, Williston basin, western North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freisatz, W.B.

    1988-07-01

    Fractures play a critical role in oil production from the Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The Bakken Formation in the study area is known for its low matrix porosity and permeability, high organic content, thermal maturity, and relative lateral homogeneity. Core analysis has shown the effective porosity and permeability development within the Bakken Formation to be related primarily to fracturing. In theory, lineaments mapped on the surface reflect the geometry of basement blocks and the zones of fracturing propagated upward from them. Fracturing in the Williston basin is thought to have occurred along reactivated basement-block boundaries in response to varying tectonic stresses and crustal flexure throughout the Phanerozoic. Landsat-derived lineament maps were examined for the area between 47/degrees/ and 48/degrees/ north lat. and 103/degrees/ and 104/degrees/ west long. (northern Billings and Golden Valley Counties, and western McKenzie County, North Dakota) in an attempt to identify large-scale fracture trends. In the absence of major tectonic deformation in the craton, a subtle pattern of fracturing has propagated upward through the sedimentary cover and emerged as linear topographic features visible on these large-scale, remote-sensed images.

  14. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  15. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  16. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    9 - March 31, 2010 Elastic and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of 58 Ni and 90 Zr using 240 MeV 6 Li, Krishichayan, X. Chen, Y.-W. Lui, Y. Tokimoto, J. Button, and D.H. Youngblood, Phys. Rev. C 81, 014603 (2010). Isoscalar giant resonance strength in 24 Mg, D.H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui, X.F. Chen, and H.L. Clark, Phys Rev C 80, 064318 (2009). Giant resonance in 24 Mg and 28 Si from 240 MeV 6 Li scattering, X. Chen, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto, and D.H. Youngblood, Phys. Rev. C 80,

  17. Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity Field Profile Analysis and Higher Order Mode Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marques, Carlos; Xiao, B. P.; Belomestnykh, S.

    2014-06-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is underway for a major upgrade to increase its luminosity by an order of magnitude beyond its original design specifications. This novel machine configuration known as the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on various innovative technologies including very compact and ultra-precise superconducting crab cavities for beam rotation. A double quarter wave crab cavity (DQWCC) has been designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the HL-LHC. This cavity as well as the structural support components were fabricated and assembled at Niowave. The field profile of the crabbing mode for the DQWCC was investigated using a phase shift bead pulling technique and compared with simulated results to ensure proper operation or discover discrepancies from modeled results and/or variation in fabrication tolerances. Higher-Order Mode (HOM) characterization was also performed and correlated with simulations.

  18. Molecular, crystal, and electronic structure of the cobalt(II) complex with 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linko, R. V.; Sokol, V. I.; Polyanskaya, N. A.; Ryabov, M. A.; Strashnov, P. V.; Davydov, V. V.; Sergienko, V. S.

    2013-05-15

    The reaction of 10-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-9-phenanthrol (HL) with cobalt(II) acetate gives the coordination compound [CoL{sub 2}] {center_dot} CHCl{sub 3} (I). The molecular and crystal structure of I is determined by X-ray diffraction. The coordination polyhedron of the Co atom in complex I is an octahedron. The anion L acts as a tridentate chelating ligand and is coordinated to the Co atom through the phenanthrenequinone O1 atom and the benzothiazole N1 atom of the moieties L and the N3 atom of the azo group to form two five-membered metallocycles. The molecular and electronic structures of the compounds HL, L, and CoL{sub 2} are studied at the density functional theory level. The results of the quantum-chemical calculations are in good agreement with the values determined by X-ray diffraction.

  19. SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS Double Folding Analysis of 6Li Elastic and Inelastic Scattering on 116Sn ...................................................................................I-1 X. Chen, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto, and D.H. Youngblood The Structure of 23Al and the Consequences on the 22Mg(p,γ23Al Stellar Reaction Rate .......................................................I-5 Y. Zhai, V.E. Iacob, T. Al-Abdullah, C. Fu, J.C. Hardy, N. Nica,

  20. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at Intermediate Energies, T

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2004 Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance for Several Nuclei with A ≥ 90, Y.-W. Lui, X. Chen, H.L. Clark, B. John, Y. Tokimoto and D.H. Youngblood, International Conference on Collective Motion in Nuclei Under Extreme Conditions (COMEX1), La Sorbonne, Paris, France, (June 2003). Compression Mode Giant Resonances and Nuclear Matter Compressibility, Y.-W. Lui, Invited Talk, National Technical University in Athens, Athens, Greece, (June 2003). Radioactive Beams at Texas A&M

  1. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at Intermediate Energies, T

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - March 31, 2005 Giant Monopole Resonance in Cd and Sn Isotopes, Y.-W. Lui, D.H. Youngblood, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto and B. John, Invited Talk, International Symposium on Atomic Nuclei at Extreme Values of Temperature,Spin and Isospin, Zakopane, Poland, (August 2004). Report on BigSol Operations, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, Workshop on Measuring Transfer reactions with Radioactive Beams, Argonne national Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, (June 2004). Indirect Techniques in Nuclear Astrophysics:

  2. Copper(II) complexes with 4-(1H-1, 2, 4-trizol-1-ylmethyl) benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures and antifungal activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Pingping; Li, Jie; Bu, Huaiyu; Wei, Qing; Zhang, Ruolin; Chen, Sanping

    2014-07-01

    Reaction of Cu(II) with an asymmetric semi-rigid organic ligand 4-(1H-1, 2, 4-trizol-1-ylmethyl) benzoic acid (HL), yielded five compounds, [Cu{sub 0.5}L]{sub n} (1), [Cu(HL){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]{sub n} (2), [Cu(HL){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (3), [Cu(L){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (4) and [Cu(L)(phen)(HCO{sub 2})]{sub n} (5), which have been fully characterized by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. As for compounds 1, 2 and 5, Cu(II) is bridged through HL, Cl{sup -}, and formic acid, respectively, featuring 1D chain-structure. In compound 3, Cu(II) with hexahedral coordination sphere is assembled through hydrogen-bonding into 3D supramolecular framework. In compound 4, 1D chain units –Cu–O–Cu–O– are ligand-bridged into a 3D network. All compounds were tested on fungi (Fusarium graminearum, Altemaria solani, Macrophoma kawatsukai, Alternaria alternata and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides). Compound 1 exhibits a better antifungal effect compared to other compounds. An effect of structure on the antifungal activity has also been correlated. - Graphical abstract: Copper(II) compounds with 4-(1H-1, 2, 4-trizol-1-ylmethyl) benzoic acid, were prepared, structurally characterized and investigated for antifungal activity. - Highlights: • The title compounds formed by thermodynamics and thermokinetics. • The five compounds show higher inhibition percentage than reactants. • The structure effect on the antifungal activity.

  3. Geomechanical response of permafrost-associated hydrate deposits to depressurization-induced gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, J.; Moridis, G.J.; Grover, T.; Collett, T.

    2009-02-01

    In this simulation study, we analyzed the geomechanical response during depressurization production from two known hydrate-bearing permafrost deposits: the Mallik (Northwest Territories, Canada) deposit and Mount Elbert (Alaska, USA) deposit. Gas was produced from these deposits at constant pressure using horizontal wells placed at the top of a hydrate layer (HL), located at a depth of about 900 m at the Mallik and 600 m at the Mount Elbert. The simulation results show that general thermodynamic and geomechanical responses are similar for the two sites, but with substantially higher production and more intensive geomechanical responses at the deeper Mallik deposit. The depressurization-induced dissociation begins at the well bore and then spreads laterally, mainly along the top of the HL. The depressurization results in an increased shear stress within the body of the receding hydrate and causes a vertical compaction of the reservoir. However, its effects are partially mitigated by the relatively stiff permafrost overburden, and compaction of the HL is limited to less than 0.4%. The increased shear stress may lead to shear failure in the hydrate-free zone bounded by the HL overburden and the downward-receding upper dissociation interface. This zone undergoes complete hydrate dissociation, and the cohesive strength of the sediment is low. We determined that the likelihood of shear failure depends on the initial stress state as well as on the geomechanical properties of the reservoir. The Poisson's ratio of the hydrate-bearing formation is a particularly important parameter that determines whether the evolution of the reservoir stresses will increase or decrease the likelihood of shear failure.

  4. Negative feedback regulation of Homer 1a on norepinephrine-dependent cardiac hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiarello, Carmelina; Bortoloso, Elena; Carpi, Andrea; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo

    2013-07-15

    Homers are scaffolding proteins that modulate diverse cell functions being able to assemble signalling complexes. In this study, the presence, sub-cellular distribution and function of Homer 1 was investigated. Homer 1a and Homer 1b/c are constitutively expressed in cardiac muscle of both mouse and rat and in HL-1 cells, a cardiac cell line. As judged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Homer 1a displays sarcomeric and peri-nuclear localization. In cardiomyocytes and cultured HL-1 cells, the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine (NE) induces α{sub 1}-adrenergic specific Homer 1a over-expression, with a two-to-three-fold increase within 1 h, and no up-regulation of Homer 1b/c, as judged by Western blot and qPCR. In HL-1 cells, plasmid-driven over-expression of Homer 1a partially antagonizes activation of ERK phosphorylation and ANF up-regulation, two well-established, early markers of hypertrophy. At the morphometric level, NE-induced increase of cell size is likewise and partially counteracted by exogenous Homer 1a. Under the same experimental conditions, Homer 1b/c does not have any effect on ANF up-regulation nor on cell hypertrophy. Thus, Homer 1a up-regulation is associated to early stages of cardiac hypertrophy and appears to play a negative feedback regulation on molecular transducers of hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • Homer 1a is constitutively expressed in cardiac tissue. • In HL-1 cells, norepinephrine activates signaling pathways leading to hypertrophy. • Homer 1a up-regulation is an early event of norepinephrine-induced hypertrophy. • Homer 1a plays a negative feedback regulation modulating pathological hypertrophy. • Over-expression of Homer 1a per se does not induce hypertrophy.

  5. Evaluating the Performance of the MRF Subgrid-Scale Cloud Fraction Parameterization: Examination of Two Significant Strati...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    the Performance of the MRF Subgrid-Scale Cloud Fraction Parameterization: Examination of Two Significant Stratiform Cloud Events Over the ARM SGP S. M. Lazarus Florida Institute of Technology Melbourne, Florida S. K. Krueger University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah H.-L. Pan National Centers for Environmental Prediction Camp Springs, Maryland Introduction As part of a collaborative effort with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the University of Utah continues to archive

  6. Microsoft Word - MOU Between DOE and Germany 9-15-11.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE DOE Hosts German Energy Official, Signs MOU to Share WIPP Information CARLSBAD, N.M., September 15, 2011 - A high-ranking energy official from Germany formalized a partnership between her country and the United States during a recent visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Dr. Dorothee Műhl, Deputy Director General Manager of Germany's Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), and other German officials visited WIPP, the U.S. Department of Energy's

  7. CD

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    CD .... -- en .. CD :II -- = .= * = = = * en CD .= .... .... * E CD i .. CD .... * .. 1:11 CD .... = - = III HL W -99-0008 Revision 10 June 1999 with October 1999 Update High Level Waste Division High Level Waste System Plan Revision 10 (U) Contributors: Prepared by: A. S. Choi P. Paul F. E. Wise Approved by: t....,..~'O:"::""f-..:-........::::::::.....t..--=+--7"'f-------- W.G. Poulson Vice President and General Manager High Level Waste Division Wesfnghouse Sav nnah River

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications of a Reference Sonde System in the ARM Program Wang, J., Carlson, D.J., and Cole, H.L., National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A reference sonde system is proposed to be developed at the Atmospheric Technology Division (ATD) at NCAR. The reference sonde will use current best sensors, will have a flexible infrastructure and can be easily adapted to many types of sensors and many modes of deployment. In

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluating the NCEP Global Forecast Model Clouds Lazarus, S.M. (a), Krueger, S.K. (a), Jenkins, M.A. (a), and Pan, H.-L. (b), University of Utah (a), National Centers for Environmental Prediction (b) Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting As part of a collaborative effort with the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the University of Utah is now archiving (daily) column data from the NCEP Medium Range Forecast (MRF) model. Data are collected for 8

  10. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  11. Investigation of peeling-ballooning stability prior to transient outbursts accompanying transitions out of H-mode in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldon, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Groebner, R. J.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Burrell, K. H.; Tynan, G. R.; Boedo, J. A.; Kolemen, E.; Schmitz, L.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-05-15

    The H-mode transport barrier allows confinement of roughly twice as much energy as in an L-mode plasma. Termination of H-mode necessarily requires release of this energy, and the timescale of that release is of critical importance for the lifetimes of plasma facing components in next step tokamaks such as ITER. H-L transition sequences in modern tokamaks often begin with a transient outburst which appears to be superficially similar to and has sometimes been referred to as a type-I edge localized mode (ELM). Type-I ELMs have been shown to be consistent with ideal peeling ballooning instability and are characterized by significant (up to ∼50%) reduction of pedestal height on short (∼1 ms) timescales. Knowing whether or not this type of instability is present during H-L back transitions will be important of planning for plasma ramp-down in ITER. This paper presents tests of pre-transition experimental data against ideal peeling-ballooning stability calculations with the ELITE code and supports those results with secondary experiments that together show that the transient associated with the H-L transition is not triggered by the same physics as are type-I ELMs.

  12. Thermodynamic, spectroscopic, and computational studies of lanthanide complexation with Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acide: temperature effect and coordination modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guoxin Tian; Leigh R. Martin; Zhiyong Zhang; Linfeng Rao

    2011-04-01

    Stability constants of two DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) complexes with lanthanides (ML2- and MHL-, where M stands for Nd and Eu and L stands for diethylenetriaminepentaacetate) at 10, 25, 40, 55, and 70 degrees C were determined by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, and luminescence spectroscopy. The enthalpies of complexation at 25 degrees C were determined by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic data show that the complexation of Nd3þ and Eu3þ with DTPA is weakened at higher temperatures, a 10-fold decrease in the stability constants of ML2- and MHL- as the temperature is increased from 10 to 70 degrees C. The effect of temperature is consistent with the exothermic enthalpy of complexation directly measured by microcalorimetry. Results by luminescence spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that DTPA is octa-dentate in both the EuL2- and EuHL- complexes and, for the first time, the coordination mode in the EuHL- complex was clarified by integration of the experimental data and DFT calculations. In the EuHL- complex, the Eu is coordinated by an octa-dentate H(DTPA) ligand and a water molecule, and the protonation occurs on the oxygen of a carboxylate group.

  13. Test beam studies of silicon timing for use in calorimetry

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Apresyan, A.; Bolla, G.; Bornheim, A.; Kim, H.; Los, S.; Pena, C.; Ramberg, E.; Ronzhin, A.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.

    2016-04-12

    The high luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN is expected to provide instantaneous luminosities of 5 X 1034 cm–2 s–1. The high luminosities expected at the HL-LHC will be accompanied by a factor of 5 to 10 more pileup compared with LHC conditions in 2015, causing general confusion for particle identification and event reconstruction. Precision timing allows to extend calorimetric measurements into such a high density environment by subtracting the energy deposits from pileup interactions. Calorimeters employing silicon as the active component have recently become a popular choice for the HL-LHC and future collider experiments whichmore » face very high radiation environments. In this article, we present studies of basic calorimetric and precision timing measurements using a prototype composed of tungsten absorber and silicon sensor as the active medium. Lastly, we show that for the bulk of electromagnetic showers induced by electrons in the range of 20 GeV to 30 GeV, we can achieve time resolutions better than 25 ps per single pad sensor.« less

  14. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  15. Modest hypoxia significantly reduces triglyceride content and lipid droplet size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Yokokawa, Takumi; Endo, Yuriko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Faculty of Sport Science, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 ; Taguchi, Sadayoshi

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: Long-term hypoxia decreased the size of LDs and lipid storage in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Long-term hypoxia increased basal lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hypoxia decreased lipid-associated proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hypoxia decreased basal glucose uptake and lipogenic proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hypoxia-mediated lipogenesis may be an attractive therapeutic target against obesity. -- Abstract: Background: A previous study has demonstrated that endurance training under hypoxia results in a greater reduction in body fat mass compared to exercise under normoxia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this hypoxia-mediated reduction in fat mass remain uncertain. Here, we examine the effects of modest hypoxia on adipocyte function. Methods: Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated at 5% O{sub 2} for 1 week (long-term hypoxia, HL) or one day (short-term hypoxia, HS) and compared with a normoxia control (NC). Results: HL, but not HS, resulted in a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride content (by 50%) compared to NC (p < 0.01). As estimated by glycerol release, isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly lowered by hypoxia, whereas the release of free fatty acids under the basal condition was prominently enhanced with HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Lipolysis-associated proteins, such as perilipin 1 and hormone-sensitive lipase, were unchanged, whereas adipose triglyceride lipase and its activator protein CGI-58 were decreased with HL in comparison to NC. Interestingly, such lipogenic proteins as fatty acid synthase, lipin-1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma were decreased. Furthermore, the uptake of glucose, the major precursor of 3-glycerol phosphate for triglyceride synthesis, was significantly reduced in HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Conclusion: We conclude that hypoxia has a direct impact on reducing the triglyceride content and lipid droplet size via decreased

  16. Petroleum source rocks and stratigraphy of Bakken formation in North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    The Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) of North Dakota consists of upper and lower, black, organic-rich shales separated by a calcareous siltstone middle member. Organic-carbon measurements revealed the Bakken shales to be very organic-rich (average of 11.33 wt.% of organic carbon), and visual kerogen typing revealed this organic matter to be predominantly an amorphous type that is inferred to be sapropelic. The onset of hydrocarbon generation was determined to occur at an average depth of 9000 ft (2.74 km) by interpreting plots of geochemical parameters with depth (e.g., ratios of hydrocarbon to nonhydrocarbon, saturated hydrocarbon to organic carbon, pyrolytic hydrocarbon to organic carbon, and the pyrolysis production index). Hydrocarbon content and thermal kerogen breakdown increase greatly in the Bakken shales where they are buried at depths greater than 9000 ft (2.74 km). The effective source area of the Bakken, as determined by maps of the above geochemical parameters, lies mostly in McKenzie, Williams, Dunn, and Billings Counties. Oil generation was probably initiated in the Bakken about 75 Ma (Late Cretaceous) at a temperature of about 100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F), with initial expulsion of oil from the Bakken probably occurring 70 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The amount of oil generated by the Bakken in North Dakota, as calculated from pyrolysis data, is 92.3 billion bbl. If only 10% of this oil was actually expelled from the shales, it could easily account for the 3 billion bbl of known type II oil reserves in the Williston basin.

  17. Outplanting Anadromous Salmonids, A Lilterature Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Eugene M.

    1985-10-01

    This paper presents a list of more than 200 references on topics associated with offstation releases of hatchery stocks of anadromous fish used to supplement or reestablish wild rearing. The narrative briefly reviews influences of genetics, rearing density of fish in the natural environment, survival rates observed from outplanted stocks, and estimation procedures for stocking rates and rearing densities. We have attempted to summarize guidelines and recommendations for fishery managers to consider. Based on tagging studies, a typical smolt release from a Willamette River hatchery would return 0.29% of the smolts to the stream of release as adults. Catch to escapement ratios for adult Willamette chinook vary widely between broods, but on average two fish are caught for each fish that escapes. The catch is about evenly divided between offshore and freshwater harvest. British Columbia is the primary location of offshore harvest, and the lower Willamette River is the primary location of freshwater harvest. Review of departmental policy indicates that only Willamette stock spring chinook are currently acceptable for use in a proposed outplant study within the Willamette basin. Further, most Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife district management biologists would prefer not to transfer any stocks of spring chinook between drainage subbasins. State fishery managers identified 16 Willamette basin streams as being suitable for supplementation with spring chinook from hatcheries. We reviewed the potential for rearing salmon in reservoirs throughout the basin. Use of the Carmen-Smith spawning channel, which was constructed on the upper McKenzie River in 1960, has generally declined with the decline in populations of chinook salmon in this river. The Carmen-Smith channel still provides a spawning place for those relatively few adult chinook that still return each year, but more fishery benefits may result from other uses of this facility. 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Maximizing photosynthetic productivity and solar conversion efficiency in microalgae by minimizing the light-harvesting chlorophyll antenna size of the photosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melis, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Benemann, J.R.

    1998-08-01

    The solar conversion efficiency and productivity of photosynthesis in light-acclimated Dunaliella salina (green algae) were analyzed. Cells were grown under continuous low-light (LL; 100 {micro}mol photons/m{sup 2} s) or high-light (HL; 2,000 {micro}mol photons/m{sup 2} s) conditions. HL-grown cells exhibited signs of chronic photoinhibition, i.e., a lower pigment content, a highly truncated chlorophyll (Chl) antenna size for the photosystems, and accumulation of photodamaged photosystem-II (PSII) reaction centers in the chloroplast thylakoids. In spite of these deficiencies, high-light-grown cells showed photosynthetic productivity (300 mmol O{sub 2}/(mol Chl) s) that was {approximately} 3 times greater than that of the normally pigmented LL-grown cells ({approximately} 100 mmol O{sub 2}/(mol Chl) s). Recovery from photoinhibition in the HL-grown cells, induced in the absence of a light-harvesting Chl antenna size enlargement, increased photosynthetic productivity further to {approximately} 650 mmol O{sub 2}/(mol Chl) s. It is shown that, under moderate to high light conditions, D. salina with a highly truncated Chl antenna size will display superior photosynthetic productivity, solar conversion efficiency and H{sub 2} production when compared to the normally pigmented control cells. Estimates of H{sub 2} production in mass culture suggest an average of 200 L H{sub 2}/m{sup 2} d for the cells with the truncated Chl antenna, and less than 50 L H{sub 2}/m{sup 2} d for the normally pigmented cells.

  19. Relapse Analysis of Irradiated Patients Within the HD15 Trial of the German Hodgkin Study Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriz, Jan; Reinartz, Gabriele; Dietlein, Markus; Kobe, Carsten; Kuhnert, Georg; Haverkamp, Heinz; Haverkamp, Uwe; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Herfarth, Klaus; Lukas, Peter; Schmidberger, Heinz; Staar, Susanne; Hegerfeld, Kira; Baues, Christian; Engert, Andreas; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To determine, in the setting of advanced-stage of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), whether relapses occur in the irradiated planning target volume and whether the definition of local radiation therapy (RT) used by the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) is adequate, because there is no harmonization of field and volume definitions among the large cooperative groups in the treatment of advanced-stage HL. Methods and Materials: All patients with residual disease of ≥2.5 cm after multiagent chemotherapy (CTX) were evaluated using additional positron emission tomography (PET), and those with a PET-positive result were irradiated with 30 Gy to the site of residual disease. We re-evaluated all sites of disease before and after CTX, as well as the PET-positive residual tumor that was treated in all relapsed patients. Documentation of radiation therapy (RT), treatment planning procedures, and portal images were carefully analyzed and compared with the centrally recommended RT prescription. The irradiated sites were compared with sites of relapse using follow-up computed tomography scans. Results: A total of 2126 patients were enrolled, and 225 patients (11%) received RT. Radiation therapy documents of 152 irradiated patients (68%) were analyzed, with 28 irradiated patients (11%) relapsing subsequently. Eleven patients (39%) had an in-field relapse, 7 patients (25%) relapsed outside the irradiated volume, and an additional 10 patients (36%) showed mixed in- and out-field relapses. Of 123 patients, 20 (16%) with adequately performed RT relapsed, compared with 7 of 29 patients (24%) with inadequate RT. Conclusions: The frequency and pattern of relapses suggest that local RT to PET-positive residual disease is sufficient for patients in advanced-stage HL. Insufficient safety margins of local RT may contribute to in-field relapses.

  20. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.; Filippi, Andrea R.; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A.; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  1. Impact of Cardiovascular Counseling and Screening in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniëls, Laurien A.; Krol, Stijn D.G.; Graaf, Michiel A. de; Scholte, Arthur J.H.A.; Veer, Mars B. van 't; Putter, Hein; Roos, Albert de; Schalij, Martin J.; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of death in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, especially after mediastinal irradiation. The role of screening for CVD in HL survivors is unclear, but confrontation with risks of CVD may have a negative influence on health-related quality of life (HRQL). As part of a phase 2 screening study using computed tomography angiography (CTA) among HL survivors, an HRQL analysis was done to evaluate the emotional and practical burden and perceived benefits of screening and the effect of CVD-specific counseling on patient satisfaction. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in the screening study also took part in the HRQL study. The impact of undergoing screening was evaluated with a 9-item questionnaire, and impact on HRQL with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Core Questionnaire C30, version 3.0. The effect of counseling of CVD on perceived provision of information was evaluated with EORTC INFO-25. All questionnaires were completed at baseline and after screening. Results: Baseline questionnaires were received from 48 participants, and 43 completed questionnaires after screening. Mean age was 47 years, and mean time since diagnosis was 21 years. Of the total, 93% of subjects were content with participating, and 80% did not find the emphasis placed on late effects burdensome, although screening did have a small impact on social functioning and global quality of life. Perceived information on disease, medical tests, and treatment increased significantly after screening (P<.01). Differences were clinically relevant. There were no differences in perceived information between patients with and without screen-detected CVD. Conclusions: Screening was evaluated favorably, whether CTA showed abnormalities or not. Extensive counseling resulted in substantially increased provision of information and improved information satisfaction. Screening by

  2. Beam losses due to abrupt crab cavity failures in the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, T.; Barranco, J.; Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Wenninger, B.; Yee, B.; Zimmermann, F.

    2011-03-28

    A major concern for the implementation of crab crossing in a future High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is machine protection in an event of a fast crab-cavity failure. Certain types of abrupt crab-cavity amplitude and phase changes are simulated to characterize the effect of failures on the beam and the resulting particle-loss signatures. The time-dependent beam loss distributions around the ring and particle trajectories obtained from the simulations allow for a first assessment of the resulting beam impact on LHC collimators and on sensitive components around the ring. Results for the nominal LHC lattice is presented.

  3. SECTION I: NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    resonance study of 28Si and 24Mg with 240 MeV 6Li scattering ...................................... I-1 X. Chen, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto, and D.H. Youngblood β-delayed p-decay of proton-rich nucleus 31Cl............................................................................. I-9 L. Trache, A. Banu, J. C. Hardy, M. McCleskey, E. Simmons, R. E. Tribble, Y. Zhai A. Saastamoinen, A. Jokinen, T. Davinson, P.J. Woods, L. Achouri, and B. Roeder Determination of the ANC and

  4. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at Intermediate Energies, T

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    6 - March 31, 2007 Inelastic 6 Li Scattering Studies of the ISGMR - Prospects with Radioactive Beams, D.H. Youngblood, Invited Talk, NSCL User Workshop on, East Lansing, Michigan, (May 2006). Systematic of Giant Monopole Resonance and its Isotopic Dependence, Y.-W. Lui, D.H. Youngblood, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto and X. Chen, Invited Talk, Workshop on In Heaven and On Earth 2006 - The Equation of State in Astrophysics, Montreal, Canada, (July 2006). Report to NuPECC (Nuclear Physics European

  5. Role of Salvage Radiation Therapy for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma Who Failed Autologous Stem Cell Transplant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goda, Jayant S.; Massey, Christine; Kuruvilla, John; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Sun, Alexander; Keating, Armand; Crump, Michael; Tsang, Richard W.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze, through chart review, the efficacy of salvage radiation therapy (sRT) for relapsed or progressive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients who failed autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Patients and Methods: Among 347 patients with recurrent/refractory HL who received ASCT from 1986-2006, 163 had post-ASCT progression or relapse. Of these, 56 received sRT and form the basis of this report. Median age at sRT was 30 years (range, 17-59 years). Disease was confined to lymph nodes in 27 patients, whereas 24 had both nodal and extranodal disease. Salvage radiation therapy alone was given in 34 patients (61%), and sRT plus chemotherapy was given in 22 (39%). Median interval from ASCT to sRT was 0.8 years (range, 0.1-5.6 years). The median dose was 35 Gy (range, 8-40.3 Gy). The sRT technique was extended-field in 14 patients (25%) and involved-field in 42 (75%). Results: The median follow-up from sRT was 31.3 months (range, 0.2-205.5 months). Overall response rate was 84% (complete response: 36%; partial response: 48%). The median overall survival was 40.8 months (95% confidence interval, 34.2-56.3 months). The 5-year overall survival was 29% (95% confidence interval, 14%-44%). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 16%; the 2-year local PFS was 65%, whereas the 2-year systemic PFS was 17%. The 1-year PFS was higher in patients in whom all diseased sites were irradiated (49%) compared with those in whom only the symptomatic site was treated (22%, P=.07). Among 20 alive patients, 5 were disease free (at 6.4, 6.8, 7.4, 7.9, and 17.1 years). Conclusion: For patients with HL who fail ASCT, a selective use of RT provides a durable local control rate of 65% at 2 years and should be considered as part of the standard management plan for the palliation of incurable HL. Occasionally irradiation of truly localized disease can lead to long-term survival.

  6. Nonideal fishbone instability excited by trapped energetic electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Tang, C. J.; Wang, Z. T.; Long, Y. X.; Dong, J. Q.

    2013-03-15

    It is shown that trapped energetic electrons can resonate with the collisionless m = 1 nonideal kink mode, therefore exciting the nonideal e-fishbone, which would often lead to a drop in soft x-ray emissivity and frequency chirping. The theory predictions agree well with the experimental observations of e-fishbone on HL-2A. It is also found that the effects of MHD energy of background plasma might be the reason for the observed phenomena: frequency chirping up and down, and V-font-style sweeping.

  7. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    4 - March 31, 2005 Giant Resonance in 112 Sn and 124 Sn: Isotopic Dependence of Monopole Resonance Energies, Y.-W. Lui, D.H. Youngblood, Y. Tokimoto, H.L. Clark, and B. John, Phys. Rev. C 70, 014307 (2004). Refractive Effects in the Scattering of Loosely Bound Nuclei, F. Carstoiu, L. Trache, R.E. Tribble, and C.A. Gagliardi, Phys. Rev. C 70, 054610 (2004). The 17 F(p,γ) 18 Ne Direct Capture Cross Section, J.C. Blackmon, D.W. Bardayan, C.R. Brune, F. Carstoiu, A.E. Champagne, R. Crespo, T.

  8. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    8 - March 31, 2009 Giant resonances in 116 Sn from 240 MeV 6 Li scattering, X. Chen, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto, and D.H. Youngblood, Phys. Rev. C 79, 024320 (2009). Astrophysical S factor for the radiative capture 12 N(p,γ) 13 O determined from the 14 N( 12 N, 13 O) 13 C proton transfer reaction, A. Banu, T. Al-Abdullah, C. Fu, C.A. Gagliardi, R.E. Tribble, Y. Zhai, F. Carstoiu, V. Burjan, and V. Kroha, Phys Rev C 79, 025805 (2009). A new astrophysical S factor for the 15 N(p,γ) 16 O

  9. Supercritical water oxidation technology for DWPF. [Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.T.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1992-02-07

    At the request of Mr. H.L. Brandt and others in the Savannah River Field Office High Level Waste Division office, DWPF, and SRL personnel have reviewed two potential applications for supercritical water oxidation technology in DWPF. The first application would replace the current hydrolysis process by destroying the organic fractions of the precipitated cesium / potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. The second application pertains to liquid benzene destruction. After a thorough evaluation the first application is not recommended. The second is ready to be tested if needed.

  10. Supercritical water oxidation technology for DWPF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.T.; Gentilucci, J.A.

    1992-02-07

    At the request of Mr. H.L. Brandt and others in the Savannah River Field Office High Level Waste Division office, DWPF, and SRL personnel have reviewed two potential applications for supercritical water oxidation technology in DWPF. The first application would replace the current hydrolysis process by destroying the organic fractions of the precipitated cesium / potassium tetraphenylborate slurry. The second application pertains to liquid benzene destruction. After a thorough evaluation the first application is not recommended. The second is ready to be tested if needed.

  11. Syntheses, crystal structures, and properties of four complexes based on polycarboxylate and imidazole ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiao, Rui; Chen, Shui-Sheng; Sheng, Liang-Quan; Yang, Song; Li, Wei-Dong

    2015-08-15

    Four metal–organic coordination polymers [Zn(HL)(H{sub 2}O)]·4H{sub 2}O (1), [Zn(HL)(L{sub 1})]·4H{sub 2}O (2), [Cu(HL)(H{sub 2}O)]·3H{sub 2}O (3) and [Cu(HL)(L{sub 1})]·5H{sub 2}O (4) were synthesized by reactions of the corresponding metal(II) salts with semirigid polycarboxylate ligand (5-((4-carboxypiperidin-1-yl)methyl)isophthalic acid hydrochloride, H{sub 3}L·HCl) or auxiliary ligand (1,4-di(1H-imidazol-4-yl)benzene, L{sub 1}). The structures of the compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The use of auxiliary ligand L{sub 1} has great influence on the structures of two pairs of complexes 1, 2 and 3, 4. Complex 1 is a uninodal 3-connected rare 2-fold interpenetrating ZnSc net with a Point (Schlafli) symbol of (10{sup 3}) while 2 is a one-dimensional (1D) ladder structure. Compound 3 features a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb network with typical 6{sup 3}-hcb topology, while 4 is 2D network with (4, 4) sql topology based on binuclear Cu{sup II} subunits. The non-covalent bonding interactions such as hydrogen bonds, π···π stacking and C–H···π exist in complexes 1–4, which contributes to stabilize crystal structure and extend the low-dimensional entities into high-dimensional frameworks. And the photoluminescent property of 1 and 2 and gas sorption property of 4 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Four new coordination polymers have been obtained and their photoluminescent and gas sorption properties have also been investigated. - Highlights: • Two pairs of Zn{sup II}/ Cu{sup II} compounds have been synthesized. • Auxiliary ligand-controlled assembly of the complexes is reported. • The luminescent properties of complexes 1–2 were investigated. • The gas sorption property of 4 has been investigated.

  12. COMPILATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ORP GLASS FORMULATION DATABASE, VSL-12R2470-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pasieka, Holly K.; Muller, Isabelle; Gilbo, Konstantin; Perez-Cardenas, Fernando; Joseph, Innocent; Pegg, Ian L.; Kot, Wing K.

    2012-12-13

    The present report describes the first steps in the development of a glass property-composition database for WTP LAW and HL W glasses that includes all of the data that were used in the development of the WTP baseline models and all of the data collected subsequently as part of WTP enhancement studies perfonned for ORP. The data were reviewed to identifY some of the more significant gaps in the composition space that will need to be filled to support waste processing at Hanford. The WTP baseline models have been evaluated against the new data in terms of range of validity and prediction perfonnance.

  13. V-1 PAPERS PUBLISHED

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - March 31, 2014 Unexpected characteristics of the isoscalar monopole resonance in the A≈90 region: Implications for nuclear incompressibility, D.H. Youngblood, Y.-W. Lui, Krishichayan, J. Button, M.R. Anders, M. L. Gorelik, M.H. Urin, and S. Shlomo, Phys. Rev. C 88, 021301(R) (2013). Astrophysical reaction rate for 17 F(p,γ) 18 Ne from the transfer reaction 13 C( 17 O, 18 O) 12 C, T. Al- Abdullah, F. Carstoiu, X. Chen, H.L. Clark, C.A. Gagliardi, Y.-W. Lui, A. Mukhamedzhanov, G. Tabacaru,

  14. Memorandum of AHPBC DOE Meeting_8_19_2013_FINAL_SIGNED.pdf.pdf

    Energy Savers

    ~ e ~ u t ~ ~ l o ~ f @ i j Washington, DC 20585 hlEMORANDUM TO DEPARTMENTAL ELEh@NT& FROM: SUBJECT: DANIEL B. P O N W Improving the Headquarters' Hiring Processes Secretary Chu has set forth an athbitious agenda for the D of Energy i f l - a f d a to build a clean, secure, and prosperous energy future for our Nation. Fulfilling that agenda requires that we act with urgency and purpose. Success will depend largely on ow ability to recruit and retain a dedicated, high-performing workforce. To

  15. Synthesis, crystal structures, and luminescent properties of Cd(II) coordination polymers assembled from semi-rigid multi-dentate N-containing ligand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Gang; Shao, Kui-Zhan; Chen, Lei; Liu, Xin-Xin; Su, Zhong-Min; Ma, Jian-Fang

    2012-12-15

    Three new polymers, [Cd(L){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (1), [Cd{sub 3}(L){sub 2}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}({mu}{sub 2}-Cl){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (2), {l_brace}[Cd{sub 2}(L){sub 2}(nic){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O{r_brace}{sub n} (3) (HL=5-(4-((1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)methyl)phenyl)-1H-tetrazole, Hnic=nicotinic acid) have been prepared and structurally characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 display 2D monomolecular layers built by the inter-linking single helical chains and L{sup -} ligands connecting chain-like [Cd({mu}{sub 3}-OH)({mu}{sub 2}-Cl)]{sub n} secondary building units, respectively. Compound 3 is constructed from the mixed ligands and possesses a (3,4)-connected framework with (4{center_dot}8{sup 2})(4{center_dot}8{sup 2}{center_dot}10{sup 3}) topology. Moreover, the fluorescent properties of HL ligand and compounds 1-3 are also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new coordination polymers based on the semi-rigid multidentate N-donor ligand have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal reaction. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit the 2D layers formed by inter-linking single helices and L{sup -} anions bridging 1D chain-like SBUs, respectively. Complex 3 is buit by L{sup -} and assistant nic{sup -} ligands connecting metal centers and possesses a (3,4)-connected framework with (4 Multiplication-Sign 8{sup 2})(4 Multiplication-Sign 8{sup 2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}) topology. Moreover, these complexes display fluorescent properties indicating that they may have potential applications as optical materials. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three Cd-compounds were prepared from semi-rigid HL ligand with different N-containing groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They exhibit diverse structures from 2D monomolecular layer to 3D covalent framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The HL ligands displayed various coordination modes under different reaction conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds exhibit

  16. A series of novel metal–organic coordination polymers constructed from the new 5-(4-imidazol-1-yl-phenyl)-2H-tetrazole spacer and aromatic carboxylates: Synthesis, crystal structures, and luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jiayin; Zhang, Daojun; Wang, Li; Zhang, Renchun; Wang, Junjie; Zeng, Ying; Zhan, Jinling; Xu, Jianing; Fan, Yong

    2013-10-15

    Using bifunctional organic ligand 5-(4-imidazol-1-yl-phenyl)-2H-tetrazole (HL) and different aromatic carboxylates as secondary ligands, four novel metal-organic coordination polymers, [Zn(L)(1,4-bdc){sub 0.5}] (1), [Zn{sub 1.5}(L)(2,5-pydc)] (2), [Zn(HL)(1,2,4,5-btec){sub 0.5}] (3), and [Cd(HL)(1,2,4,5-btec){sub 0.5}] (4) (1,4-bdc, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate; 2,5-pydc, 2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate; 1,2,4,5-btec, 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylate) have been successfully synthesized and analyzed. Compound 1 features the 2D [Zn(L)]{sub n} layers built by μ{sub 3}-L bridging ligands and Zn(II) ions, which are further linked by pillared 1,4-bdc{sup 2−} ligands to form a 2-fold interpenetrating dmc framework. The 3D network of compound 2 can be simplified as a rare 2-nodal (3,6)-connected rtl (rutile) topology. Compound 3 possesses a 2D layer structure which is accomplished by connecting ladder-chains to L ligands. Compound 4 exhibits 2D [Cd(1,2,4,5-btec)] layers with infinite Cd–O–Cd rods and the adjacent 2D networks are further pillared by L with terminal bidentate coordination mode to generate the final 3D structure. The solid-state luminescent studies show that compounds 1–4 display intense fluorescent emissions. - Graphical abstract: Using bifunctional organic ligand 5-(4-imidazol-1-yl-phenyl)-2H-tetrazole (HL) and different aromatic carboxylates as secondary ligands, four novel metal-organic coordination polymers have been obtained. All compounds show good luminescence properties at room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Four Zn(II)/Cd(II)-MOCPs have been successfully prepared with the rigid bifunctional ligand 5-(4-imidazol -1-yl-phenyl) -2H-tetrazole and different aromatic carboxylates mixed ligands. • Compound 2 is a 2-nodal rtl (rutile) net and compound 4 is a binodal (5, 6)-connected net with yav topology. • Compounds 1-4 display intense fluorescent emissions at room temperature.

  17. Section V

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    P. May, G.J. Kim and F.P. Abegglen Radiation Effects Facility H.L. Clark, V. Horvat, B. Hyman and D. Utley Control System Upgrade F.P. Abegglen, R.H. Bruch and T. Cowden ECR2 Ion Source Upgrade D.P. May, G.J. Derring and F.P. Abegglen Cyclotron Computing K. Hagel, R. Burch, K. Wada, K. Ko, D. Rosenfeld NIMROD T. Keutgen, R. Wada, M. Murray, K. Hagel, E. Martin, M. Veselsky, G. Souliotis, E. Winchester, A. Ruangma, J. Natowitz, S. Yennello, J. Shumbera, H. Peeler, B. Olsen, M. Potter, F.

  18. PAPERS PUBLISHED / 2005-2006 Progress in Research / Cyclotron Institute /

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University (links to abstracts/articles provided if available) April 1, 2005 - March 31, 2006 Isoscalar Giant Resonance for Nuclei with Mass between 56 and 60, Y.-W. Lui, D.H. Youngblood, H.L. Clark, Y. Tokimoto, and B. John, Phys. Rev. C 73, 014314 (2006). Indirect Techniques in Nuclear Astrophysics: the ANC Method, R.E. Tribble, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B241, 204 (2005). Indirect Techniques in Nuclear Astrophysics: Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient and Trojan

  19. PAPERS PUBLISHED / 2006-2007 Progress in Research / Cyclotron Institute /

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University PAPERS PUBLISHED April 1, 2006 - March 31, 2007 (links to abstracts and/or full text provided where possible) Giant resonances in 46,48Ti Y. Tokimoto, Y.-W. Lui, H.L. Clark, B. John, X. Chen, and D.H. Youngblood Phys. Rev. C 74, 044308 (2007) Precise half-life measurements for the superallowed β+ emitters 34Ar and 34Cl V.E. Iacob, J.C. Hardy, J.F. Brinkley, C.A. Gagliardi, V.E. Mayes, N. Nica, M. Sanchez-Vega, G. Tabacaru, L. Trache, and R.E. Tribble Phys. Rev. C

  20. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jean-Luc Vay With inputs from J. Amundson, J. Cary, W. Mori, C.-K. Ng, R. Ryne, J. Qiang Exascale Requirements Reviews: High Energy Physics June 10-12, 2015 Traditional HPC needs: particle accelerators 2 2 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Office of Science Advanced s imula.ons p lay a n i ncreasingly i mportant r ole in the design, o pera.on and t uning o f a ccelerators. CERN ( HL---)LHC FNAL P IP(---II/III) "Conven.onal a ccelerators" accelerate b eams i n R F c avi.es "Advanced c

  1. Locoregional Treatment for Breast Carcinoma After Hodgkin's Lymphoma: The Breast Conservation Option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberer, Sophie; Belin, Lisa; Le Scodan, Romuald; Kirova, Youlia M.; Savignoni, Alexia; Stevens, Denise; Moisson, Patricia; Decaudin, Didier; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of breast cancer (BC) after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in women treated at the Institut Curie, with a special focus on the breast-conserving option. Methods and Materials: Medical records of 72 women who developed either ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma of the breast after HL between 1978 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age at HL diagnosis was 23 years (range, 14-53 years). Median total dose received by the mediastinum was 40 Gy, mostly by a mantle-field technique. Breast cancers occurred after a median interval of 21 years (range, 5-40 years). Ductal invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ represented, respectively, 51 cases (71%) and 14 cases (19%). Invasive BCs consisted of 47 cT0-2 tumors (82%), 5 cN1-3 tumors (9%), and 20 Grade 3 tumors (35%). Locoregional treatment for BCs consisted of mastectomy with (3) or without (36) radiotherapy in 39 patients and lumpectomy with (30) or without (2) adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients. The isocentric lateral decubitus radiation technique was used in 17 patients after breast-conserving surgery (57%). With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival rate and locoregional control rate were, respectively, 74.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64-88%) and 82% (95% CI, 72-93%) for invasive carcinoma and 100% (95% CI, 100 -100%) and 92% (95% CI, 79-100%) for in situ carcinoma. In patients with invasive tumors, the 5-year distant disease-free survival rate was 79% (95% CI, 69-91%), and 13 patients died of progressive BC. Contralateral BC was diagnosed in 10 patients (14%). Conclusions: Breast-conserving treatment can be an option for BCs that occur after HL, despite prior thoracic irradiation. It should consist of lumpectomy and adjuvant breast radiotherapy with use of adequate techniques, such as the lateral decubitus isocentric position, to protect the underlying heart and

  2. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SPECTROSCOPICALLY CONFIRMED GALAXIES AT z {>=} 6. II. MORPHOLOGY OF THE REST-FRAME UV CONTINUUM AND Ly{alpha} EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Linhua; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Cohen, Seth H.; Mechtley, Matthew; Egami, Eiichi; Fan Xiaohui; Dave, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Ouchi, Masami; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2013-08-20

    We present a detailed structural and morphological study of a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies at z {>=} 6 using deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) near-IR broad-band images and Subaru Telescope optical narrow-band images. The galaxy sample consists of 51 Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z {approx_equal} 5.7, 6.5, and 7.0, and 16 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 5.9 {<=} z {<=} 6.5. These galaxies exhibit a wide range of rest-frame UV continuum morphology in the HST images, from compact features to multiple component systems. The fraction of merging/interacting galaxies reaches 40%-50% at the brightest end of M{sub 1500} {<=} -20.5 mag. The intrinsic half-light radii r{sub hl,in}, after correcting for point-spread function (PSF) broadening, are roughly between r{sub hl,in} {approx_equal} 0.''05 (0.3 kpc) and 0.''3 (1.7 kpc) at M{sub 1500} {<=} -19.5 mag. The median r{sub hl,in} value is 0.''16 ({approx}0.9 kpc). This is consistent with the sizes of bright LAEs and LBGs at z {>=} 6 found in previous studies. In addition, more luminous galaxies tend to be larger and exhibit a weak size-luminosity relation, r{sub hl,in}{proportional_to}L {sup 0.14} at M{sub 1500} {<=} -19.5 mag. The slope of 0.14 is significantly flatter than those in fainter LBG samples. We discuss the morphology of z {>=} 6 galaxies with nonparametric methods, including the concentration, asymmetry, and smoothness system and the Gini and M{sub 20} parameters, and demonstrate their validity through simulations. We search for extended Ly{alpha} emission halos around LAEs at z {approx_equal} 5.7 and 6.5 by stacking a number of narrow-band images. We do not find evidence of extended Ly{alpha} halos predicted by cosmological simulations. Such halos, if they exist, could be weaker than predicted. Finally, we investigate positional misalignment between the UV continuum and Ly{alpha} emissions in LAEs. While the two positions are generally consistent, several merging galaxies show significant

  3. Table B1. Pipe Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    B1. Pipe Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends Manufacturer Product Model Ethanol Compatibility Piping-All Companies have UL 971 listing for E100 Advantage Earth Products Piping 1.5", 2", 3", 4" E0-E100 Brugg Piping FLEXWELL-HL, SECON-X, NITROFLEX, LPG E0-E100 Franklin Fueling Piping Franklin has third-party certified piping compatible with up to E85. Contact manufacturer for specific part numbers. E0-E85 OPW Piping FlexWorks, KPS, Pisces (discontinued) E0-E100 NOV

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    FFIEIAL ~SE 9NLV U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections INSPECTION REPORT Alleged Fraud, Waste, Abuse and (b)(6),(b)(7)(C) Mismanagement at the Site Office -*. . _, .. . - ' - - - - - ,_ . - *- - - .. _ * 4 ~r....-* -r-* ,_,._ ... - *~ -- - ---* ..... r - * *- - µ1 t ti ti 11! I ± Id h ! l't ** Jt1i1µ1 l ! t tFEt t g; gff th I I . ~ ' - . I ~111 I Ii 11 ti B~, iilii~hl Ii; 1 liiitil !i iiiii! I I II I lil. 111 111, i'll i111 i i § !li!i~IU

  5. Speakers: Adam Sieminski, Deutsche Bank Stephen P. A. Brown, Resources for the Future

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    5: "Energy and the Economy" Speakers: Adam Sieminski, Deutsche Bank Stephen P. A. Brown, Resources for the Future Donald L. Paul, University of Southern California Energy Institute David Sandalow, DOE Christof Rühl, Group Chief Economist, BP [Note: Recorders did not pick up introduction of panel (see biographies for details on the panelists) or introduction of session.] Adam: Microphone. So, we've lost a little bit of time because of all of the sessions running a bit over, but here is

  6. CURTKOEGEN Business Manager

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Union of Operating Engineers/Local 370 Affiliated with P.O. Box 3386 510 SOUTH ELM SPOKANE, WA 99220 (509) 624-~670 FAX (509) 624-5554 AFL-CIO ;risdiction *pstern Woshmgton ;rid CURTKOEGEN Business Manager tate ofldoho <~ .. ,*. ': . 64 ~AVl:JIMIU. P!i1t'Hl'iN December l l ~ 2015 Joyce N. Gilbert U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550 MSlN A7-27 Richland, WA99352 Freedom of Information Act Request RE: United Rentals at Hanford This is a formal letter of request for

  7. Morphology and sexual dimorphism of the many-lined skink in north central New Mexico

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hathcock, Charles D.; Wright, Marjorie Alys; Gonzales, Gilbert J.; Sias, Donald S.

    2015-08-01

    In 2001 and 2002, a study of many-lined skinks (Plestiodon multivirgatus) was conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory biologists in north-central New Mexico to determine means and ranges for several morphological characters and to test for sexual dimorphism. Over both years, there were 539 new captures of many-lined skinks, which included 131 hatchlings. The earliest hatchling capture was on 19 June and the latest capture was on 31 August. Hatchling captures peaked on 1 August in 2001 and 6 August in 2002. The age class, sex, snout–vent length (SVL), tail length (TL), mass, head length (HL), and head width (HW)more » were recorded and individuals were released at the point of capture. Our results indicate that the SVL, mass, HL, and HW did not exhibit sexual dimorphism. The sex ratio was skewed toward females in this study. It is not known whether the many-lined skink has sexual determination based on environmental factors, but the data here suggest that more research is needed. From these observations, we supplement the limited existing knowledge on the morphology of this species.« less

  8. Morphology and sexual dimorphism of the many-lined skink in north central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathcock, Charles D.; Wright, Marjorie Alys; Gonzales, Gilbert J.; Sias, Donald S.

    2015-08-01

    In 2001 and 2002, a study of many-lined skinks (Plestiodon multivirgatus) was conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory biologists in north-central New Mexico to determine means and ranges for several morphological characters and to test for sexual dimorphism. Over both years, there were 539 new captures of many-lined skinks, which included 131 hatchlings. The earliest hatchling capture was on 19 June and the latest capture was on 31 August. Hatchling captures peaked on 1 August in 2001 and 6 August in 2002. The age class, sex, snout–vent length (SVL), tail length (TL), mass, head length (HL), and head width (HW) were recorded and individuals were released at the point of capture. Our results indicate that the SVL, mass, HL, and HW did not exhibit sexual dimorphism. The sex ratio was skewed toward females in this study. It is not known whether the many-lined skink has sexual determination based on environmental factors, but the data here suggest that more research is needed. From these observations, we supplement the limited existing knowledge on the morphology of this species.

  9. HLW Melter Control Strategy Without Visual Feedback VSL-12R2500-1 Rev 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, A A.; Joseph, Innocent; Matlack, Keith S.; Callow, Richard A.; Abramowitz, Howard; Pegg, Ian L.; Brandys, Marek; Kot, Wing K.

    2012-11-13

    Plans for the treatment of high level waste (HL W) at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the pretreatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form [I]. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat and mass transfer and increase glass melting rates. The WTP HLW melter has a glass surface area of 3.75 m{sup 2} and depth of ~ 1.1 m. The two melters in the HLW facility together are designed to produce up to 7.5 MT of glass per day at 100% availability. Further increases in HL W waste processing rates can potentially be achieved by increasing the melter operating temperature above 1150°C and by increasing the waste loading in the glass product. Increasing the waste loading also has the added benefit of decreasing the number of canisters for storage.

  10. Field Tolerances for the Triplet Quadrupoles of the LHC High Luminosity Lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Cai, Y.; Jiao, Y.; Wang, M-H.; /SLAC; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Maria, R.de; McIntosh, E.; ,

    2012-06-25

    It has been proposed to implement the so-called Achromatic Telescopic Squeezing (ATS) scheme in the LHC high luminosity (HL) lattice to reduce beta functions at the Interaction Points (IP) up to a factor of 8. As a result, the nominal 4.5 km peak beta functions reached in the Inner Triplets (IT) at collision will be increased by the same factor. This, therefore, justifies the installation of new, larger aperture, superconducting IT quadrupoles. The higher beta functions will enhance the effects of the triplet quadrupole field errors leading to smaller beam dynamic aperture (DA). To maintain the acceptable DA, the effects of the triplet field errors must be re-evaluated, thus specifying new tolerances. Such a study has been performed for the so-called '4444' collision option of the HL-LHC layout version SLHCV3.01, where the IP beta functions are reduced by a factor of 4 in both planes with respect to a pre-squeezed value of 60 cm at two collision points. The dynamic aperture calculations were performed using SixTrack. The impact on the triplet field quality is presented.

  11. Emission factors for leaks in refinery components in heavy liquid service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taback, H.; Godec, M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this program was to provide sufficient screening data so that EPA can develop an official set of emission factors (expressed in lb/hr/component) for refinery components (valves, flanged connectors, non-flanged connectors, pumps, open-ended lines, and other) in heavy liquid (BL) service. To accomplish this, 211,000 existing HL screening values from Southern California refineries were compiled and compared with 2,500 new HL screening measurements taken at two refineries in the state of Washington. Since Southern California is an area in extreme non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore has tight emission control regulations, it was felt that its screening data may not be representative of refineries without tight emission controls. Thus, the Southern California screening data were compared to screening measurements at refineries in an area that is in attainment of the NAAQS and without emissions control, which is the case for those refineries in Washington. It was found that statistically there was no significant difference in emission factors between the two areas and, therefore, there appears to be no difference in emissions from heavy liquid components in areas with and without leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs. The new emission factors range from 1/7 to 1/3 times the current EPA emission factors. This program was sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute (API) and an API report will soon be released providing complete details.

  12. Metal-organic coordination architectures of azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Bowen; Zhao Jiongpeng; Yang Qian; Hu Tongliang; Du Wenping; Bu Xianhe

    2009-10-15

    Four new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups, [Co(L{sup 1}){sub 2}]{sub n} (1), [CuL{sup 1}N{sub 3}]{sub n} (2), [Cu(L{sup 2}){sub 2}.0.5C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH.H{sub 2}O]{sub n} (3) and [Co(L{sup 2}){sub 2}]{sub n} (4) (here, HL{sup 1}=1H-imidazole-1-yl-acetic acid, HL{sup 2}=1H-benzimidazole-1-yl-acetic acid) have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal structure analysis shows that 3 and 4 are 2D complexes with 4{sup 4}-sql topologies, while another 2D complex 1 has a (4{sup 3}){sub 2}(4{sup 6})-kgd topology. And 2 is a 3D complex composed dinuclear mu{sub 1,1}-bridging azido Cu{sup II} entities with distorted rutile topology. The magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied. - Graphical Abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the new coordination complexes with azole heterocycle ligands bearing acetic acid groups are reported.

  13. Synthesis, spectra and crystal structure of bis(1,10-phenanthroline)di({mu}-{alpha}-methylacrylato) lanthanide(III) dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Min Lu; Zong-Ping Shao; Jing-Bo Hu

    1996-11-01

    The homodinuclear complexes, [RE/(CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3})COO){sub 3}(phen)]{sub 2} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Y, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR and NMR. The complex [La(CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3})COO){sub 3}(phen)(HL)]{sub 2} (HL)=CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3})COOH crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c with Z = 2. Cell dimensions are a = 9.878(2), b = 11.07(1), c = 26.528(3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 94.02(1){degrees} and the structure was refined to R = 0.036 for 4136 observed reflections. The structure consists of a centrosymmetric dinuclear molecule. Lanthanum(III) atoms are bridged by two bidentate and two terdentate carboxylato groups with an La...La separation of 4.0456(4) {angstrom}. Each lanthanum(III) atom is nine-coordinated and exhibits a slightly distorted, tricapped, trigonal prism. The La-O and La-N bond distances are in the range 2.473-2.738 and 2.696-2.722 {angstrom}, respectively. 12 refs.

  14. Three-dimensional texture analysis of contrast enhanced CT images for treatment response assessment in Hodgkin lymphoma: Comparison with F-18-FDG PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knogler, Thomas; El-Rabadi, Karem; Weber, Michael; Karanikas, Georgios; Mayerhoefer, Marius E.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) texture analysis (TA) of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) images for treatment response assessment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), compared with F-18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT. Methods: 3D TA of 48 lymph nodes in 29 patients was performed on venous-phase CE-CT images before and after chemotherapy. All lymph nodes showed pathologically elevated FDG uptake at baseline. A stepwise logistic regression with forward selection was performed to identify classic CT parameters and texture features (TF) that enable the separation of complete response (CR) and persistent disease. Results: The TF fraction of image in runs, calculated for the 45° direction, was able to correctly identify CR with an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 79.3%, and a specificity of 68.4%. Classical CT features achieved an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 57.9%, whereas the combination of TF and CT imaging achieved an accuracy of 83.3%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 78.9%. Conclusions: 3D TA of CE-CT images is potentially useful to identify nodal residual disease in HL, with a performance comparable to that of classical CT parameters. Best results are achieved when TA and classical CT features are combined.

  15. Involved-Node Proton Therapy in Combined Modality Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Results of a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Flampouri, Stella; Zaiden, Robert; Slayton, William; Sandler, Eric; Dang, Nam H.; Lynch, James W.; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study describes the early clinical outcomes of a prospective phase 2 study of consolidative involved-node proton therapy (INPT) as a component of combined-mode therapy in patients with stages I to III Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) with mediastinal involvement. Methods and Materials: Between September 2009 and June 2013, 15 patients with newly diagnosed HL received INPT after completing chemotherapy in an institutional review board-approved protocol comparing the dosimetric impact of PT with those of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated RT. Based on {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) response, 5 children received 15 to 25.5 cobalt Gy equivalent (CGE) of INPT after receiving 4 cycles of Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vincristine, Etoposide, Prednisone, Cyclophosphamide or Vincristine, adriamycin, methotrexate, Prednisone chemotherapy, and 10 adults received 30.6 to 39.6 CGE of INPT after 3 to 6 cycles of Adriamycin, Bleomycine, Vinblastine, Dacarbazine. Patients were routinely evaluated for toxicity during and after treatment, using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and for relapse by physical examination and routine imaging. Relapse-free survival (RFS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method from the time of diagnosis. Results: The median follow-up was 37 months (range, 26-55). Two events occurred during follow-up: 1 relapse (inside and outside the targeted field) and 1 transformation into a primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma. The 3-year RFS rate was 93%, and the 3-year EFS rate was 87%. No acute or late grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Although decades of follow-up will be needed to realize the likely benefit of PT in reducing the risk of radiation-induced late effects, PT following chemotherapy in patients with HL is well-tolerated, and disease outcomes

  16. Interim PET After Two ABVD Cycles in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Outcomes Following the Continuation of Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simontacchi, Gabriele; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Buglione, Michela; Saieva, Calogero; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Livi, Lorenzo; Iotti, Cinzia; Botto, Barbara; Vaggelli, Luca; Re, Alessandro; Merli, Francesco; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: This multicenter retrospective study was designed to evaluate the prognostic role of interim fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (i-FDG-PET) in a cohort of patients affected with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated initially with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy, and to assess the role of chemotherapy continuation plus radiation therapy for i-FDG-PET-positive patients. Methods and Materials: Data from 257 patients were retrieved from 4 hematology and radiation oncology departments. Inclusion criteria were stage I to IIAB HL, “intention-to-treat” AVBD plus radiation therapy, and FDG-PET at diagnosis and after the first 2 ABVD cycles. All i-FDG-PET scans underwent blinded local review by using the Deauville 5-point scoring system; patients were stratified as negative or positive using 2 Deauville score cutoff values, ≥3 or ≥4. Results: Median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 9-163 months); 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) for the whole cohort were 97.5% and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 95.6%. After i-FDG-PET revision, 43 of 257 patients (16.7%) had a positive i-FDG-PET (Deauville scores: 3-5). Five-year PFS rates for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients were 98.1% and 83.7%, respectively, if using a Deauville score cutoff of 3, and 97.7% and 78.6%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.0001). Five-year OS for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients was 98.5% and 93.0%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 3, and 98.6% and 89.3%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.029 and P=.002). At univariate regression analysis, i-FDG-PET positivity was associated with worse OS and PFS. At multivariate analysis, performed only for PFS, i-FDG-PET positivity confirmed its negative impact (P=.002). Conclusions: i-FDG-PET is prognostic for PFS and OS in early-stage HL

  17. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Nodular Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma Versus Those With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Population-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, Naamit K.; Atoria, Coral L.; Elkin, Elena B.; Yahalom, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is rare, comprising approximately 5% of all Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cases. Patients with NLPHL tend to have better prognoses than those with classical HL (CHL). Our goal was to assess differences in survival between NLPHL and CHL patients, controlling for differences in patient and disease characteristics. Methods and Materials: Using data from the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry program, we identified patients diagnosed with pathologically confirmed HL between 1988 and 2010. Results: We identified 1,162 patients with NLPHL and 29,083 patients with CHL. With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91% and 83% for NLPHL, respectively, and 81% and 74% for CHL, respectively. After adjusting for all available characteristics, NLPHL (vs CHL) was associated with higher OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62, P<.01) and disease-specific survival (DSS; HR: 0.48, P<.01). The male predominance of NLPHL, compared to CHL, as well as the more favorable prognostic features in NLPHL patients are most pronounced in NLPHL patients <20 years old. Among all NLPHL patients, younger patients were less likely to receive radiation, and radiation use has declined by 40% for all patients from 1988 to 2010. Receipt of radiation was associated with better OS (HR: 0.64, P=.03) and DSS (HR: 0.45, P=.01) in NLPHL patients after controlling for available baseline characteristics. Other factors associated with OS and DSS in NLPHL patients are younger age and early stage. Conclusions: Our results in a large population dataset demonstrated that NLPHL patients have improved prognosis compared to CHL patients, even after accounting for stage and baseline characteristics. Use of radiation is declining among NLPHL patients despite an association in this series between radiation and better DSS and OS. Unique treatment strategies for NLPHL are warranted in both

  18. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo; Botto, Barbara; Gavarotti, Paolo; Merli, Francesco; Vitolo, Umberto; Iotti, Cinzia; Ricardi, Umberto

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  19. Secondary ligand-directed assembly of Co(II) coordination polymers based on a pyridine carboxylate ligand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Ke-Li; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Cai, Yi-Ni; Xu, Xiao-Wei; Feng, Yun-Long

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the influence of hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands on the structures and properties of the resulting frameworks, five new Co(II) compounds have been synthesized by the reactions of Co(II) salts and 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL) with four rationally selected dicarboxylic acid ligands. Without secondary ligand, we got one compound [CoL{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}·2nH{sub 2}O (1), which possesses a 1D chain structure. In the presence of ancillary ligands, namely, 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}adbc), terephthalic acid (H{sub 2}tpa), thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) and 1,4-benzenedithioacetic acid (H{sub 2}bdtc), four 3D structures [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(adbc)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O (2), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(tpa)]{sub n} (3), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(tdc)]{sub n} (4), [Co{sub 2}L{sub 2}(bdtc)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (5) were obtained, respectively. It can be observed from the architectures of 1–5 that hydrogen bonds and secondary ligands both have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. The XRPD, TGA data of title polymers and the magnetic properties for 2 and 5 have also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The structural differences show that the ancillary ligands have great effects on the spatial connective fashions, resulting in the formation of various dimensional compounds. - Highlights: • Five new Co(II) coordination polymers have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions based on 3,5-bis(pyridin-4-ylmethoxy)benzoic acid (HL). • The long-flexible ligand (HL) is a good candidate to produce interpenetrating architectures. • The secondary dicarboxylic acid ligands play important roles in the spatial connective fashions and the formation of various dimensional compounds. • The magnetism studies show that both 2 and 5 exhibit antiferromagnetic interactions.

  20. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F.; Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, M. Alma [Department of Lymphoma and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ{sup 2} test and logistic multivariate regression. Results: Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grades 1-3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation therapy (10%, P=.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose of >13.5 Gy, V{sub 20} of >30%, V{sub 15} of >35%, V{sub 10} of >40%, and V{sub 5} of >55%. The likelihood ratio χ{sup 2} value was highest for V{sub 5} >55% (χ{sup 2} = 19.37). Conclusions: In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed

  1. Patterns and Implications of Gene Gain and Loss in the Evolution of Prochlorococcus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapidus, Alla; Kettler, Gregory C.; Martiny, Adam C.; Huang, Katherine; Zucker, Jeremy; Coleman, Maureen L.; Rodrigue, Sebastien; Chen, Feng; Lapidus, Alla; Ferriera, Steven; Johnson, Justin; Steglich, Claudia; Church, George M.; Richardson, Paul; Chisholm, Sallie W.

    2007-07-30

    Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. Numerous isolatesfrom diverse areas of the world's oceans have been studied and shown to be physiologically and genetically distinct. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL)-adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL)-adapted group. The 16S rRNA sequences of the entire Prochlorococcus group differ by at most 3percent, and the four initially published genomes revealed patterns of genetic differentiation that help explain physiological differences among the isolates. Here we describe the genomes of eight newly sequenced isolates and combine them with the first four genomes for a comprehensive analysis of the core (shared by all isolates) and flexible genes of the Prochlorococcus group, and the patterns of loss and gain of the flexible genes over the course of evolution. There are 1,273 genes that represent the core shared by all 12 genomes. They are apparently sufficient, according to metabolic reconstruction, to encode a functional cell. We describe a phylogeny for all 12 isolates by subjecting their complete proteomes to three different phylogenetic analyses. For each non-core gene, we used a maximum parsimony method to estimate which ancestor likely first acquired or lost each gene. Many of the genetic differences among isolates, especially for genes involved in outer membrane synthesis and nutrient transport, are found within the same clade. Nevertheless, we identified some genes defining HL and LL ecotypes, and clades within these broad ecotypes, helping to demonstrate the basis of HL and LL adaptations in Prochlorococcus. Furthermore, our estimates of gene gain events allow us to identify highly variable genomic islands that are not apparent through simple pairwise comparisons. These results emphasize the functional roles, especially those connected to outer

  2. ,. P~IVERSITI' OF CAUFORXIA, BERKELEY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . P~IVERSITI' OF CAUFORXIA, BERKELEY llou:I:l.EY * DA.\'JS * DWDOE * LOS ANCELES * 1\l\'D\StDE * SA!'\ DU:CO * SAil: Fl\ASOSCO SA!I."TA BAIUIAJ\A * SA!'o"TA a:;:z COLLEGE Of !'."ATt:R.~L RESOli\CES DE.F:\P.ntt.XT Of PLAXT AXD SOIL BIOLOCY Mr. Calvin Jackson, Director Environmental Safety and Program Support Division San Francisco Operations Office Department of Energy 133 Broadway Oakland, CA 94612 Dear Mr. Jackson: lOS HlLGARD HALL Bou.:ELEY. C.,LIFORXIA 9.C7:!0 January 6, 1981

  3. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -,qy4 I _ . I .__. ..-.- -....k ~&cTIAL USE UNL-T 0 L; : A I ,; ,' MN- I?%-(83 aj 0.3 ' f4lttaIIurgicaI lafioratorph k+ A- - p 111~ uu-mnt consists of _____. 5 ___-- .^_. F%es and.--m_m - No...---:- ---.- -.---_ Q- -15 ____ of b ,,;-+~----c------ __-_ figures - --------=-.LupieS, &je3me-&vw-y wu Readers File. - UT, h 5 lDcnLats* P&r W% l290 ma - , (1k.h kas tl61t6d xb&eeTTiul~onf aQ At the pmumat * guwxwlm on Pun* PM thracr htiheu 'ba% &+#8' end one en tiho flnl6hlBaiq 0

  4. Utility-led cogen plant meets tight specs on steam supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckersley, R.

    1995-08-01

    No Purpa machine here, this plant adds low-cost generating capacity while supplying steam with guaranteed reliability to petrochemicals producer. This article examines the design which ensures recovery of export steam load with minimum time and pressure loss. EI DuPont de Nemours and Co needed a new source of reliable, inexpensive steam to replace aging, inefficient boilers at its LaPorte (Tex) plant, where agricultural chemicals and other products are manufactured. At the same time, Houston Lighting and Power Co (HL and P) was exploring new ways to add capacity cost effectively. San Jacinto steam/electric station was the ideal solution that satisfied both needs. Fully operation since last April, the station`s performance has been excellent. Operating with complete reliability, the system has respond smoothly to meet changes in DuPont`s steam demand without upset.

  5. Edge profile measurements using Thomson scattering on the KSTAR tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. H. Ko, W. H.; Oh, S.; Lee, W. R.; Kim, K. P.; Lee, K. D.; Jeon, Y. M.; Yoon, S. W.; Cho, K. W.; Narihara, K.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Hatae, T.; Yatsuka, E.; Ono, T.; Hong, J. H.

    2014-11-15

    In the KSTAR Tokamak, a Tangential Thomson Scattering (TTS) diagnostic system has been designed and installed to measure electron density and temperature profiles. In the edge system, TTS has 12 optical fiber bundles to measure the edge profiles with 1015 mm spatial resolution. These 12 optical fibers and their spatial resolution are not enough to measure the pedestal width with a high accuracy but allow observations of L-H transition or H-L transitions at the edge. For these measurements, the prototype ITER edge Thomson Nd:YAG laser system manufactured by JAEA in Japan is installed. In this paper, the KSTAR TTS system is briefly described and some TTS edge profiles are presented and compared against the KSTAR Charge Exchange Spectroscopy and other diagnostics. The future upgrade plan of the system is also discussed in this paper.

  6. Spectral studies of copper(II) complexes of 6-(3-thienyl) pyridine-2-thiosemicarbazone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahjoub, Omima Abdalla; Farina, Yang

    2014-09-03

    Two novel copper(II) complexes [Cu(HL)Cl]Cl.H{sub 2}O (1) and [Cu(L)NO{sub 3}]Ðœ‡H{sub 2}O (2) of the three NNS donor thiosemicarbazone ligand 6-(3-thienyl) pyridine-2-thiosemicarbazone have been synthesized. The ligand and its copper(II) complexes were characterized by elemental analysis (C, H, N, and S), FT-IR, UV-visible, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductance. The thiosemicarbazone is present either as the thione form in complex 1 or as thiol form in complex 2 and is coordinated to copper(II) atom via the pyridine nitrogen atom, the azomethine nitrogen atom and the sulfur atom. The physicochemical and spectral data suggest square planar geometry for copper(II) atoms.

  7. T D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    D - 4 5 0 0 . UC-35, Nuclear Explosions - Peaceful .Applications UC-48, Biology and Medicine RUL 4 - 8 - 3 L a w m o n o o R a d i a f l o n Laborafory U N l V E R S l T V O F C A L I F O R N I A L I V E R M O R E Bio-hl edicol Division UCRL- 50791 ! ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL BIOLOGICAL HAZARDS FROM PROJECT R ULISON ! W. L. Robison L. R. Anspaugh Preface This analysis of the radiological hazards of Project Rulison was undertaken a t the informal request of members of the Nevada Operations Office

  8. Support Structure Design of the $$\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of themore » detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.« less

  9. Support structure design of the Nb?Sn quadrupole for the high luminosity LHC

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Juchno, M.; Anerella, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-? quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb?Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of themoredetailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.less

  10. Xenon in the protoplanetary disk (PPD-XE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J.

    2015-06-18

    Relationships among solar system Xe components as observed in the solar wind (SW), in planetary atmospheres and in meteorites are investigated using isotopic correlations. The term PPD-Xe is used for components inferred to have been present in the molecular cloud material that formed the protoplanetary disk (PPD). The evidence of the lack of simple relationships between terrestrial atmospheric Xe and solar or meteoritic components is confirmed. Xe isotopic correlations indicate a heterogeneous PPD composition with variable mixing ratios of the nucleosynthetic component Xe-HL. Solar Xe represents a bulk PPD component, and the isotopic abundances did not change from the time of incorporation into the interior of Mars, through times of regolith implantations to the present.

  11. Section I

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    8B Astrophysical Factor A.M. Mukhamedzhanov and R.E. Tribble Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient and the S17(0) A. Azhari, V. Burjan, F.Carstoiu. C.A. Gagliardi, V. Kroha, A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, X. Tang, L. Trache, R.E. Tribble A 2- Level 8B and the 7Be(p,g)8B S-factor F.C. Barker and A.M. Mukhamedzhanov Study of 8Li and the Astrophysical S17(0) Factor L. Trache, A. Azhari, H.L. Clark, C.A. Gagliardi, Y.-W. Lui, A.M. Mukhamedzhanov, R.E. Tribble and F. Carstoiu Determining the Direct Capture Rate

  12. Support Structure Design of the $\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-β quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb₃Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of the detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.

  13. Xenon in the protoplanetary disk (PPD-XE)

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Marti, K.; Mathew, K. J.

    2015-06-18

    Relationships among solar system Xe components as observed in the solar wind (SW), in planetary atmospheres and in meteorites are investigated using isotopic correlations. The term PPD-Xe is used for components inferred to have been present in the molecular cloud material that formed the protoplanetary disk (PPD). The evidence of the lack of simple relationships between terrestrial atmospheric Xe and solar or meteoritic components is confirmed. Xe isotopic correlations indicate a heterogeneous PPD composition with variable mixing ratios of the nucleosynthetic component Xe-HL. Solar Xe represents a bulk PPD component, and the isotopic abundances did not change from the timemore » of incorporation into the interior of Mars, through times of regolith implantations to the present.« less

  14. Support Structure Design of the $\\hbox{Nb}_{3}\\hbox{Sn}$ Quadrupole for the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juchno, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Cheng, D.; Felice, H.; Ferracin, P.; Perez, J. C.; Prin, H.; Schmalzle, J.

    2014-10-31

    New low-? quadrupole magnets are being developed within the scope of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project in collaboration with the US LARP program. The aim of the HLLHC project is to study and implement machine upgrades necessary for increasing the luminosity of the LHC. The new quadrupoles, which are based on the Nb?Sn superconducting technology, will be installed in the LHC Interaction Regions and will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. In this paper, we describe the design of the short model magnet support structure and discuss results of the detailed 3D numerical analysis performed in preparation for the first short model test.

  15. Thermodynamic Studies to Support Extraction of Uranium from Seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Linfeng

    2015-09-01

    This milestone report summarizes the data obtained in FY15 on the major task of quantifying the binding strength of amidoxime-related ligands. Thermodynamic studies of the interaction between U(VI) and amidoxime ligand HLIII were studied to quantify the binding ability of U(VI) with amidoxime-related ligands and help to select grafting/reaction conditions so that higher yield of preferred amidoxime-related ligands is obtained. Besides the thermodynamic task, structural studies on vanadium complexation with amidoxime ligand were conducted to help understand the extremely strong sorption of vanadium on poly(amidoxime) sorbents. Data processing and summarization of the vanadium system are in progress and will be included in the next milestone report.

  16. Plans for Deployment of Hollow Electron Lenses at the LHC for Enhanced Beam Collimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redaelli, S.; Bertarelli, A.; Bruce, R.; Perini, D.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.

    2015-06-01

    Hollow electron lenses are considered as a possible means to improve the LHC beam collimation system, providing active control of halo diffusion rates and suppressing the population of transverse halos. After a very successful experience at the Tevatron, a conceptual design of a hollow e-lens optimized for the LHC was produced. Recent further studies have led to a mature preliminary technical design. In this paper, possible scenarios for the deployment of this technology at the LHC are elaborated in the context of the scheduled LHC long shutdowns until the full implementation of the HL-LHC upgrade in 2023. Possible setups of electron beam test stands at CERN and synergies with other relevant electron beam programmes are also discussed.

  17. Stochastic sensing through covalent interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayley, Hagan; Shin, Seong-Ho; Luchian, Tudor; Cheley, Stephen

    2013-03-26

    A system and method for stochastic sensing in which the analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element or an adaptor element. If such bonding is irreversible, the bond may be broken by a chemical reagent. The sensor element may be a protein, such as the engineered P.sub.SH type or .alpha.HL protein pore. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current, change in force, and change in fluorescence. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may be detected.

  18. A Contribution to Solve the Problem of the Need for Consolidative Radiotherapy after Intensive Chemotherapy in Advanced Stages of Hodgkin's Lymphoma-Analysis of a Quality Control Program Initiated by the Radiotherapy Reference Center of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eich, Hans Theodor Gossmann, Axel; Engert, Andreas; Kriz, Jan; Bredenfeld, Henning; Hansemann, Katja; Skripnitchenko, Roman; Brillant, Corinne; Pfistner, Beate; Staar, Susanne; Diehl, Volker; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The role of radiotherapy (RT) after intensive chemotherapy in patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is still unclear. The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) randomized HD12 trial was designed to test whether consolidative RT in the region of initial bulky disease and of residual disease is necessary after effective chemotherapy. A quality control program based on a multidisciplinary panel of radiation oncologists, radiologists, and medical oncologists who reviewed all patients' staging and restaging imaging was initiated. Methods and Materials: A total of 1661 patients aged 16 to 65 years with HL in Stage IIB (large mediastinal mass and/or E-lesions) or Stage III to IV were randomized from January 1999 to January 2003 according to a factorial design between: 8 esc.BEACOPP + RT (arm A), 8 esc.BEACOPP non-RT (arm B), 4+4BEACOPP + RT (arm C), 4+4BEACOPP non-RT (arm D). Results: In the fifth interim analysis, 1449 patients were eligible for the arm comparison with regard to RT. After a median observation time of 48 months the FFTF rate was 86% and the OS 92%. The FFTF was 95% in the RT arms A+C and 88% in the non-RT arms B+D: no sequential significant difference. One thousand and eighty four patients were evaluated by the panel. The panel defined initial bulky disease in 800 patients and residual disease in 600 patients. The panel recommended continuation of therapy according to the randomization for 934 of 1084 patients and additive RT independently from the randomization arm for 145 of 1084 patients. Conclusions: The study showed that RT can be reduced substantially after effective chemotherapy. However, because of the irradiation of 10% of patients in the non-RT arms, equivalent effectiveness of a non-RT strategy cannot be proved. A substantial limitation of consolidative RT according to expert panel recommendations appears to be possible without reducing effectiveness.

  19. Luminescent pillared Ln{sup III}–Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination frameworks with two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylate ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Sui-Jun; Jia, Ji-Min; Cui, Yu; Han, Song-De; Chang, Ze

    2014-04-01

    In our efforts toward rational design and systematic synthesis of ‘pillar-layer’ structure coordination frameworks, four new Ln{sup III}–Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination polymers (CPs) based on two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylic ligands with formula ([LnZn(L1){sub 2}(L2)(H{sub 2}O){sub m}]·nH{sub 2}O){sub ∞} (Ln=La (1), Eu (2), Gd (3) and Dy (4), m=3 (for 1) and 2 (for 2–4), n=8 (for 1) and 7 (for 2–4), H{sub 2}L1=pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylate acid, HL2=isonicotinic acid), have been synthesized under hydrothermal reaction of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZnO, H{sub 2}L1 and HL2. CP 1 has a three-dimensional (3D) structure with a (3,6)-connected sit topology network, while CPs 2–4 are isostructural with 3D single-node pcu alpha-Po topology network. Also, luminescent properties of these CPs have also been investigated. The emission of 1 and 3 should be attributed to the coordination-perturbed ligand-centered luminescence and the emission spectra of 2 and 4 show the characteristic bands of the corresponding Ln{sup III} ions. - Graphical abstract: Four new 3D Ln{sup III}–Zn{sup II} coordination frameworks with “pillar-layer” sit or pcu alpha-Po topology have been successfully obtained. Moreover, the photoluminescent properties of compounds 1–4 have also been investigated. - Highlights: • Four new Ln{sup III}–Zn{sup II} heterometallic coordination frameworks with two types of topologies have been synthesized. • Metal oxides and two kinds of N-heterocyclic carboxylate ligands were used for the construction of targeted coordination polymers. • The luminescent properties of the coordination polymers are investigated.

  20. Global Structure of a Three-Way Junction in a Phi29 Packaging RNA Dimer Determined Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sowa, Glenna; Hatmal, Ma'mon M.; Haworth, Ian S.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2012-02-08

    The condensation of bacteriophage phi29 genomic DNA into its preformed procapsid requires the DNA packaging motor, which is the strongest known biological motor. The packaging motor is an intricate ring-shaped protein/RNA complex, and its function requires an RNA component called packaging RNA (pRNA). Current structural information on pRNA is limited, which hinders studies of motor function. Here, we used site-directed spin labeling to map the conformation of a pRNA three-way junction that bridges binding sites for the motor ATPase and the procapsid. The studies were carried out on a pRNA dimer, which is the simplest ring-shaped pRNA complex and serves as a functional intermediate during motor assembly. Using a nucleotide-independent labeling scheme, stable nitroxide radicals were attached to eight specific pRNA sites without perturbing RNA folding and dimer formation, and a total of 17 internitroxide distances spanning the three-way junction were measured using Double Electron-Electron Resonance spectroscopy. The measured distances, together with steric chemical constraints, were used to select 3662 viable three-way junction models from a pool of 65 billion. The results reveal a similar conformation among the viable models, with two of the helices (HT and HL) adopting an acute bend. This is in contrast to a recently reported pRNA tetramer crystal structure, in which HT and HL stack onto each other linearly. The studies establish a new method for mapping global structures of complex RNA molecules, and provide information on pRNA conformation that aids investigations of phi29 packaging motor and developments of pRNA-based nanomedicine and nanomaterial.

  1. Role of FDG-PET in the Implementation of Involved-Node Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girinsky, Théodore; Aupérin, Anne; Ribrag, Vincent; Elleuch, Manel; Fermé, Christophe; Bonniaud, Guillaume; Ruelle, Claude; Alberini, Jean-Louis; Celebic, Aljosa; Edeline, Véronique

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: This study examines the role of {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the implementation of involved-node radiation therapy (INRT) in patients treated for clinical stages (CS) I/II supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Material: Patients with untreated CS I/II HL enrolled in the randomized EORTC/LYSA/FIL Intergroup H10 trial and participating in a real-time prospective quality assurance program were prospectively included in this study. Data were electronically obtained from 18 French cancer centers. All patients underwent APET-computed tomography (PET-CT) and a post-chemotherapy planning CT scanning. The pre-chemotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and the postchemotherapy clinical target volume (CTV) were first delineated on CT only by the radiation oncologist. The planning PET was then co-registered, and the delineated volumes were jointly analyzed by the radiation oncologist and the nuclear medicine physician. Lymph nodes undetected on CT but FDG-avid were recorded, and the previously determined GTV and CTV were modified according to FDG-PET results. Results: From March 2007 to February 2010, 135 patients were included in the study. PET-CT identified at least 1 additional FDG-avid lymph node in 95 of 135 patients (70.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 61.9%-77.9%) and 1 additional lymph node area in 55 of 135 patients (40.7%; 95% CI: 32.4%-49.5%). The mean increases in the GTV and CTV were 8.8% and 7.1%, respectively. The systematic addition of PET to CT led to a CTV increase in 60% of the patients. Conclusions: Pre-chemotherapy FDG-PET leads to significantly better INRT delineation without necessarily increasing radiation volumes.

  2. Anion-controlled assembly of metal 3,5-bis(benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl) benzoate complexes: Synthesis, characterization and property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuai, Hai-Wei; Lv, Gao-Chao; Hou, Chao; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2015-03-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of 3,5-bis(benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzoic acid (HL) with Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) salts provide eight new metal complexes which were characterized by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, IR, elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. Two cadmium frameworks [Cd(L){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O (1) and [Cd(L)Cl] (2) have 3D structures with (4{sup 2}.6{sup 5}.8{sup 3})(4{sup 2}.6) and rtl (4.6{sup 2}){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.6{sup 10}.8{sup 3}) topologies, respectively. Structural diversity of four copper complexes [Cu{sub 3}(L){sub 2}]·NO{sub 3}·0.5H{sub 2}O (3), [Cu{sub 2}(HL){sub 2}(SO{sub 4})]·3.5H{sub 2}O (4), [Cu(L)(bdc){sub 0.5}]·1.5H{sub 2}O (5) and [Cu{sub 2}(L)(HL)(Hbdc)] (6) (H{sub 2}bdc=1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid) is achieved through the alteration of copper salts and addition of auxiliary ligand. As a result, 3 has a 1D ladder structure, 4 is a discrete dinuclear complex, 5 displays a (3,4)-connected 2-nodal 3-fold interpenetrating framework with (4{sup 2}.6.10{sup 2}.12)(4{sup 2}.6) topology, 6 exhibits a 4-connected uninodal 2D sql (4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}) network. Within the zinc series, ZnCl{sub 2} and ZnSO{sub 4} were used for the syntheses of [Zn(L)Cl] (7) and [Zn(L)(SO{sub 4}){sub 0.5}]·2H{sub 2}O (8), respectively. 7 shows a 3-connected uninodal 2D hcb network with (6{sup 3}) topology and 8 is a (3,6)-connected 2-nodal 3D framework with (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 4}.6{sup 2}.8{sup 8}.10) topology. The luminescent properties of the Cd(II) and Zn(II) complexes were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Eight new complexes have been successfully synthesized from the hydrothermal reactions of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) salts with 3,5-bis(benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzoic acid. The complexes exhibited anion-controlled structural diversity. - Highlights: • Metal complexes have diverse structures of 1D chains, 2D networks and 3D frameworks. • Anion-controlled assembly of the complexes is reported. • The luminescent properties of the Cd

  3. The factory and the beehive. II. Activity and rotation in Praesepe and the Hyades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas, S. T.; Ageros, M. A.; Bowsher, E. C.; Lemonias, J. J.; Fierroz, D. F.; Covey, K. R.; Bochanski, J. J.; Cargile, P. A.; Kraus, A.; Law, N. M.; Arce, H. G.; Kundert, A.

    2014-11-10

    Open clusters are collections of stars with a single, well-determined age, and can be used to investigate the connections between angular-momentum evolution and magnetic activity over a star's lifetime. We present the results of a comparative study of the relationship between stellar rotation and activity in two benchmark open clusters: Praesepe and the Hyades. As they have the same age and roughly solar metallicity, these clusters serve as an ideal laboratory for testing the agreement between theoretical and empirical rotation-activity relations at ?600 Myr. We have compiled a sample of 720 spectramore than half of which are new observationsfor 516 high-confidence members of Praesepe; we have also obtained 139 new spectra for 130 high-confidence Hyads. We have also collected rotation periods (P {sub rot}) for 135 Praesepe members and 87 Hyads. To compare H? emission, an indicator of chromospheric activity, as a function of color, mass, and Rossby number R{sub o} , we first calculate an expanded set of ? values, with which we can obtain the H? to bolometric luminosity ratio, L {sub H?}/L {sub bol}, even when spectra are not flux-calibrated and/or stars lack reliable distances. Our ? values cover a broader range of stellar masses and colors (roughly equivalent to spectral types from K0 to M9), and exhibit better agreement between independent calculations, than existing values. Unlike previous authors, we find no difference between the two clusters in their H? equivalent width or L {sub H?}/L {sub bol} distributions, and therefore take the merged H? and P {sub rot} data to be representative of 600 Myr old stars. Our analysis shows that H? activity in these stars is saturated for R{sub o}?0.11{sub ?0.03}{sup +0.02}. Above that value activity declines as a power-law with slope ?=?0.73{sub ?0.12}{sup +0.16}, before dropping off rapidly at R{sub o} ? 0.4. These data provide a useful anchor for calibrating the age-activity-rotation relation beyond 600 Myr.

  4. Individualized 3D Reconstruction of Normal Tissue Dose for Patients With Long-term Follow-up: A Step Toward Understanding Dose Risk for Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Angela; Brock, Kristy K.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Tim; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario ; Hodgson, David C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Understanding the relationship between normal tissue dose and delayed radiation toxicity is an important component of developing more effective radiation therapy. Late outcome data are generally available only for patients who have undergone 2-dimensional (2D) treatment plans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of 3D normal tissue dosimetry derived from reconstructed 2D treatment plans in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods and Materials: Three-dimensional lung, heart, and breast volumes were reconstructed from 2D planning radiographs for HL patients who received mediastinal radiation therapy. For each organ, a reference 3D organ was modified with patient-specific structural information, using deformable image processing software. Radiation therapy plans were reconstructed by applying treatment parameters obtained from patient records to the reconstructed 3D volumes. For each reconstructed organ mean dose (D{sub mean}) and volumes covered by at least 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) and 20Gy (V{sub 20}) were calculated. This process was performed for 15 patients who had both 2D and 3D planning data available to compare the reconstructed normal tissue doses with those derived from the primary CT planning data and also for 10 historically treated patients with only 2D imaging available. Results: For patients with 3D planning data, the normal tissue doses could be reconstructed accurately using 2D planning data. Median differences in D{sub mean} between reconstructed and actual plans were 0.18 Gy (lungs), -0.15 Gy (heart), and 0.30 Gy (breasts). Median difference in V{sub 5} and V{sub 20} were less than 2% for each organ. Reconstructed 3D dosimetry was substantially higher in historical mantle-field treatments than contemporary involved-field mediastinal treatments: average D{sub mean} values were 15.2 Gy vs 10.6 Gy (lungs), 27.0 Gy vs 14.3 Gy (heart), and 8.0 Gy vs 3.2 Gy (breasts). Conclusions: Three-dimensional reconstruction of absorbed dose to

  5. Syntheses and structures of three heterometallic coordination polymers derived from 4-pyridin-3-yl-benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Wei-Hui; Yang, Guo-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Three lanthanide–transition-metal coordination polymers, namely, [Er{sub 2}L{sub 6}(H{sub 2}O)][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 2}] (1), [ErL{sub 3}][CuI] (2), and [Dy{sub 2}L{sub 6}(BPDC){sub 0.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}][Cu{sub 3}I{sub 2}] (3) (HL=4-pyridin-3-yl-benzoic acid, H{sub 2}BPDC=4,4′-biphenyldicarboxylic acid) have been made by reacting Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CuI with HL at different temperatures under hydrothermal conditions. All the complexes are characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, respectively. 1–3 all construct from dimeric (Ln{sub 2}) and (Cu{sub 2}) units and exhibit two types of the structural features: 1 is a two-dimensional layer, 2–3 are three-dimensional frameworks. Interestingly, the in situ formation of the BPDC ligand is found in the structure of 3. The distinct architectures of these complexes indicated that the reaction temperature plays an important role in the formation of higher dimensional coordination polymers. - Graphical abstract: By hydrothermal reaction of lanthanide oxide, copper halide, and 4-pyridin-3-yl-benzoic ligand at different temperatures, a series of 1-D to 3-D 3d–4f coordination polymers, namely [ErL{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][CuI], [Er{sub 2}L{sub 6}(H{sub 2}O)][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 2}], [ErL{sub 3}][CuI], and [Dy{sub 2}L{sub 6}(BPDC){sub 0.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}][Cu{sub 3}I{sub 2}], have been made, respectively. - Highlights: • Three novel heterometallic coordination polymers derived from 4-pyridin-3-yl-benzoic acid have been hydrothermally synthesized. • Mixed dinuclear motifs of (Ln{sub 2}) and (Cu{sub 2}) serve as secondary building units to generate 2-D layer and 3-D frameworks. • It is proved that higher temperature is apt to permit construction of high dimensional architectures.

  6. New divalent manganese complex with pyridine carboxylate N-oxide ligand: Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fuchen; Xue Min; Wang Haichao; Ouyang Jie

    2010-09-15

    Two new manganese complexes, [Mn{sub 3}(L{sup 1}){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub n} (1, HL{sup 1}=nicotinate N-oxide acid) and [MnL{sup 2}Cl]{sub n} (2, HL{sup 2}=isonicotinate N-oxide acid)], have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In 1, the L{sup 1} ligands take two different coordinated modes bridging four and three Mn{sup II} ions. The nitrate anions take chelating coordination modes, leading one type of the Mn{sup II} ions as a 4-connected node. The whole net can be viewed as a 3, 4, 6-connected 4-nodal net with Schlaefli notation {l_brace}4{sup 3{r_brace}}2{l_brace}4{sup 4}; 6{sup 2{r_brace}}4{l_brace}4{sup 6}; 6{sup 6}; 8{sup 3{r_brace}}. Complex 2 has a honeycomb layer mixed bridged by chlorine, N-oxide and carboxylate. The adjacent layers are linked by the phenyl ring of L{sup 2} ligand, giving a 3D framework with a {l_brace}3{sup 4}; 5{sup 4{r_brace}} {l_brace}3{sup 2};4;5{sup 6};6{sup 6{r_brace}} 4, 6-connect net. Magnetic studies indicate that 1 is an antiferromagnet with low-dimensional characteristic, in which a -J{sub 1}J{sub 1}J{sub 2}- coupled alternating chain is predigested. Fitting the data of 1 gives the best parameters J{sub 1}=-2.77, J{sub 2}=-0.67 cm{sup -1}. The magnetic properties of complex 2 represent the character of the 2D honeycomb layer with the J{sub 1}=-2.05 and J{sub 2}=0.55 cm{sup -1}, which results in a whole antiferromagnetic state. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties of two new MnII complexes with pyridyl-carboxylate N-oxide ligands are reported.

  7. A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers: Structure, magnetic properties and effects of 'Non-innocent' reagent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Xue-Miao; Guo, Qian; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen

    2012-12-15

    A novel copper-azido coordination polymer, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (1, HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction with 'Non-innocent' reagent in the aqueous solution. In the reaction system, Cu{sup II} ions are avoided to reduce to Cu{sup I} ions due to the existence of Nd{sup III}. It is found that the complex is a 3D structure based on two double EO azido bridged trimmers and octahedron Cu{sup II} ions, in which the azide ligands take on EO and {mu}{sub 1,1,3} mode to form Cu{sup II}-azido 2D layers, furthermore L ligands pillar 2D layers into an infinite 3D framework with the Schlaefli symbol of {l_brace}4;6{sup 2}{r_brace}4{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 12};8{sup 10};10{sup 4}{r_brace}{l_brace}4{sup 2};6{sup 4}{r_brace}. Magnetic studies revealed that the interactions between the Cu{sup II} ions in the trimmer are ferromagnetic for the Cu-N-Cu angle nearly 98 Degree-Sign , while the interactions between the trimmer and octahedron Cu{sup II} ion are antiferromgantic and result in an antiferromagnetic state. - Graphical abstract: A 3D complex containing novel 2D Cu{sup II}-azido layers, [Cu{sub 2}(N{sub 3}){sub 3}(L)]{sub n} (HL=pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid), was synthesized by hydrothermal reaction and exhibit interesting structure and magnetic properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Non-innocent' reagents plays a key role in the process of formation of this complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D layer is formed only by Cu{sup II} ions and azido ligands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrazine-2-carboxylate ligands reinforce 2D layers and pillar them into an infinite 3D framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic study indicates that alternating FM-AF coupling exists in the complex.

  8. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, Harris; Kass, Richard; Gan, K.K.

    2014-01-23

    With the LHC upgrades in 2013, and further LHC upgrades scheduled in 2018, most LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require more radiation hard technologies than presently available. At present all LHC experiments now have some form of diamond detector. As a result Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of all LHC experiments. Moreover CVD diamond is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the HL-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications. Our accomplishments include: Developed a two U.S.companies to produce electronic grade diamond, Worked with companies and acquired large area diamond pieces, Performed radiation hardness tests using various proton energies: 70 MeV (Cyric, Japan), 800 MeV (Los Alamos), and 24 GeV (CERN).

  9. Simulation of 1% hot leg SBLOCA with TRACE5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Veru, G.

    2012-07-01

    During a Small Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) transient, depressurization can be slow enough to delay the Accumulators (ACC) entry for a long time. Actuation of High Pressure Injection (HPI) system is then necessary in order to maintain the core temperature low enough to avoid core boil off, and consequently avoiding the core level to fall below fuel rods level, thus producing a temperature trip in the fuel cladding. In this frame, the OECD/NEA ROSA Project Test 1.2 (SB-HL-17 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)) has been simulated using the thermal-hydraulic code TRACES. Test 1.2 was performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproducing a 1% hot leg SBLOCA in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). A comparison between experimental and the main simulated variables was performed to study the effect of important parameters (liquid stratification, geometry and size) to model the break. Finally, in an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) failure scenario, loss of coolant is large enough to produce core boil-off and a Peak Cladding Temperature (PCT) excursion. With this purpose a sensitivity analysis varying the HPI mass flow rate has been performed covering the range between HPI actuation and failure. (authors)

  10. Highly c-axis oriented GaN films grown on free-standing diamond substrates for high-power devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, J.M., E-mail: jmbian@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Qin, F.W.; Wang, J.; Pan, L. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, J.M. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Y.; Bai, Y.Z. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China) [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Du, G.T. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} GaN films are deposited on diamond substrates by ECR-PEMOCVD. {yields} Influence of deposition temperature on the properties of samples is investigated. {yields} Properties of GaN films are dependent on the deposition temperature. -- Abstract: GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are deposited on free-standing thick diamond films by low temperature electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced metal organic chemical vapor deposition (ECR-PEMOCVD). The TMGa and N{sub 2} are applied as precursors of Ga and N, respectively. The quality of as-grown GaN films are systematically investigated as a function of deposition temperature by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Hall Effect measurement (HL), room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the dense and uniformed GaN films with highly c-axis preferred orientation are successfully achieved on free-standing diamond substrates under optimized deposition temperature of 400 {sup o}C, and the room temperature PL spectra of the optimized GaN film show a intense ultraviolet near band edge emission and a weak yellow luminescence. The obtained GaN/diamond structure has great potential for the development of high-power semiconductor devices due to its excellent heat dissipation nature.

  11. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin, E-mail: hding@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, No. 3 South Section 3, Circle Road 2, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2014-05-15

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ?20 nm in depth and ?500 ?m or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  12. Cerium Doped LSO/LYSO Crystal Development for future High Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren-Yuan Zhu

    2012-03-25

    Because of their high stopping power and fast and bright scintillation, cerium doped LSO and LYSO crystals have attracted a broad interest in the physics community pursuing precision electromagnetic calorimeter for future high energy physics experiments. Their excellent radiation hardness against gamma-rays, neutrons and charged hadrons also makes them a preferred material for calorimeters to be operated in a severe radiation environment, such as the HL-LHC. An effort was made at SIPAT to grow 25 X{sub 0} (28 cm) long LYSO crystals for high energy physics applications. In this paper, the optical and scintillation properties and its radiation hardness against gamma-ray irradiations up to 1 Mrad are presented for the first 2.5 X 2.5 X 28 cm LYSO sample. An absorption band was found at the seed end of this sample and three other 20 cm long samples, which was traced back to a bad seed crystal used in the corresponding crystal growth process. Significant progresses in optical and scintillation properties were achieved for large size LYSO crystals after eliminating this absorption band.

  13. Future HEP Accelerators: The US Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, Pushpalatha; Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-11-02

    Accelerator technology has advanced tremendously since the introduction of accelerators in the 1930s, and particle accelerators have become indispensable instruments in high energy physics (HEP) research to probe Nature at smaller and smaller distances. At present, accelerator facilities can be classified into Energy Frontier colliders that enable direct discoveries and studies of high mass scale particles and Intensity Frontier accelerators for exploration of extremely rare processes, usually at relatively low energies. The near term strategies of the global energy frontier particle physics community are centered on fully exploiting the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), while the intensity frontier HEP research is focused on studies of neutrinos at the MW-scale beam power accelerator facilities, such as Fermilab Main Injector with the planned PIP-II SRF linac project. A number of next generation accelerator facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and long-term future programs of accelerator-based HEP research. In this paper, we briefly review the post-LHC energy frontier options, both for lepton and hadron colliders in various regions of the world, as well as possible future intensity frontier accelerator facilities.

  14. Feasibility study of noise analysis methods on virtual thermal reactor subcriticality monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, C.; Lee, D.; Lee, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis results of Rossi-alpha, cross-correlation, Feynman-alpha, and Feynman difference methods applied to the subcriticality monitoring of nuclear reactors. A thermal spectrum Godiva model has been designed for the analysis of the four methods. This Godiva geometry consists of a spherical core containing the isotopes of H-l, U-235 and U-238, and the H{sub 2}O reflector outside the core. A Monte Carlo code, McCARD, is used in real time mode to generate virtual detector signals to analyze the feasibility of the four methods. The analysis results indicate that the four methods can be used with high accuracy for the continuous monitoring of subcriticality. In addition to that, in order to analyze the impact of the random noise contamination on the accuracy of the noise analysis, the McCARD-generated signals are contaminated with arbitrary noise. It is noticed that, even when the detector signals are contaminated, the four methods can predict the subcriticality with reasonable accuracy. Nonetheless, in order to reduce the adverse impact of the random noise, eight detector signals, rather than a single signal, are generated from the core, one signal from each equally divided eighth part of the core. The preliminary analysis with multiple virtual detector signals indicates that the approach of using many detectors is promising to improve the accuracy of criticality prediction and further study will be performed in this regard. (authors)

  15. Demonstrating Reliable High Level Waste Slurry Sampling Techniques to Support Hanford Waste Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Steven E.

    2013-11-11

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HL W) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOC must demonstrate the ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP Waste Acceptance Criteria and Data Quality Objectives. The sampling method employed must support both TOC and WTP requirements. To facilitate information transfer between the two facilities the mixing and sampling demonstrations are led by the One System Integrated Project Team. The One System team, Waste Feed Delivery Mixing and Sampling Program, has developed a full scale sampling loop to demonstrate sampler capability. This paper discusses the full scale sampling loops ability to meet precision and accuracy requirements, including lessons learned during testing. Results of the testing showed that the Isolok(R) sampler chosen for implementation provides precise, repeatable results. The Isolok(R) sampler accuracy as tested did not meet test success criteria. Review of test data and the test platform following testing by a sampling expert identified several issues regarding the sampler used to provide reference material used to judge the Isolok's accuracy. Recommendations were made to obtain new data to evaluate the sampler's accuracy utilizing a reference sampler that follows good sampling protocol.

  16. Comparisons between tokamak fueling of gas puffing and supersonic molecular beam injection in 2D simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Y. L.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, H. D.; Feng, H.; Sun, W. G.

    2015-01-15

    Plasma fueling with high efficiency and deep injection is very important to enable fusion power performance requirements. It is a powerful and efficient way to study neutral transport dynamics and find methods of improving the fueling performance by doing large scale simulations. Two basic fueling methods, gas puffing (GP) and supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), are simulated and compared in realistic divertor geometry of the HL-2A tokamak with a newly developed module, named trans-neut, within the framework of BOUT++ boundary plasma turbulence code [Z. H. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 043019 (2014)]. The physical model includes plasma density, heat and momentum transport equations along with neutral density, and momentum transport equations. Transport dynamics and profile evolutions of both plasma and neutrals are simulated and compared between GP and SMBI in both poloidal and radial directions, which are quite different from one and the other. It finds that the neutrals can penetrate about four centimeters inside the last closed (magnetic) flux surface during SMBI, while they are all deposited outside of the LCF during GP. It is the radial convection and larger inflowing flux which lead to the deeper penetration depth of SMBI and higher fueling efficiency compared to GP.

  17. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-09-20

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of accelerator-based particle physics.

  18. High temperature self-lubricating coatings for air lubricated foil bearings for the automotive gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhushan, B.

    1980-04-01

    The objective of this program was to further develop the coating combinations identified in a previous program for compliant surface bearings and journals to be used in an automotive gas turbine engine. The coatings should be able to withstand the sliding start/stops during rotor lifetoff and touchdown and occasional short-time, high speed rubs under representative loading of the engine - 14 kPa and at 35 kPa if possible, and at a maximum temperature of 427 to 650/sup 0/C. Some dozen coating variations of CdO-graphite, Cr/sup 2/O/sub 3/ (by sputtering) and CaF/sub 2/ (plasma sprayed) were identified. The coatings were optimized and they were examined for stoichiometry, metallurgical condition, and adhesion. Sputtered Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ was most adherent when optimum parameters were used and it was applied on an annealed (soft) substrate. Metallic binders and interlayers have been used to improve the ductility and the adherence. The following coating combinations have satisfied the above requirements: CdO-graphite-Ag (HL-800-2)/sup TM/ on foil versus det. gun Cr/sub 3/C/sub 2/ good up to 427/sup 0/C and sputtered Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ versus det. gun Cr/sub 3/C/sub 2/ good from RT to 427 to 650/sup 0/C.

  19. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  20. A new coordination mode of (E)-3-(3-hydroxyl-phenyl)-acrylic acid in copper complex: Crystal structure and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Xin; Zhou, Pei; Zheng, Chunying; Li, Hui

    2015-05-15

    A copper complex ([Cu(py){sub 2}(L){sub 2}]·2CH{sub 3}OH){sub n} (HL=(E)-3-(3-hydroxyl-phenyl)-acrylic acid) (1) with acrylic acid ligand was synthesized and structurally analyzed by IR, elemental analysis, TGA and the single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. It is the first time to find that phenolic hydroxyl of L coordinates to Cu(II). Complex 1 exhibits 1D chain by a double-bridge of ligands, and the 3D supramolecular framework in complex 1 is constructed by π–π stacking interactions and van der Waals Contacts among the 1D chains. The magnetic properties of complex 1 have been studied. - Graphical abstract: A copper complex based on (E)-3-(3-hydroxyl-phenyl)-acrylic acid in a novel coordinated way was synthesized and a ferromagnetic exchange interactions between neighboring Cu(II) ions has be achieved. - Highlights: • A new copper complex with acrylic acid ligand was synthesized and analyzed. • We find the phenolic hydroxyl of MCA ligand coordinates to metal ion firstly. • A ferromagnetic exchange interactions between Cu(II) ions has been achieved.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and properties of a novel chain coordination polymer constructed by tetrafunctional phosphonate anions and cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan, Lei; Wang, Ying

    2015-08-15

    A novel cobalt phosphonate, [Co(HL)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{sub n} (1) (L=N(CH{sub 2}PO{sub 3}H){sub 3}{sup 3−}) has been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction at 150 °C and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, elemental and thermogravimetric analysis. Complex 1 features a 1D chain structure with double-channel built from CoO{sub 6} octahedra bridged together by the phosphonate groups. Each cobalt ion is octahedrally coordinated by three phosphonate oxygen atoms and three water molecules. The coordinated water molecules can form the hydrogen bonds with the phosphonate oxygen atoms to link the 1D chains, building a 2D layered structure, further resulting in a 3D network. The luminescence spectrum indicates an emission maximum at 435 nm. The magnetic susceptibility curve exhibits a dominant antiferromagnetic behavior with a weakly ferromagnetic component at low temperatures. - Graphical abstract: The connectivity between cobalt ions and the ligands results in a chain structure with a 1D double-channel structure, which is constructed by A-type subrings and B-type subrings. - Highlights: • The tetrafunctional phosphonate ligand was used as the ligand. • A novel chain structure can be formed by A-type rings and B-type rings. • Two types of rings can form a 1D double-channel structure, along the c-axis.

  2. A new model for thermal volatilization of solid particles undergoing flash-pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villermaux, J.; Antoine, B.; Lede, J.; Soulignac, F.

    1983-01-01

    The authors propose a new model describing the volatilization of a solid by thermal penetration (VTP model). This model was initially imagined for interpreting flash-pyrolysis of sawdust particles. Actually, it could be applied to any kind of solid reactions where volatilization is controlled by heat conduction from the outer surface. Although relying on very simple assumptions, the VTP model makes it possible to estimate the rate of consumption of solid particles as a function of physicochemical parameters. Evidence for the existence of two volatilization regimes is provided, depending on the value of the thermal Thiele Modulus M and the thermal Biot number B. The ablation regime is achieved if both M = t /SUB T/ /t /SUB R/ and B = hL /SUB o/ /lambda are large (M, B > 100). In this regime, the shrinking velocity is constant and the reaction takes place only in a thin layer at the solid surface. Experimental data on wood pyrolysis obtained with sawdust or with massive rods confirm the existence of these two regimes (see companion paper). Total consumption times estimated in a cyclone reactor or direct measurement of ablation velocities are in agreement with theoretical predictions of the VPT model. These preliminary results have been obtained with very simple numerical methods which are not best adapted to the ''stiff'' conditions encountered in the ablation regime (M and B both large). Further improvements are in progress, which will make it possible to perform more accurate simulations in a broader range of variation of parameters.

  3. Synthesis, structure and fluorescence of novel cadmium(II) and silver(I) complexes with in situ ligand formation of 1-(5-tetrazolyl)-4-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su Zhi; Xu Jing; Huang Yongqing; Okamura, Taka-aki; Liu Guangxiang; Bai Zhengshuai; Chen Mansheng; Chen Shuisheng; Sun Weiyin

    2009-06-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of cadmium(II) or silver(I) salt, NaN{sub 3}, 4-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzonitrile (IBN) yield three coordination complexes, [Cd(L){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd{sub 3}(L){sub 5}(OH)] (2) and [Ag{sub 2}(L){sub 2}] (3) where HL=1-(5-tetrazolyl)-4-(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene. The crystal structure analysis revealed that 1 has 1D hinged-chain structure containing 24-membered ring with a Cd...Cd intra-chain distance of 13.18 A, while 2 is 1D ladder-like chain with Cd{sub 3}O core. However, the complex 3 is a 3D 4-connected framework with Schlaefli symbol of (4{sup 2}.6{sup 3}.8)(4{sup 3}.6{sup 2}.8). The L{sup -} ligand was found to show four different coordination modes in 1-3, as 2-, 3- and 4-connector, respectively. The results indicate that the coordination modes of the ligand and metal centers with different coordination geometry have great influence on the structures of the complexes. In addition, the photoluminescence of the complexes were studied in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three novel coordination polymers were obtained with in situ ligand formation through Sharpless's [3+2] reaction. The structure and luminescence properties of the complexes were investigated.

  4. hhjj production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigation of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.

  5. hhjj production at the LHC

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigationmore » of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.« less

  6. ProPortal: A Database for Prochlorococcus

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Huang, Katherine [Chisholm lab, MIT

    Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans, and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL) adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL) adapted group. They are closely related to, but distinct from, marine Synechococcus. The genomes of 12 strains have been sequenced and they range in size from 1.6 to 2.6 Mbp. They represent diverse lineages, spanning the rRNA diversity (97 to 99.93% similarity) of cultured representatives of this group. Our analyses of these genomes inform our understanding of how adaptation occurs in the oceans along gradients of light, nutrients, and other environmental factors, providing essential context for interpreting rapidly expanding metagenomic datasets. [Copied from http://proportal.mit.edu/project/prochlorococcus/] ProPortal allows users to browse and search genome date for not only Prochlorococcus, but Cyanophage and Synechococcus. Microarray data, environmental cell concentration data, and metagenome information are also available.

  7. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2012-04-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length

  8. A new carboxyl-copper-organic framework and its excellent selective absorbability for proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Linyan; Xin, Liangliang; Gu, Wen; Tian, Jinlei; Liao, Shengyun; Du, Peiyao; Tong, Yuzhang; Zhang, Yanping; Lv, Rui; Wang, Jingyao; Liu, Xin

    2014-10-15

    One-pot solvothermal treatments of CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}L (5-(3-methyl-5-(pyridin-4-yl)-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl) isophthalic acid) and Sm(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O in water yielded a rare carboxyl-copper-organic framework, [Cu(HL)]{sub n}·nH{sub 2}O (1). The existence of carboxyl groups in compound 1 may be due to the interference of Sm(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O at the relatively high temperature and autogenous pressure of the reaction. Compound 1 has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, PXRD, IR, and elemental analysis. Compound 1 is a 3D coordination polymer, and an xfe-4-Fddd, (4{sup 2}.6.8{sup 3}) topology in 1 is created. In addition, the optical properties have been investigated. Rhodamine B dyeing experiments exhibited that there were residual carboxyl groups on the surface of compound 1. UV–vis results showed that more lysozyme was adsorbed onto the surface of compound 1 than BSA at pH 7.4. At the same time, XPS spectra were also investigated to verify the results. - Graphical abstract: One-pot solvothermal treatments of CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, H2L (5-(3-methyl-5-(pyridin-4-yl)-4H-1, 2, 4-triazol-4-yl) isophthalic acid) and Sm(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O in water yielded a rare carboxyl-copper-organic framework, [Cu(HL)]n·nH{sub 2}O (1). The existence of carboxyl groups in compound 1 may be due to the interference of Sm(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}·6H{sub 2}O at the relatively high temperature and autogenous pressure of the reaction. Compound 1 has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, XRPD, IR, and elemental analysis. Compound 1 is a 3D coordination polymer, and an xfe-4-Fddd, (4{sup 2}.6.8{sup 3}) topology in 1 is created. In addition, the optical properties have been investigated. Rhodamine B dyeing experiments exhibited that there were residual carboxyl groups on the surface of compound 1. UV-vis results showed that more lysozyme was adsorbed onto the surface of compound 1 than that of BSA at pH 7

  9. Geochemistry and thermal maturation of the Ordovician Utica Shale in the Redstone Corporation No. 3 Barth well, Coshocton County Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryder, R.T.; Burruss, J.R.; Hatch, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    The Middle and Upper Ordovician Utica Shale is an important petroleum source rock in the central Appalachian basin. We analyzed a continuous core of the Utica Shale between 5630 and 5749 ft in the Redstone No. 3 Barth well, Coshocton County, Ohio, to geochemically characterize the Utica in a region of relatively low thermal maturity. Rock-Eval analyses of ten black shale samples, yielding average TOC = 3.1%, Tmax = 440{degrees}C, and Pl = 0.27, indicate that the Utica Shale in Coshocton County is a very good petroleum source rock that has reached the beginning to middle part of the oil-generation stage. Conodont alteration index (CAl) values of 1 to 1.5 from conodonts in thin calcareous beds in the Utica Shale support the Rock-Eval data. Average Hl = 174 mgHC/g C{sub org} and OL = 76 mgCO{sub 2}/g C{sub org} indicate a predominance of Type II organic matter in the Utica. Bitumen was extracted from four Utica shale samples (5,200 to 6,000 ppm) and analyzed by gas chromoatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry. Gas chromatograms show a slight-odd-predominance of the n-C{sub 11} to n-C{sub 17} fraction, a broad spectrum of n-alkanes that range from n-C{sub 7} to n-C{sub 33}, and abundant pristane and phytane. Mass fragmentograms of biomarker compounds reveal abundant terpane (191 m/z) and sterane (217 m/z) compounds and few pentacyclic (191 m/z) compounds. Except for the low concentration of pentacyclics, the bitumen extracts are very similar geochemically to oils produced from Cambrian and Lower Ordovician reservoirs in eastern and central Ohio. Maturation kinetics models indicate that the Utica Shale in the core reached the oil-generation stage during Pennsylvanian time.

  10. Studies of transition states and radicals by negative ion photodetachment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, R.B.

    1991-12-01

    Negative ion photodetachment is a versatile tool for the production and study of transient neutral species such as reaction intermediates and free radicals. Photodetachment of the stable XHY{sup {minus}} anion provides a direct spectroscopic probe of the transition state region of the potential energy surface for the neutral hydrogen transfer reaction X + HY {yields} XH + Y, where X and Y are halogen atoms. The technique is especially sensitive to resonances, which occur at a specific energy, but the spectra also show features due to direct scattering. We have used collinear adiabatic simulations of the photoelectron spectra to evaluate trail potential energy surfaces for the biomolecular reactions and have extended the adiabatic approach to three dimensions and used it to evaluate empirical potential energy surfaces for the I + Hl and Br + HI reactions. In addition, we have derived an empirical, collinear potential energy surface for the Br + HBr reaction that reproduces our experimental results and have extended this surface to three dimensions. Photodetachment of a negative ion can be also used to study neutral free radicals. We have studied the vibrational and electronic spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} by photoelectron spectroscopy of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, determining the electron affinity of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2}, gaining insight on the bonding of the {sup 2}B{sub 1} ground state and observing the {sup 2}A{sub 2} excited state for the first time. Negative ion photodetachment also provides a novel and versatile source of mass-selected, jet-cooled free radicals. We have studied the photodissociation of CH{sub 2}NO{sub 2} at 270, 235, and 208 nm, obtaining information on the dissociation products by measuring the kinetic energy release in the photodissociation.

  11. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian; Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Lohr, Frank; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR{sub VMAT}-to-LAR{sub 3D-CRT}) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by

  12. Trivalent Lanthanide/Actinide Separation Using Aqueous-Modified TALSPEAK Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis S. Grimes; Richard D. Tillotson; Leigh R. Martin

    2014-05-01

    TALSPEAK is a liquid/liquid extraction process designed to separate trivalent lanthanides (Ln3+) from minor actinides (MAs) Am3+ and Cm3+. Traditional TALSPEAK organic phase is comprised of a monoacidic dialkyl bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid extractant (HDEHP) in diisopropyl benzene (DIPB). The aqueous phase contains a soluble aminopolycarboxylate diethylenetriamine-N,N,N,N,N-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) in a concentrated (1.0-2.0 M) lactic acid (HL) buffer with the aqueous acidity typically adjusted to pH 3.0. TALSPEAK balances the selective complexation of the actinides by DTPA against the electrostatic attraction of the lanthanides by the HDEHP extractant to achieve the desired trivalent lanthanide/actinide group separation. Although TALSPEAK is considered a successful separations scheme, recent fundamental studies have highlighted complex chemical interactions occurring in the aqueous and organic phases during the extraction process. Previous attempts to model the system have shown thermodynamic models do not accurately predict the observed extraction trends in the p[H+] range 2.5-4.8. In this study, the aqueous phase is modified by replacing the lactic acid buffer with a variety of simple and longer-chain amino acid buffers. The results show successful trivalent lanthanide/actinide group separation with the aqueous-modified TALSPEAK process at pH 2. The amino acid buffer concentrations were reduced to 0.5 M (at pH 2) and separations were performed without any effect on phase transfer kinetics. Successful modeling of the aqueous-modified TALSPEAK process (p[H+] 1.6-3.1) using a simplified thermodynamic model and an internally consistent set of thermodynamic data is presented.

  13. Three luminescent d{sup 10} metal coordination polymers assembled from a semirigid V-shaped ligand with high selective detecting of Cu{sup 2+} ion and nitrobenzene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei-Ping; Liu, Ping; Liang, Yu-Tong; Cui, Lin; Xi, Zheng-Ping; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2015-08-15

    Three 2D luminescent coordination polymers with helical frameworks, [ZnL{sub 2}]{sub n} (1) and ([ML{sub 2}]·(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} (M=Zn (2), Cd (3)) (HL=4-((2-methyl-1 H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzoic acid), have been assembled under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Complex 1 is in chiral space group and displays a rare 2D→2D 2-fold parallel interpenetrated layer network with two types of chiral double helixes. Interestingly, the single crystal structure analyses indicate the coexistence of enantiomers la and 1b in one pot, while the bulk crystallization of 1 are racemic mixtures based on the CD measurement. 2 and 3 are isostructural, in the structure, there are two kinds of 2D chiral helical-layers which stack in an -ABAB- sequence leading to the overall structure are mesomer and achiral. All compounds display intense luminescence in solid state at room temperature with high chemical and thermal stability. More importantly, 1 has been successfully applied in the detection of Cu{sup 2+} ions in aqueous media and nitrobenzene and the probable detecting mechanism was also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Three luminescent d{sup 10} metal coordination polymers with helical-layer based on 4-((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzoic acid have been obtained. Compound 1 shows high selective detecting for Cu{sup 2+} ion in aqueous and nitrobenzene. - Highlights: • Three coordination polymers with chiral helical-layer have been obtained. • 1 Can luminescent detect Cu{sup 2+} ion in aqueous media and nitrobenzene. • Racemic mixture or mesomer compounds can be obtained by controlling the reaction conditions.

  14. Electrical conductivity and luminescence properties of two silver(I) coordination polymers with heterocyclic nitrogen ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Abhinandan; Kumar Jana, Swapan; Pal, Tanusri; Puschmann, Horst; Zangrando, Ennio; Dalai, Sudipta

    2014-08-15

    The synthesis and X-ray structural characterization of two novel silver(I) coordination polymers, [Ag(NO{sub 3})(quin)]{sub n} (1) and [Ag{sub 8}(HL){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(mpyz)]·3H{sub 2}O (2) are reported, where quin=5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinoxaline, H{sub 6}L=cyclohexane-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexacarboxylic acid and mpyz=2-methyl pyrazine. The single crystal diffraction analyses showed that complex 1 is a 2D layered structure, while 2 presents a 3D polymeric architecture. In complex 2 the network is stabilized by argentophilic interactions and hydrogen bonding. Electrical conductivity of order 3×10{sup −4} Scm{sup −1} (1) and 1.6×10{sup −4} Scm{sup −1} (2) is measured on thin film specimen at room temperature. The photoluminescence and thermal properties of the complexes have also been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two new 1D and 3D coordination polymers of Ag(I) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray analysis. The electrical, luminescence and thermal properties have been studied. - Highlights: • 1 is 2D layered while 2 present a 3D polymeric architecture. • The network in 2 is stabilized by argentophilic interactions and hydrogen bonding. • Electrical conductivity measurement is quite interesting. • Argentophilic interaction and intra-ligand π{sup ⁎}–π CT explains emission behavior of 2.

  15. Predicting critical temperatures of iron(II) spin crossover materials: Density functional theory plus U approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yachao

    2014-12-07

    A first-principles study of critical temperatures (T{sub c}) of spin crossover (SCO) materials requires accurate description of the strongly correlated 3d electrons as well as much computational effort. This task is still a challenge for the widely used local density or generalized gradient approximations (LDA/GGA) and hybrid functionals. One remedy, termed density functional theory plus U (DFT+U) approach, introduces a Hubbard U term to deal with the localized electrons at marginal computational cost, while treats the delocalized electrons with LDA/GGA. Here, we employ the DFT+U approach to investigate the T{sub c} of a pair of iron(II) SCO molecular crystals (α and β phase), where identical constituent molecules are packed in different ways. We first calculate the adiabatic high spin-low spin energy splitting ΔE{sub HL} and molecular vibrational frequencies in both spin states, then obtain the temperature dependent enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH and ΔS), and finally extract T{sub c} by exploiting the ΔH/T − T and ΔS − T relationships. The results are in agreement with experiment. Analysis of geometries and electronic structures shows that the local ligand field in the α phase is slightly weakened by the H-bondings involving the ligand atoms and the specific crystal packing style. We find that this effect is largely responsible for the difference in T{sub c} of the two phases. This study shows the applicability of the DFT+U approach for predicting T{sub c} of SCO materials, and provides a clear insight into the subtle influence of the crystal packing effects on SCO behavior.

  16. Leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma mortality (19501999) and incidence (19691999) in the Eldorado uranium workers cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zablotska, Lydia B.; Lane, Rachel S.D.; Frost, Stanley E.; Thompson, Patsy A.

    2014-04-01

    Uranium workers are chronically exposed to low levels of radon decay products (RDP) and gamma (?) radiation. Risks of leukemia from acute and high doses of ?-radiation are well-characterized, but risks from lower doses and dose-rates and from RDP exposures are controversial. Few studies have evaluated risks of other hematologic cancers in uranium workers. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiation-related risks of hematologic cancers in the cohort of Eldorado uranium miners and processors first employed in 19321980 in relation to cumulative RDP exposures and ?-ray doses. The average cumulative RDP exposure was 100.2 working level months and the average cumulative whole-body ?-radiation dose was 52.2 millisievert. We identified 101 deaths and 160 cases of hematologic cancers in the cohort. Overall, male workers had lower mortality and cancer incidence rates for all outcomes compared with the general Canadian male population, a likely healthy worker effect. No statistically significant association between RDP exposure or ?-ray doses, or a combination of both, and mortality or incidence of any hematologic cancer was found. We observed consistent but non-statistically significant increases in risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) incidence and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) mortality with increasing ?-ray doses. These findings are consistent with recent studies of increased risks of CLL and NHL incidence after ?-radiation exposure. Further research is necessary to understand risks of other hematologic cancers from low-dose exposures to ?-radiation. - Highlights: We analyzed long-term follow-up for hematologic cancers of the Eldorado uranium workers. Workers were exposed to a unique combination of radon decay products (RDP) and gamma (?) ray doses. Exposures to RDP and ?-ray doses were not associated with significantly increased risks of cancers. Radiation risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Hodgkin lymphoma were

  17. Critical interpretation of CH and OH stretching regions for infrared spectra of methanol clusters (CH{sub 3}OH){sub n} (n = 25) using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Irle, Stephan; Witek, Henryk A.

    2014-09-07

    Vibrational infrared (IR) spectra of gas-phase OH???O methanol clusters up to pentamer are simulated using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding method using two distinct methodologies: standard normal mode analysis and Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function. The twofold simulations aim at the direct critical assignment of the CH stretching region of the recently recorded experimental spectra [H.-L. Han, C. Camacho, H. A. Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144309 (2011)]. Both approaches confirm the previous assignment (ibid.) of the CH stretching bands based on the B3LYP/ANO1 harmonic frequencies, showing that ?{sub 3}, ?{sub 9}, and ?{sub 2} CH stretching modes of the proton-accepting (PA) and proton-donating (PD) methanol monomers experience only small splittings upon the cluster formation. This finding is in sharp discord with the assignment based on anharmonic B3LYP/VPT2/ANO1 vibrational frequencies (ibid.), suggesting that some procedural faults, likely related to the breakdown of the perturbational vibrational treatment, led the anharmonic calculations astray. The IR spectra based on the Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function include new, previously unaccounted for physical factors such as non-zero temperature of the system and large amplitude motions of the clusters. The elevation of temperature results in a considerable non-homogeneous broadening of the observed IR signals, while the presence of large-amplitude motions (methyl group rotations and PA-PD flipping), somewhat surprisingly, does not introduce any new features in the spectrum.

  18. Operation of Alcator C-Mod with high-Z plasma facing components and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipschultz, B.; Lin, Y.; Reinke, M.L.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.H.; Irby, J.; LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.S.; Marr, K.; Terry, J.L.; Wolfe, S.M.; Whyte, D.

    2006-05-15

    Studies of potential plasma facing component (PFC) materials for a magnetic fusion reactor generally conclude that tungsten is the best choice due to its low tritium (T) retention, capability to handle high heat fluxes with low erosion, and robustness to nuclear damage and activation. ITER [F. Perkins et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 2137 (1999)] may operate with all tungsten PFCs to provide the necessary operational experience for a reactor. Alcator C-Mod [I. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] operates with molybdenum (Mo) high-Z PFCs, which have very similar properties to tungsten. The experiments described herein have provided a unique comparison of operation with or without in situ boron coatings applied to the molybdenum PFCs; the latter are likely most relevant to ITER and beyond. ICRF-heated H-modes were readily achieved without boron coatings although the resultant enhancement in energy confinement was typically small (H{sub ITER,89}{approx}1). Molybdenum concentrations, n{sub Mo}/n{sub e}, rise rapidly after the H-mode transition up to 0.1%, cooling the plasma by line radiation, reducing energy confinement, and/or causing a back H/L transition. Surprisingly, the primarily molybdenum PFC surfaces retain 3.5-5.0x10{sup 20} of injected D{sub 2} molecules per discharge, corresponding to 50% of the injected gas. Plasma current disruptions, both randomly occurring over the course of a day, or planned, reduce the retained D long term. After applying boron coatings, n{sub Mo}/n{sub e} was reduced by a factor of 10-20 with H{sub ITER,89} approaching 2. A world-record volume-average plasma pressure of 1.8 atm at 5.4 T was achieved at the ITER normalized {beta}. The effects of each boronization are found to be limited in time, correlated to time-integrated input energy. Intra- and inter-discharge boronization techniques have been developed with the latter being the most successful. This initial study indicates that a low-Z coating over at least a fraction of

  19. SU-E-I-11: Cascaded Linear System Model for Columnar CsI Flat Panel Imagers with Depth Dependent Gain and Blur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, B; Lubinsky, A; Zheng, H; Zhao, W; Teymurazyan, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a depth dependent gain and blur cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for optimizing columnar structured CsI indirect conversion flat panel imager (FPI) for advanced imaging applications. Methods: For experimental validation, depth dependent escape efficiency, e(z), was extracted from PHS measurement of different CsI scintillators (thickness, substrate and light output). The inherent MTF and DQE of CsI was measured using high resolution CMOS sensor. For CLSM, e(z) and the depth dependent MTF(f,z), were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4) of optical photon transport through columnar CsI. Previous work showed that Monte Carlo simulation for CsI was hindered by the non-ideality of its columnar structure. In the present work we allowed variation in columnar width with depth, and assumed diffusive reflective backing and columns. Monte Carlo simulation was performed using an optical point source placed at different depth of the CsI layer, from which MTF(z,f) and e(z) were computed. The resulting e(z) with excellent matching with experimental measurements were then applied to the CLSM, Monte Carlo simulation was repeated until the modeled MTF, DQE(f) also match experimental measurement. Results: For a 150 micron FOS HL type CsI, e(z) varies between 0.56 to 0.45, and the MTF at 14 cycles/mm varies between 62.1% to 3.9%, from the front to the back of the scintillator. The overall MTF and DQE(f) at all frequencies are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements at all frequencies. Conclusion: We have developed a CLSM for columnar CsI scintillators with depth dependent gain and MTF, which were estimated from Monte Carlo simulation with novel optical simulation settings. Preliminary results showed excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental measurements. Future work is aimed at extending this approach to optimize CsI screen optic design and sensor structure for achieving higher DQE(f) in cone-beam CT, which uses

  20. FINAL REPORT SUMMARY OF DM 1200 OPERATION AT VSL VSL-06R6710-2 REV 0 9/7/06

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; DIENER G; BARDAKCI T; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    The principal objective of this report was to summarize the testing experience on the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200), which is the High Level Waste (HLW) Pilot Melter located at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Further objectives were to provide descriptions of the history of all modifications and maintenance, methods of operation, problems and unit failures, and melter emissions and performance while processing a variety of simulated HL W and low activity waste (LAW) feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and employing a variety of operating methods. All of these objectives were met. The River Protection Project - Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) Project has undertaken a 'tiered' approach to vitrification development testing involving computer-based glass formulation, glass property-composition models, crucible melts, and continuous melter tests of increasing, more realistic scales. Melter systems ranging from 0.02 to 1.2 m{sup 2} installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) have been used for this purpose, which, in combination with the 3.3 m{sup 2} low activity waste (LAW) Pilot Melter at Duratek, Inc., span more than two orders of magnitude in melt surface area. In this way, less-costly small-scale tests can be used to define the most appropriate tests to be conducted at the larger scales in order to extract maximum benefit from the large-scale tests. For high level waste (HLW) vitrification development, a key component in this approach is the one-third scale DuraMelter 1200 (DM 1200), which is the HLW Pilot Melter that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. In particular, the DM1200 provides for testing on a

  1. Simple Method to Estimate Mean Heart Dose From Hodgkin Lymphoma Radiation Therapy According to Simulation X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimwegen, Frederika A. van; Cutter, David J.; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D.G.; Janus, Cécile P.M.; Darby, Sarah C.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Aleman, Berthe M.P.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Methods and Materials: Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case–control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. Results: According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Conclusion: Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor

  2. A bidirectional coupling procedure applied to multiscale respiratory modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuprat, A.P.; Kabilan, S.; Carson, J.P.; Corley, R.A.; Einstein, D.R.

    2013-07-01

    pressure applied to the multiple sets of ODEs. In both the simplified geometry and in the imaging-based geometry, the performance of the method was comparable to that of monolithic schemes, in most cases requiring only a single CFD evaluation per time step. Thus, this new accelerator allows us to begin combining pulmonary CFD models with lower-dimensional models of pulmonary mechanics with little computational overhead. Moreover, because the CFD and lower-dimensional models are totally separate, this framework affords great flexibility in terms of the type and breadth of the adopted lower-dimensional model, allowing the biomedical researcher to appropriately focus on model design. Research funded by the National Heart and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598.

  3. A Bidirectional Coupling Procedure Applied to Multiscale Respiratory Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2013-07-01

    sets of ODEs. In both the simplified geometry and in the imaging-based geometry, the performance of the method was comparable to that of monolithic schemes, in most cases requiring only a single CFD evaluation per time step. Thus, this new accelerator allows us to begin combining pulmonary CFD models with lower-dimensional models of pulmonary mechanics with little computational overhead. Moreover, because the CFD and lower-dimensional models are totally separate, this framework affords great flexibility in terms of the type and breadth of the adopted lower-dimensional model, allowing the biomedical researcher to appropriately focus on model design. Research funded by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Award 1RO1HL073598.

  4. FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D'ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the

  5. Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tynan, George R.; Diamond, P. H.; Ji, H.; Forest, C. B.; Terry, P. W.; Munsat, T.; Brummell, N.

    2013-07-29

    The Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO) is a DOE Plasma Science Center formed in late 2009 to focus on the general principles underlying momentum transport in magnetic fusion and astrophysical systems. It is composed of funded researchers from UCSD, UW Madison, U. Colorado, PPPL. As of 2011, UCSD supported postdocs are collaborating at MIT/Columbia and UC Santa Cruz and beginning in 2012, will also be based at PPPL. In the initial startup period, the Center supported the construction of two basic experiments at PPPL and UW Madison to focus on accretion disk hydrodynamic instabilities and solar physics issues. We now have computational efforts underway focused on understanding recent experimental tests of dynamos, solar tachocline physics, intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas and L-H transition physics in tokamak devices. In addition, we have the basic experiments discussed above complemented by work on a basic linear plasma device at UCSD and a collaboration at the LAPD located at UCLA. We are also performing experiments on intrinsic rotation and L-H transition physics in the DIII-D, NSTX, C-Mod, HBT EP, HL-2A, and EAST tokamaks in the US and China, and expect to begin collaborations on K-STAR in the coming year. Center funds provide support to over 10 postdocs and graduate students each year, who work with 8 senior faculty and researchers at their respective institutions. The Center has sponsored a mini-conference at the APS DPP 2010 meeting, and co-sponsored the recent Festival de Theorie (2011) with the CEA in Cadarache, and will co-sponsor a Winter School in January 2012 in collaboration with the CMSO-UW Madison. Center researchers have published over 50 papers in the peer reviewed literature, and given over 10 talks at major international meetings. In addition, the Center co-PI, Professor Patrick Diamond, shared the 2011 Alfven Prize at the EPS meeting. Key scientific results from this startup period include initial simulations of the

  6. Final Technical Report for the Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B.; Tynan, George R.

    2013-07-29

    The Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization (CMTFO) is a DOE Plasma Science Center formed in late 2009 to focus on the general principles underlying momentum transport in magnetic fusion and astrophysical systems. It is composed of funded researchers from UCSD, UW Madison, U. Colorado, PPPL. As of 2011, UCSD supported postdocs are collaborating at MIT/Columbia and UC Santa Cruz and beginning in 2012, will also be based at PPPL. In the initial startup period, the Center supported the construction of two basic experiments at PPPL and UW Madison to focus on accretion disk hydrodynamic instabilities and solar physics issues. We now have computational efforts underway focused on understanding recent experimental tests of dynamos, solar tacholine physics, intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas and L-H transition physics in tokamak devices. In addition, we have the basic experiments discussed above complemented by work on a basic linear plasma device at UCSD and a collaboration at the LAPD located at UCLA. We are also performing experiments on intrinsic rotation and L-H transition physics in the DIII-D, NSTX, C-Mod, HBT EP, HL-2A, and EAST tokamaks in the US and China, and expect to begin collaborations on K-STAR in the coming year. Center funds provide support to over 10 postdocs and graduate students each year, who work with 8 senior faculty and researchers at their respective institutions. The Center has sponsored a mini-conference at the APS DPP 2010 meeting, and co-sponsored the recent Festival de Theorie (2011) with the CEA in Cadarache, and will co-sponsor a Winter School in January 2012 in collaboration with the CMSO-UW Madison. Center researchers have published over 50 papers in the peer reviewed literature, and given over 10 talks at major international meetings. In addition, the Center co-PI, Professor Patrick Diamond, shared the 2011 Alfven Prize at the EPS meeting. Key scientific results from this startup period include initial simulations of the

  7. UPR/Mayaguez High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez, Hector

    2014-10-31

    This year the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez (UPRM) High Energy Physics (HEP) group continued with the ongoing research program outlined in the grant proposal. The program is centered on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the proton-proton (pp) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The main research focus is on data analysis and on the preparation for the High Luminosity (HL) LHC or experiment detector upgrade. The physics data analysis included Higgs Doublet Search and measurement of the (1)#3; Λ0b branching fraction, (2) B meson mass, and (3) hyperon θ-b lifetime. The detector upgrade included work on the preparations for the Forward Pixel (FPIX) detector Silicon Sensor Testing in a production run at Fermilab. In addition, the group has taken responsibilities on the Software Release through our former research associate Dr. Eric Brownson who acted until last December as a Level Two Offline Manager for the CMS Upgrade. In support of the CMS data analysis activities carried out locally, the UPRM group has built and maintains an excellent Tier3 analysis center in Mayaguez. This allowed us to analyze large data samples and to continue the development of algorithms for the upgrade tracking robustness we started several years ago, and we plan to resume in the near future. This project involves computer simulation of the radiation damage to be suffered at the higher luminosities of the upgraded LHC. This year we continued to serve as a source of outstanding students for the field of high energy physics. Three of our graduate students finished their MS work in May, 2014, Their theses research were on data analysis of heavy quark b-physics. All of them are currently enrolled at Ph.D. physics program across the nation. One of them (Hector Moreno) at New Mexico University (Hector Moreno), one at University of New Hampshire (Sandra Santiesteban) and one at University of

  8. FINAL REPORT MELTER TESTS WITH AZ-101 HLW SIMULANT USING A DURAMELTER 100 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-01R10N0-1 REV 1 2/25/02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report provides data, analyses, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic of America (VSL) to determine the processing rates that are achievable with AZ-101 HLW simulants and corresponding melter feeds on a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) vitrification system. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. Tests conducted during Part B1 (VSL-00R2590-2) on the DM1000 vitrification system installed at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America showed that, without the use of bubblers, glass production rates with AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 simulants were significantly lower than the Project design basis rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d. Conversely, three-fold increases over the design basis rate were demonstrated with the use of bubblers. Furthermore, an un-bubbled control test using a replica of the melter feed used in cold commissioning tests at West Valley reproduced the rates that were observed with that feed on the WVDP production melter. More recent tests conducted on the DM1200 system, which more closely represents the present RPP-WTP design, are in general agreement with these earlier results. Screening tests conducted on the DM10 system have provided good indications of the larger-scale processing rates with bubblers (for both HL W and LAW feeds) but significantly overestimated the DM1000 un-bubbled rate observed for C-106/AY-102 melter feeds. This behavior is believed to be a consequence of the role of

  9. FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass

  10. 11,23,1,1,,19,10,"BANGOR HYDRO ELECTRIC CO","ELLSWORTH",0,,1179,"0A",1294,,,95,2941,0,0,3518,0,0,4870,0,0,1732,0,0,3252,0,0,2193,0,0,134,0,0,447,0,0,465,0,0,538,0,0,4295,0,0,3601,0,0,1469,6,50159,"WAT","HY"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ;WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,145,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WEST BUXTON",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,4424,0,0,2556,0,0,4381,0,0,3723,0,0,3292,0,0,1602,0,0,798,0,0,745,0,0,418,0,0,1944,0,0,4334,0,0,3045,0,0,1508,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,150,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WESTON",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,8095,0,0,8443,0,0,9513,0,0,8520,0,0,7843,0,0,7850,0,0,5819,0,0,4618,0,0,4257,0,0,5361,0,0,7925,0,0,9347,0,0,1509,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,155,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WILLIAMS",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,9171,0,0,9162,0,0,10255,0,0,6585,0,0,7543,0,0,8658,0,0,6098,0,0,5593,0,0,5308,0,0,5891,0,0,8857,0,0,10646,0,0,1510,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,1,,37,160,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WYMAN HYDRO",0,,3266,"0M",1294,,,95,30298,0,0,37016,0,0,38382,0,0,18735,0,0,24745,0,0,31774,0,0,20433,0,0,17564,0,0,16353,0,0,19735,0,0,40234,0,0,38504,0,0,1511,6,50491,"WAT","HY" 11,23,1,4,2,37,175,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","CAPE",0,"LIGHT OIL",3266,"0M",1294,,,95,40,282,7937,40,336,7601,-57,44,7557,-40,24,7533,5,162,7371,38,208,7316,611,1872,6581,497,1571,5887,-24,32,5855,-32,27,5828,-45,25,5803,-25,145,5552,1484,6,50491,"FO2","GT" 11,23,1,2,2,37,200,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WYMAN STEAM",0,"LIGHT OIL",3266,"0M",1294,,,95,707,1587,1149,810,1542,1579,117,264,1534,980,1825,1680,366,883,1468,854,1640,1807,783,1460,2327,653,1307,1677,115,266,1410,20,76,1335,486,1282,2039,604,1177,2212,1507,6,50491,"FO2","ST" 11,23,1,2,3,37,200,"CENTRAL MAINE POWER CO","WYMAN STEAM",0,"HEAVY OIL",3266,"0M",1294,,,95,47051,97029,319010,122493,214459,275338,22777,47240,228098,127804,222606,207728,22560,50003,278752,79660,140051,253816,153893,263859,173676,74046,134076,202289