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Sample records for mayan mexican olmeca

  1. Assays for important Mexican crudes updated

    SciTech Connect

    Manriguez, L.; Moreno, A.; Anaya, C.G. )

    1991-03-04

    Compared to Isthmus and Maya, Olmeca crude is the lightest of the Mexican export. It has fewer contaminants, and its 540{degrees} C. TBP distillation produces the largest quantity of distillate. The Olmeca fractions also have the lowest total sulfur content. The Maya crude is heavy, with an API gravity of 22.2{sup {degrees}}. It has a high contaminant content that induces corrosion in process equipment and causes low running times in thermal cracking units, such as visbreakers and cokers. A proposed refining scheme for the bottom of the Maya barrel consists of atmospheric distillation, vacuum distillation, the Impex process, and visbreaking.

  2. Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Mexican Hat, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Location of the Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Cell Site Location and History The Mexican Hat disposal site is located on the Navajo Reservation in southeast Utah, 1.5 miles southwest of the town of Mexican Hat and 1 mile south of the San

  3. Competitiveness of Mexican crude

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-28

    Mexico is under great pressure to maintain oil export revenue levels if it is to avoid a reversal in its economic recovery program. While the country's vulnerability to a price plunge is also applicable to OPEC countries, the North Sea producers, and others, Mexico does have an ace. The ace is that its heavier, metals-ridden and sulfur-laden Maya crude, which had to be pushed on customers until about 1981, is now in strong demand. Comparisons are presented of the market value of five crude oils refined in the US Gulf Coast: West Texas Intermediate (or WTI, a 40/sup 0/ API, light), Arabian Light and Isthmus (both 34/sup 0/ medium-light), Alaska North Slope (or ANS, a 27/sup 0/ API, a medium), and Maya (22/sup 0/ API, medium-heavy). In this mix, the heavier the crude, the greater is the refining margin (except for Arabian Light, for which freight cost and product yield provide lower margins than those derived from WTI). The sacrifice by OPEC and other producers cutting crude oil prices was to the benefit to refiners' improved margins during the first half of 1983. Those cuts were on the lighter-quality oils. But prices for heavier Venezuelan, Californian, and Mexican crudes increased during the second half of 1983, due to developing refinery technologies in extracting favorable product yields from them. This issue of Energy Detente presents their fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for December 1983 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  4. Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Mexican Electric Research Institute IIE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mexican Electric Research Institute (IIE) Place: Mexico Sector: Services Product: General Financial &...

  5. Table 30. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average ... W 14.07 - W 13.85 13.54 -...

  6. Costs of Imported Crude Oil for Selected Crude Streams

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Algerian Condensate Angolan Cabinda Canadian Lloydminster Cameroon Kole Marine Ecuadorian Oriente Mexican Isthmus Mexican Mayan 1978 Average ... W 13.32 - W 12.87 13.24 -...

  7. Santa Fe New Mexican: For cybersecurity, in quantum encryption...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    For cybersecurity, in quantum encryption we trust Santa Fe New Mexican: For cybersecurity, in quantum encryption we trust Los Alamos physicists developed a quantum random number...

  8. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  10. United States -- Mexican joint ventures: A case history approach

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, N.L.; Chidester, R.J.; Hughes, K.R.; Fowler, R.A.

    1993-03-01

    Because the Mexican government has encouraged investment in Mexico by increasing the percentage of ownership of a Mexican business that a US company can hold, joint ventures are more attractive now than they had been in the past. This study provides preliminary information for US renewable energy companies who are interested in forming a joint venture with a Mexican company. This report is not intended to be a complete reference but does identifies a number of important factors that should be observed when forming a Mexican joint venture: (1)Successful joint ventures achieve the goals of each partner. (2)It is essential that all parties agree to the allocation of responsibilities. (3)Put everything in writing. (4)Research in depth the country or countries in which you are considering doing business.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat Mill Site -...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Licensed to DOE for long-term custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management ... custody and managed by the Office of Legacy Management Also see Mexican Hat, Utah, ...

  12. Mexican demand for US natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, M.A.; Kier, P.H.

    1993-09-01

    This study describes the Mexican natural gas industry as it exists today and the factors that have shaped the evolution of the industry in the past or that are expected to influence its progress; it also projects production and use of natural gas and estimates the market for exports of natural gas from the United States to Mexico. The study looks ahead to two periods, a near term (1993--1995) and an intermediate term (1996--2000). The bases for estimates under two scenarios are described. Under the conservative scenario, exports of natural gas from the United States would decrease from the 1992 level of 250 million cubic feet per day (MMCF/d), would return to that level by 1995, and would reach about 980 MMCF/D by 2000. Under the more optimistic scenario, exports would decrease in 1993 and would recover and rise to about 360 MMCF/D in 1995 and to 1,920 MMCF/D in 2000.

  13. Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Los Alamos

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory property Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Lab property Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Los Alamos National Laboratory property Biologists located a record seven federally threatened Mexican spotted owl chicks on Los Alamos National Laboratory property during nest surveys last month.

  14. Los Alamos's portable MRI machine may benefit New Mexicans

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos's portable MRI machine Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Los Alamos's portable MRI machine may benefit New Mexicans New technology may serve New Mexico's rural communities. April 4, 2016 Los Alamos experts have developed a smaller, less expensive MRI system to serve the battlefield setting and beyond. Los Alamos experts, engineer Al Urbaitis and physicist Per

  15. The Mexican petrochemical sector in the NAFTA negotiations

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, G.; Kim, C.S.

    1993-12-31

    Since 1985, there have been important changes in the Mexican petrochemical sector, including trade liberalization, deregulation and the elimination of subsidies. NAFTA represents another step towards liberalization of the sector. Given the low tariffs currently applied to international trade among the three nations, the authors do not anticipate major impacts of NAFTA on trade flows. Nevertheless, the elimination of restrictions to foreign investment is expected to increase capital flows into the sector and to promote productivity increases. On the other hand, the new barriers to trade in petrochemical feedstocks and the restrictions on private investment in infrastructure may negatively affect the sector`s growth, making it necessary to adjust domestic regulations to improve the performance of Pemex. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Acoustic and electrical properties of Mexican geothermal rock samples

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, E.A.; King, M.S.

    1984-12-01

    Acoustic compressional and shear-wave velocities have been measured on a suite of ten sandstone samples obtained from wells in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field and on two rock samples from other Mexican geothermal fields. The samples were tested in both their dry and fully brine-saturated states at uniaxial stresses to 15 MPa. Electrical resistivities and associated phase angles have been measured on the same core samples as a function of frequency in the range 10 Hz to 10/sup 5/ Hz under drained conditions at hydrostatic confining stresses to 10 MPa. The electrical properties were measured on samples tested in their fully saturated state, using brines of two different concentrations.

  17. UMTRA Project Site Observational Work Plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Surface cleanup activities at the Mexican Hat UMTRA processing site are nearing completion. Ground Water contamination at the Mexican Hat site is a result of uranium milling operations. The extent of residual process water has been identified, and it is limited to the uppermost aquifer in the vicinity of the site. Deeper aquifers are not affected because of an upward hydraulic gradient and the presence of a confining unit (the deeper aquifers are protected by hydrogeologic isolation). The uppermost unit is returning to its pre-milling, mainly unsaturated state. The unit that contains the contaminated water is not a ground water resource because it qualifies as Class III (limited use) based on limited yield. Ground water in the uppermost unit is currently not used and is not anticipated to be used as a ground water resource. The nearby San Juan River and a converted oil exploration well provide all of the water needs for the area. There are no current threats to human health or livestock; and, because the zone of contamination does not represent a ground water resource, none are anticipated in the future. There are, however, seeps where contaminated water is exposed at land surface. The seeps create potential exposure pathways for plants and wildlife. It is not known at this time if there is a risk to the environment. Additional investigations are needed and are described in this document to confirm the presence or absence of potential environmental risks. Additional hydrogeologic investigations are not required. The proposed ground water compliance strategy for the site is no remediation, because the ground water in the uppermost aquifer (which is also the zone of contamination) qualifies for supplemental standards based on Class III, limited yield, and because there are no threats to human health. Domestic and agricultural water is pumped from a deeper aquifer that is isolated from the contaminated zone.

  18. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings site, Mexican Hat, Utah. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    This document assesses the environmental impacts of the proposed remedial action at the Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings site located on the Navajo Reservation in southern Utah. The site covers 235 acres and contains 69 acres of tailings and several of the original mill structures. Remedial action must be performed in accordance with standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Navajo Nation. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings within the present tailings site by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile. A radon barrier of compacted earth would be constructed over the pile, and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term stability of the pile. The no action alternative is also assessed in this document. 240 refs., 12 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendices C--E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document provides appendices C, D, and E this Remedial Action Plan (RAP) which is a revision of the original Mexican Hat Remedial Action Plan and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. Appendix C provide the Radiological Support Plan, Appendix D provides the Site Characterization, and Appendix E provides the Water Resources Protection Strategy.

  20. Booming Mexican market may flourish with free trade

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-27

    Private power developers and utilities in the US are courting deals to build powerplants or supply electricity in Mexico. An the pending North American Free Trade Agreement, if passed, is expected to vastly increase the Mexican market for US constructors and manufacturers in the power sector. Ironically, a powerplant now under construction near the US border could be a factor in scuttling the NAFTA treaty. Mexico is seeking more than $18 billion in private sector investment. New regulations there now allow foreign firms to own 100% of the powerplants they build. The government-owned utility, Comision Federal de Electricidad, will offer firms power purchase agreements lasting up to 30 years. CFE also offers build-operate-transfer arrangements. It recently selected a consortium including General Electric Co., Bechtel Enterprises Inc., and Mexico's Groupo ICA to build the $600-million, 700-Mw, gas and oil-fired Samalayuca II project, about 20 miles south of El Paso, Texas. It will revert to CFE after 15 years.

  1. New Mexicans` perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Since May, 1990, the Institute for Public Policy (IPP) has published Quarterly Profiles (QPs) of New Mexico`s citizenry. Each QP has focused on a different issue, but they have all asked a set of standard items, including questions about the public`s perceptions of the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL). Each year, the IPP has used the University of New Mexico`s Survey Research Center to conduct a telephone survey of a representative random sample of New Mexicans, and respondents were asked whether they had favorable or unfavorable views of LANL and the degree to which they perceived LANL as an environmentally responsible institution. As a result of this sustained research effort, the IPP now has a collection of fifteen consecutive QPs. With an aggregate sample size of over 8800, we are now able to make precise statistical inferences with greater confidence than was possible when using individual QP samples. Such an extremely large sample mitigates two kinds of common survey research problems.

  2. INTRODUCING MEXICAN NEEDLETS FOR CMB ANALYSIS: ISSUES FOR PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH STANDARD NEEDLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Scodeller, S.; Rudjord, Oe.; Hansen, F. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Marinucci, D. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Geller, D.; Mayeli, A., E-mail: sandro.scodeller@astro.uio.no [Department of Mathematics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3651 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Over the last few years, needlets have emerged as a useful tool for the analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Our aim in this paper is first to introduce into the CMB literature a different form of needlets, known as Mexican needlets, first discussed in the mathematical literature by Geller and Mayeli. We then proceed with an extensive study of the properties of both standard and Mexican needlets; these properties depend on some parameters which can be tuned in order to optimize the performance for a given application. Our second aim in this paper is then to give practical advice on how to adjust these parameters for WMAP and Planck data in order to achieve the best properties for a given problem in CMB data analysis. In particular, we investigate localization properties in real and harmonic space and propose a recipe for quantifying the influence of galactic and point-source masks on the needlet coefficients. We also show that for certain parameter values, the Mexican needlets provide a close approximation to the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelets (whence their name), with some advantages concerning their numerical implementation and derivation of their statistical properties.

  3. Remedial Action Plan for the codisposal and stabilization of the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1993-02-01

    This document is a revision of the original Mexiacan Hat Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and RAP Modification submitted in July 1988 and January 1989, respectively, along with updated design documents. This RAP has been developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Section 2.0 presents the EPA standards, including a discussion of their objectives. Section 3. 0 summarizes the present site characteristics and provides a definition of site-specific problems. Section 4.0 is the site design for the proposed action. Section 5.0 presents the water resources protection strategy. Section 6.0 summarizes the plan for ensuring health and safety protection for the surrounding community and the on- site workers. Section 7.0 lists the responsibilities of the project participants. Section 8.0 describes the features of the long-term surveillance and maintenance plan.

  4. Logistics measurement and performance for United States-Mexican operations under NAFTA

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.E.; Smith, S.R.

    1995-12-01

    An empirical study utilizing a survey methodology was undertaken to explore the issues surrounding logistics performance under the recently enacted North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The study surveyed 524 senior level managers directly responsible for their strategic business units` operations involving Mexican production sharing. The study focused on what role Mexican production facilities take in the production process, relative technology level, planning activities, final destination of products, and what level of logistics performance was required to successfully operate. Some of the findings suggest a need to reevaluate current strategies to incorporate logistics support systems. Many benefits of true integration may have been overlooked since logistics was given a secondary position when strategies were formulated. Excessive tranportation and distribution costs may be lowered if logistics is given a higher emphasis in corporate decision making.

  5. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

  6. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix E. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This document provides Appendix E of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP) presented in 1988 for the stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at the Mexican Hat, Utah site. The RAP was developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. The RAP has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action.

  7. Assessment of the radiological impact of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Fox, W.F.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    High surface soil concentrations of /sup 226/Ra and high above-ground measurements of gamma-ray intensity in the vicinity of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Mexican Hat show both wind and water erosion of the tailings. The former mill area, occupied by a trade school at the time of this survey, shows a comparatively high level of contamination, probably from unprocessed ore on the surface of the ore storage area near the location of the former mill buildings. However, the estimated health effect of exposure to gamma rays during a 2000-hr work year in the area represents an increase of 0.1% in the risk of death from cancer. Exposure of less than 600 persons within 1.6 km of the tailings to radon daughters results in an estimated 0.2%/year increase in risk of lung cancer.

  8. A general overview of the Mexican battery industry with the effects and opportunities that NAFTA will have on it

    SciTech Connect

    Malacon, S.

    1995-02-01

    This article, overviewing the past and future of the Mexican battery manufacturing industry, was originally presented at the 1994 IBMA Convention. The past history of Mexican battery manufacturing remains factual and unchanged. However, the present is still developing in ways unforeseen at this time, especially with the acceptance of Mexico into the the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Previous to NAFTA, the Mexican battery market was protected by import duties approaching one hundred percent. This protection made the battery industry in Mexico inefficient against international competition. Mexico was accepted into the General Agreement of Tariffs and Trade (GATT) in 1985 which made the economy start to open, with import duties reduced and import licenses required for only a few items. The NAFTA agreement, phased in over fifteen years beginning in 1994, reduces tariffs to zero for trade between Canada, the USA, and Mexico. The articles focuses on trends in automotive parts trade, including batteries; rules of origin that determine whether a good can be traded freely; and evaluation of NAFTA and trade trends in the period Jan. to June, 1994.

  9. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor

    2014-11-07

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  10. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Appendix D. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This appendix is an assessment of the present conditions of the inactive uranium mill site near Mexican Hat, Utah. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan. Plan is to characterize the conditions at the mill and tailings site so that the Remedial Action Contractor may complete final designs of the remedial action.

  11. Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Text, Appendices A--C. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a two- fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents. Appendices A,B, and C are provided as part of this document. Appendix A presents regulatory compliance issues, Appendix B provides details of the engineering design, and Appendix C presents the radiological support plan.

  12. Modification to the Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Mexican Hat, Utah: Volume 1, Text, Attachments 1--6. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1989-01-01

    This document provides the modifications to the 1988 Remedial Action Plan (RAP) of the contaminated materials at the Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah. The text detailing the modifications and attachments 1 through 6 are provided with this document. The RAP was developed to serve a two-fold purpose. It presents the activities proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials (RRM) from Monument Valley, Arizona, and Mexican Hat, Utah, at the Mexican Hat disposal site. It also serves to document the concurrence of both the Navajo Nation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by DOE and the Navajo Nation and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement. This document has been structured to provide a comprehensive understanding of the remedial action proposed for the Monument Valley and Mexican Hat sites. It includes specific design and construction requirements for the remedial action. Pertinent information and data are included with reference given to the supporting documents.

  13. Preliminary risk assessment of the Mexican Spotted Owl under a spatially-weighted foraging regime at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D.; Pratt, L.E.

    1997-02-01

    The Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory requires that the Department of Energy takes special precautions to protect the Mexican Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis lucida). In order to do so, risk to the owl presented by radiological and nonradiological contaminants must be estimated. A preliminary risk assessment on the Mexican Spotted Owl in two Ecological Exposure Units (EEUs) was performed using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Quotient method, the FORTRAN model ECORSK4, and a geographic information system. Estimated doses to the owl under a spatially-weighted foraging regime were compared against toxicological reference doses generating hazard indices (HIs) and hazard quotients (HQs) for three risk source types. The average HI was 0.20 for EEU-21 and 0.0015 for EEU-40. Under the risk parameter assumptions made, hazard quotient results indicated no unacceptable risk to the owl, including a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes a linear additive toxicity type. An HI of 1.0 was used as the evaluative criteria for determining the acceptability of risk. This value was exceeded (1.06) in only one of 200 simulated potential nest sites. Cesium-137, Ni, {sup 239}Pu, Al and {sup 234}U we`re among the constituents with the highest partial HQs. Improving model realism by weighting simulated owl foraging based on distance from potential nest sites decreased the estimated risk by 72% (0.5 HI units) for EEU-21 and by 97.6% (6.3E-02 HI units) for EEU-40. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, owl habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain risk from contaminants at acceptably low levels.

  14. A G {r_arrow} A transition at position IVS-11 +1 of the HEX A {alpha}-chain gene in a non-Ashkenazic Mexican Tay-Sachs infant

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, S.R.P.; Gwon, S.; DeGasperi, R.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is an autosomal recessive storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, {beta}-N-acetylhexosaminidase A (Hex A), a heteropolymer composed of two polypeptides, {alpha} and {beta}. Mutations in the {alpha}-chain gene render the enzyme defective, resulting in the accumulation of g{sub m2} ganglioside in the nervous system. Deficiency of Hex A was detected in a non-Ashkenazic girl of Mexican origin indicating infantile onset of TSD. Molecular investigation of the {alpha}-chain gene excluded the typical Ashkenazic 4 bp insertion in the exon 11 and the intron 12 splice-junction mutations by Hae III and Dde I restriction analysis, respectively. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis showed a different pattern in the sample where exon 11 and flanking regions were amplified in the patient DNA as compared to the migration of control DNA. Sequencing of PCR amplified genomic DNA containing exon 11 and flanking intronic regions showed a single base substitution (G {r_arrow} A) at position IVS-11 +1. This mutation creates a recognition site for the restriction enzyme Mbo II. Digestion of exon 11 and flanking regions with Mbo II demonstrated homozygosity of the patient for this mutation and heterozygosity in the mother. mRNA from cultured fibroblasts obtained from a normal control and from the propositus was reverse transcribed. The cDNAs coding for Hex A {alpha}-chain were amplified in four overlapping fragments. In the patient sample it was not possible to amplify the fragment containing the exon 11/intron 11 junction, indicating that this mutation alters normal RNA processing of the Hex A pre-mRNA resulting in the deficiency of Hex A activity.

  15. Mexican firms commit to responsabilidad integral

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.

    1992-12-09

    With the prospect of Mexico joining the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), eyes are on the environmental performance of that country's chemical industry. Its image has already been dented directly by pollution problems at certain maquiladora plants on the U.S. border, and indirectly by the April explosions at Guadalajara, blamed on gasoline leaks from state oil group Petroleos Mexicanos, (Pemex). NAFTA has drown the issue into focus, since the pact could encourage companies to build plants in Mexico to take advantage of cheaper labor costs. Concerned that laxer environmental provisions could also play a part, environmentalists are pressuring Washington to ensure that NAFTA puts Mexico on a par with the rest of North America. But chemical markers assert that Mexico's environmental legislation is already similar to that of the US. And, under the administration of President Carlos Salinas Gortari, the Ministry of Social Development has upped enforcement, fined a number of producers, and closed down some chemical units for failing to meet environmental regulations.

  16. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sabloff, J A

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  17. Free trade and freer petchems drive Mexican restructuring

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.

    1992-11-25

    When Mexico first opened up its protected markets in 1987 by cutting import tariffs, it thrust the chemical industry into a phase of change. Now, with the advent of the North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA) and the liberalization of petrochemicals by state oil group Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex), restructuring has moved up a gear.

  18. Mexican-German Climate Alliance | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    (GIZ) Partner SEMARNAT, Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission...

  19. Fisheries Management of Mexican and Central American Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Amezcua-Martinez, Felipe; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2014-09-14

    The contributed papers in this book provide research undertaken in estuarine systems of Mexico and Central America that aim to provide a scientific basis for proper estuarine management. The book is divided in three parts that cover topics associated with fisheries management and regulations: physicochemical studies, ecological studies and socioeconomic studies. This introduction outlines the contents of this book in relation to the management of coastal ecosystems, which have a high socioeconomic importance for a large proportion of the population in this area of the world. Rather than be a definitive suite of papers for the regulation of these habitats, the goal of this book is to outline the urgent need to continue research of threatened coastal ecosystems of Mexico and Central America.

  20. Mexican University Program presentations for the University of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    3-5, 2011 in Guadalajara, Jalisco, MEXICO.; Related Information: Proposed for ... at the University of Guadalajara held October 3-5, 2011 in Guadalajara, Jalisco, MEXICO

  1. New pemex agency, smog checks greet Mexican LPG vehicle users

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that the relaxation of prohibitions on the use of propane as a motor fuel has spurred sizeable business activity in carburetion and higher demand for LPG throughout Mexico and particularly in Mexico City. However, a number of unforeseen problems have developed that required tough, immediate solutions. After the alternative fuels project began at city hall in Mexico City, publicity spread nationwide, reportedly spurring conversion activity in many other cities. That led to additional demand for fuel of a magnitude that few people had anticipated. In order to assume control of the situation, the national oil company, Pemex, established an official LPG Motor Fuel Department on June 1. Operating in conjunction with the Ministry of Industry, the new department has been busy registering every major propane-powered fleet in the country. Most important, the rate of conversion work must now be pegged to the availability of fuel. It is believed that conversion activity has become more evenly paced since the new Pemex agency took over.over.

  2. Northern New Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    to bring the youth academic enrichment through emphasis on science, math and language arts in addition to honoring tradition. Through the program, which offers Tewa classes in...

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mexican Hat AEC Ore Buying...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were ...

  4. Northern New Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dakota

    North Dakota and Texas help boost U.S. oil reserves to highest level since 1975 U.S. proved oil reserves have topped 36 billion barrels for the first time in nearly four decades...with North Dakota and Texas accounting for 90% of the increase according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. In a new report, EIA says U.S. proved reserves of crude oil and lease condensate increased for the fifth year in a row in 2013 and exceed 36 billion barrels for the first time since 1975.

  5. Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    that our efforts to protect these species are making an impact." Under its Habitat Management Plan, the Laboratory protects and manages species that are federally listed as...

  6. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mayan Nigerian Qua Iboe Venezuelan Merey 1983 Average ... 24.54 - 23.99 - - 1984 Average ... 24.70 - 25.35 - - 1985 Average ... 23.79 - 24.23 - - 1986...

  7. New Mexicans` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Winter, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-01-01

    This report uses survey data to profile New Mexico residents` images and perceptions of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The survey results are the responses of a representative, stratified random sample of 992 New Mexico households to a set of questions asked in October, 1992. The data allow statistical inference to the general population`s responses to the same set of questions at the time the survey was administered. The results provide an overview of New Mexico residents` current images and perceptions of the Laboratory. The sample margin of error is plus or minus 3.5% at the 95% confidence level.

  8. IRIS Reactor a Suitable Option to Provide Energy and Water Desalination for the Mexican Northwest Region

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, G.; Ramirez, R.; Gomez, C.; Viais, J.

    2004-10-03

    The Northwest region of Mexico has a deficit of potable water, along this necessity is the region growth, which requires of additional energy capacity. The IRIS reactor offers a very suitable source of energy given its modular size of 300 MWe and it can be coupled with a desalination plant to provide the potable water for human consumption, agriculture and industry. The present paper assess the water and energy requirements for the Northwest region of Mexico and how the deployment of the IRIS reactor can satisfy those necessities. The possible sites for deployment of Nuclear Reactors are considered given the seismic constraints and the closeness of the sea for external cooling. And in the other hand, the size of the desalination plant and the type of desalination process are assessed accordingly with the water deficit of the region.

  9. Characterization of Mesoamerican jade

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R.L.; Sayre, E.V.; van Zelst, L.

    1983-11-23

    Jadeite occurring in the Motague River Valley of Guatemala has been characterized by neutron activation analysis and forms two district, phase-related groups. Comparison of the compositional profiles of Mayan jadeite artifacts reveals many specimens having profiles matching those of the Montagua source. Of particular interest are the large number of jadeite artifacts which show internal similarity yet have compositional patterns which are significantly different from the Montagua samples and Montagua-related artifacts. A few of the analyzed Costa Rican artifacts show patterns similar to those of the Motagua yet the vast majority fall within one of the two Costa Rican compositional groups. When considering the non-Motagua related Mayan artifacts, the analytical approach appears to be sufficiently sensitive so as to distinguish differences between the Chrome-green and Chichen-green material. Even two Honduran site specific groups of albite - cultural jade - form distinct groups.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Utah

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Utah Utah ut_map Green River Site Mexican Hat Site Monticello Site Salt Lake City Sites (2)

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- MexHat

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Utah Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Communications and Outreach Plan for the Navajo Nation Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Sites Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County,

  12. NAFTA: Energy provisions and environmental implications. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power of the Committee on Energy and Commerce House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, September 22, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This hearing discusses the energy provisions of NAFTA and on the related environmental and economic effects of expanded Mexican energy production.

  13. Microsoft Word - HAT 2008-final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation ... of the EarthScope USArray Project continues to collect data. ... and coming to equilibrium with the outlying areas. ...

  14. Energy Reform: New Paradigm forMexico's Growth

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    from Pemex E&P. 1. Oil investment climate in the Americas vary, recent Mexican ... across the hydrocarbon value change Contracts for E&P. Permits for ...

  15. PP-235 Sempra Energy Resources | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Sempra Energy Resources to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PDF icon PP-235 Sempra Energy Resources More Documents & ...

  16. Microsoft Word - Nogales Interconnection Project Commments-FPAA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mexican utilities, FPAA believes that the costs of the Project should be born entirely by those merchants and utilities who will be the direct beneficiaries of those transactions. ...

  17. Engaging Hispanic Leadership in the Federal Government

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Hispanics United in Strengthening  America," this year's theme for the National Organization for Mexican American Rights, Inc. (NOMAR) Training Conference, speaks to recruiting, training, and...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    in the country, and the Mexican constitution prohibits foreign ownership and investment in the exploration, production, refining, and marketing of the nation's hydrocarbon...

  19. 2016-2025 LM Strategic Plan

    Energy Saver

    Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site. BONUS, Puerto Rico, Decommissioned Reactor, Site. Center ... Pinellas Jersey City Maxey Flats Missouri University Research Reactor Alaska Wayne ...

  20. Restaurants

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Quick-find list Argonne | Continental | Mixed Menu | Burgers & Dogs | Pizza | Chicken | Seafood | Italian Mexican | Breakfast | Sandwiches | Asian | OtherEthnic | BBQ | Brew Pubs...

  1. Endangered Species

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Owl The Mexican spotted owl is the only subspecies of spotted owl recognized in New Mexico and generally inhabits mixed conifer and ponderosa pine forests in mountains and...

  2. Office of Legacy Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Office of Legacy Management Abandoned Uranium Mines Abandoned Uranium Mines Read more Amchitka, Alaska, Site Amchitka, Alaska, Site Read more Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    competition for oil investment from the upstream sector and the priority given to stemming, if not reversing, recent crude production declines. However, just as Mexican demand...

  4. Protecting Wildlife

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Found in Pellets of Mexican Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis lucida) from Los Alamos, New Mexico Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Predator and Bottom-Feeding Fish from Abiquiu...

  5. Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and Coal for Electricity, under the Mexican Scenario Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Levelized Costs for Nuclear, Gas and ...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News: Archive

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    use of renewable energy technologies in eight Mexican states: Marcos Alvarez, a cattle rancher in the desert of Baja California, Mexico, faced a dilemma each year that cost...

  7. Success at Sandia - Attracting Top Native American STEM Professionals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Stan Atcitty, a Sandia engineer, works on power electronics and energy storage integration ... From their labs under the hot New Mexican sun, the staff at Sandia National Laboratories ...

  8. Profile for Elizabeth Hong-Geller

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Interview with Santa Fe New Mexican on Host-Pathogen research, 1132012 Featured in Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News, OMICs section "Embattled RNAi Technology Tries New ...

  9. We have a new Community Commitment Plan

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan is no longer a specific contractual obligation. We listened to many Northern New Mexicans and worked diligently to demonstrate that the previous 3 million LANS spent each...

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    is the primary repository for the waste, Martinez added, "This is an example of New Mexicans working together to solve an environmental challenge and demonstrates the high degree...

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory celebrates 1000th transuranic...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    is the primary repository for the waste, Martinez added, "This is an example of New Mexicans working together to solve an environmental challenge and demonstrates the high degree...

  12. Industry sector analysis, Mexico: Annual petroleum report. Export Trade Information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The comprehensive appraisal of the Mexican Petroleum industry was completed in July 1991. Some of the topics concerning the Mexican petroleum industry covered in the Annual Petroleum Report include: exploration efforts, oil reserves, pipelines, refining, finances, transportation, alternative energy sources, and others. The report also contains lists of petrochemicals produced in Mexico and extensive statistics on oil production and export prices.

  13. 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mexican Hat, Utah Page 12-1 12.0 Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site 12.1 Compliance Summary The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected on April 7, 2015. The disposal cell was in excellent condition. Signs and posts were missing from P17 and P18 with the posts cut at ground surface using a pipe cutter. Access to Seep 0248 was overgrown and material from the upper cliff had collapsed onto the seep covering the majority of the seep

  14. FIRST DRAFT

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    paper everyday - Santa Fe New Mexican. If there are successes they need to be seen in the media. Have more activity towards disabled. Public Relations about programs. More efforts...

  15. Energy Secretary Moniz Will Host North American Energy Ministers in Trilateral Meeting Focused on Energy Cooperation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON—On December 15, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will host a trilateral meeting with Natural Resources Canada Minister Greg Rickford and Mexican Secretary of Energy Pedro Joaquin Coldwell.

  16. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dave Keller Dave Keller-Sleepless in Los Alamos From the end of March into early May, Keller and the Laboratory's other wildlife biologists monitor the Mexican Spotted Owl's ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Office of ES&H, Office of Epidemiologic Studies (United States) USDOE Office of ES&H, ... Since 1989, the Mexican government has implemented a radical program of reconstructing the ...

  18. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The period of time the processing was performed is not known. The site also conducted developed research for the VCA processing plants at Naturita and Mexican Hat. The work was ...

  19. Mexico-NAMA Programme | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to the implementation of NAMAs in Mexican key sectors (residential buildings, solar cooling) that are (co-)financed by the public andor private sector and that are framed by...

  20. 2015 REDI summit focuses on community sustainability

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The highest percentage of New Mexicans living in poverty (33 percent) had less than a high school education, according to 2009-2013 U.S. Census Bureau data, while only six percent ...

  1. At LANL-sponsored networking forum, businesses make their pitch...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    key goal of the Recovery Act is to provide jobs and opportunities for Northern New Mexicans. October 22, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in...

  2. Regional nonprofits receive sizeable monetary boost

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    deserved as a result of that war's widespread unpopularity at the time. "A lot of New Mexicans served in Vietnam," Hopwood noted. "The very first soldier who fell in Vietnam, Turk...

  3. MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTAN'JING AMONG THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTAN'JING AMONG THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES OF CANADA AND THE MINISTRY OF ENERGY OF THE UNITED MEXICAN STATES CONCERNING COOPERATION ON ENERGY INFORMATION The Department of Energy of the United States of America, the Department of Natural Resourcesof Canada, and the Ministry of Energy of the United Mexican States, hereinafter referred to asthe "Participants": NOTING the longstanding and productive

  4. Endangered Species

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Endangered Species Protecting our Endangered Species The Endangered Species Act requires that endangered species be protected at the individual level. February 2, 2015 Adult Mexican Spotted Owl Adult Mexican Spotted Owl recorded in 2010. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The Habitat Management Plan details how threatened and endangered species and their habitats are managed at LANL. Endangered species on

  5. North America Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    North American Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling North American Energy Working Group NORTH AMERICAN ENERGY WORKING GROUP The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The Group is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. RegIntlElecTrade_Eng_final.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    North America Regulation of International Electricity Trade prepared by North American Energy Working Group December 2002 2 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEW G) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The Group is led by officials from Natural Resources Canada, the Mexican Secretariat of

  7. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Seven federally protected Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Los Alamos National Laboratory property July 13, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 13, 2015-Biologists located a record seven federally threatened Mexican spotted owl chicks on Los Alamos National Laboratory property during nest surveys last month."We've never found this many chicks," said Chuck Hathcock, wildlife biologist with the Environmental Stewardship group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. "It's encouraging to see

  8. Director at Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) at Sandia National Laboratories Sidney Gutierrez Sidney Gutierrez June 2010 Notable New Mexican Sidney Gutierrez, former NASA astronaut, retired U.S. Air Force colonel and a director at Sandia National Laboratories, has been named the 2010 Notable New Mexican by the Albuquerque Museum Foundation. He will be honored June 2 at the 10th annual award ceremony, where award-winning santero artist Arthur López will unveil a bulto depicting Gutierrez and the story of his

  9. New trends in industrial energy efficiency in the Mexico iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, Leticia; Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Sheinbaum, Claudia

    1999-07-31

    Energy use in the Mexican industrial sector experienced important changes in the last decade related to changes in the Mexican economy. In previous studies, we have shown that a real change in energy-intensity was the most important factor in the overall decline of energy use and CO2 emissions in the Mexican industrial sector. Real changes in energy intensity were explained by different factors, depending on the industrial sub-sector. In this paper, we analyze the factors that influenced energy use in the Mexican iron and steel industry, the largest energy consuming and energy-intensive industry in the country. To understand the trends in this industry we used a decomposition analysis based on physical indicators to decompose the changes in intra-sectoral structural changes and efficiency improvements. Also, we use a structure-efficiency analysis for international comparisons, considering industrial structure and the best available technology. In 1995, Mexican iron and steel industry consumed 17.7 percent of the industrial energy consumption. Between 1970 and 1995, the steel production has increased with an annual growth rate of 4.7 percent, while the specific energy consumption (SEC) has decreased from 28.4 to 23.8 GJ/tonne of crude steel. This reduction was due to energy efficiency improvements (disappearance of the open hearth production, increase of the share of the continuous casting) and to structural changes as well (increase of the share of scrap input in the steelmaking).

  10. Energy and environment market conditions in Mexico. Business focus series

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The report provides: (1) an overview of the Mexican economy and the energy and environmental sectors; (2) specific market assessments of the oil and gas sector, the electric power sector, the industrial air pollution control sector, and the municipal and industrial water pollution control sector; and (3) an analysis of the Mexican business climate and procedures. Each of the sectors is projected to show significant growth over the next several years. The Mexican government has taken many positive steps to improve the country's business climate, including trade and foreign exchange liberalization, foreign investment incentives, and strengthened intellectual property regulation. The North American Free Trade Agreement is expected to further improve the business climate in Mexico.

  11. PP-16 Alendatory Permit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Alendatory Permit PP-16 Alendatory Permit Presidential permit authorizing Alendatory Permit to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-16 Alendatory Permit (422.88 KB) More Documents & Publications PP-16-1 UNS Electric Inc PP-235-2 Termoelectrica U.S LLC PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc

  12. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Annual Environmental Monitoring Report calendar year 1992: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report contains environmental monitoring information for the following UMTRA sites for the 1992 Calendar Year: Lakeview, OR; Lowman, ID; Mexican Hat, UT; Monument Valley, AZ; Rifle, CO; Riverton, WY; Shiprock, NM; Spook, WY; Tuba City, AZ. Each site report contains a site description, compliance summary, environmental program information, environmental radiological and non-radiological program information, water resources protection, and quality assurance information.

  13. (Attendance at the XIV Nuclear Physics Symposium)

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.

    1991-01-16

    This report includes background material on the long-standing series of annual symposia presented by the Mexican nuclear physics community, summarizes the highlights of the fourteenth symposium in the series, and records items learned by the traveler in subsequent visits to two research laboratories in Mexico.

  14. Opportunity for America: Mexico`s coal future

    SciTech Connect

    Loose, V.W.

    1993-09-01

    This study examines the history, current status and future prospects for increased coal use in Mexico. Environmental implications of the power-generation capacity expansion plans are examined in general terms. Mexican environmental law and regulations are briefly reviewed along with the new sense of urgency in the cleanup of existing environmental problems and avoidance of new problems as clearly mandated in recent Mexican government policy initiatives. It is expected that new capital facilities will need to incorporate the latest in process and technology to comply with existing environmental regulation. Technology developments which address these issues are identified. What opportunities have new initiatives caused by the recent diversification of Mexico`s energy economy offered US firms? This report looks at the potential future use of coal in the Mexican energy economy, examining this issue with an eye toward identifying markets that might be available to US coal producers and the best way to approach them. Market opportunities are identified by examining new developments in the Mexican economy generally and the energy economy particularly. These developments are examined in light of the current situation and the history which brought Mexico to its present status.

  15. Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mexico NNSA Recovers Radiological Material from Mexico WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in partnership with the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the U.S. Air Force (USAF), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the United Mexican States, has successfully completed the

  16. Mechanical Properties of Unreinforced Brick Masonry, Section1

    SciTech Connect

    Mosalam, K; Glascoe, L; Bernier, J

    2009-10-02

    Before the advent of concrete and steel, masonry helped build civilizations. From Egypt in Africa, Rome in Europe, Maya in the America to China in Asia, masonry was exploited to construct the most significant, magnificent and long lasting structures on the Earth. Looking at the Egyptian pyramids, Mayan temples, Roman coliseum and Chinese Great Wall, one cannot stop wondering about the significance and popularity that masonry has had through out history. Lourenco et al (1989) summed up the reasons for the popularity of masonry in the following, 'The most important characteristic of masonry construction is its simplicity. Laying pieces of stone or bricks on top of each other, either with or without cohesion via mortar, is a simple, though adequate, technique that has been successful ever since remote ages. Other important characteristics are the aesthetics, solidity, durability, low maintenance, versatility, sound absorption and fire protection' Despite these advantages, masonry is no longer preferred structural material in many parts of the developed world, especially in seismically active parts of the world. Partly, masonry and especially unreinforced masonry (URM) has mechanical properties such as strength and ductility inferior to those of reinforced concrete and steel. Moreover, masonry structures were traditionally built based on rules of thumb acquired over many years of practice and/or empirical data from testing. Accordingly, we do not have a rigorous and uniform method of analysis and design for masonry. Nevertheless, the world still possesses numerous historic and ordinary masonry structures, which require maintenance and strengthening to combat the assault of time and nature. Hence, it is important to study fundamental properties of masonry so that new masonry structures can be effectively designed and built, and the cost for servicing old structures and for building new ones will be less expensive.

  17. Correlations estimate volume distilled using gravity, boiling point

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.; Consuelo Perez de Alba, M. del; Manriquez, L.; Guardia Mendoz, P. de la

    1995-10-23

    Mathematical nd graphic correlations have been developed for estimating cumulative volume distilled as a function of crude API gravity and true boiling point (TBP). The correlations can be used for crudes with gravities of 21--34{degree} API and boiling points of 150--540 C. In distillation predictions for several mexican and Iraqi crude oils, the correlations have exhibited accuracy comparable to that of laboratory measurements. The paper discusses the need for such a correlation and the testing of the correlation.

  18. Mexico: Paving the way

    SciTech Connect

    Erckert, C.

    1993-02-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) signed last year by the presidents of Mexico and the United States and the Canadian prime minister will pave the way for increased outside participation in Mexico's growing energy sector. In its penultimate session of 1992, the Mexican Congress approved a bill which would enact the treaty provisions into domestic law and expand upon the details of previously enacted liberalization plans.

  19. 201603_DNR Summit Sidebar

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Navajo Uranium Mill Sites Sidebar Meeting Dr. April Gil Rich Bush Mark Kautsky Angelita Denny U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Navajo Division of Natural Resources Summit 2016 Current LM Sites 2 Summary of LM Involvement on Navajo Nation Land  DOE has responsibility for four Navajo Nation sites * Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site * Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site * Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site * Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site  DOE and the

  20. SREL Reprint #3170

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Microsatellite markers isolated from the Mexican banded spring snail Mexipyrgus churinceanus Lyndon M. Coghill1, Johel Chaves-Campos1, Flor E. Espinoza1, Stacey L. Lance3, Travis C. Glenn2, and Steven G. Johnson1 1Department of Biological Sciences, University of New Orleans, 2000 Lakeshore Dr, New Orleans, LA 70148, USA 2Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 3Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802, USA

  1. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. April 30, 2013 The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. An international team of researchers,

  2. PP-234 Baja California Power Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    234 Baja California Power Inc PP-234 Baja California Power Inc Presidential permit authorizing Baja California Power Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-234 Baja California Power Inc (905.28 KB) More Documents & Publications PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-234 Baja California Power, Inc PP-16-1 UNS Electric Inc

  3. Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2015 Students gain new insights into their ancestry LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 24, 2015-San Ildefonso Pueblo's Summer Education Enhancement Program brought together academic and cultural learning in the form of a recent tour of Cave Kiva Trail in Mortandad Canyon."Opening up this archaeological site and sharing it with the descendants of its first inhabitants is a

  4. Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Hawks nesting Bike rider commutes to work at LANL A bobcat walking on LANL property Weather monitoring at LANL supermoon over Los Alamos New Mexican Spotted Owls Sunset over LANL Over the next several decades, we anticipate significant changes to the mission and operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our strategy commits to a progressively more sustainable site, a mission entwined with and accomplished by effective

  5. Science on the Hill

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on the Hill Science on the Hill Recent Los Alamos research and achievements featured in the Santa Fe New Mexican News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets This 3D image taken at Los Alamos National Laboratory by x-ray tomography shows an experimental fuel cell membrane electrode assembly. On track for a clean, hydrogen-powered future Los Alamos, within the ElectroCat consortium, is investigating less expensive, more abundant

  6. Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monument Valley, Arizona, Processing Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Monument Valley, Arizona. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Site Description and History The Monument Valley processing site is located on the Navajo Nation in northeastern Arizona, approximately 15 miles south of Mexican Hat, Utah, on the west side of Cane Valley. A uranium-ore

  7. PP-16-1 UNS Electric Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    -1 UNS Electric Inc PP-16-1 UNS Electric Inc Presidential permit authorizing UNS Electric Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-16-1 UNS Electric Inc (879.04 KB) More Documents & Publications PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc PP-234 Baja California Power Inc PP-16 Alendatory Permit

  8. PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    6 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership Presidential permit authorizing Frontera Generation Limited Partnership to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-206 Frontera Generation Limited Partnership (19.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-403 Frontera Marketing, LLC PP-174 Imperial Irrigation District PP-53 Rio Grande Electric

  9. PP-219 Central Power and Light Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    19 Central Power and Light Company PP-219 Central Power and Light Company Presidential permit authorizing Central Power and Light Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-219 Central Power and Light Company (946.17 KB) More Documents & Publications PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc PP-234 Baja California Power Inc PP-16 Alendatory Permit

  10. PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4-1 Baja California Power Inc PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc Presidential permit authorizing Baja California Power Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc (1.27 MB) More Documents & Publications PP-234 Baja California Power Inc PP-16-1 UNS Electric Inc PP-219 Central Power and Light Company

  11. Mexico's petroleum and US policy: implications for the 1980s

    SciTech Connect

    Ronfeldt, D.; Nehring, R.; Gandara, A.

    1980-06-01

    This report examines selected factor affecting Mexico's future petroleum policies, and then assesses various implications of Mexico's petroleum for US interests and policies. After a brief introduction, the report is divided into three sections. The first offers a detailed analysis of Mexico's petroleum resources and production possibilities. The second considers petroleum as a symbolic issue of profound significance for Mexican nationalism. The final section provides an assessment of these and other factors for US interests, objectives, and policy options during the 1980s.

  12. Protecting Lab land and the creatures that inhabit it

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Protecting Lab land and the creatures that inhabit it Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Protecting Lab land and the creatures that inhabit it Working to protect endangered species and minimizing fire danger. April 1, 2013 View of Sangre de Christo mauntains from overlook on NM502 Mexican Spotted Owls live on Lab property. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community

  13. Diana Natalicio | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Diana Natalicio About Us Diana Natalicio - President, The University of Texas at El Paso Diana Natalicio Diana Natalicio was named president of the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) in 1988. Dr. Natalicio has served as vice president for academic affairs, dean of liberal arts, chair of the modern languages department and professor of linguistics. During Dr. Natalicio's tenure as president, UTEP's enrollment has grown from 14,971 to more than 23,000 students, more than 78% are Mexican

  14. Climate Change Vulnerability and Resilience: Current Status and Trends for Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarraran , Maria E.; Malone, Elizabeth L.; Brenkert, Antoinette L.

    2010-08-25

    Climate change alters different localities on the planet in different ways. The impact on each region depends mainly on the degree of vulnerability that natural ecosystems and human-made infrastructure have to changes in climate and extreme meteorological events, as well as on the coping and adaptation capacity towards new environmental conditions. This study assesses the current resilience of Mexico and Mexican states to such changes, as well as how this resilience will look in the future.

  15. Community Connections: April 2015

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2015 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE Celebrating and supporting women Technical fields offer lucrative opportunities for female New Mexicans MidSchoolMath conference helps teachers, students and regional economy International participants come to Santa Fe from as far away as Colombia and Dubai In other news Laboratory dramatically reduces water use;

  16. Community Connections: April 2016

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2016 Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit IN THIS ISSUE RoboRave brings science to life More than 300 students build robots, discover STEM fields Major Subcontractors Consortium sharpens its focus Area businesses gain more value in MSC collaboration with Lab in 2016 Los Alamos's portable MRI machine may benefit New Mexicans New technology may serve New Mexico's rural

  17. United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman and Mexican Minister of Finance and Public Credit Agustin Carstens today signed an agreement to help detect and prevent the smuggling of nuclear and other radioactive material. Under the Megaports agreement, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear

  18. PP-234-1

    Energy Saver

    234 Baja California Power Inc PP-234 Baja California Power Inc Presidential permit authorizing Baja California Power Inc to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexican border. PP-234 Baja California Power Inc (905.28 KB) More Documents & Publications PP-234-1 Baja California Power Inc Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-234 Baja California Power, Inc PP-16-1 UNS Electric Inc

  19. In other news

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    In other news Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit In other news Manhattan Project park planning committee visits Los Alamos; Native American Economic Summit was a success; Laboratory giving supports United Way of Northern New Mexico grants; New "Science on the Hill" column in Santa Fe New Mexican; Thirteen area students receive Oppenheimer memorial scholarships; Book

  20. In other news

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    In other news Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit In other news Maestas-Swazo named Lab's tribal liaison; new head for DOE's Los Alamos cleanup office; 2015 recipients of Northern New Mexico Tribal Business Scholarship; LANL Laces and school supplies drive invest in students; seven Mexican spotted owl chicks hatch on Lab property; new podcast September 1, 2015 Baxter the Bear

  1. In other news

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    In other news Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit In other news Safety, supercomputing, science museums, scholarships-read all about 'em. May 2, 2016 May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month Richard Sturgeon, head of the Lab's Motorcycle Safety Committee, wrote to the Governor suggesting that the state raise the safety awareness of New Mexican drivers and motorcyclists as the

  2. 1

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    captures first image April 30, 2013 An international team of researchers, including scientists from Los Alamos, has taken the first image of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC. The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. Although only 10 percent of the observatory is constructed, the team has made its

  3. Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States - English Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    GUIDE TO FEDERAL REGULATION OF SALES OF IMPORTED ELECTRICITY IN CANADA, MEXICO, AND THE UNITED STATES A Publication of The North American Energy Working Group January 2005 1 The North American Energy Working Group The North American Energy Working Group (NAEWG) was established in spring of 2001 by the Canadian Minister of Natural Resources, the Mexican Secretary of Energy and the U.S. Secretary of Energy, to enhance North American energy cooperation. The NAEWG is led by officials from Natural

  4. North American Free Trade Agreement: Mexico`s petroleum sector (Part I and Part II). Joint Hearings before the Subcommittees on International Economic Policy and Trade and Western Hemisphere Affairs of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, March 26 and May 5, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Joint hearings were held on the The North American Free Trade Agreement(NAFTA): Mexico`s Petroleum Sector. The purpose of this session was to receive a report from the General Accounting Office. The report Mexican Oil: Issues Affecting the Potential U.S. Trade and Development was requested by the Congress to aid in deciding if Oil should be included in the NAFTA. The report included: (1) recent trends in Mexican oil production and exports and the primary factors affecting Mexico`s ability to meet current production and export goals, (2) the views of U.S. oil-producing and oil service contracting companies regarding principal barriers to and potential benefits of U.S. trade with and investment in Mexico`s petroleum sector and the response of Mexican officials to those views, and (3) U.S. government efforts to assist Mexico`s petroleum sector. Prepared statements of government and industry officials were included in the record of the proceedings.

  5. NAFTA opportunities: Bituminous coal and lignite mining

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) secures and improves market access in Mexico and Canada for the United States bituminous coal and lignite mining sector. Canada is one of the United States' largest export markets for bituminous coal and lignite, with exports of $486.7 million in 1992. Conversely, the Mexican market is one of the smallest export markets for U.S. producers with exports of $1.8 million in 1992. Together, however, Canada and Mexico represent approximately 15 percent of total U.S. coal exports. The report presents a sectoral analysis.

  6. NAFTA opportunities: Electrical equipment and power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) provides significant commercial opportunities in Mexico and Canada for the United States electric equipment and power generation industries, through increased goods and services exports to the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE) and through new U.S. investment in electricity generation facilities in Mexico. Canada and Mexico are the United States' two largest export markets for electrical equipment with exports of $1.53 billion and $1.51 billion, respectively, in 1992. Canadian and Mexican markets represent approximately 47 percent of total U.S. exports of electric equipment. The report presents an economic analysis of the section.

  7. 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Resolution of Seep and Ground Water Monitoring at the Mexican Hat, Utah, UMTRCA Title I Disposal Site March 2006 DOE M/GJ1139 2006 - -L Work Performed nder DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. by the S.M. Stoller Corporation u DE AC01 02GJ79491 - - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management This page intentionally left blank S02222 DOE-LM/GJ1139-2006 Office of

  8. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Opportunity Assessment for USAID Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Andrea; Bracho, Ricardo; Romero, Rachel; Mercer, Megan

    2015-11-13

    The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program is designing its second phase of assistance to the Government of Mexico (GOM). In preparation for program design, USAID has asked the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assist in identifying options for enabling renewable energy in Mexico and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the energy sector. The NREL team conducted a literature review and consulted with over 20 Mexican agencies and organizations during a two-week temporary duty assignment (TDY) to Mexico to identify gaps, opportunities, and program theme areas for Mexico.

  9. Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1994-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  10. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  11. MAC-GWHAT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GWHAT 1.1 Rev. 1 Final Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Mexican Hat, Utah July 1998 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number UGW-511-0014-03-000 Document Number U0026800 Work Performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Document Number U0026800 Contents DOE/Grand Junction Office Site Observational Work Plan for

  12. Microsoft Word - S03535_Oct2007

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Plan for the Mexican Hat, Utah (UMTRCA Title I), Disposal Site San Juan County, Utah October 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1530 2007 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1530-2007 Revision 3

  13. Risk of Zika virus is low in New Mexico

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Risk of Zika virus is low in New Mexico Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Risk of Zika virus is low in New Mexico Be cautious when traveling to warmer climates. June 2, 2016 Los Alamos National Lab epidemiologist Brian Foley co-authored a chapter on Zika virus in a recently published book on global virology and said there is little for New Mexicans to worry about when it

  14. Tikal obsidian: sources and typology

    SciTech Connect

    Moholy-Nagy, H.; Asaro, F.; Stross, F.H.

    1984-01-01

    The obsidian industry of Classic period Tikal, Guatemala, is discussed with regard to geological source determinations and behavioral typology. The potential of these two approaches for cultural reconstruction is greatly extended when they can supplement each other. Recent source determinations of obsidian artifacts from Tikal indicate (1) a behavioral link between locally-produced prismatic blades of Highland Guatemalan stone and ceremonial incised obsidians and eccentrics, and (2) a Central Mexican origin for a seemingly large portion of Tikal's obsidian projectile points and knives. 25 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  15. NNSA Recovers Radiological Material from Mexico | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Recovers Radiological Material from Mexico July 28, 2015 The irradiators were loaded on the U.S. Air Force C-17 in Southern Mexico and flown back to a base in the United States. WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), in partnership with the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the U.S. Air Force (USAF), the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the United Mexican States, has successfully completed

  16. Asia, North America lead way in growth of NGL, LPG trade

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, K.; Gist, R.; Whitley, C.; Haun, R.

    1998-01-12

    Recent analyses of world NGL trade indicate that important changes in LPG supply and demand are under way in Asia and North America. LPG markets in the 1990s reflect a rapidly shifting balance between East-of-Suez and West-of-Suez markets. This shift has increased concern about availability of future LPG supplies for Asia. The paper discusses world developments, East versus West of Suez, end uses and supplies in Asia, Canadian ethane, propane, butane, and natural gasoline, Mexican ethane, LPG, and natural gasoline, US ethane, propane, butanes, and iso-C{sub 4} and C{sub 5}.

  17. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Dave Keller June 2, 2014 It's 2 o'clock in the morning and pitch black. While most Laboratory employees are getting a good night's sleep, wildlife biologist Dave Keller and a colleague are up and about, stopping by the Environmental Protection Division's office in White Rock to pick up a four-wheel-drive government vehicle and head out to look for Mexican Spotted Owls, a federally listed threatened species living on Laboratory property. By the time Keller and his travel partner reach the first

  18. L EONARDO BELTRAN DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR PLANNING AND ENERGY TRANSITION OF MEXICO

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    L EONARDO BELTRAN DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR PLANNING AND ENERGY TRANSITION OF MEXICO MEXICAN ENERGY REFORM 2015 EIA ENERGY CONFERENCE JUNE 15, 2015 * AVERAGE DAILY IRRADIATION IN MEXICO IS ABOUT 5.5 KWH/M 2 /D, AND CAN REACH VALUES HIGHER THAN 8.5KWH/M 2 . ** STUDIES TO CHARACTERIZE THE WIND RESOURCE IN REGIONS OF THE ISTHMUS OF TEHUANTEPEC, THE PENINSULAS OF YUCATAN AND BAJA CALIFORNIA, AND THE NORTHERN REGION OF THE GULF OF MEXICO. *** GEOTHERMAL POTENTIAL BASED ON THE CENSUS OF MORE THAN 1,300

  19. Solar Two technology for Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    KOLB,GREGORY J.; STRACHAN,JOHN W.; GASCO,CLAUDIO ESTRADA

    2000-03-02

    Solar power towers, based on molten salt technology, have been the subject of extensive research and development since the late 1970s. In the mid 1980s, small experimental plants were successfully fielded in the USA and France that demonstrated the feasibility of the concept at a 1 to 2 MW{sub e} scale. Systems analyses indicate this technology will be cost competitive with coal-fired power plants after scaling-up plant size to the 100 to 200 MW{sub e} range. To help bridge the scale-up gap, a 10 MW{sub e} demonstration project known as Solar Two, was successfully operated in California, USA from 1996 to 1999. The next logical step could be to scale-up further and develop a 30 MW{sub e} project within the country of Mexico. The plant could be built by an IPP industrial consortium consisting of USA's Boeing and Bechtel Corporations, combined with Mexican industrial and financial partners. Plausible technical and financial characteristics of such a ``Solar-Two-type'' Mexican project are discussed in this paper.

  20. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  1. Contamination in marine turtle (Dermochelys coriaca) egg shells of Playon de Mexiquillo, Michoacan, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, G.F.; Reyes, M.C.; Fenandez, G.

    1997-02-01

    Concern for the decreasing population sizes of marine turtles around the world is growing. Potential contamination within habitats of marine turtles, and human activities, such as poaching, modification of nesting sites, and capture of adult turtles, may be responsible for their decreasing populations. Little is known about the baseline levels and physiological effects of environmental contaminants on marine turtle populations. Responding to this concern, the Mexican government has designated areas along the Mexican coastline to preserve marine turtle nesting habitats. {open_quotes}Playon de Mexiquillo{close_quotes}, Michocan, Mexico is one of the coastal preservation areas located near the mouth of Rio la Manzanilla which flows between Sierra Madre del Sur and the Pacific Ocean. Samples of seawater, sand, and marine turtle egg (Dermochelys Coriaca) shells were collected monthly from October, 1992-March, 1993. Contaminants investigated were oil and grease, and metals (cadmium, copper, zinc, nickel, and lead). Seawater samples were collected where the turtles lay eggs in the preservation area and sand samples were taken from the area surrounding the eggs. 12 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Association of low-level blood lead and blood pressure in NHANES 1999-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Scinicariello, Franco; Abadin, Henry G.; Edward Murray, H.

    2011-11-15

    This study investigated whether low blood-lead levels ({<=}10 {mu}g/dL) were associated with blood pressure (BP) outcomes. The authors analyzed data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2006 and participants aged 20 years or older. Outcome variables were systolic and diastolic BP measurements, pulse pressure, and hypertension status. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions stratified by race/ethnicity and gender were performed. Blood lead levels (BLL) were significantly correlated with higher systolic BP among black men and women, but not white or Mexican-American participants. BLLs were significantly associated with higher diastolic BPs among white men and women and black men, whereas, a negative association was observed in Mexican-American men that had, also, a wider pulse pressure. Black men in the 90th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{>=}3.50 {mu}g/dL) compared to black men in the 10th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{<=}0.7 {mu}g/dL) had a significant increase of risk of having hypertension (adjusted POR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.08-6.72). In addition, blood cadmium was significantly associated with hypertension and systolic and diastolic blood. This study found that, despite the continuous decline in blood lead in the U.S. population, lead exposure disparities among race and gender still exist.

  3. Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Third Quarter Report 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    The second quarter 1997 Quarterly Report of Natural Gas Imports and Exports featured a Quarterly Focus report on cross-border natural gas trade between the United States and Mexico. This Quarterly Focus article is a follow-up to the 1997 report. This report revisits and updates the status of some of the pipeline projects discussed in 1997, and examines a number of other planned cross-border pipeline facilities which were proposed subsequent to our 1997 report. A few of the existing and proposed pipelines are bidirectional and thus have the capability of serving either Mexico, or the United States, depending on market conditions and gas supply availability. These new projects, if completed, would greatly enhance the pipeline infrastructure on the U.S.-Mexico border and would increase gas pipeline throughput capacity for cross-border trade by more than 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day. The Quarterly Focus is comprised of five sections. Section I includes the introduction as well as a brief historic overview of U.S./Mexican natural gas trade; a discussion of Mexico's energy regulatory structure; and a review of trade agreements and a 1992 legislative change which allows for her cross-border gas trade in North America. Section II looks at initiatives that have been taken by the Mexican Government since 1995to open its energy markets to greater competition and privatization. Section III reviews Mexican gas demand forecasts and looks at future opportunities for U.S. gas producers to supplement Mexico's indigenous supplies in order to meet the anticipated rapid growth in demand. Section IV examines the U.S.-Mexico natural gas trade in recent years. It also looks specifically at monthly import and export volumes and prices and identifies short-term trends in this trade. Finally, Section V reviews the existing and planned cross-border gas pipeline infrastructure. The section also specifically describes six planned pipelines intended to expand this pipeline network and

  4. Multi-Attribute Decision Theory methodology for pollution control measure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera Roldan, A.S.; Corona Juarez, A. ); Hardie, R.W.; Thayer, G.R. )

    1992-01-01

    A methodology based in Multi-Attribute Decision Theory was developed to prioritize air pollution control measures and strategies (a set of measures) for Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). We have developed a framework that takes into account economic, technical feasibility, environmental, social, political, and institutional factors to evaluate pollution mitigation measures and strategies utilizing a decision analysis process. In a series of meetings with a panel of experts in air pollution from different offices of the mexican government we have developed General and Specific criteria for a decision analysis tree. With these tools the measures or strategies can be graded and a figure of merit can be assigned to each of them, so they can be ranked. Two pollution mitigation measures were analyzed to test the methodology, the results are presented. This methodology was developed specifically for Mexico City, though the experience gained in this work can be used to develop similar methodologies for other metropolitan areas throughout the world.

  5. Multi-Attribute Decision Theory methodology for pollution control measure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera Roldan, A.S.; Corona Juarez, A.; Hardie, R.W.; Thayer, G.R.

    1992-12-31

    A methodology based in Multi-Attribute Decision Theory was developed to prioritize air pollution control measures and strategies (a set of measures) for Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). We have developed a framework that takes into account economic, technical feasibility, environmental, social, political, and institutional factors to evaluate pollution mitigation measures and strategies utilizing a decision analysis process. In a series of meetings with a panel of experts in air pollution from different offices of the mexican government we have developed General and Specific criteria for a decision analysis tree. With these tools the measures or strategies can be graded and a figure of merit can be assigned to each of them, so they can be ranked. Two pollution mitigation measures were analyzed to test the methodology, the results are presented. This methodology was developed specifically for Mexico City, though the experience gained in this work can be used to develop similar methodologies for other metropolitan areas throughout the world.

  6. Mexico City air quality research initiative: An overview and some statistical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, R.A.; Streit, G.E. ); Guzman, F. )

    1991-01-01

    The Mexican Petroleum Institute (Institute Mexicano del Petroleo, IMP) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are in the first year of a three-year jointly funded project to examine the air quality in Mexico City and to provide techniques to evaluate the impact of proposed mitigation options. The technical tasks include modeling and simulation; monitoring and characterization; and strategic evaluation. Extensive measurements of the atmosphere, climate, and meteorology are being made as part of the study. This presentation provides an overview of the total project plan, reports on the current status of the technical tasks, describes the data collection methods, presents examples of the data analysis and graphics, and suggest roles for statistical analysis in this and similar environmental studies. 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Think twice before moving south: Environmental considerations of NAFTA

    SciTech Connect

    Ullman, A.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Managing the environment is an increasingly complex task for industries in the US In the 1990s, with the high cost of environmental management and the formation of regional trading alliances, strategic environmental management has become crucial to competitiveness. US corporations considering relocating some or all of their facilities to Mexico feel that lower labor costs and less stringent regulation will boost their competitive edge. While such a move may seem attractive, companies must consider what environmental costs will be borne. Companies may face substantial closure costs for existing facilities, including remediation of contaminated property and other restoration activities; they also may incur substantial pollution control equipment installation costs for new facilities. Additionally, they may face periodic facility shutdowns by strict Mexican Regulators. Many US corporations may consider relocating to Mexico. Before they do, however, they should carefully evaluate all of the expenses, including the environmental costs that will be incurred.

  8. North America: There's never been a slump like this

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The perspectives for petroleum development in North America are the subject of this survey. Observations include: Revised forecast of U.S. drilling calls for 34,028 wells and 165.8 million ft in 1986; Exploration will suffer the worst loss, with activity down as much as 70%; At best, an average of 675 to 725 rigs are expected to be active the second half; Canadian drillers ride roller coaster up on taxes, down on plunging oil prices; Incentives offered by various Canadian governments are a help, but not a cure; Pemex export earnings nosedive, bringing Mexican debt repayment into question; Guatemalan operators resume activity, major production increases planned for '86; Weak oil prices slash Castro's earnings from resale of Soviet-supplied crude oil.

  9. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

  10. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  11. Advances in heavy oil hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Mendizabal, O.B. )

    1988-06-01

    The world increase in heavy crudes has forced refiners to develop different processes that upgrade the yields and product properties recovered from these crudes. However, some of the optimized and new processes are not able to handle whole heavy crude oils, due to the high viscosity and corrosion of their long and short residues. The different processes for heavy crudes can be classified in two areas: physical (vg. Liquid Extraction) and chemical processes. The catalytic hydrotreating process, which belongs to this last classification, has demonstrated to be an economical upgrading process for heavy crude oil. This paper describes the development by the Mexican Petroleum Institute of the process to hydrotreat maya heavy crude. The effect of the operating conditions, the catalyst ---- development and the technical - economical analysis are presented. The product properties and yields are compared with the results obtained with light crude oil like isthmus.

  12. A technical and economic assessment of petroleum, heavy oil, shale oil and coal liquid refining

    SciTech Connect

    Sikonia, J.G.; Shah, B.R.; Ulowetz, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    Decreasing availability of conventional crude oil will result in the utilization of alternative raw materials for the production of transportation fuels. Based on currently available processes and as a result of detailed pilot plant studies, the differences in the technical and economic aspects of refining alternative feedstocks of heavy oil, coal liquids and shale oil have indicated that heavy, hydrogen-deficient materials require more complex and costly upgrading techniques. Compared to the base case of Arabian Light crude oil, the Mexican Maya heavy oil is worth about $4.35/B less, the coal liquid about $2.38/B less and the shale oil about $5.98/B less. All of these alternative fuels can be upgraded into high quality transportation fuels.

  13. Renewable energy for productive uses in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, C.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a USAID/USDOE sponsored program to implement renewable energy in Mexico for productive uses. The objectives are to expand markets for US and Mexican industries, and to combat global climate change - primarily greenhouse gas emissions. The focus is on off-grid applications, with an emphasis on developing the institution structure to support the development of these industries within the country. Agricultural development is an example of the type of industry approached, where photovoltaic and wind power can be used for water pumping. There are hundreds of projects under review, and this interest has put renewables as a line item in Mexico`s rural development budget. Village power projects are being considered in the form of utility partnerships.

  14. 1993 Annual performance report for Environmental Oversight and Monitoring at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    In October of 1990, the New Mexico Environment Department entered into an agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to create the Department of Energy Oversight and Monitoring Program. This program is designed to create an avenue for the State to ensure DOE facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental regulations, to allow the State oversight and monitoring independent of the DOE, to allow the State valuable input into remediation decision making, and to protect the environment and the public health and safety of New Mexicans concerning DOE facility activities. This agreement, called the Agreement in Principle (AIP), includes all four of New Mexico`s DOE facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos; Sandia National Laboratories and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad.

  15. Proceedings for air quality management programs: A workshop on lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Streit, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    The coordinators of this project at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo proposed a workshop to bring together an international group of experts to present both the lessons of history and the current practices in air quality management around the world. The workshop would also serve as a forum for presenting the accomplishments and plans of this project and for receiving comments from the assembled group. The workshop was favored with an outstanding set of speakers who represented a broad spectrum of experience. Their papers are presented in this volume. The total attendance was forty-four (see List of Participants) with representation from numerous interested Mexican institutions. Individual reports are processed separately for the database.

  16. Assessment of the Impacts of Standards and Labeling Programs inMexico (four products).

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Itha; Pulido, Henry; McNeil, Michael A.; Turiel, Isaac; della Cava, Mirka

    2007-06-12

    This study analyzes impacts from energy efficiency standards and labeling in Mexico from 1994 through 2005 for four major products: household refrigerators, room air conditioners, three-phase (squirrel cage) induction motors, and clothes washers. It is a retrospective analysis, seeking to assess verified impacts on product efficiency in the Mexican market in the first ten years after standards were implemented. Such an analysis allows the Mexican government to compare actual to originally forecast program benefits. In addition, it provides an extremely valuable benchmark for other countries considering standards, and to the energy policy community as a whole. The methodology for evaluation begins with historical test data taken for a large number of models of each product type between 1994 and 2005. The pre-standard efficiency of models in 1994 is taken as a baseline throughout the analysis. Model efficiency data were provided by an independent certification laboratory (ANCE), which tested products as part of the certification and enforcement mechanism defined by the standards program. Using this data, together with economic and market data provided by both government and private sector sources, the analysis considers several types of national level program impacts. These include: Energy savings; Environmental (emissions) impacts, and Net financial impacts to consumers, manufacturers and utilities. Energy savings impacts are calculated using the same methodology as the original projections, allowing a comparison. Other impacts are calculated using a robust and sophisticated methodology developed by the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in a collaboration supported by the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP).

  17. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; Hardin, Danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV

  18. Land subsidence in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, 1 Baja California, Mexico, from 1994 to 2005. An integrated analysis of DInSAR, levelingand geological data.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarychikhina, O; Glowacka, E; Mellors, R; Vidal, F S

    2011-03-03

    Cerro Prieto is the oldest and largest Mexican geothermal field in operation and has been producing electricity since 1973. The large amount of geothermal fluids extracted to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in considerable deformation in and around the field. The deformation includes land subsidence and related ground fissuring and faulting. These phenomena have produced severe damages to infrastructure such as roads, irrigation canals and other facilities. In this paper, the technique of Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is applied using C-band ENVISAR ASAR data acquired between 2003 and 2006 to determine the extent and amount of land subsidence in the Mexicali Valley near Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field. The DInSAR results were compared with published data from precise leveling surveys (1994- 1997 and 1997-2006) and detailed geological information in order to improve the understanding of temporal and spatial distributions of anthropogenic subsidence in the Mexicali Valley. The leveling and DInSAR data were modeled to characterize the observed deformation in terms of fluid extraction. The results confirm that the tectonic faults control the spatial extent of the observed subsidence. These faults likely act as groundwater flow barriers for aquifers and reservoirs. The shape of the subsiding area coincides with the Cerro Prieto pull-apart basin. In addition, the spatial pattern of the subsidence as well as changes in rate are highly correlated with the development of the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field.

  19. Gasoline distribution cycle and vapor emissions in Mexico City metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, M.M.; Secora, I.S.; Gallegos, J.R.M.; Grapain, V.M.G.; Villegas, F.M.R.; Flores, L.A.M.

    1997-12-31

    Ozone in the main air pollutant in Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). This kind of pollution is induced by the emissions of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. According to Official Statistics National Air Pollution Quality Standard is exceeded over 300 days a year. Volatile hydrocarbons are generated in the cycle of storage transport and distribution of fuel (Gasoline Distribution Cycle). Above 17 millions of liters are handled daily in MCMA. Evaporative emission control is a complex task involving: floating roof tanks and vapor recovery units installation at bulk terminals and implementation of Phase 1 and Phase 2 vapor recovery systems at service stations. Since 1990, IMP has been involved in researching vapor emissions associated to gasoline storage and distribution cycle. Besides, the authors evaluate several technologies for bulk terminals and service stations. In this job, the authors present the results of an evaluation according to Mexican Official Standard of 500 vehicles. The gasoline vapors are trapped during refueling of cars and they are conduced to an equipment that includes an activated charcoal canister in order to adsorb them. Another Activated charcoal canister adsorbs ambient air as a reference. Experimental results showed that refueling hydrocarbon emissions are between 0.4 and 1.2 grams per liter with averages of 0.79 and 0.88 grams per liter according with two different gasoline types. These results were applied to Mexico City Vehicular fleet for the gasoline distribution cycle in order to obtain a total volatile hydrocarbon emission in Mexico City Metropolitan Area.

  20. Paso del Norte ozone study VOC measurements, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Seila, R.L.; Main, H.; Arriaga, J.L.; Martinez, G.V.; Ramadan, A.B.

    1999-11-01

    The results of VOC determinations of ambient air samples collected at surface air quality monitoring sites and near sources of interest on the US and Mexican side of the border during six weeks of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study are reported. Carbonyl samples were collected on DNPH impregnated cartridges at three surface sites and analyzed by HPLC to quantify 13, C-1 to C-8 species. Whole air samples were collected in electro-polished stainless steel canisters which were returned to laboratory for determination of C-2 to C-10+ hydrocarbons by cryogenic preconcentration capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (gc-fid). Several sources were sampled: rush hour traffic, propane-powered bus exhaust, automobile paint shop emissions, propane fuel, petroleum refinery, and industrial manufacturing site. Spatial and temporal characteristics of VOC species concentrations and compositions are presented. Overall surface TNMOC values ranged from 0.1 to 3.4 ppmC with the highest concentrations recorded in the morning at three vehicle-dominated sites, two in Cuidad Juarez and one in downtown El Paso. Toluene in El Paso samples and propane, which is used as a cooking and transportation fuel in Cuidad Juarez, were the most abundant hydrocarbons.

  1. Paso del Norte ozone study VOC measurements, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Seila, R.L.; Main, H.; Arriaga, J.L.; Martinez, G.V.; Ramadan, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    The results of VOC determinations of ambient air samples collected at surface air quality monitoring sites and near sources of interest on the US and Mexican side of the border during six weeks of the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study are reported. Carbonyl samples were collected on DNPH impregnated cartridges at three surface sites and analyzed by HPLC to quantify 13, C-1 to C-8 species. Whole air samples were collected in electro-polished stainless steel canisters which were returned to laboratory for determination of C-2 to C-10+ hydrocarbons by cryogenic preconcentration capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (gc-fid). Several sources were sampled: rush hour traffic, propane-powered bus exhaust, automobile paint shop emissions, propane fuel, petroleum refinery, and industrial manufacturing site. Spatial and temporal characteristics of VOC species concentrations and compositions are presented. Overall surface TNMOC values ranged from 0.1 to 3.4 ppmC with the highest concentrations recorded in the morning at three vehicle-dominated sites, two in Cuidad Juarez and one in downtown El Paso. Toluene in El Paso samples and propane, which is used as a cooking and transportation fuel in Cuidad Juarez, were the most abundant hydrocarbons.

  2. Design of a PGAA Facility at the TRIGA Mark III of ININ, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Rios-Martinez, C.; Paredes-Gutierrez, L.; Arias, E. Alemon; Ortiz-Romero, M.E.

    2001-06-17

    A thermal neutron prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) facility is being developed at the TRIGA-Mark III research reactor, located at the Nabor Carrillo Nuclear Center of the Mexican Institute for Nuclear Research. The PGAA facility is to be built at the exit of a 3.9-m-long radial beam port, which pierces the graphite core reflector. The measured thermal neutron flux at the beam port exit is 0.7 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s, with an epithermal neutron flux of 0.66 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s and a gamma-ray dose of 0.1 Sv/h at full reactor power. Under these circumstances, the extraction of a suitable thermal neutron beam becomes quite challenging. The neutron beam filtering and collimation systems are to be designed for a substantial reduction of the background source components in order to maximize the usable thermal neutron intensity. To obtain reasonable PGAA performance from a filtered low-intensity thermal neutron beam, a Compton suppression feature is added to the detection system. Representative suppressed and unsuppressed spectra of paraffin (hydrogen) neutron capture gamma rays are shown.

  3. Emission factors for domestic use of L.P. gas in the metropolitan area of Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, M.M.; Schifter, I.; Ontiveros, L.E.; Salinas, A.; Moreno, S.; Melgarejo, L.A.; Molina, R.; Krueger, B.

    1998-12-31

    One of the main problems found in air pollution in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City (MAMC) is the presence of high concentrations of ozone at ground level in the atmosphere. The official Mexican standard for ozone concentration in the air (0.11 ppm, one hour, once every 3 years) has been exceeded more than 300 days per year. Ozone is formed due to the emissions of nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons originated from either combustion processes or vapors emanating from fuel handling operations. The results of an evaluation of several domestic devices like stoves and water heaters with L.P. gas as fuel are presented. A method for the evaluation of hydrocarbon emission was developed. A prototype of domestic installation was constructed. The prototype includes L.P. gas tank, domestic stove, water heater, piping and instrumentation. Several combinations of stoves and water heaters were evaluated. The sampling and analysis of hydrocarbons were performed using laboratory equipment originally designed for the evaluation of combustion and evaporative emissions in automobiles: a SHED camera (sealed room equipped with an hydrocarbon analyzer) was used to measure leaks in the prototype of domestic installation and a Constant Volume Sampler (CVS) for the measurement of incomplete combustion emissions. Emission factors were developed for each domestic installation.

  4. Trends of renewables in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Vera, J.

    1996-12-31

    The Mexican Federal Government through its Secretaria de Energia and the Federal Government owned electrical utilities, Comision Federal de Electricidad and Luz y Feurza del Centro, are doing very important efforts in order to give electric power to remote villages in Mexico via PV stand alone systems and hybrid systems with PV modules, wind generators, batteries and a back up diesel electric generator. Nowadays they are trying to take advantage of municipal solid waste in order to get power from the biogas generated in landfills. The main reason for this is, after NAFTA was signed, the municipal authorities in charge of final disposal of MSW will not be allowed any longer to throw away MSW in open fields. Besides, municipal authorities are also in charge of street lighting systems and they have to pay to the utilities a very high rate (12 cents/kWH). The main idea of this paper is how to dispose properly of MSW, fulfilling what is written in the new Environmental Law, and how to take advantage of this process in order to get power from landfill gas at marginal cost. A power wheeling agreement must be reached with the utility in order to send the power generated at the biogas facility to the street lighting lamps, avoiding the high rate for this purpose.

  5. Traffic circulation study and long-range plan for Del Rio. Interim research report

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, A.J.; Islam, R.

    1996-03-01

    A 1992 report to Congress, pursuant to Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act (ISTEA) sections 1089 and 6015, acknowledges that Texas serves a disproportionate share of the U.S.-Mexico international trade, and, accordingly, recommends the development of federal-aid program options to improve transportation infrastructure related to international trade. In order to take advantage of this recommendation, border states must monitor their transborder traffic demand and develop traffic circulation plans for their border cities. This report presents a 25-year traffic circulation plan for the City of Del Rio, Texas. The plan includes recommendations for increasing roadway capacity, adding left-turn lanes, building new routes to relieve congestion, and adding international thoroughfares. It also includes a comprehensive analysis of a transborder traffic in Del Rio, as well as of international thoroughfares between Cuidad Acuna and Del Rio. The recommendations take into account input from TxDOT personnel, City officials, border inspectors, international bridge managers, and several Mexican officials. The recommendations and schedules discussed in this report can assist TxDOT not only in planning land transport infrastructure, but also in alleviating problems associated with additional highway capacity, pavement rehabilitation, signalization, and right-of-way.

  6. Data collection for cooperative water resources modeling in the Lower Rio Grande Basin, Fort Quitman to the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Pallachula, Kiran; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Villalobos, Joshua; Piccinni, Giovanni; Brainard, James Robert; Gerik, Thomas; Morrison, Wendy; Serrat-Capdevila, Aleix; Valdes, Juan; Sheng, Zhuping; Lovato, Rene; Guitron, Alberto; Ennis, Martha Lee; Aparicio, Javier; Newman, Gretchen Carr; Michelsen, Ari M.

    2004-10-01

    Water resource scarcity around the world is driving the need for the development of simulation models that can assist in water resources management. Transboundary water resources are receiving special attention because of the potential for conflict over scarce shared water resources. The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo along the U.S./Mexican border is an example of a scarce, transboundary water resource over which conflict has already begun. The data collection and modeling effort described in this report aims at developing methods for international collaboration, data collection, data integration and modeling for simulating geographically large and diverse international watersheds, with a special focus on the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo. This report describes the basin, and the data collected. This data collection effort was spatially aggregated across five reaches consisting of Fort Quitman to Presidio, the Rio Conchos, Presidio to Amistad Dam, Amistad Dam to Falcon Dam, and Falcon Dam to the Gulf of Mexico. This report represents a nine-month effort made in FY04, during which time the model was not completed.

  7. Assessment of particulate concentrations from domestic biomass combustion in rural Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, M.; Bartlett, K.; Regalado-Pineda, J.; Perez-Padilla, R.

    1996-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that woodsmoke exposure in developed countries is associated with acute and chronic health impacts. Particulate concentrations were measured in rural Mexican kitchens using biomass combustion for cooking. To investigate differences in indoor particle concentrations between kitchens using different fuels and stove types, measurements were made in eight kitchens using only biomass, six using only liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), six using a combination of biomass and LPG, and three using biomass in ventilated stoves. Outdoor samples were collected at the same time as the indoor samples. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} measurements were made with inertial impactors, and particle light scattering was measured continuously with an integrating nephelometer. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations (mean concentrations of 768 and 555 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively) in the kitchens burning only biomass were greater than in all other types (biomass > biomass + LPG > ventilated > LPG > outdoor). A similar trend was evident for the indoor/outdoor concentration ratio. Based on the short-term measurements estimated from the nephelometer data, PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} cooking period average and 5-min peak concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in kitchens using only biomass than in those using LPG, a combination of LPG and biomass, or a ventilated biomass stove. 20 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet U.S. transportation energy demand.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. K.; Moore, J. S.

    2002-03-04

    Recent studies have indicated that substitutes for conventional petroleum resources will be needed to meet U.S. transportation energy demand in the first half of this century. One possible substitute is natural gas which can be used as a transportation fuel directly in compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas vehicles or as resource fuel for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. This paper contains a preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet future U.S. transportation fuel demand. Several scenarios of natural gas demand, including transportation demand, in the U.S. to 2050 are developed. Natural gas resource estimates for the U. S. are discussed. Potential Canadian and Mexican exports to the U.S. are estimated. Two scenarios of potential imports from outside North America are also developed. Considering all these potential imports, U.S. natural gas production requirements to 2050 to meet the demand scenarios are developed and compared with the estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The comparison results in a conclusion that (1) given the assumptions made, there are likely to be supply constraints on the availability of U.S. natural gas supply post-2020 and (2) if natural gas use in transportation grows substantially, it will have to compete with other sectors of the economy for that supply-constrained natural gas.

  9. Sustainable fuelwood use in rural Mexico. Volume 1: Current patterns of resource use

    SciTech Connect

    Masera, O.

    1993-04-01

    The present report summarizes the results of the first phase of a project of cooperation between the Mexican National Commission for Energy Conservation (CONAE) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) on sustainable biofuel use in rural Mexico. This first phase has been devoted to (i) conducting an in-depth review of the status of fuelwood use in rural and peri-urban areas of Mexico, (ii) providing improved estimates of biomass energy use, (iii) assessing the socioeconomic and environmental impacts of fuelwood use, and (iv) identifying preliminary potential lines of action to improve the patterns of biomass energy use in Mexico; in particular, identifying those interventions that, by improving living conditions for rural inhabitants, can result in global benefits (such as the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions). A comprehensive review of the existing documentation of biofuel use in rural and peri-urban Mexico was conducted. Reports from official, academic, and non-governmental organizations were gathered and analyzed. A computerized rural energy database was created by re-processing a national rural energy survey. Because of the paucity of information about biofuel use in small rural industries, most of the analysis is devoted to the household sector.

  10. Radiation protection program for early detection of breast cancer in a mammography facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mariana, Villagomez Casimiro E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Cesar, Ruiz Trejo E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Ruby, Espejo Fonseca

    2014-11-07

    Mammography is the best tool for early detection of Breast Cancer. In this diagnostic radiology modality it is necessary to establish the criteria to ensure the proper use and operation of the equipment used to obtain mammographic images in order to contribute to the safe use of ionizing radiation. The aim of the work was to implement at FUCAM-AC the radiation protection program which must be established for patients and radiation workers according to Mexican standards [14]. To achieve this goal, radiation protection and quality control manuals were elaborated [5]. Furthermore, a quality control program (QCP) in the mammography systems (analog/digital), darkroom included, has been implemented. Daily sensitometry, non-variability of the image quality, visualizing artifacts, revision of the equipment mechanical stability, compression force and analysis of repetition studies are some of the QCP routine tests that must be performed by radiological technicians of this institution as a set of actions to ensure the protection of patients. Image quality and patients dose assessment were performed on 4 analog equipment installed in 2 mobile units. In relation to dose assessment, all equipment passed the acceptance criteria (<3 mGy per projection). The image quality test showed that most images (70%) presented artifacts. A brief summary of the results of quality control tests applied to the equipment and film processor are presented. To maintain an adequate level of quality and safety at FUCAM-AC is necessary that the proposed radiation protection program in this work is applied.

  11. Mathematical modeling to predict residential solid waste generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda Benitez, Sara; Vega, Carolina Armijo de

    2008-07-01

    One of the challenges faced by waste management authorities is determining the amount of waste generated by households in order to establish waste management systems, as well as trying to charge rates compatible with the principle applied worldwide, and design a fair payment system for households according to the amount of residential solid waste (RSW) they generate. The goal of this research work was to establish mathematical models that correlate the generation of RSW per capita to the following variables: education, income per household, and number of residents. This work was based on data from a study on generation, quantification and composition of residential waste in a Mexican city in three stages. In order to define prediction models, five variables were identified and included in the model. For each waste sampling stage a different mathematical model was developed, in order to find the model that showed the best linear relation to predict residential solid waste generation. Later on, models to explore the combination of included variables and select those which showed a higher R{sup 2} were established. The tests applied were normality, multicolinearity and heteroskedasticity. Another model, formulated with four variables, was generated and the Durban-Watson test was applied to it. Finally, a general mathematical model is proposed to predict residential waste generation, which accounts for 51% of the total.

  12. Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico. Supplement to the IEA Expert Group Report on Recommended Practices for Wind Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Brian; Cochran, Jaquelin; Watson, Andrea; Katz, Jessica; Bracho, Ricardo

    2015-08-19

    As a recognized leader in efforts to mitigate global climate change, the Government of Mexico (GOM) works proactively to reduce emissions, demonstrating strong political will and capacity to comprehensively address climate change. Since 2010, the U.S. government (USG) has supported these efforts by partnering with Mexico under the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program. Through the program, the USG has partnered with Mexico’s Ministry of Energy (SENER), as well as other government agencies, to support GOM in reaching its clean energy and climate change goals. Specifically, the EC-LEDS program is supporting GOM’s clean energy goal of generating 35% of its electricity from renewable energy (RE) by 2024. EC-LEDS, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has been collaborating with SENER and GOM interagency working group—the Consejo Consultivo para las Energías Renovables (Consultative Council on Renewable Energy)—to create a grid integration roadmap for variable RE. 1 A key objective in creating a grid integration roadmap is assessing likely impacts of wind and solar energy on the power system and modifying planning and operations accordingly. This paper applies best practices in conducting a grid integration study to the Mexican context.

  13. A pilot exercise on comparative risk assessment in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cebrian, M.E.; Albores, A.; Sierra, A.

    1996-12-31

    Concern in the Mexican government and academic institutions about human health problems derived from exposure to environmental contaminants has been increasing. This interest prompted us to perform a pilot study to identify and rank potentially problematic environmental situations. We were given access to files from the Instituto Nacional de Ecologia. We screened about 2,500 documents and selected about 200 reports for further analysis. We adapted methodologies developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1993) and ATSDR (1992) to analyze environmental data. San Luis Potosi City and Region Lagunera were the areas posing greater risks. We chose San Luis Potosi City to perform a more detailed study, since here a smelting complex is located within an urban zone. The high levels of As, Pb, and Cd in environmental media resulted in a higher body burden in exposed children than children living 7 km away. Multiple regression analysis suggested that alterations in sensorial nerve transmission were mainly related to As in urine (AsU), whereas those in motor nerves were mainly related to Pb in blood (PbB). No apparent relationships associated with CdU were found. Slower auditory nerve conduction was associated with both AsU and PbB. These findings suggest that exposed children are also at high risk of suffering other adverse health effects. This exercise illustrates the need to perform studies aimed at identifying and ranking environmental contamination problems in industrializing countries. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Natural Analog Studies at Pena Blanca, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2005-07-11

    The significance of the Pena Blanca uranium deposits in the State of Chihuahua, Mexico as potential natural analogs for a nuclear waste repository in unsaturated welded tuff was first recognized in the 1980s. In the 1970s, the Pena Blanca region was a major target of uranium exploration and exploitation by the Mexican government. Since then the Nopal I uranium deposit has been studied extensively by researchers in the U.S., Mexico, and Europe. The Nopal I deposit represents an environment similar to that of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain in many ways. Both are located in semi-arid regions. Both are located in Tertiary rhyolitic tuffs overlying carbonate rocks that have been subjected to basin and range-style tectonic deformation. Both are located in a chemically oxidizing, unsaturated zone 200 m or more above the water table. The alteration of uraninite to secondary minerals at Nopal I may be similar to the alteration of uranium fuel rods in this type of setting. Investigations at Nopal I and in the surrounding Sierra Pena Blanca have included detailed outcrop mapping, hydrologic and isotopic studies of flow and transport, studies of mineral alteration, modeling, and performance assessment.

  15. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {yields} {infinity} and r {yields} const > 0 as l {yields} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {yields} 0 as l {yields} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {Gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {Gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  16. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {sup {yields}} {infinity} and r {sup {yields}} const > 0 as l {sup {yields}} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {sup {yields}} 0 as l {sup {yields}} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  17. Update: US oil-import market. 1982 top 7 suppliers to US import market: how their shares changed since 1973

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-09

    This issue updates the Energy Detente 7/09/82, which tracked US oil imports since the Arab Oil Embargo. Since then, the phrase oil glut became common even among cautious market analysts as many exporters, hard-pressed for petrodollars, produced much more than the market was prepared to absorb. To examine how the US import market has adjusted to this continued buyers market, the top seven suppliers of 1982 are tracked backwards through time. A graph shows the 1982 reversal of Mexico's and Saudi Arabia's positions in this market. The three main reasons for Mexico's strong present position in the US market are: crude costs and corresponding refined value; proximity to US refining centers; and strategic importance of Mexico's economic stability through oil sales. Interviews with various US refiners and other market observers confirm that these elements will persist during 1983, regardless of significant price cuts among OPEC and other producers. It is believed that the profitability of running heavy Maya crude in sophisticated plants will continue to look optimistic, and that Mexican crude sales to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve implies US government interest in Mexico's economic recovery, and in its stability in the light of civil wars being waged in Central America. This issue presents the Energy Detente (1) fuel price/tax series and (2) industrial fuel prices for March 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere. 6 figures, 8 tables.

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  19. Winter season air pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. A review of air pollution studies in an international airshed

    SciTech Connect

    Einfeld, W.; Church, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes a number of research efforts completed over the past 20 years in the El Paso del Norte region to characterize pollution sources and air quality trends. The El Paso del Norte region encompasses the cities of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua and is representative of many US-Mexico border communities that are facing important air quality issues as population growth and industrialization of Mexican border communities continue. Special attention is given to a group of studies carried out under special US Congressional funding and administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Many of these studies were fielded within the last several years to develop a better understanding of air pollution sources and trends in this typical border community. Summary findings from a wide range of studies dealing with such issues as the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutants and pollution potential from both stationary and mobile sources in both cities are presented. Particular emphasis is given to a recent study in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez that focussed on winter season PM{sub 10} pollution in El Paso-Ciudad Juarez. Preliminary estimates from this short-term study reveal that biomass combustion products and crustal material are significant components of winter season PM{sub 10} in this international border community.

  20. Symposium in the field of geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Miguel; Mock, John E.

    1989-04-01

    Mexico and the US are nations with abundant sources of geothermal energy, and both countries have progressed rapidly in developing their more accessible resources. For example, Mexico has developed over 600 MWe at Cerro Prieto, while US developers have brought in over 2000 MWe at the Geysers. These successes, however, are only a prologue to an exciting future. All forms of energy face technical and economic barriers that must be overcome if the resources are to play a significant role in satisfying national energy needs. Geothermal energy--except for the very highest grade resources--face a number of barriers, which must be surmounted through research and development. Sharing a common interest in solving the problems that impede the rapid utilization of geothermal energy, Mexico and the US agreed to exchange information and participate in joint research. An excellent example of this close and continuing collaboration is the geothermal research program conducted under the auspices of the 3-year agreement signed on April 7, 1986 by the US DOE and the Mexican Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The major objectives of this bilateral agreement are: (1) to achieve a thorough understanding of the nature of geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary and fractured igneous rocks; (2) to investigate how the geothermal resources of both nations can best be explored and utilized; and (3) to exchange information on geothermal topics of mutual interest.

  1. Electronic and thermoelectric properties of van der Waals materials with ring-shaped valence bands

    SciTech Connect

    Wickramaratne, Darshana E-mail: rlake@ece.ucr.edu; Lake, Roger K. E-mail: rlake@ece.ucr.edu; Zahid, Ferdows

    2015-08-21

    The valence band of a variety of few-layer, two-dimensional materials consist of a ring of states in the Brillouin zone. The energy-momentum relation has the form of a “Mexican hat” or a Rashba dispersion. The two-dimensional density of states is singular at or near the band edge, and the band-edge density of modes turns on nearly abruptly as a step function. The large band-edge density of modes enhances the Seebeck coefficient, the power factor, and the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. Electronic and thermoelectric properties are determined from ab initio calculations for few-layer III–VI materials GaS, GaSe, InS, InSe, for Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, for monolayer Bi, and for bilayer graphene as a function of vertical field. The effect of interlayer coupling on these properties in few-layer III–VI materials and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is described. Analytical models provide insight into the layer dependent trends that are relatively consistent for all of these few-layer materials. Vertically biased bilayer graphene could serve as an experimental test-bed for measuring these effects.

  2. Mexico: swapping crude for atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, B.

    1982-06-24

    Mexico, considered the Saudi Arabia of the Western Hemisphere because of its proven and potential petroleum reserves, has surprised the world: it has embarked on the biggest nuclear-electric program in the Third World, only to postpone it days before scheduled approval of an international bidding (on which the atomic energy industry had pinned its hopes). A graph shows Mexican supplies of electricity by source with official projections to 1990. The point of entrance of the first nuclear reactor, originally scheduled for 1982, won't come onstream until 1983; and how nuclear-generated electricity grows close to 5% of the total in 1990. The big question is, will the future President of Mexico give the green light to the atomic megaproject. And if he does, how will Mexico deal with the serious logistics problems and grave ecological implications confronting the industry worldwide. In this issue, the author and Energy Detente touch on these questions and review the nuclear power status of Mexico, as well as addressing some of its global problems. Also presented in this issue is an update of the fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries.

  3. Weldability, mechanical and corrosion properties of microalloyed reinforcing bars

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, L. |; Hernandez, G.; Carpio, J.J.; Arganis, C.

    1994-12-31

    The first Mexican specification of low alloy reinforcing bars of weldable grade and optimal mechanical response during plastic deformation caused by earthquakes was issued in 1987. The modifications of the Construction Code of Mexico City after the 1985 earthquakes included the recommendation of using low alloy rebars as a first option for the reinforced concrete building main structural components. The low alloy rebars are fabricated employing low carbon steels microalloyed with niobium or vanadium in order to combine the weldability and high ductility of the low carbon steels with the high strength provided by the, microalloying elements. The present paper reports the results of a comparative study of standard (medium carbon) and microalloyed rebars considering features of microstructure, mechanical behavior, weldability and the electrochemical properties of these two materials embedded in plain and chloride contaminated concrete. The main differences were observed in microstructural features, mechanical behavior and weldability. The corrosion rate measurements of standard and microalloyed rebars are similar. The weldability of the rebars is discussed in terms of the better electrical connectivity of the reinforcement and cathodic protection.

  4. Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Project for an Integral Oncology Center at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    De Jesus, M.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.

    2010-12-07

    A building project of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine services (diagnostic and therapy), within an Integral Oncology Center (IOC), requires interdisciplinary participation of architects, biomedical engineers, radiation oncologists and medical physicists. This report focus on the medical physicist role in designing, building and commissioning stages, for the final clinical use of an IOC at the Oaxaca High Specialization Regional Hospital (HRAEO). As a first step, during design stage, the medical physicist participates in discussions about radiation safety and regulatory requirements for the National Regulatory Agency (called CNSNS in Mexico). Medical physicists propose solutions to clinical needs and take decisions about installing medical equipment, in order to fulfill technical and medical requirements. As a second step, during the construction stage, medical physicists keep an eye on building materials and structural specifications. Meanwhile, regulatory documentation must be sent to CNSNS. This documentation compiles information about medical equipment, radioactivity facility, radiation workers and nuclear material data, in order to obtain the license for the linear accelerator, brachytherapy and nuclear medicine facilities. As a final step, after equipment installation, the commissioning stage takes place. As the conclusion, we show that medical physicists are essentials in order to fulfill with Mexican regulatory requirements in medical facilities.

  5. Gladden Pull-Apart Basin, offshore Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Morrice, S. )

    1993-02-01

    The junction of the American and Caribbean plates in Belize has created a complex structural setting for oil and gas exploration. Recent seismic offshore Belize has been used to identify three structural provinces, from west to east: a shallow thrust zone, a narrow upthrown wrench faulted zone and a deeper extensional basin, named the Gladden Pull-Apart Basin. Hydrocarbon leakage from recent fault movement appears to have depleted the shallow structures to the west, but the pull-apart basin has a thick sequence of low-frequency clay-dominated sealing rocks with the potential to preserve hydrocarbon accumulations in Cretaceous carbonate banks. These buried carbonate are of the same age and depositional environment of Mexico's Golden Lane/Tabasco Reforma carbonate banks which are world class giant fields. The Belize and Mexican carbonate banks are within the same Cretaceous depositional basin, the Peten Basin. Seismic interpretations in offshore Belize have been integrated with gravity and magnetic surveys. This provides additional support for the deep extensional basin. The location of the thick Cretaceous carbonate banks is better interpreted with the integration of these three geophysical tools. Airborne geochemical surveys were used to detect the presence of oil seeps on the east and west basin margins.

  6. Localization of a locus for juvenile myoclonic epilepsy on chromosome 6p11-21.2 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V. |; Alonso, V.M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a common form of primary idiopathic generalized epilepsy characterized by myoclonias, tonic-clonic or clonic tonic-clonic convulsions and absences. Ictal electroencephalograms (EEGs) show high amplitude multispikes folowed by slow waves and interictal EEGs manifest 3.5-6 Hz diffuse multispike wave complexes. JME affected about 7-10% of patients with epilepsies and its onset peaks between 13-15 years of age. We recently mapped a JME locus on chromosome 6p21.1-6p11 by linkage analysis of one relatively large JME family from Los Angeles and Belize. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with 70% penetrance, pairwise analyses tightly linked JME to D6S257 (Z = 3.67), D6S428 (Z = 3.08) and D6S272 (Z = 3.56) at {theta} = 0, m = f. Recombination and multipoints linkage analysis also suggested a locus is between markers D6S257 and D6S272. We then screened three relatively larger Mexican JME pedigrees with D6S257, D6S272, D6S282, TNF, D6S276, D6S273, D6S105 and F13A1 on chromosome 6p. Assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance, linkage to chromosome 6p DNA markers are excluded. Our findings underline the genetic heterogeneity of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

  7. Climate Change Vulnerability and Resilience: Current Status and Trends for Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarraran , Maria E.; Malone, Elizabeth L.; Brenkert, Antoinette L.

    2008-12-30

    Climate change alters different localities on the planet in different ways. The impact on each region depends mainly on the degree of vulnerability that natural ecosystems and human-made infrastructure have to changes in climate and extreme meteorological events, as well as on the coping and adaptation capacity towards new environmental conditions. This study assesses the current resilience of Mexico and Mexican states to such changes, as well as how this resilience will look in the future. In recent studies (Moss et al. 2000, Brenkert and Malone 2005, Malone and Brenket 2008, Ibarrarán et al. 2007), the Vulnerability-Resilience Indicators Model (VRIM) is used to integrate a set of proxy variables that determine the resilience of a region to climate change. Resilience, or the ability of a region to respond to climate variations and natural events that result from climate change, is given by its adaptation and coping capacity and its sensitivity. On the one hand, the sensitivity of a region to climate change is assessed, emphasizing its infrastructure, food security, water resources, and the health of the population and regional ecosystems. On the other hand, coping and adaptation capacity is based on the availability of human resources, economic capacity and environmental capacity.

  8. A novel plug-flow digester for biogasification of conventional and hazardous organics

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Kato, Y.; Liu, T.; Fukushi, K.

    1996-12-31

    A novel plug-flow digestion system of simple construction was designed, fabricated and operated for several years with a synthetic mixture of solid and liquid wastes simulating conditions south of the US-Mexican border and other developing countries. Benzene, toluene, and o-xylene (BTX) were mixed with the synthetic feed in several phases of this research to simulate field conditions where these solvents are discharged to public sewers and mixed with non-hazardous pollutants. The mesophilic plug-flow digester exhibited a high gas yield of 0.46 SCM /kg VS added, a methane content of 77 mol%, and a VS reduction of 75% at an HRT of 13 days with a 96% biodegradation of the feed toluene. At a feed concentration of 50 mg/l, toluene did not inhibit anaerobic fermentation. Gas and methane yields, and VS and COD conversion efficiencies were about the same with or without toluene present in the feed. At a reduced HRT of 8 days, a high feed COD concentration of 50,000 mg/l, and a loading rate of 0.48 kg VS/m{sup 3}-day, the digester afforded a gas yield of 3.1 SCM /kg VS added, and a methane content of 67 mol%. Benzene, toluene, and o-xylene were biodegraded at efficiencies of 94%, 90%, and 88%, respectively. The degradation kinetics of the xenobiotic compound could be described by a model based on cometabolic degradation of these secondary substrates.

  9. Stakeholder identification of advanced technology opportunities at international ports of entry

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.K.; Icerman, L.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Technologies for International and Intermodal Ports of Entry (ATIPE) Project, a diverse group of stakeholders was engaged to help identify problems experienced at inland international border crossings, particularly those at the US-Mexican border. The fundamental issue at international ports of entry is reducing transit time through the required documentation and inspection processes. Examples of other issues or problems, typically manifested as time delays at border crossings, repeatedly mentioned by stakeholders include: (1) lack of document standardization; (2) failure to standardize inspection processes; (3) inadequate information and communications systems; (4) manual fee and tariff collection; (5) inconsistency of processes and procedures; and (6) suboptimal cooperation among governmental agencies. Most of these issues can be addressed to some extent by the development of advanced technologies with the objective of allowing ports of entry to become more efficient while being more effective. Three categories of technologies were unambiguously of high priority to port of entry stakeholders: (1) automated documentation; (2) systems integration; and (3) vehicle and cargo tracking. Together, these technologies represent many of the technical components necessary for pre-clearance of freight approaching international ports of entry. Integration of vehicle and cargo tracking systems with port of entry information and communications systems, as well as existing industry legacy systems, should further enable border crossings to be accomplished consistently with optimal processing times.

  10. Performance of a new wind updating system for a prognostic meteorological model in the environs of Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and Institute Mexicano del Petroleo are completely a joint study of options for improving air quality in Mexico City. The US Department of Energy supported the efforts of the Los Alamos investigators, while PEMEX supported the efforts of the Mexican researchers. One of the first steps in the process was to develop an understanding of the existing air quality situation. In this context we have modified a three-dimensional, prognostic, higher order turbulence model for atmospheric circulation (HOTMAC) to treat domains which include an urbanized area. This sophisticated meteorological model is required because of the complexity of the terrain and the relative paucity of meteorological data. Mexico City lies at an elevation of approximately 7500 feet above sea level in a ``U`` shaped basin which opens to the north. The city occupies a major part of the southwest portion of the basin. Upper level winds are provided by rawinsondes at the airport, while low-level winds are measured at several sites within the city. Many of the sites have obstructed upwind fetches for a variety of directions. During the wintertime when the worst air quality episodes occur, the winds are frequently light, and out of the northeast at lower levels, while above 1000 meters above the surface they are usually from the southwest. This means the winds are light within the city, but significant slope winds develop which influence the behavior of the pollutants. Frequently, the winds in the basin change as a seabreeze penetrates the basin from the northeast. The seabreeze produces a much different wind regime after its arrival in the late afternoon or early evening. This makes it important to update the winds in a realistic fashion.

  11. FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF MEXICO, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nicholas; Watson, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Mexico, GTRI first made contact in 2005. The project then lost momentum and stalled. At the same time, GTRIs cooperation with the Republic of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRIs interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Mexico and to facilitate this cooperation, they offered to invite their Mexican counterparts to Colombia to observe its successful cooperation with GTRI. Shortly after that visit, the Government of Mexico agreed to move forward and requested that the cooperative efforts in Mexico be performed in a tripartite manner, leveraging the skills, experience, and resources of the Colombians. As a result, 22 of Mexicos largest radioactive sites have had security upgrades in place within 18 months of cooperation.

  12. SU-E-I-04: A Mammography Phantom to Measure Mean Glandular Dose and Image Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Pineda, E; Ruiz-Trejo, C; E, Brandan M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mean glandular dose (MGD) and image quality in a selection of mammography systems using a novel phantom based on thermoluminescent dosemeters and the ACR wax insert. Methods: The phantom consists of two acrylic, 19 cm diameter, 4.5 cm thick, semicircular modules, used in sequence. The image quality module contains the ACR insert and is used to obtain a quality control image under automatic exposure conditions. The dosimetric module carries 15 TLD-100 chips, some under Al foils, to determine air kerma and half-value-layer. TL readings take place at our laboratory under controlled conditions. Calibration was performed using an ionization chamber and a Senographe 2000D unit for a variety of beam qualities, from 24 to 40 kV, Mo and Rh anodes and filters. Phantom MGD values agree, on the average, within 3% with ionization chamber data, and their precision is better than 10% (k=1). Results: MGD and image quality have been evaluated in a selection of mammography units currently used in Mexican health services. The sample includes analogic (screen/film), flexible digital (CR), and full-field digital image receptors. The highest MDG are associated to the CR technology. The most common image quality failure is due to artifacts (dust, intensifying screen scratches, and processor marks for film/screen, laser reader defects for CR). Conclusion: The developed phantom permits the MGD measurement without the need of a calibrated ionization chamber at the mammography site and can be used by a technician without the presence of a medical physicist. The results indicate the urgent need to establish quality control programs for mammography.

  13. Book review of Dragonfly Genera of the New World. An Illustrated and Annotated Key to the Anisoptera. Garrison, R.W., N. Von Ellenrieder and J.A. Louton, Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, MD. xi+368 pp. Hardback, ISBN 0-8018-8446-2

    SciTech Connect

    Cannings, R.A.

    2007-03-15

    This superb book is the most important reference on the Order Odonata to appear since the 1999 publication of Philip Corbet's monumental work on the behavior and ecology of Odonata. In the context of specimen identification and faunistics, it is the most significant contribution in decades, for it opens a new door to the most diverse and least known dragonfly fauna on Earth, that of the Neotropical Region. The book treats the genera of all the New World dragonflies, but while the Nearctic Anisoptera (at least north of the Mexican border) is extensively summarized in many taxonomic and identification manuals (e.g., Needham et al. 2000), the Neotropical fauna remains rather poorly known. Much of it still is undescribed and taxonomic syntheses are few and far between. This is partly because of its huge diversity, the remoteness of much of the region, and the relative scarcity of specimens in collections. As T. W. Donnelly (2006) noted in a recent review of this book, the New World tropics have always been a challenge to biologists in many disciplines because the region was first colonized by the Spanish and Portuguese who largely lacked the tradition of natural history studies characteristic of the British, French, Dutch and Germans in Africa, India or Southeast Asia. In South America there simply was no F. C. Fraser to write an equivalent to his three volumes on the Odonata in The Fauna of British India. Borror (1945) was an early and wonderful resource for deciphering the genera of the large family Libellulidae in the Americas. Calvert's hard-to-find contributions on the Odonata (1902-1908) in the Biologia Centrali-Americana helped students of the Central American fauna; the updated equivalent by Foerster (2001) for Mesoamerican genera is also important. But as far as syntheses and overviews, that's about all there was - until now.

  14. Phylogenetic relationships among amphisbaenian reptiles based on complete mitochondrial genomic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, J. Robert; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-05-19

    Complete mitochondrial genomic sequences are reported from 12 members in the four families of the reptile group Amphisbaenia. Analysis of 11,946 aligned nucleotide positions (5,797 informative) produces a robust phylogenetic hypothesis. The family Rhineuridae is basal and Bipedidae is the sister taxon to the Amphisbaenidae plus Trogonophidae. Amphisbaenian reptiles are surprisingly old, predating the breakup of Pangaea 200 million years before present, because successive basal taxa (Rhineuridae and Bipedidae) are situated in tectonic regions of Laurasia and nested taxa (Amphisbaenidae and Trogonophidae) are found in Gondwanan regions. Thorough sampling within the Bipedidae shows that it is not tectonic movement of Baja California away from the Mexican mainland that is primary in isolating Bipes species, but rather that primary vicariance occurred between northern and southern groups. Amphisbaenian families show parallel reduction in number of limbs and Bipes species exhibit parallel reduction in number of digits. A measure is developed for comparing the phylogenetic information content of various genes. A synapomorphic trait defining the Bipedidae is a shift from the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement to the derived state of trnE and nad6. In addition, a tandem duplication of trnT and trnP is observed in B. biporus with a pattern of pseudogene formation that varies among populations. The first case of convergent rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome among animals demonstrated by complete genomic sequences is reported. Relative to most vertebrates, the Rhineuridae has the block nad6, trnE switched in order with cob, trnT, trnP, as they are in birds.

  15. Concentrations of the urinary pyrethroid metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid in farm worker families in the MICASA study

    SciTech Connect

    Trunnelle, Kelly J.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Ahn, Ki Chang; Schenker, Marc B.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Gee, Shirley J.; Stoecklin-Marois, Maria T.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-05-01

    Indoor pesticide exposure is a growing concern, particularly from pyrethroids, a commonly used class of pesticides. Pyrethroid concentrations may be especially high in homes of immigrant farm worker families who often live in close proximity to agricultural fields, and are faced with poor housing conditions, causing higher pest infestation and more pesticide use. We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids in a study of mothers and children living in Mendota, CA within the population-based Mexican Immigration to California: Agricultural Safety and Acculturation (MICASA) Study. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary metabolite 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA) levels among 105 women and 103 children. The median urinary 3PBA levels (children=2.56 ug/g creatinine, mothers=1.46 ug/g creatinine) were higher than those reported in population based studies for the United States general population, but similar to or lower than studies with known high levels of pyrethroid exposure. A positive association was evident between poor housing conditions and the urinary metabolite levels, showing that poor housing conditions are a contributing factor to the higher levels of 3PBA seen in the urine of these farm worker families. Further research is warranted to fully investigate sources of exposure. - Highlights: We investigate exposure of farm worker families to pyrethroids. We present pyrethroid exposure based on an ELISA analysis of urinary 3PBA levels. 3PBA levels were higher than those reported for the U.S. general population. Poor housing conditions may be associated with pyrethroid exposure.

  16. Phanerozoic tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin regions (Mexico, Texas, New Mexico) using Landsat imagery, subsurface and outcrop data

    SciTech Connect

    Markello, J.R.; Sarg, J.F.

    1996-08-01

    Integrating regional Landsat imagery, outcrop field studies, and subsurface data has resulted in a more comprehensive understanding and delineation of the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos region. Landsat imagery were acquired and registered to the existing 1:25000 scale maps and mosaiced to create a regional view of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin region. The imagery were used to extrapolate and map key stratigraphic and tectonic elements after calibration from documented outcrop and subsurface data. The interpretations aided in the extrapolation of scattered control information and were critical in the complete reconstruction of the geologic history of the area. The Trans-Pecos Phanerozoic history comprises five tectono-depositional phases, and these have controlled the shape of the modem landscape: (1) Late Proterozoic rifting (Gondwana from Laurentia), and development of the Early-Middle Paleozoic Tobosa basin; (2) Pennsylvanian collision (South and North Americas), and differentiation of the Tobosa basin into the Midland, Delaware, Orogrande, and Pedregosa basins separated by basement blocks: Central Basin Platform, Diablo Platform, Burro-Florida Platform; (3) Middle Mesozoic transtensional rifting (Mexico from North America), and Late Jurassic failed rifting of the Mexican Chihuahua and Coahuila Troughs west and south of the Diablo Platform; (4) Late Mesozoic Laramide collision (Mexico and Texas), and development of the Chihuahua fold/thrust belt limited by the western margin of the Diablo Platform; (5) Late Cenozoic North American basin and Range rifting, and development of Rio Grande grabens, block-faulted mountains, and volcanics. The Tobosa basin was a passive-margin interior sag; its continental margin was south of the Marathons.

  17. Sensitivity of North American agriculture to ENSO-based climate scenarios and their socio-economic consequences: Modeling in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, N.J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Brown, R.A.; Sands, R.D.; Legler, D.; Srinivasan, R.; Tiscareno-Lopez, M.

    1997-09-01

    A group of Canadian, US and Mexican natural resource specialists, organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under its North American Energy, Environment and Economy (NA3E) Program, has applied a simulation modeling approach to estimating the impact of ENSO-driven climatic variations on the productivity of major crops grown in the three countries. Methodological development is described and results of the simulations presented in this report. EPIC (the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) was the agro-ecosystem model selected-for this study. EPIC uses a daily time step to simulate crop growth and yield, water use, runoff and soil erosion among other variables. The model was applied to a set of so-called representative farms parameterized through a specially-assembled Geographic Information System (GIS) to reflect the soils, topography, crop management and weather typical of the regions represented. Fifty one representative farms were developed for Canada, 66 for the US and 23 for Mexico. El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) scenarios for the EPIC simulations were created using the historic record of sea-surface temperature (SST) prevailing in the eastern tropical Pacific for the period October 1--September 30. Each year between 1960 and 1989 was thus assigned to an ENSO category or state. The ENSO states were defined as El Nino (EN, SST warmer than the long-term mean), Strong El Nino (SEN, much warmer), El Viejo (EV, cooler) and Neutral (within {+-}0.5 C of the long-term mean). Monthly means of temperature and precipitation were then calculated at each farm for the period 1960--1989 and the differences (or anomalies) between the means in Neutral years and EN, SEN and EV years determined. The average monthly anomalies for each ENSO state were then used to create new monthly statistics for each farm and ENSO-state combination. The adjusted monthly statistics characteristic of each ENSO state were then used to drive a stochastic-weather simulator

  18. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS OF THE IRIS PROJECT OF INTEREST FOR LATIN AMERICA

    SciTech Connect

    Carelli, M.D.; Petrovic, B.

    2004-10-03

    possibility of corrosion cracking as in Davis-Besse and other plants. Latin America, as many other regions on the earth, needs water as much as electricity. IRIS has developed a water desalination co-generation design which can employ a variety of processes as dictated by local and economic conditions. Applications to the arid Brazilian Nord-Este and Mexican Nord-Oeste are being considered.

  19. Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Volkamer, Rainer; de Foy, Benjamin; Lei, Wenfang; Zavaka, Miguel; Velasco, Erik

    2008-10-31

    This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on

  20. U.S.-MEXICO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; BILATERAL TECHNICAL EXCHANGES FOR SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH IN THE BORDER REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Richard, D., Dr.

    2007-10-01

    issues. The results also brought focus to the potential contributions that DOEs science and technology could make for solving the many difficult, multi-generational problems faced by hundreds of bi-national communities along the 2,000-mile shared border of the United States and Mexico. Efforts to address these U.S.-Mexico border issues were initially sponsored by the DOEs Albuquerque and Carlsbad offices. In subsequent years, the U.S. Congress directed appropriations to DOEs Carlsbad office to address public health, safety and security issues prevalent within U.S.-Mexico border communities. With ASLs assistance, DOEs Albuquerque office developed contacts and formed partnerships with interested U.S and Mexican government, academic, and commercial organizations. Border industries, industrial effluents, and public health conditions were evaluated and documented. Relevant technologies were then matched to environmental problem sets along the border. Several technologies that were identified and subsequently supported by this effort are now operational in a number of U.S.-Mexico border communities, several communities within Mexicos interior states, and in other parts of Latin America. As a result, some serious public health threats within these communities caused by exposure to toxic airborne pollutants have been reduced. During this time, DOEs Carlsbad office hosted a bilateral conference to establish a cross-border consensus on what should be done on the basis of these earlier investigative efforts. Participating border region stakeholders set an agenda for technical collaborations. This agenda was supported by several Members of Congress who provided appropriations and directed DOEs Carlsbad office to initiate technology demonstration projects. During the following two years, more than 12 private-sector and DOE-sponsored technologies were demonstrated in partnership with numerous border community stakeholders. All technologies were well received and their

  1. Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Charles E. Kolb Dr. Douglas R. Worsnop Dr. Manjula R. Canagaratna Dr. Scott C. Herndon Dr. John T. Jayne Dr. W. Berk Knighton Dr. Timothy B. Onasch Dr. Ezra C. Wood Dr. Miguel Zavala

    2008-03-31

    dioxide. Deployment of the Aerodyne mobile laboratory, equipped with instruments from five collaborating laboratories, at the T0 urban supersite, four downwind sites and the Tula industrial area yielded unique trace gas and fine PM data sets during the March 2006 MAXMex/MILAGRO campaign. In addition, on-road measurements as the mobile laboratory moved between sites provided extensive data on 2006 MCMA fleet averaged vehicle emissions. Analyses of 2006 data sets have yielded the identification of a close correlation between the rate of production of SOA and “Odd Oxygen” (O3 + NO2) and primary organic PM with CO in the MCMA urban plume, a more sophisticated understanding of the interplay between nitrogen oxide speciation and ozone production, the identification of significant vehicular emission sources of HCN and CH3CN (usually associated with biomass burning), characterization of the aging of primary carbonaceous PM, and updated 2006 MCMA fleet on-road trace gas and fine PM emissions. Results from analyses of 2002/2003 and 2006 emissions and ambient measurements have conveyed to Mexican air quality managers who are using these data to devise and assess air quality management strategies. All data sets and published analyses are available to DOE/ASP researchers evaluating the impact of urban emissions on regional climate.