National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ma mn mo

  1. Structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties of pulsed-laser-deposition-grown La<mn>1.85mn> Sr<mn>0.15mn> CuO<mn>4mn> / La<mn>2mn>/>3mn> Ca<mn>1mn>/>3mn> MnO>3mn> superlattices on (001)-oriented LaSrAlO<mn>4mn> substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Sen, K.; Marozau, I.; Uribe-Laverde, M. A.; Biskup, N.; Varela, M.; Khaydukov, Y.; Soltwedel, O.; Keller, T.; Döbeli, M.; Schneider, C. W.; Bernhard, C.

    2014-03-12

    Epitaxial La<mn>1.85mn> Sr<mn>0.15mn> CuO<mn>4mn> / La<mn>2mn>/>3mn> Ca<mn>1mn>/>3mn> MnO>3mn> (LSCO/LCMO) superlattices (SL) on (001)- oriented LaSrAlO4 substrates have been grown with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Their structural, magnetic and superconducting properties have been determined with in-situ reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), x-ray diffraction, specular neutron reflectometry, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electric transport, and magnetization measurements. We find that despite the large mismatch between the in-plane lattice parameters of LSCO (a = 0.3779 nm) and LCMO (a = 0.387 nm) these superlattices can be grown epitaxially and with a high crystalline quality. While the first LSCO layer remains clamped to the LSAO substrate, a sizeable strain relaxation occurs already in the first LCMO layer. The following LSCO and LCMO layers adopt a nearly balanced state in which the tensile and compressive strain effects yield alternating in-plane lattice parameters with an almost constant average value. No major defects are observed in the LSCO layers, while a significant number of vertical antiphase boundaries are found in the LCMO layers. The LSCO layers remain superconducting with a relatively high superconducting onset temperature of Tconset ≈ 36 K. The macroscopic superconducting response is also evident in the magnetization data due to a weak diamagnetic signal below 10 K for H ∥ ab and a sizeable paramagnetic shift for H ∥ c that can be explained in terms of a vortex-pinning-induced flux compression. The LCMO layers maintain a

  2. Magnetic domain tuning and the emergence of bubble domains in the bilayer manganite La<mn>2mn>->2mn>xSr<mn>1mn>+>2mn>xMn>2mn>O>7mn><mo>(x=>0.32mn>)>

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Juyoung; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Ayala-Valenzuela, Oscar E.; Wulferding, Dirk; Zhou, J. -S.; Goodenough, John B.; de Lozanne, Alex; Mitchell, J. F.; Leon, Neliza; Movshovich, Roman; Jeong, Yoon Hee; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2015-08-17

    Here, we report a magnetic force microscopy study of the magnetic domain evolution in the layered manganite La2–2xSr1+2xMn2O7 (with x = 0.32). This strongly correlated electron compound is known to exhibit a wide range of magnetic phases, including a recently uncovered biskyrmion phase. We observe a continuous transition from dendritic to stripelike domains, followed by the formation of magnetic bubbles due to a field- and temperature-dependent competition between in-plane and out-of-plane spin alignments. The magnetic bubble phase appears at comparable field and temperature ranges as the biskyrmion phase, suggesting a close relation between both phases. Based on our real-space images we construct a temperature-field phase diagram for this composition.

  3. MA

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    low MA Run PAMM / AP Low alpha University Holidays AP PAMM Spear Down 648 64 AP Oct Nov S 1 Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 M 10/3/2016 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2016-2017 2016 2017 Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar S 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 T 4 1 3 3 1 AP 2 3 2 3 4 1 4 2 3 T 6 3 1 4 1 AP 5 2 5 3 4 1 1 W 5 4 2 5 2 6 3 6 4 1 5 2 2 6 3 3 7 4 S 8 5 7 4 1 7 5 2 6 3 3 F 7 2 7 4 3 8 5 4 8 6 M 10 7 9 6 3 9 7 4 8 5 5 S 9 6 4 5 9 10 6 PAMM PAMM 8 5 4 9 6 5 10 7 PAMM PAMM 6 10 8 PAMM 12 7 W 12 9 AP 11 AP 8 5 11 AP 9 6 AP 10 AP 7 7

  4. B -meson decay constants from <mn>2mn>+>1mn> -flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Christ, N. H.; Flynn, J. M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2015-03-01

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants fB, fBs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of amo>≈>0.11mn>, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπmo>≈>290mn>MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the

  5. Determination of the direct double- β -decay Q value of Zr <mn>96mn> and atomic masses of Zr <mn>90mn> <mo>-> <mn>92mn> <mo>,> <mn>94mn> <mo>,> <mn>96mn> and Mo <mn>92mn> <mo>,> <mn>94mn> <mo>-> <mn>98mn> <mo>,> <mn>100mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyuz, K.; Ariche, J.; Bollen, G.; Bustabad, S.; Eibach, M.; Izzo, C.; Novario, S. J.; Redshaw, M.; Ringle, R.; Sandler, R.; Schwarz, S.; Valverde, A. A.

    2015-05-06

    Experimental searches for neutrinoless double-β decay offer one of the best opportunities to look for physics beyond the standard model. Detecting this decay would confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino, and a measurement of its half-life can be used to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale. Important to both tasks is an accurate knowledge of the Q value of the double-β decay. The LEBIT Penning trap mass spectrometer was used for the first direct experimental determination of the ⁹⁶Zr double-β decay Q value: Qββ=3355.85(15) keV. This value is nearly 7 keV larger than the 2012 Atomic Mass Evaluation [M. Wang et al., Chin. Phys. C 36, 1603 (2012)] value and one order of magnitude more precise. The 3-σ shift is primarily due to a more accurate measurement of the ⁹⁶Zr atomic mass: m(⁹⁶Zr)=95.90827735(17) u. Using the new Q value, the 2νββ-decay matrix element, |M|, is calculated. Improved determinations of the atomic masses of all other zirconium (90-92,94,96Zr) and molybdenum (92,94-98,100Mo) isotopes using both ¹²C₈ and ⁸⁷Rb as references are also reported.

  6. MA AP MA MA MA AP AP MA MA MA AP AP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AP MA MA MA AP AP MA MA MA AP AP low low low AP MA Run PAMM AP Low alpha University Holidays APPAMM Spear Down Hrs S 30 31 S 30 5260 832 6092 2013 2014 Scheduled Hours Users...

  7. Magnetochromic effect in multiferroic R In <mn>1mn> <mo>₋> x Mn x O <mn>3mn> ( R <mo>=> Tb , Dy)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Holinsworth, B. S.; O'Neal, K. R.; Brinzari, T. V.; Mazumdar, D.; Topping, C. V.; Luo, X.; Cheong, S.-W.; Singleton, J.; McGill, S.; Musfeldt, J. L.

    2015-05-26

    We combined high field magnetization and magneto-optical spectroscopy to investigate spin-charge coupling in Mn-substituted rare-earth indium oxides of chemical formula RIn₁₋xMnxO₃ (R=Tb, Dy). The edge states, on-site Mn³⁺d to d excitations, and rare-earth f-manifold excitations all track the magnetization energy due to dominant Zeeman interactions. The field-induced modifications to the rare-earth excitations are quite large because spin-orbit coupling naturally mixes spin and charge, suggesting that the next logical step in the design strategy should be to bring spin-orbit coupling onto the trigonal bipyramidal chromophore site with a 4 or 5d center.

  8. MA AP MA MA MA AP AP MA MA MA AP AP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AP MA MA MA AP AP MA MA MA AP AP low low low AP MA Run PAMM / AP Low alpha University Holidays AP/PAMM Spear Down Hrs S 30 31 S 30 5260 832 6092 2013 2014 Scheduled Hours Users Total 29 31 30 29 31 30 F 31 28 29 30 T 31 28 27 29 28 30 30 27 29 W 30 29 26 29 27 31 28 AP T 29 26 29 27 AP PAMM 30 28 25 31 28 26 30 27 30 28 26 M 28 25 29 27 24 30 27 25 29 26 S 27 24 28 26 23 27 29 26 24 28 25 S 26 23 28 26 24 23 27 25 28 28 25 25 22 27 24 25 23 F 25 26 24 21 27 24 22 26 23 22 27 T 24 21 20 24 22 21

  9. MA MA AP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    MA AP low low low MA Run PAMM / AP Low alpha University Holidays AP/PAMM Spear Down Oct Nov S Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 7/17/2015 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2015-2016 2015 2016 Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar S 1 1 2 1 4 1 M 2 1 2 1 T 3 1 3 PAMM 1 2 2 3 6 3 W 4 2 3 AP AP 5 2 1 3 2 4 F 2 6 4 1 5 2 4 3 T 1 5 3 5 2 7 4 3 1 5 4 1 6 4 1 5 8 5 S 4 8 2 6 3 2 7 4 2 6 5 S 3 7 6 5 3 7 6 3 8 6 3 7 4 8 7 M 5 9 7 4 9 10 7 AP PAMM PAMM PAMM PAMM 4 8 5 4 9 6 8 AP 5 9 6 5 AP 10 7 5 9 AP 8 6 10 9 13 W 7 11 9 11 T 6 10 8 12

  10. Tammy Ma

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    tammy ma Tammy Ma Drawn to Science and Giving Back Tammy Ma Tammy Ma We sat down with Dr. Tammy Ma, an experimental physicist at the National Ignition Facility, to talk about what motivates her, why she loves science, her belief in giving back, and advice for younger scientists. Motivation and work ethic My mother, unfortunately, didn't get the chance to finish high school or go to college because she emigrated to Canada as a teenager. So it's always been instilled in both me and my younger

  11. First-Principles Calculations, Electrochemical and X-ray Absorption Studies of Li-Ni-PO4 Surface-Treated xLi2MnO3 (1 x)LiMO2 (M = Mn, Ni, Co) Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, Christopher; Croy, J R; Balasubramanian, M; Kang, Sun-Ho; Lopez-Rivera, C. M.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously hypothesized that the enhanced rate capability of Li-Ni-PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} positive electrodes (M = Mn, Ni, Co) in Li-ion batteries might be associated with a defect Ni-doped Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} surface structure [i.e., Li{sub 3-2y}Ni{sub y}PO{sub 4} (0 < y < 1)], thereby promoting fast Li{sup +}-ion conduction at the xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} particle surface. In this paper, the solubility of divalent metals (Fe, Mn, Ni, Mg) in {gamma}-Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is predicted with the first-principles GGA+U method in an effort to understand the enhanced rate capability. The predicted solubility (x) is extremely small; this finding is consistent with experimental evidence: 1) X-ray diffraction data obtained from Li-Ni-PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} electrodes that show that, after annealing at 550 C, a Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-like structure forms as a second phase at the electrode particle surface, and 2) X-ray absorption spectroscopy, which indicate that the nickel ions are accommodated in the transition metal layers of the Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} component during the annealing process. However, electrochemical studies of Li{sub 3-2y}Ni{sub y}PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} electrodes indicate that their rate capability increases as a function of y over the range y = 0 (Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) to y = 1 (LiNiPO{sub 4}), strongly suggesting that, at some level, the nickel ions play a role in reducing electrochemical impedance and increasing electrode stability at the electrode particle surface.

  12. Measurement of the direct CP -violating parameter ACP in the decay D<mo>+ stretchy='false'>→mo>K<mo>-mo>π<mo>+mo>π+>

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-12-01

    We measure the direct CP-violating parameter ACP for the decay of the charged charm meson, Dmo>+ stretchy="false">→mo>Kmo>-mo>πmo>+mo>πmo>+> (and charge conjugate), using the full mn>10.4mn> fbmo>->1mn> sample of ppmo accent="true" stretchy="false">¯mo> collisions at smo>=>1.96mn> TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We extract the raw reconstructed charge asymmetry by fitting the invariant mass distributions for the sum and difference of charge-specific samples. This quantity is then corrected for detector-related asymmetries using data-driven methods and for possible physics asymmetries (from Bmo stretchy="false">→mo

  13. Formation of voids and secondary-phase precipitates in the Fe-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-1Mn-Ti-Si steel under high-doze neutron irradiation and during post-irradiation annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Portnykh, I. A. Kozlov, A. V.; Shcherbakov, E. N.; Asiptsov, O. I.

    2009-12-15

    The effect of high-dose neutron irradiation on the structural changes in Fe-16Cr-15Ni-2Mo-1Mn-Ti-Si austenitic steel have been investigated. Samples irradiated at temperatures of 390, 500, and 600{sup o} to damage doses of 46, 86, and 46 dpa, respectively, were analyzed by electron microscopy and dilatometry. The quantitative characteristics of radiation voids and secondary-phase precipitates formed under neutron irradiation are obtained. Their behavior upon heating to 700{sup o}C and annealing at this temperature for 2 h is studied. It is shown that annealing leads to the dissociation of small voids, which is accompanied by the growth of large ones. The secondary-phase precipitates are partially dissolved upon annealing, and their volume fraction decreases.

  14. MaRIE Presentations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    MaRIE Presentations MaRIE Presentations MaRIE will provide a capability to address the control of performance and production of weapons materials at the mesoscale. MaRIE fills a critical gap in length scale between the integral scale addressed by studies conducted at DARHT, U1a, NIF, and Z. MaRIE 1.0 Matter Radiation Interactions in Extremes 1.0 70th Anniversary (pdf) July 27, 2013

  15. Mo-99

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    its project for domestic production of molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) without highly enriched uranium (HEU).

    Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m, which is the most widely...

  16. MA Org Chart, October, 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MA-1 Ingrid Kolb, Director Laurie Morman, Chief of Staff Office of Corporate Business Operations MA-1.1 Marilyn Dillon, Director Office of Scheduling and Advance Charles Quintero, Director MA-10 MA-70 Office of Executive Secretariat Amy B. Demagistris Director Shena Kennerly Deputy Director Office of Policy Analysis Michael Coogan Office of Correspondence Management Steven Johnsen MA-72 Administration, MIS, and Executive Commitments Group Shena Kennerly MA-73 Office of History and Heritage

  17. Mo-99

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes to further develop its technology to produce Mo-99 via neutron capture, bringing the total NNSA support to this project to the maximum of 25...

  18. Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

  19. MA-60 Org chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MA-60 Org chart MA-60 Org chart Updated May 5, 2016 OAM Org Chart (MA-60) 053016.png OAM Org Chart (MA-60) 053016.pdf (148.11 KB)

  20. MA Mortenson | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Name: MA Mortenson Place: Minnesota Zip: 55440-0710 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Construction and building firm active in the installation of wind and solar farms....

  1. Ookie Ma | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Ookie Ma - Policy and Analysis Portfolio Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Most Recent Natural Gas: Lifting Mileage Higher and Higher April 7 New EERE ...

  2. CAES MaCS Home

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    cross-cutting capabilities that support the Center for Advanced Energy Studies' (CAES) mission in multiple initiative areas. MaCS is largely made possible through its...

  3. US NE MA Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption

  4. Discovery and utilization of sorghum genes (Ma5/Ma6)

    DOEpatents

    Mullet, John E; Rooney, William L; Klein, Patricia E; Morishige, Daryl; Murphy, Rebecca; Brady, Jeff A

    2012-11-13

    Methods and composition for the production of non-flowering or late flowering sorghum hybrid. For example, in certain aspects methods for use of molecular markers that constitute the Ma5/Ma6 pathway to modulate photoperiod sensitivity are described. The invention allows the production of plants having improved productivity and biomass generation.

  5. MxMn8O16 (M = Ag or K) as promising cathode materials for secondary Mg based batteries: The role of the cation M

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianping; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Altug S. Poyraz; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Marschilok, Amy C.

    2016-02-15

    Here, AgxMn8O16 (Ag-OMS-2) and KxMn8O16 (K-OMS-2) were investigated as high voltage cathode materials for Mg based batteries. Both MxMn8O16 materials delivered high initial capacities (>180 mA h g–1), and KxMn8O16 showed high cycle stability with a reversible capacity of >170 mA h g–1 after 20 cycles.

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Beverly MA Site - MA 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. MA.04-1 - DOE Memorandum; Voigt to LaGrone; Subject: Designation of Sites for Remedial Action - ...

  7. US NE MA Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... Yes Yes No No 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US MA No Car CAR IS PARKED WITHIN 20 FT OF ELECTRICAL OUTLET More highlights from RECS on housing characteristics and energy-related ...

  8. MA Org Chart, November 16, 2015

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    of Staff MA-80 Office of the Ombudsman Rita R. Franklin, Director November 2015 Adrian Collins, Dep. Director MA-50 Office of Asset Management Carmelo Melendez, Director MA-40...

  9. MA Org Chart, August 13, 2015

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    of Staff MA-80 Office of the Ombudsman Rita R. Franklin, Director August 2015 Adrian Collins, Dep. Director MA-50 Office of Asset Management Carmelo Melendez, Director MA-40...

  10. MA Org Chart, January 5, 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Director Office of Scheduling and Advance Charles Quintero, Director MA-10 MA-70 Office of ... Information Technology Program Emily Stanton Chris Morris, FOIA Officer Vacant Office of ...

  11. Scaling of X pinches from 1 MA to 6 MA.

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Wenger, David Franklin; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Pikuz, Sergei A.; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Yu, Edmund P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Shelkovenko, Tatiana A.; Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2010-09-01

    This final report for Project 117863 summarizes progress made toward understanding how X-pinch load designs scale to high currents. The X-pinch load geometry was conceived in 1982 as a method to study the formation and properties of bright x-ray spots in z-pinch plasmas. X-pinch plasmas driven by 0.2 MA currents were found to have source sizes of 1 micron, temperatures >1 keV, lifetimes of 10-100 ps, and densities >0.1 times solid density. These conditions are believed to result from the direct magnetic compression of matter. Physical models that capture the behavior of 0.2 MA X pinches predict more extreme parameters at currents >1 MA. This project developed load designs for up to 6 MA on the SATURN facility and attempted to measure the resulting plasma parameters. Source sizes of 5-8 microns were observed in some cases along with evidence for high temperatures (several keV) and short time durations (<500 ps).

  12. MA.+'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... The beta-gamma dose rates measured on the power equipment (room 6) indicated levels as ... contamination from the land surface by wind or air currents; hence, radiation ...

  13. MaRIE Name and Logo

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    The MaRIE Name and Logo Explaining the MaRIE Name and Logo MaRIE is an acronym for "Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extreme" and honors a great scientist. Making, Measuring, and Modeling Materials» Multi-Probe Diagnostic Hall» Theory, Modeling and Computation» Accelerator Systems» Why MaRIE?: The MaRIE/Madame Curie relationship Marie Curie Los Alamos National Laboratory's flagship facility concept, MaRIE, stands for Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes. It is also named after

  14. Roadmap to MaRIE November 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Cris William

    2015-11-23

    This report describes MaRIE experimental facility in the November 2015 issue of their Science and Technology newsletter.

  15. LAMPF TO MaRIE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    LAMPF TO MaRIE Los Alamos National Laboratory - 70 Years of Science and Beyond E X P E R I M E N T A L P H Y S I C A L S C I E N C E S Through the science of making, measuring, and modeling, the people of Los Alamos National Laboratory discover breakthrough solutions to the most pressing national security challenges. PEOPLE BEHIND THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY LOS ALAMOS MILESTONES THE EVOLUTION OF LOS ALAMOS SIGNATURE FACILITIES EXPERTISE AND ACHIEVEMENTS IN MAKING, MEASURING, AND MODELING This

  16. Average and local structure of the Pb-free ferroelectric perovskites <mo>(mo>Sr<mo>,mo>Sn<mo>)TiO>3mn> and <mo>(mo>Ba<mo>,mo>Ca<mo>,mo>Sn<mo>)TiO>3mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Laurita, Geneva; Page, Katharine; Suzuki, Shoichiro; Seshadri, Ram

    2015-12-16

    The characteristic structural off -centering of Pb2+ in oxides, associated with its 6s2 lone pair, allows it to play a dominant role in polar materials, and makes it a somewhat ubiquitous component of ferroelectrics. In this work, we examine the compounds Sr0.9Sn0.1TiO3 and Ba0.79Ca0.16Sn0.05TiO3 using neutron total scattering techniques with data acquired at di erent temperatures. In these compounds, previously reported as ferroelectrics, Sn2+ appears to display some of the characteristics of Pb2+. We compare the local and long-range structures of the Sn2+-substituted compositions to the unsubstituted parent compounds SrTiO3 and BaTiO3. Lastly, we find that even at these small substitution levels, the Sn2+ lone pairs drive the local ordering behavior, with the local structure of both compounds more similar to the structure of PbTiO3 rather than the parent compounds.

  17. Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Johnston LFG (MA RPS Biomass Facility Facility Johnston LFG (MA RPS Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location...

  18. Nonuniversal gaugino masses and muong<mo>->2mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Gogoladze, Ilia; Nasir, Fariha; Shafi, Qaisar; n, Cem Salih

    2014-08-11

    We consider two classes of supersymmetric models with nonuniversal gaugino masses at the grand unification scale MGUT in an attempt to resolve the apparent muon g-2 anomaly encountered in the Standard Model. We explore two distinct scenarios, one in which all gaugino masses have the same sign at MGUT, and a second case with opposite sign gaugino masses. The sfermion masses in both cases are assumed to be universal at MGUT. We exploit the nonuniversality among gaugino masses to realize large mass splitting between the colored and noncolored sfermions. Thus, the sleptons can have masses in the few hundred GeV range, whereas the colored sparticles turn out to be an order of magnitude or so heavier. In both models the resolution of the muon g-2 anomaly is compatible, among other things, with a 125126 GeV Higgs boson mass and the WMAP dark matter bounds.

  19. Stoichiometry dependence of potential screening at La <mo>(> <mn>1mn> <mo>-> δ <mo>)> Al <mo>(> <mn>1mn> <mo>+> δ <mo>)> O <mn>3mn> <mo>/> SrTiO <mn>3mn> interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Conan; Sterbinsky, George E.; Rumaiz, Abdul K.; Hellberg, C. Stephen; Woicik, Joseph C.; Zhu, Shaobo; Schlom, Darrell G.

    2015-04-03

    Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) and variable kinetic energy x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VKE-XPS) analyses have been performed on ten-unit-cell-thick La(1-δ)Al(1+δ)O₃ films, with La:Al ratios of 1.1, 1.0, and 0.9, deposited on SrTiO₃. Only Al-rich films are known to have a conductive interface. VKE-XPS, coupled with maximum entropy analysis, shows significant differences in the compositional depth profile among the Al-rich, La-rich, and stoichiometric films: significant La enrichment at the interface is observed in the La-rich and stoichiometric films, while the Al-rich film shows little to no intermixing. Additionally, the La-rich and stoichiometric films show a high concentration of Al at the surface, which is not observed in the Al-rich film. HAXPES valence band (VB) analysis shows a broadening of the VB for the Al-rich sample relative to the stoichiometric and La-rich samples. This broadening is consistent with an electric field across the Al-rich film. These results are consistent with a defect-driven electronic reconstruction.

  20. MoS2

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... mechanisms for its eventual aging and demise. Figure 3: Typical x-ray diffraction of the poorly crystalline MoS phase. (reference 5) Often transmission electron microscopy (TEM) ...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Shpack Landfill - MA 06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Shpack Landfill - MA 06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Shpack Landfill, NY Alternate Name(s): Attleboro, MA Metals and Controls Site Norton Landfill area MA.06-2 MA.06-3 Location: 68 ...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tracerlab Inc - MA 11

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and cesium blocks during the early 1950s. MA.11-1 MA.11-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed MA.11-2 MA.11-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive...

  3. MA Org Chart, March 22, 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Rebecca Montoya, Dep. Director- Admin Svcs. Office of Administrative Management and Support Office of Logistics and Facility Operations Office Travel Management MA-45 Umeki Thorne, ...

  4. InThrMa | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Softwaremodeling tools User Interface: Website, Mobile Device Website: www.inthrma.com Web Application Link: www.inthrma.com Cost: Paid Language: English InThrMa Screenshot...

  5. MA - Office of Management - Energy Conservation Plan

    Energy Saver

    MA Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 1 Office of Management Office-Level Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 I. BACKGROUND This energy conservation plan represents an effort ...

  6. Preparation and electrochemical properties of lamellar MnO{sub 2} for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jun; Wei, Tong; Cheng, Jie; Fan, Zhuangjun; Zhang, Milin

    2010-02-15

    Lamellar birnessite-type MnO{sub 2} materials were prepared by changing the pH of the initial reaction system via hydrothermal synthesis. The interlayer spacing of MnO{sub 2} with a layered structure increased gradually when the initial pH value varied from 12.43 to 2.81, while the MnO{sub 2}, composed of {alpha}-MnO{sub 2} and {gamma}-MnO{sub 2}, had a rod-like structure at pH 0.63. Electrochemical studies indicated that the specific capacitance of birnessite-type MnO{sub 2} was much higher than that of rod-like MnO{sub 2} at high discharge current densities due to the lamellar structure with fast intercalation/deintercalation of protons and high utilization of MnO{sub 2}. The initial specific capacitance of MnO{sub 2} prepared at pH 2.81 was 242.1 F g{sup -1} at 2 mA cm{sup -2} in 2 mol L{sup -1} (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous electrolyte. The capacitance increased by about 8.1% of initial capacitance after 200 cycles at a current density of 100 mA cm{sup -2}.

  7. Resonant ?<mo>+? stretchy='false'>?mo>?<mo>+?>0mn> amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Briceo, Ral A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2015-12-08

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for $\\pi\\pi \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$, as a function of the energy of the $\\pi\\pi$ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where $\\pi\\pi$ couples strongly to the unstable $\\rho$ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to $m_\\pi \\approx 400$ MeV. As a result, we obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the $\\rho$ pole and identify from its residue the $\\rho \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$ form-factor.

  8. Lattice dynamics of BaFe<mn>2mn>X>3mn><mo>(X=>S<mo>,>Se<mo>)> compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Popovi?, Z. V.; ?epanovi?, M.; Lazarevi?, N.; Opa?i?, M.; Radonji?, M. M.; Tanaskovi?, D.; Lei, Hechang; Petrovic, C.

    2015-02-27

    We present the Raman scattering spectra of the S=2 spin ladder compounds BaFe?X? (X=S,Se) in a temperature range between 20 and 400 K. Although the crystal structures of these two compounds are both orthorhombic and very similar, they are not isostructural. The unit cell of BaFe?S? (BaFe?Se?) is base-centered Cmcm (primitive Pnma), giving 18 (36) modes to be observed in the Raman scattering experiment. We have detected almost all Raman active modes, predicted by factor group analysis, which can be observed from the cleavage planes of these compounds. Assignment of the observed Raman modes of BaFe?S(Se)? is supported by the lattice dynamics calculations. The antiferromagnetic long-range spin ordering in BaFe?Se? below TN=255K leaves a fingerprint both in the A1g and B3g phonon mode linewidth and energy.

  9. Multichannel <mn>0mn> stretchy='false'>?mo>>2mn> and <mn>1mn> stretchy='false'>?mo>>2mn> transition amplitudes for arbitrary spin particles in a finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Maxwell; Briceno, Raul

    2015-10-01

    We present a model-independent, non-perturbative relation between finite-volume matrix elements and infinite-volume $\\textbf{0}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ and $\\textbf{1}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ transition amplitudes. Our result accommodates theories in which the final two-particle state is coupled to any number of other two-body channels, with all angular momentum states included. The derivation uses generic, fully relativistic field theory, and is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections in the lightest particle mass times the box size. This work distinguishes itself from previous studies by accommodating particles with any intrinsic spin. To illustrate the utility of our general result, we discuss how it can be implemented for studies of $N+\\mathcal{J}~\\rightarrow~(N\\pi,N\\eta,N\\eta',\\Sigma K,\\Lambda K)$ transitions, where $\\mathcal{J}$ is a generic external current. The reduction of rotational symmetry, due to the cubic finite volume, manifests in this example through the mixing of S- and P-waves when the system has nonzero total momentum.

  10. Multichannel <mn>0mn> stretchy='false'>→mo>>2mn> and <mn>1mn> stretchy='false'>→mo>>2mn> transition amplitudes for arbitrary spin particles in a finite volume

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Maxwell; Briceno, Raul

    2015-10-01

    We present a model-independent, non-perturbative relation between finite-volume matrix elements and infinite-volume $\\textbf{0}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ and $\\textbf{1}\\rightarrow\\textbf{2}$ transition amplitudes. Our result accommodates theories in which the final two-particle state is coupled to any number of other two-body channels, with all angular momentum states included. The derivation uses generic, fully relativistic field theory, and is exact up to exponentially suppressed corrections in the lightest particle mass times the box size. This work distinguishes itself from previous studies by accommodating particles with any intrinsic spin. To illustrate the utility of our general result, we discuss how it can be implemented for studies of $N+\\mathcal{J}~\\rightarrow~(N\\pi,N\\eta,N\\eta',\\Sigma K,\\Lambda K)$ transitions, where $\\mathcal{J}$ is a generic external current. The reduction of rotational symmetry, due to the cubic finite volume, manifests in this example through the mixing of S- and P-waves when the system has nonzero total momentum.

  11. Team OptiMN

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    University of Minnesota Team OptiMN "OptiMN Impact Home" Project Summary Designed to fit on the majority of North Minneapolis infill lots, the OptiMN Impact Home is a collaborative project between the University of Minnesota and Urban Homeworks. The overarching goal was a flexible, high-performance, energy-efficient, and affordable house that can be easily built by Urban Homeworks and purchased by eligible low-income residents of North Minneapolis through the Green Homes North program.

  12. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Norton Co - MA 12

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MA.12-3 MA.12-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited scope of activities performed at the site MA.12-2 ...

  14. MA Org Chart, June 2 Rev. 1, 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MA-64 MA-60 John Bashista, Director Thomas Dussault, Dep. Director MA-80 Office of the Ombudsman Rita R. Franklin, Director June 2016 Adrian Collins, Director of Ops Francine ...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Nuclear Metals Inc - MA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Metals Inc - MA 09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NUCLEAR METALS, INC. (MA.09) Eliminated ... Also see Documents Related to NUCLEAR METALS, INC. MA.09-1 - DOE Memorandum; D. Levine to ...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Heald Machine Co - MA 15

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Location: Worcester , Massachusetts MA.15-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 MA.15-2 MA.15-3 Site Operations: Research and development on uranium slug drilling machines in the early 1960s. ...

  17. CRAD, NNSA - Maintenance (MN) | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    NNSA - Maintenance (MN) CRAD, NNSA - Maintenance (MN) CRAD for Maintenance (MN). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and ...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Watertown Arsenal - MA 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Watertown Arsenal - MA 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: WATERTOWN ARSENAL (MA.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to EPA, State of Massachusetts, and the NRC ...

  19. El Ma Electronic Machining srl | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ma Electronic Machining srl Jump to: navigation, search Name: El.Ma. Electronic Machining srl Place: Riva del Garda (TN), Italy Zip: 38066 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar, Wind...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Englehard Industries - MA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    operations - uranium metal - under AEC license. MA.0-03-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed MA.0-03-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials...

  1. MaRIE: An experimental facility concept revolutionizing materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MaRIE: An experimental facility concept revolutionizing materials in extremes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE: An experimental facility concept revolutionizing...

  2. MaRIE theory, modeling and computation roadmap executive summary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: MaRIE theory, modeling and computation roadmap executive summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE theory, modeling and computation roadmap executive ...

  3. PARS II Enhancements - Igor Pedan, MA-63 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Enhancements - Igor Pedan, MA-63 PARS II Enhancements - Igor Pedan, MA-63 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop PDF icon 28PedanPARSII Enhancements.pdf More Documents & ...

  4. MaRIE Undulator & XFEL Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong; Marksteiner, Quinn R.; Anisimov, Petr Mikhaylovich; Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-03-23

    The 22 slides in this presentation treat the subject under the following headings: MaRIE XFEL Performance Parameters, Input Electron Beam Parameters, Undulator Design, Genesis Simulations, Risks, and Summary It is concluded that time-dependent Genesis simulations show the MaRIE XFEL can deliver the number of photons within the required bandwidth, provided a number of assumptions are met; the highest risks are associated with the electron beam driving the XFEL undulator; and risks associated with the undulator and/or distributed seeding technique may be evaluated or retired by performing early validation experiments.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Latty Avenue Site - MO 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Former Cotter Site, Latty Avenue Properties Contemporary Metals Corp. Continental Mining and Milling MO.04-1 MO.04-2 MO.04-5 MO.04-6 MO.06-8 MO.06-11 Location: 9200 Latty ...

  6. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less

  7. Microstructure evolution of Li uptake/removal in MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles with high lithium storage performance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Pan; Chen, Wenhao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhchli@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: The carbon-coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) ultra fine nanoparticles are synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method. MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles have high specific capacity, excellent cycling performance and rate performance. Phase transformations for lithium ion uptake/removal are examined carefully by TEM. Phase transformations are highly reversible during the redox process. - Abstract: A facile one pot strategy of a hydrothermal methodology was applied to synthesize the carbon coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) nanostructured particles, which are composed of ultra fine nanoparticles with homogeneous carbon coating about several nanometers. As an electrode in lithium ion batteries, the MoO{sub 2}@C shows a high specific capacity and reversible capacity (730 mA h g{sup ?1} after 60 cycles). Microstructure investigations, by using a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, of the MoO{sub 2}@C based electrodes employed at various states during the first discharge/charge cycle were conducted to elucidate the lithium ion uptake/removal mechanism and cycling behavior. In the lithium uptake process, the original MoO{sub 2} phase transfers into Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} through an addition type reaction, and then nanosized metallic Mo emerges as a result of a conversion reaction. In turn, Mo could be oxidized to the intermediate Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} before converting to hyperfine MoO{sub 2} phase on upcoming lithium removal process.

  8. MN Office of Energy Security | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MN Office of Energy Security Jump to: navigation, search Name: MN Office of Energy Security Place: St. Paul, MN Website: www.mnofficeofenergysecurity.c References: MN Office of...

  9. Spectroscopy of Gd<mn>153mn> and Gd<mn>157mn> using the <mo>(mo>p<mo>,mo>dγ<mo>)> reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, T. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Allmond, J. M.; Beausang, C. W.; Angell, C. T.; Basunia, M. S.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Escher, J. E.; Fallon, P.; Hatarik, R.; Munson, J.; Paschalis, S.; Petri, M.; Phair, L. W.; Ressler, J. J.; Scielzo, N. D.

    2014-10-31

    Low-spin single quasineutron levels in 153Gd and 157Gd have been studied following the 154Gd(p,d-γ )153Gd and 158Gd(p,d-γ )157Gd reactions. A combined Si telescope and high-purity germanium array was utilized, allowing d-γ and d-γ-γ coincidence measurements. Almost all of the established low-excitation-energy, low-spin structures were confirmed in both 153Gd and 157Gd. Several new levels and numerous new rays are observed in both nuclei, particularly for Ex ≥1 MeV. Lastly, residual effects of a neutron subshell closure at N = 64 are observed in the form of a large excitation energy gap in the single quasineutron level schemes.

  10. Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Australia ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Australia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports ... U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Everett, MA LNG Imports from ...

  11. SE-MA-NO Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    SE-MA-NO Electric Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name: SE-MA-NO Electric Coop Place: Missouri Phone Number: (417) 924-3291 Website: www.semano.com Facebook: https:...

  12. Mn-doped ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with enhanced performances as anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaoqin; Hou, Xianhua; Yao, Lingmin; Hu, Shejun; Liu, Xiang; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Mn-doped ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. • Zn{sub 0.96}Mn{sub 0.04}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode shows the highest reversible capacity of 1157 mA h g{sup −1}. • The Zn{sub 0.96}Mn{sub 0.04}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode shows promising cycling stability. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline Zn{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.1) have been successfully synthesized by one-step hydrothermal method. The morphologies and electrochemical performance of Mn-doped ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} in various proportions were investigated at room temperature, respectively. The Zn{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.04) electrode in the as-synthesized samples showed the highest specific capacity of 1547 mA h g{sup −1} and 1157 mA h g{sup −1} in the initial discharge/charge process, with a coulombic efficiency of 74.8%. Additionally, excellent cycling stability was performed with a 1214 mA h g{sup −1} capacity retention at a current density of 100 mA g{sup −1} after 50 cycles. The corresponding mechanism was proposed which indicated that the Mn-doped ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles experienced an aggregation thermochemical reaction among ZnO, MnO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} subparticles.

  13. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... Yes Yes No No 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US MO No Car CAR IS PARKED WITHIN 20 FT OF ELECTRICAL OUTLET More highlights from RECS on housing characteristics and energy-related ...

  14. Office of Information Resources (MA-90) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Resources (MA-90) Office of Information Resources (MA-90) Freedom of Information 2007 Annual Report Office of Information Resources (MA-90) (220.69 KB) More Documents & Publications ANNUAL FOIA REPORT FOR 2009 U.S. Department of Energy 2008 Annual FOIA Report Microsoft Word - 2005 FOIA ANNUAL REPORT.doc

  15. Category:Minneapolis, MN | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 89 KB SVHospital Minneapolis MN Northern States...

  16. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin; Xu, Zhe; He, Dacheng; Lu, Guanting

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Seven NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing were categorized into 3 groups: long, middle and short. • Both exons 15 and 16 in long NuMA were “hotspot” for alternative splicing. • Lower expression of short NuMA was observed in cancer cells compared with nonneoplastic controls. • Distinct localization pattern of short isoforms indicated different function from that of long and middle NuMA. - Abstract: The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30 years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two “hotspot” exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA’s various functions.

  17. The 300 mA SRF ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2013-11-07

    Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) are important for a variety of applications, from high-power Free-Electron Lasers (FEL) to polarized-electron polarized-proton colliders. The ERL current is arguably the most important characteristic of ERLs for such applications. With that in mind, the Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory embarked on the development of a 300 mA ERL to serve as an R and D test-bed for high-current ERL technologies. These include high-current, extremely well damped superconducting accelerating cavities, high-current superconducting laser-photocathode electron guns and high quantum-efficiency photocathodes. In this presentation I will cover these ERL related developments.

  18. Mo-Si alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  19. Electronic structure of the heavy-fermion caged compound Ce<mn>3mn>Pd>20mn>X>6mn><mo>(mo>X=>Si,Ge<mo>)> studied by density functional theory and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Schwier, Eike F.; Arita, Masashi; Shimada, Kenya; Tsujii, Naohito; Jarrige, Ignace; Jiang, Jian; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Iwasawa, Hideaki; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kitazawa, Hideaki

    2015-03-30

    The electronic structure of Ce₃Pd₂₀X₆ (X = Si, Ge) has been studied using detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations and high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements. The orbital decomposition of the electronic structure by DFT calculations indicates that Ce atoms at the (8c) site surrounded by 16 Pd atoms have a more localized nature and a tendency to be magnetic. Ce atoms in the (4a) site surrounded by 12 Pd and 6 X atoms, on the other, show only a negligible magnetic moment. In the photoemission valence-band spectra we observe a strong f⁰ (Ce⁴⁺) component with a small fraction of f¹ (Ce³⁺) component. The spectral weight of f¹ component near the Fermi level Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ is stronger than that for Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆ at the 4d-4f resonance, suggesting stronger c-f hybridization in the former. This may hint to the origin of the large electronic specific coefficient of Ce₃Pd₂₀Si₆ compared to Ce₃Pd₂₀Ge₆.

  20. Measurements of the properties of Λc<mo stretchy='false'>(mo>>2595mn> stretchy='false'>)mo> , Λc<mo stretchy='false'>(mo>>2625mn> stretchy='false'>)mo> , Σc<mo stretchy='false'>(mo>>2455mn> stretchy='false'>)mo> , and Σc<mo stretchy='false'>(mo>>2520mn> stretchy='false'>)mo> baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C. -J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. -M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-07-13

    We report measurements of the resonance properties of Λc(2595)+ and Λc(2595)+ baryons in their decays to Λc+π+π- as well as Σc(2455)++,0 and Σc(2455)++,0 baryons in their decays to Λc+π± final states. These measurements are performed using data corresponding to 5.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, exploiting the largest available charmed baryon sample, we measure masses and decay widths with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for Σc states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited Λc+ states.

  1. Two-leg SU<mo>(>2mn>n)> spin ladder: A low-energy effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lecheminant, P.; Tsvelik, A. M.

    2015-05-07

    We present a field-theory analysis of a model of two SU(2n)-invariant magnetic chains coupled by a generic interaction preserving time reversal and inversion symmetry. Contrary to the SU(2)-invariant case the zero-temperature phase diagram of such two-leg spin ladder does not contain topological phases. Thus, only generalized Valence Bond Solid phases are stabilized when n > 1 with different wave vectors and ground-state degeneracies. In particular, we find a phase which is made of a cluster of 2n spins put in an SU(2n) singlet state. For n = 3, this cluster phase is relevant to ?Yb ultracold atoms, with an emergent SU(6) symmetry, loaded in a double-well optical lattice.

  2. Momentum distributions for H<mn>2mn><mo>(mo>e<mo>,mo>e<mo>'p)>

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, William P.; Jeschonnek, Sabine; Van Orden, J. W.

    2014-12-29

    [Background] A primary goal of deuteron electrodisintegration is the possibility of extracting the deuteron momentum distribution. This extraction is inherently fraught with difficulty, as the momentum distribution is not an observable and the extraction relies on theoretical models dependent on other models as input. [Purpose] We present a new method for extracting the momentum distribution which takes into account a wide variety of model inputs thus providing a theoretical uncertainty due to the various model constituents. [Method] The calculations presented here are using a Bethe-Salpeter like formalism with a wide variety of bound state wave functions, form factors, and final state interactions. We present a method to extract the momentum distributions from experimental cross sections, which takes into account the theoretical uncertainty from the various model constituents entering the calculation. [Results] In order to test the extraction pseudo-data was generated, and the extracted "experimental'' distribution, which has theoretical uncertainty from the various model inputs, was compared with the theoretical distribution used to generate the pseudo-data. [Conclusions] In the examples we compared the original distribution was typically within the error band of the extracted distribution. The input wave functions do contain some outliers which are discussed in the text, but at least this process can provide an upper bound on the deuteron momentum distribution. Due to the reliance on the theoretical calculation to obtain this quantity any extraction method should account for the theoretical error inherent in these calculations due to model inputs.

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fenwal Inc - MA 14

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ashland, Massachusetts, February 1, 1967; February 9, 1968 MA.14-2 - DOE Memorandum; Williams to The File; Subject: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites...

  4. Radiation Protection Instrument Manual, Revision 1, PNL-MA-562

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2009-09-23

    PNL-MA-562 This manual provides specific information for operating and using portable radiological monitoring instruments available for use on the Hanford Site.

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Woburn Landfill - MA 07

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1987 MA.07-6 Site Operations: The National Lead Company, Inc. disposed of approximately ... development and experimental studies of uranium and thorium extraction; Contract No. ...

  6. THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAT, MA-70 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Organization chart for the Office of the Executive Secretariat, MA-70 PDF icon Office of the Executive Secretariat More Documents & Publications Office of Management Organization ...

  7. MHK Projects/GCK Technology Merrimack River Amesbury MA US |...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Merrimack River Amesbury MA US < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","typ...

  8. MaRIE: An experimental facility concept revolutionizing materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    concept revolutionizing materials in extremes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE: An experimental facility concept revolutionizing materials in extremes Authors: ...

  9. EDeMa (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EDeMa Country Germany Headquarters Location Mlheim, Germany Coordinates 51.427074, 6.886492 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  10. New lifetime measurements in Pd<mn>109mn> and the onset of deformation at N<mo>=>60mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, B.; Mach, H.; Aprahamian, A.; Simpson, G. S.; Rissanen, J.; Ghiţă, D. G.; Olaizola, B.; Kurcewicz, W.; Äystö, J.; Bentley, I.; Eronen, T.; Fraile, L. M.; Jokinen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Reponen, M.; Ruchowska, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Smith, M. K.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-14

    We measured several new subnanosecond lifetimes in 109Pd using the fast-timing βγ γ (t ) method. Fission fragments of the A = 109 mass chain were produced by bombarding natural uranium with 30 MeV protons at the Jyväskylä Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) facility. We obtained lifetimes for excited states in 109Pd populated following β decay of 109Rh. The new lifetimes provide some insight into the evolution of nuclear structure in this mass region. In particular, the distinct structure of the two low-lying 7/2+ states occurring systematically across the Pd isotopic chain is supported by the new lifetime measurements. Finally, the available nuclear data indicate a sudden increase in deformation at N = 60 which is related to the strong p-n interaction between πg9/2 and νg7/2 valence nucleons expected in this region.

  11. Integral cross section measurement of the U <mn>235mn> <mo>(> n <mo>,> n <mo>'> <mo>)> U <mn>235mn> m reaction in a pulsed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bélier, G.; Bond, E. M.; Vieira, D. J.; Authier, N.; Becker, J. A.; Hyneck, D.; Jacquet, X.; Jansen, Y.; Legendre, J.; Macri, R.; Méot, V.; Romain, P.

    2015-04-08

    The integral measurement of the neutron inelastic cross section leading to the 26-minute half-life 235mU isomer in a fission-like neutron spectrum is presented. The experiment has been performed at a pulsed reactor, where the internal conversion decay of the isomer was measured using a dedicated electron detector after activation. The sample preparation, efficiency measurement, irradiation, radiochemistry purification, and isomer decay measurement will be presented. We determined the integral cross section for the ²³⁵U(n,n')235mU reaction to be 1.00±0.13b. This result supports an evaluation performed with TALYS-1.4 code with respect to the isomer excitation as well as the total neutron inelastic scattering cross section.

  12. SSL Demonstration: Street Lighting, Kansas City, MO

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    GATEWAY program report brief summarizing an SSL street lighting demonstration at nine separate installations in Kansas City, MO.

  13. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tkac, Peter; Rotsch, David A.; Stepinski, Dominique; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Harvey, James; Vandegrift, George F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  14. Search for CP Violation in B<mn>0mn> - B<mo>¯>0mn> Mixing Using Partial Reconstruction of B<mn>0mn><mo>→mo>D<mo>*mo><mo>-mo>X<mo>+mo>ν and a Kaon Tag

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present results of a search for CP violation in B0-B¯0 mixing with the BABAR detector. We select a sample of B0→D*-Xℓ+ν decays with a partial reconstruction method and use kaon tagging to assess the flavor of the other B meson in the event. We determine the CP violating asymmetry ACP≡[N(B0B0)-N(B¯00)]/[N(B0B0)+N(B¯00)]=(0.06±0.17+0.38-0.32)%, corresponding to ΔCP=1-|q/p|=(0.29±0.84+1.88-1.61)×10-3.

  15. Preferential Eu Site Occupation and Its Consequences in the Ternary Luminescent HalidesAB<mn>2mn>I<mn>5mn><mo>:Eu>2mn>+>(A<mo>=mo>Li<mo>–>Cs;B<mo>=>Sr, Ba)

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.  M.; Biswas, Koushik

    2015-07-22

    Several rare-earth-doped, heavy-metal halides have recently been identified as potential next-generation luminescent materials with high efficiency at low cost. AB2I5:Eu2+ (A=Li–Cs; B=Sr, Ba) is one such family of halides. Its members, such as CsBa2I5:Eu2+ and KSr2I5:Eu2+, are currently being investigated as high-performance scintillators with improved sensitivity, light yield, and energy resolution less than 3% at 662 keV. Within the AB2I5 family, our first-principles-based calculations reveal two remarkably different trends in Eu site occupation. The substitutional Eu ions occupy both eightfold-coordinated B1(VIII) and the sevenfold-coordinated B2(VII) sites in the Sr-containing compounds. However, in the Ba-containing crystals, Eu ions strongly prefer the B2(VII)sites. This random versus preferential distribution of Eu affects their electronic properties. The calculations also suggest that in the Ba-containing compounds one can expect the formation of Eu-rich domains. These results provide atomistic insight into recent experimental observations about the concentration and temperature effects in Eu-doped CsBa2I5. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to luminescent properties and applications. We also hypothesize Sr, Ba-mixed quaternary iodides ABaVIIISrVIII5:Eu as scintillators having enhanced homogeneity and electronic properties.

  16. 2016 Polymer Physics Gordon Research Conference (South Hadley, MA) - JCAP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    16 Polymer Physics Gordon Research Conference (South Hadley, MA) 2016 Polymer Physics Gordon Research Conference (South Hadley, MA) Sun, Jul 24, 2016 3:00pm 15:00 Fri, Jul 29, 2016 4:00pm 16:00 South Hadley, MA USA Bryan S. Beckingham, Breanna M. Dobyns and Daniel J. Miller, "Real-time monitoring of single-and multi-component permeation via in-situ ATR FTIR spectroscopy" (poster) July 9 Gordon Research Seminar on Plasmonics and Nanophotonics (Newry, ME) July 25 21st International

  17. MaRIE theory, modeling and computation roadmap executive summary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    executive summary describe in detail for each of these areas the current state of the art, the gaps that exist and the road map to MaRIE and beyond. Here we integrate the...

  18. Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Objectives Forecasts sales of competing vehicle technologies among consumer segments. Analyzes how technology, infrastructure, consumer behavior, and policy affect sales of new technologies and determines the resulting societal, environmental and economic impacts. Key Attributes & Strengths MA3T can be used to investigate the societal benefits, costs, and employment impacts of market transitions

  19. A new 40 MA ranchero explosive pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James; Herrera, Dennis; Oona, Hank; Torres, David; Atchison, W L; Colgate, S A; Griego, J R; Guzik, J; Holtkamp, D B; Idzorek, G; Kaul, A; Kirkpatrick, R C; Menikoff, R; Reardon, P T; Reinovsky, R E; Rousculp, C L; Sgro, A G; Tabaka, L J; Tierney, T E; Watt, R G

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a new high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system based on the 1.4 m long Ranchero generator which was developed in 1999 for driving solid density z-pinch loads. The new application requires approximately 40 MA to implode similar liners, but the liners cannot tolerate the 65 {micro}s, 3 MA current pulse associated with delivering the initial magnetic flux to the 200 nH generator. To circumvent this problem, we have designed a system with an internal start switch and four explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switches. The integral start switch is installed between the output glide plane and the armature. It functions in the same manner as a standard input crowbar switch when armature motion begins, but initially isolates the load. The circuit is completed during the flux loading phase using post hole convolutes. Each convolute attaches the inner (coaxial) output transmission line to the outside of the outer coax through a penetration of the outer coaxial line. The attachment is made with the conductor of an EFF at each location. The EFFs conduct 0.75 MA each, and are actuated just after the internal start switch connects to the load. EFFs operating at these parameters have been tested in the past. The post hole convolutes must withstand as much as 80 kV at peak dl/dt during the Ranchero load current pulse. We describe the design of this new HEPP system in detail, and give the experimental results available at conference time. In addition, we discuss the work we are doing to test the upper current limits of a single standard size Ranchero module. Calculations have suggested that the generator could function at up to {approx}120 MA, the rule of thumb we follow (1 MA/cm) suggests 90 MA, and simple flux compression calculations, along with the {approx}4 MA seed current available from our capacitor bank, suggests 118 MA is the currently available upper limit.

  20. mo_whitson.jpg | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Information mo_whitson

  1. Mo99 Production Plant Layout

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Naranjo, Angela Carol

    2015-06-25

    The NorthStar Medical Technologies 99Mo production facility configuration is envisioned to be 8 accelerator pairs irradiating 7 100Mo targets (one spare accelerator pair undergoing maintenance while the other 7 pairs are irradiating targets). The required shielding in every direction for the accelerators is initially estimated to be 10 feet of concrete. With the accelerator pairs on one (ground) level and spaced with the required shielding between adjacent pairs, the only practical path for target insertion and removal while minimizing floor space is vertical. The current scheme then requires a target vertical lift of nominally 10 feet through a shield stack. It is envisioned that the lift will be directly into a hot cell where an activated target can be removed from its holder and a new target attached and lowered. The hot cell is on a rail system so that a single hot cell can service all active target locations, as well as deliver the ready targets to the separations lab. On this rail system, coupled to the hot cell, will be a helium recovery and clean-up system. All helium coolant equipment is located on the upper level near to the target removal point.

  2. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state inB<mo stretchy='false'>mo>>0mn> stretchy='false'>?mo>J<mo>/mo>?K<mo>-mo>?<mo>+>decays

    SciTech Connect

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribel, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  3. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction He<mn>3mn> stretchy='false'>↑mo> stretchy='false'>(mo>e<mo>,mo>e<mo>' stretchy='false'>)mo>

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovič, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; John, J. St.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, X.; Riordan, S.; Ron, G.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Širca, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He↑ (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3He asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)σ. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.

  4. Microsoft Word - Mn.doc

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Structural Determination of Marine Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides John R. Bargar, Samuel M. Webb (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory), and Bradley M. Tebo (Oregon Health and Science University) Bacterial oxidation of Mn(II) impacts the global geochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, nutrients, and contaminants in the environment. Manganese is abundant in the biosphere (~10 14 Kg of suspended and dissolved manganese in the oceans) and is second only to iron in relative

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- St Louis Airport - MO 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - MO 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites St. Louis Airport, MO Alternate Name(s): Airport Site St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLAPS) Former Robertson Storage Area Robertson Airport MO.01-1 ...

  6. Materials Data on BaLaMnMoO6 (SG:216) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-19

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Mn4+ emission in pyrochlore oxides

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    For the existing Mn4+ activated red phosphors have relatively low emission energies (or long emission wavelengths) and are therefore inefficient for general lighting. Density functional calculations are performed to study Mn4+ emission in rare-earth hafnate, zirconate, and stannate pyrochlore oxides (RE2Hf2O7, RE2Zr2O7, and RE2Sn2O7). We show how the different sizes of the RE3+ cation in these pyrochlores affect the local structure of the distorted MnO6 octahedron, the Mn–O hybridization, and the Mn4+ emission energy. The Mn4+ emission energies of many pyrochlores are found to be higher than those currently known for Mn4+ doped oxides and should be closer to thatmore » of Y2O3:Eu3+ (the current commercial red phosphor for fluorescent lighting). The O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is shown to play an important role in weakening Mn–O hybridization and consequently increasing the Mn4+ emission energy. Our result shows that searching for materials that allow significant O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is an effective approach to find new Mn4+ activated red phosphors with potential to replace the relatively expensive Y2O3:Eu3+ phosphor.« less

  8. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Nine ...

  9. Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Department of National Resources Energy Center Mo DNR Jump to: navigation, search Name: Missouri Department of National Resources Energy Center (Mo DNR) Place: Jefferson City,...

  10. Update to M&O Contractor Model Subcontract entitled "Standard...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    M&O Contractor Model Subcontract entitled "Standard Research Subcontract (Educational Institution or Nonprofit Organization)" Update to M&O Contractor Model Subcontract entitled ...

  11. Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene/ Mo S 2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene Mo S 2 van der Waals ... Title: Tuning the electronic structure of monolayer graphene Mo S 2 van der Waals ...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- United Nuclear Corp - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Nuclear Corp - MO 0-03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNITED NUCLEAR CORP. (MO.0-03) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate ...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- West Lake Landfill - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Lake Landfill - MO 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: West Lake Landfill (MO.05) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

  14. Phase transformation during mechano-synthesis of nanocrystalline/amorphous Fe32Mn6Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Rasool; Shamsipoor, Ali; Ghaffari, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Morteza; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2013-10-15

    Mechano-synthesis of Fe32Mn6Si alloy by mechanical alloying of the elemental powder mixtures was evaluated by running the ball milling process under an inert argon gas atmosphere. In order to characterize the as-milled powders, powder sampling was performed at predetermined intervals from 0.5 to 192 h. X-ray florescence analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and high resolution transmission electron microscope were utilized to investigate the chemical composition, structural evolution, morphological changes, and microstructure of the as-milled powders, respectively. According to the results, the nanocrystalline FeMnSi alloys were completely synthesized after 48 h of milling. Moreover, the formation of a considerable amount of amorphous phase during the milling process was indicated by quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis as well as high resolution transmission electron microscopy image and its selected area diffraction pattern. It was found that the ?-to-? and subsequently the amorphous-to-crystalline (especially martensite) phase transformation occurred by milling development. - Graphical abstract: Mechano-synthesis of nanocrystalline/amorphous Fe32Mn6Si shape memory alloys in the powder form: amorphous phase formation, ?-to-? phase transformation, mechano-crystallization of the amorphous, and martensite phase formation during the process. Highlights: During MA, the ?-to-? phase transformation and amorphization occurred. Mechano-crystallization of the amorphous phase occurred at sufficient milling time. The formation of high amount of ?-martensite was evidenced at high milling times. The platelet, spherical, and then irregular particle shapes was extended by MA. By MA, the particles size was increased, then reduced, and afterward re-increased.

  15. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of high-capacity 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} cathode materials using a CouetteTaylor reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Mansoo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Jik-Soo; Park, Suk-Joon; Lee, Young Moo; Jin, Bong-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: The cathode material synthesized by co-precipitation using a CouetteTaylor reactor. The first and second discharge capacities were measured to be 311 and 307 mA h g{sup ?1}. The material has an excellent rate capability. - Abstract: The 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} cathode material for the Li-ion battery is synthesized by co-precipitation using a CouetteTaylor reactor. Particle size analysis (PSA) and a field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images show that the obtained precursor and cathode material exhibit a narrow particle size distribution and spherical shape. The structure and composition of the 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} are confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The first and second discharge capacities of 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} are measured to be 311 and 307 mA h g{sup ?1}, respectively. The material also has an excellent rate capability (250 and 180 mA h g{sup ?1} at 1 C and 5 C, respectively). In the rate capability test at 60 C, 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} has a higher capacity of over 210 mA h g{sup ?1} in the range 0.110 C. In the cyclic performance test, the capacity retention at high temperature is over 85% after 50 cycles, which is similar to that at room temperature. The 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} is therefore a high-capacity material with potential for use as an electrode in Li-ion batteries.

  16. Materials Research Society (MRS) Fall Meeting (Boston, MA) - JCAP

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Research Society (MRS) Fall Meeting (Boston, MA) Materials Research Society (MRS) Fall Meeting (Boston, MA) Sun, Nov 27, 2016 9:00am 09:00 Fri, Dec 2, 2016 6:00pm 18:00 Hynes Convention Center Boston USA Monday, 28 November 2016, 10:30 AM Materials Challenges for Sustainable Photoelectrochemical Solar to Fuel Conversion J. W. Ager Monday, 28 November 2016, 11:00 AM Solar Fuels Photoanodes Prepared by Inkjet Printing of Copper Vanadates P. Newhouse, D. Boyd, A. Shinde, D. Guevarra, L.

  17. Climate Action Champions: Boston, MA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Boston, MA Climate Action Champions: Boston, MA Boston is the largest city in New England and one of the oldest in the United States. Home to sixty colleges and universities, world-renowned medical facilities, nationally competitive professional sports teams, and thriving music and arts scene, Boston is a cultural hub and leader in innovation. | Photo courtesy of the City of Boston. Boston is the largest city in New England and one of the oldest in the United States. Home to sixty colleges and

  18. Thermophysical Properties of U-10MO Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Phillips; G. S. Mickum; D. E. Burkes

    2010-11-01

    This report provides an overview of thermophysical properties of unirradiated uranium alloyed with ten weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo), with particular focus on those material properties needed for modeling of new fuels for HPRRs (High Performance Research Reactors). The report contains both historical data available in the literature on U-10Mo, as well as more recent results conducted by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative fuel development program. The main use of the report is intended as a standard U-10Mo alloy properties reference for reactor models and simulations.

  19. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http:www.eia.govsurveyformeia14instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https:...

  20. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of γγ<mo stretchy='false'>→mo>π<mo>+mo>π<mo>-,π>0mn>π>0mn> and K<mo accent='true' stretchy='true'>¯mo>K below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the available data, and give the two photon couplings of scalar and tensor resonances that appear.

  1. Measurement of the I<mo>=>1mn> stretchy='false'>/mo>>2mn> K<mo>π> S -wave amplitude from Dalitz plot analyses of ηc<mo stretchy='false'>→mo>KK<mo stretchy='false'>¯mo>π in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Pennington, M. R.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the processes γγ→K0SK±π and γγ→K+K-π0 using a data sample of 519 fb-1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ(nS) (n=2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe ηc decays to both final states and perform Dalitz plot analyses using a model-independent partial wave analysis technique. This allows a model-independent measurement of the mass-dependence of the I=1/2 Kπ S-wave amplitude and phase. A comparison between the present measurement and those from previous experiments indicates similar behavior for the phase up to a mass of 1.5 GeV/c2. In contrast, the amplitudes show very marked differences. The data require the presence of a new a0(1950) resonance with parameters m=1931±14±22 MeV/c2 and Γ=271±22±29 MeV.

  2. Search for proton decay via p<mo stretchy='false'>?mo>?K<mo>+> using <mn>260mn> kiloton<mo>>year data of Super-Kamiokande

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakayama, S.; Wendell, R.?A.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Ueno, K.; Yokozawa, T.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K.?P.; Okumura, K.; McLachlan, T.; Labarga, L.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J.?L.; Stone, J.?L.; Sulak, L.?R.; Goldhaber, M.; Bays, K.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W.?R.; Mine, S.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M.?B.; Sobel, H.?W.; Ganezer, K.?S.; Hill, J.; Keig, W.?E.; Jang, J.?S.; Kim, J.?Y.; Lim, I.?T.; Albert, J.?B.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C.?W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Learned, J.?G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S.?N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A.?T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Kubo, H.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyake, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C.?K.; Taylor, I.; Yanagisawa, C.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Takeuchi, J.; Kuno, Y.; Kim, S.?B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Obayashi, Y.; Vagins, M.?R.; Chen, S.; Sui, H.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Connolly, K.; Dziomba, M.; Wilkes, R.?J.

    2014-10-14

    We have searched for proton decay via p??K+ using Super-Kamiokande data from April 1996 to February 2013, 260 kilotonyear exposure in total. No evidence for this proton decay mode is found. A lower limit of the proton lifetime is set to ?/B(p??K+)>5.91033 years at 90% confidence level.

  3. Resonant π<mo>+γ stretchy='false'>→mo>π<mo>+π>0mn> amplitude from Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Shultz, Christian J.; Thomas, Christopher E.; Wilson, David J.

    2015-12-08

    We present the first ab initio calculation of a radiative transition of a hadronic resonance within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We compute the amplitude for $\\pi\\pi \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$, as a function of the energy of the $\\pi\\pi$ pair and the virtuality of the photon, in the kinematic regime where $\\pi\\pi$ couples strongly to the unstable $\\rho$ resonance. This exploratory calculation is performed using a lattice discretization of QCD with quark masses corresponding to $m_\\pi \\approx 400$ MeV. As a result, we obtain a description of the energy dependence of the transition amplitude, constrained at 48 kinematic points, that we can analytically continue to the $\\rho$ pole and identify from its residue the $\\rho \\to \\pi\\gamma^\\star$ form-factor.

  4. Centrality dependence of low-momentum direct-photon production in Au<mo>+>Au collisions at sNN<mo>=>200mn> >GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bing, X.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Castera, P.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guo, L.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hashimoto, K.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Hollis, R. S.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneti, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, K. -B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Kochenda, L.; Komatsu, Y.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Krizek, F.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, B.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Masumoto, S.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Means, N.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyachi, Y.; Miyasaka, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Motschwiller, S.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Nederlof, A.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. H.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Soumya, M.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Tennant, E.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Todoroki, T.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vossen, A.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; Whitaker, S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2015-06-05

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured the centrality dependence of the direct photon yield from Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV down to pT = 0.4 GeV/c. Photons are detected via photon conversions to e⁺e⁻ pairs and an improved technique is applied that minimizes the systematic uncertainties that usually limit direct photon measurements, in particular at low pT . We find an excess of direct photons above the Ncoll-scaled yield measured in p+p collisions. This excess yield is well described by an exponential distribution with an inverse slope of about 240 MeV/c in the pT range from 0.6–2.0 GeV/c. In this study, while the shape of the pT distribution is independent of centrality within the experimental uncertainties, the yield increases rapidly with increasing centrality, scaling approximately with N α part, where α = 1.38±0.03(stat)±0.07(syst).

  5. Magnetostructural phase transformations in Tb 1-x Mn 2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    phase transformations in Tb 1-x Mn 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetostructural phase transformations in Tb 1-x Mn 2 Magnetism and phase transformations ...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Elk River Reactor - MN 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Elk River , Minnesota MN.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 MN.01-1 Site Operations: Boiling water reactor demonstration, ...

  7. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy in UMn<mn>2mn>Ge>2mn> and related Mn-based actinide ferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, David S.; Ghimire, Nirmal; Singleton, John; Thompson, J. D.; Bauer, Eric D.; Baumbach, Ryan; Mandrus, David; Li, Ling; Singh, David J.

    2015-05-04

    We present magnetization isotherms in pulsed magnetic fields up to 62 Tesla, supported by first principles calculations, demonstrating a huge uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy - approximately 20 MJ/m3 - in UMn<mn>2mn>Ge>2mn>. This large anisotropy results from the extremely strong spin-orbit coupling affecting the uranium 5 f electrons, which in the calculations exhibit a substantial orbital moment exceeding 2 μB. Finally, we also find from theoretical calculations that a number of isostructural Mn-actinide compounds are expected to have similarly large anisotropy.

  8. Role of Ce<mn>4mn>+> in the scintillation mechanism of codoped Gd<mn>3mn>Ga<mn>3mn>Al<mn>2mn>O<mn>12mn>:>Ce

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuntao; Meng, Fang; Li, Qi; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2014-10-17

    To control the time-response performance of widely used cerium-activated scintillators in cutting-edge medical-imaging devices, such as time-of-flight positron-emission tomography, a comprehensive understanding of the role of Ce valence states, especially stable Ce4+, in the scintillation mechanism is essential. However, despite some progress made recently, an understanding of the physical processes involving Ce4+ is still lacking. The aim of this work is to clarify the role of Ce4+ in scintillators by studying Ca2+ codoped Gd3Ga3Al2O12∶Ce (GGAG∶Ce). By using a combination of optical absorption spectra and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopies, the correlation between Ca2+codoping content and the Ce4+ fraction is seen. The energy-level diagrams of Ce3+ and Ce4+ in the Gd3Ga3Al2O12 host are established by using theoretical and experimental methods, which indicate a higher position of the 5d1 state of Ce4+ in the forbidden gap in comparison to that of Ce3+. Underlying reasons for the decay-time acceleration resulting from Ca2+ codoping are revealed, and the physical processes of the Ce4+-emission model are proposed and further demonstrated by temperature-dependent radioluminescence spectra under x-ray excitation.

  9. Temperature and composition phase diagram in the iron-based ladder compounds Ba <mn>1mn> <mo>-> x Cs x Fe <mn>2mn> Se <mn>3mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Hawai, Takafumi; Nambu, Yusuke; Ohgushi, Kenya; Du, Fei; Hirata, Yasuyuki; Avdeev, Maxim; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Sekine, Yurina; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Ma, Jie; Chi, Songxue; Ueda, Yutaka; Yoshizawa, Hideki; Sato, Taku J.

    2015-05-28

    We investigated the iron-based ladder compounds (Ba,Cs)Fe?Se?. Their parent compounds BaFe?Se? and CsFe?Se? have different space groups, formal valences of Fe, and magnetic structures. Electrical resistivity, specific heat, magnetic susceptibility, x-ray diffraction, and powder neutron diffraction measurements were conducted to obtain a temperature and composition phase diagram of this system. Block magnetism observed in BaFe?Se? is drastically suppressed with Cs doping. In contrast, stripe magnetism observed in CsFe?Se? is not so fragile against Ba doping. A new type of magnetic structure appears in intermediate compositions, which is similar to stripe magnetism of CsFe?Se?, but interladder spin configuration is different. Intermediate compounds show insulating behavior, nevertheless a finite T-linear contribution in specific heat was obtained at low temperatures.

  10. Thermodynamic evidence for the Bose glass transition in twinnedYBa<mn>2mn>Cu>3mn>O<mn>7mn><mo>->δcrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez-Morelo, D. J.; Osquiguil, E.; Kolton, A. B.; Nieva, G.; Jung, I. W.; López, D.; Pastoriza, H.

    2015-07-21

    We used a micromechanical torsional oscillator to measure the magnetic response of a twinned YBaBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystal disk near the Bose glass transition. We observe an anomaly in the temperature dependence of the magnetization consistent with the appearance of a magnetic shielding perpendicular to the correlated pinning of the twin boundaries. This effect is related to the thermodynamic transition from the vortex liquid phase to a Bose glass state.

  11. Magnetism and superconductivity in U<mn>2mn>PtxRh<mn>1mn>->xC<mn>2mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeham, N.; Ni, Ni; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Tegtmeier, E.; Ronning, F.

    2015-01-09

    We report the phase diagram of the doping series U₂PtxRh(1–x)C₂, studied through measurements of resistivity, specific heat, and magnetic susceptibility. The Néel temperature of U₂Rh₂C₂ of ~ 22 K is suppressed with increasing Pt content, reaching zero temperature close to x = 0.7, where we observed signatures of increased quantum fluctuations. Additionally, evidence is presented that the antiferromagnetic state undergoes a spin-reorientation transition upon application of an applied magnetic field. This transition shows non-monotonic behavior as a function of x, peaking at around x = 0.3. Superconductivity is observed for x ≥ 0.9, with Tc increasing with increasing x. The reduction in Tc and increase in residual resistivity with decreasing Pt content is inconsistent with the extension of the Abrikosov-Gor'kov theory to unconventional superconductivity.

  12. Comparative Study on the Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal, Borated Stainless Steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tiangan; Day, Daniel; Hailey, Phillip; Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph

    2007-07-01

    Iron-based amorphous alloy Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} was compared to borated stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy on their corrosion resistance in various high-concentration chloride solutions. The melt-spun ribbon of this iron-based amorphous alloy have demonstrated a better corrosion resistance than the bulk borated stainless steel and the bulk Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy, in high-concentration chloride brines at temperatures 90 deg. C or higher. (authors)

  13. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  14. Magnetic coupling in ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Wadley, P.; Campion, R. P.; Rushforth, A. W.; Edmonds, K. W.; Gallagher, B. L.; Charlton, T. R.; Kinane, C. J.; Langridge, S.

    2015-08-07

    We report on a study of ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/(Al,Ga,Mn)As bilayers using magnetometry and polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR). From depth-resolved characterization of the magnetic structure obtained by PNR, we concluded that the (Ga,Mn)As and (Al,Ga,Mn)As layers have in-plane and perpendicular-to-plane magnetic easy axes, respectively, with weak interlayer coupling. Therefore, the layer magnetizations align perpendicular to each other under low magnetic fields and parallel at high fields.

  15. Roadmap to MaRIE (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE Authors: Barnes, Cris William ... Elementary Particles & Fields(72) LANL, Roadmap to MaRIE, Matter-Radiation Interactions ...

  16. Roadmap to MaRIE August 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE August 2015 Authors: Barnes, ... Elementary Particles & Fields(72) LANL, Roadmap to MaRIE, Matter-Radiation Interactions ...

  17. Roadmap to MaRIE May 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE May 2015 Los Alamos National ... PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS LANL, Roadmap to MaRIE, Matter-Radiation Interactions ...

  18. Roadmap to MaRIE January 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE January 2015 Authors: Barnes, ... Elementary Particles & Fields(72) LANL, Roadmap to MaRIE, Matter-Radiation Interactions ...

  19. Roadmap to MaRIE March 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE March 2015 Authors: Barnes, ... Elementary Particles & Fields(72) LANL, Roadmap to MaRIE, Matter-Radiation Interactions ...

  20. Roadmap to MaRIE November 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE November 2015 This report ... PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS LANL; Roadmap to MaRIE; Matter-Radiation Interactions ...

  1. Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Egypt (Nominal...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Egypt (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG ... U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Everett, MA LNG Imports from ...

  2. Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Algeria (Dollars...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Algeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Everett, MA Natural Gas LNG Imports ... U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Everett, MA LNG Imports from ...

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- E B Badger - MA 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 75 Pitts Street , Boston , Massachusetts MA.0-01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 MA.0-01-2 Site Operations: Construction ...

  4. MaRIE: Probing Dynamic Processes in Soft Materials Using Advanced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a concept for a new research facility, MaRIE: Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes. The key motivation for MaRIE is to develop new ...

  5. Roadmap to MaRIE January 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Roadmap to MaRIE January 2015 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE January 2015 You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech ...

  6. Roadmap to MaRIE August 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Roadmap to MaRIE August 2015 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE August 2015 You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech ...

  7. Roadmap to MaRIE (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Roadmap to MaRIE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech ...

  8. Roadmap to MaRIE March 2015 (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Roadmap to MaRIE March 2015 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Roadmap to MaRIE March 2015 You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's ...

  9. MaRIE 1.0: The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MaRIE 1.0: The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project, and the Challenge of Dynamic Mesoscale Imaging Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE 1.0: The Matter-Ra...

  10. MaRIE 1.0 -- The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MaRIE 1.0 -- The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project: Accelerating Qualification, Certification, and Assessment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE 1.0 ...

  11. SSL Demonstration: Bridge Lighting, Minneapolis, MN

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY summary brief for Phase II report on the longer-term performance of LED lighting installed in 2008 on the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis, MN.

  12. Oxidation, Reduction, and Condensation of Alcohols over (MO3)3 (M=Mo, W) Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zongtang; Li, Zhenjun; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Li, Shenggang; Hennigan, Jamie M.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

    2014-10-02

    The reactions of deuterated methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, 2-butanol and t-butanol over cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) clusters were studied experimentally with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and theoretically with coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory and density functional theory. The reactions of two alcohols per M3O9 cluster are required to provide agreement with experiment for D2O release, dehydrogenation and dehydration. The reaction begins with the elimination of water by proton transfers and forms an intermediate dialkoxy species which can undergo further reaction. Dehydration proceeds by a ? hydrogen transfer to a terminal M=O. Dehydrogenation takes place via an ? hydrogen transfer to an adjacent MoVI = O atom or a WVI metal center with redox involved for M = Mo and no redox for M = W. The two channels have comparable activation energies. H/D exchange to produce alcohols can take place after olefin is released or via the dialkoxy species depending on the alcohol and the cluster. The Lewis acidity of the metal center with WVI being larger than MoVI results in the increased reactivity of W3O9 over Mo3O9 for dehydrogenation and dehydration.

  13. Elastic modulus of phases in Ti–Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei-dong; Liu, Yong; Wu, Hong; Song, Min; Zhang, Tuo-yang; Lan, Xiao-dong; Yao, Tian-hang

    2015-08-15

    In this work, a series of binary Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were prepared using non-consumable arc melting. The microstructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, and the elastic modulus was evaluated by nanoindentation testing technique. The evolution of the volume fractions of ω phase was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicated that the phase constitution and elastic modulus of the Ti–Mo alloys are sensitive to the Mo content. Ti–3.2Mo and Ti–8Mo alloys containing only α and β phases, respectively, have a low elastic modulus. In contrast, Ti–4.5Mo, Ti–6Mo, Ti–7Mo alloys, with different contents of ω phase, have a high elastic modulus. A simple micromechanical model was used to calculate the elastic modulus of ω phase (E{sub ω}), which was determined to be 174.354 GPa. - Highlights: • Ti–Mo alloys with the Mo contents ranging from 3.2 to 12 at.% were investigated. • XPS was used to investigate the volume fractions of ω phase. • The elastic modulus of Ti–Mo alloys is sensitive to the Mo content. • The elastic modulus of ω phase was determined to be 174.354 GPa.

  14. Audit Report: CR-MA-95-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MA-95-02 Audit Report: CR-MA-95-02 February 10, 1995 Management Advisory Report on Universities Research Association's Documentation and Technical Closeout Activities Audit Report: CR-MA-95-02 (535.76 KB) More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0389 Audit Report: IG-0407 Audit Report: IG-0520

  15. Electrochemical performance of polyaniline coated LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode active material for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    ?ahan, Halil Dokan, Fatma K?l?c Ayd?n, Abdlhamit zdemir, Burcu zdemir, Nazl? Patat, ?aban

    2013-12-16

    LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} compound are synthesized by combustion method using glycine as a fuel at temperature (T), 800C which was coated by a polyaniline. The goal of this procedure is to promote better electronic conductivity of the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles in order to improve their electrochemical performance for their application as cathodes in secondary lithium ion batteries. The structures of prepared products have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To investigate the effect of polyaniline coating galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling (148 mA g{sup ?1}) studies are made in the voltage range of 3.5-4.5 V vs. Li at room temperature. Electrochemical performance of the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} was significantly improved by the polaniline coating.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rogers Iron Works Co - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Ohio Analytical Data Sheet 9908; August 2, 1956 MO.10-2 - MemorandumChecklist, Williams to File; Subject: Rogers Iron; June 1, 1990 MO.10-3 - DOE Memorandum; Williams to the...

  17. Accelerator Production Options for 99MO

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    Shortages of {sup 99}Mo, the most commonly used diagnostic medical isotope, have caused great concern and have prompted numerous suggestions for alternate production methods. A wide variety of accelerator-based approaches have been suggested. In this paper we survey and compare the various accelerator-based approaches.

  18. Science and Technology of the 10-MA Spherical Tori

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y-K.M.

    1999-11-14

    The Spherical Torus (ST) configuration has recently emerged as an example of confinement concept innovation that enables attractive steps in the development of fusion energy. The scientific potential for the ST has been indicated by recent encouraging results from START,2 CDX-U, and HIT. The scientific principles for the D-fueled ST will soon be tested by NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment3) in the U.S. and MAST (Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak4) in the U.K. at the level of l-2 MA in plasma current. More recently, interest has grown in the U.S. in the possibility of near-term ST fusion burn devices at the level of 10 MA in plasma current. The missions for these devices would be to test burning plasma performance in a small, pulsed D-T-fueled ST (i.e., DTST) and to develop fusion energy technologies in a small steady state ST-based Volume Neutron Source (VNS). This paper reports the results of analysis of the key science and technology issues for these devices.

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Medart Co - MO 09

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Nuclear Metals, Inc.; August 26, 1987 MA.09-2 - Nuclear Metals Letter; Morris to Strauch (AEC); Subject: Program for Uranium Recovery; October 11, 1956. 2 pages MA.09-3 - ...

  20. Intermetallic phase formation and breakdown of Mo diffusion barriers in Ni-Mo-Cu and Ni-Mo-Monel 400 diffusion triads

    SciTech Connect

    Shueh, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the kinetics of compound formation and the interdiffusion behavior of a sacrificial type diffusion barrier in a model system. Ni-Mo diffusion couples were annealed in an inert atmosphere at 950-1050{degree}C for 5-300 hours. Ni-Mo-Cu and Ni-Mo-Monel 400 diffusion triads with varied thicknesses of Mo layers sandwiched by Ni and C or Monel 400 disks were annealed under the same conditions. Parabolic growth of the intermetallic phase, {beta}, was observed at 1000{degree}C and 1050{degree}C in the semi-infinite Ni-Mo diffusion couple an din the Ni-Mo-Cu diffusion triad when a finite thickness of the Mo layer remained. The {beta} phase exhibited more or less planar morphology except in the case of some extremely rugged interfaces which were associated with grain boundaries adjacent to these interfaces. Dissociation and recession of the compound layer in Ni-Mo-Cu diffusion triads initiated when the Mo layer was nearly consumed. The product phases of the dissociation reaction are consistent with those predicted from the Ni-Mo-Cu ternary phase diagram. Numerical methods based on a finite difference technique, and an analytical solution based on diffusion controlled parabolic growth and quasi-steady-state approximation in the {beta} phase region were used to analyze the results.

  1. Local environment of Mn in Mn delta-doped Si layers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Q.F.; Kahwaji, S.; Monchesky, T.L.; Gordon, R.A.; Crozier, E.D.

    2009-11-09

    Dilute magnetic semiconductors combine both magnetic ordering and semiconducting behaviour, leading to potential spintronic applications. Silicon containing dilute Mn impurities is a potential dilute magnetic semiconductor. We have grown Mn delta-doped films by deposition of 0.7 of a monolayer of Mn on Si(001) by molecular beam epitaxy and capping the film with Si. The magnetic properties are likely sensitive to the distribution of Mn on substitutional or interstitial sites and the formation of metallic precipitates. We have used polarization-dependent XAFS to examine the local structure. We compare to a thicker MnSi film grown on Si(111) and also examine the influence of lead on the manganese environment when used as a surfactant in the growth process.

  2. Performance improvement of Li-rich layer-structured Li 1.2 Mn 0.54 Ni 0.13 Co 0.13 O 2 by integration with spinel LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Tang, Daichun; Kong, Qingyu; Gu, Lin; Wang, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Liquan

    2015-01-01

    Li-rich layered Li1+xMnyM1-x-yO2 (or denoted xLi2MnO3center dot1-xLiMO2, M = Ni, Co, Mn, etc.) are promising cathode materials for high energy-density Li-ion batteries. However, their commercial applications suffer from problems such as a drop in the capacity and discharge voltage during cycling. In this work, the cycling performance of a layered oxide Li1.2Ni0.13Co0.13Mn0.54O2 is improved by integration with spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 to obtain a layered-spinel composite. Characterization by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) as well as cyclic voltammetry (CV) indicates that delayed degradation of layered Li2MnO3 and the suppressed growth of LiMn2O4-like spinel are responsible for the performance improvement.

  3. Role of SrMoO{sub 4} in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vasala, S.; Yamauchi, H.; Karppinen, M.

    2011-05-15

    Here we investigate the elemental and phase compositions during the solid-state synthesis of the promising SOFC-anode material, Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, and demonstrate that molybdenum does not notably evaporate under the normal synthesis conditions with temperatures up to 1200 {sup o}C due to the formation of SrMoO{sub 4} as an intermediate product at low temperatures, below 600 {sup o}C. However, partial decomposition of the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} phase becomes evident at the higher temperatures ({approx}1500 {sup o}C). The effect of SrMoO{sub 4} on the electrical conductivity of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is evaluated by preparing a series of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with different amounts of additional SrMoO{sub 4}. Under the reducing operation conditions of an SOFC anode the insulating SrMoO{sub 4} phase is apparently reduced to the highly conductive SrMoO{sub 3} phase. Percolation takes place with 20-30 wt% of SrMoO{sub 4} in a Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} matrix, with a notable increase in electrical conductivity after reduction. Conductivity values of 14, 60 and 160 S/cm are determined at 800 {sup o}C in 5% H{sub 2}/Ar for the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples with 30, 40 and 50 wt% of added SrMoO{sub 4}, respectively. -- Graphical abstract: SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low temperatures during the synthesis of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, which prevents the volatilization of Mo from typical precursor mixtures of this promising SOFC anode material. SrMoO{sub 4} is insulating and it is often found as an impurity in Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} samples. It is however readily reduced to highly conducting SrMoO{sub 3}. Composites of Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} and SrMoO{sub 3} show increased electrical conductivities compared to pure Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} under the reductive operation conditions of an SOFC anode. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} is a promising SOFC anode material. {yields} During the Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6} synthesis SrMoO{sub 4} is formed at low

  4. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He<mo stretchy='true'>?mo>>3mn> stretchy='false'>(mo>e<mo stretchy='false'>?mo><mo>,mo>e<mo>'d stretchy='false'>)mo> Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  5. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He<mo stretchy='true'>→mo>>3mn> stretchy='false'>(mo>e<mo stretchy='false'>→mo><mo>,mo>e<mo>'d stretchy='false'>)mo> Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  6. Nanoscale coherent intergrowthlike defects in a crystal of La<mn>1.9mn>Ca<mn>1.1mn>Cu<mn>2mn>O<mn>6mn>+>δ made superconducting by high-pressure oxygen annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hefei; Zhu, Yimei; Shi, Xiaoya; Li, Qiang; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John A.; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John M.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2014-10-28

    Superconductivity with Tc = 53.5 K has been induced in a large La₁.₉Ca₁.₁Cu₂O₆ (La-2126) single crystal by annealing in a high partial-pressure of oxygen at 1200°C. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, we show that a secondary Ca-doped La₂CuO₄ (La-214) phase, not present in the as-grown crystal, appears as a coherent “intergrowth” as a consequence of the annealing. A corresponding secondary superconducting transition near 13 K is evident in the magnetization measurement. In this study, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) reveals a pre-edge peak at the O K edge in the superconducting La-2126 phase, which is absent in the as-grown crystal, confirming the hole-doping by interstitial oxygen.

  7. (In,Mn)As multilayer quantum dot structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bouravleuv, Alexei; Sapega, Victor; Nevedomskii, Vladimir; Khrebtov, Artem; Samsonenko, Yuriy; Cirlin, George

    2014-12-08

    (In,Mn)As multilayer quantum dots structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy using a Mn selective doping of the central parts of quantum dots. The study of the structural and magneto-optical properties of the samples with three and five layers of (In,Mn)As quantum dots has shown that during the quantum dots assembly, the out-diffusion of Mn from the layers with (In,Mn)As quantum dots can occur resulting in the formation of the extended defects. To produce a high quality structures using the elaborated technique of selective doping, the number of (In,Mn)As quantum dot layers should not exceed three.

  8. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    SciTech Connect

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-06-02

    We grow Li codoped (Ga,Mn)As layers with nominal Mn composition up to 0.15 by molecular beam epitaxy. The layers before and after annealing are characterized by x-ray diffraction, transport, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The codoping with Li reduces the lattice constant and electrical resistivity of (Ga,Mn)As after annealing. We find that (Ga,Mn)As:Li takes similar Curie temperature to that of (Ga,Mn)As, but with pronounced magnetic moments and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, indicating that the Li codoping has nontrivial effects on the magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As.

  9. Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 2,583 2,728 2014 5,470 3,783 2,334 2,806 2,175 3,311 1,567 2,871 2,505 2,003 2015 7,729 7,623 5,521 1,673 2,557 7,133 8,237 2,563 2,653 1,541 2,452 2016 10,633 8,593 5,626 4,693 5,087 7,520 5,703 7,998 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  10. Spin reorientation and Ce-Mn coupling in antiferromagnetic oxypnictide CeMnAsO

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Wei; Peterson, Spencer G.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Vaknin, David

    2015-02-18

    Structure and magnetic properties of high-quality polycrystlline CeMnAsO, a parent compound of the “1111”-type oxypnictides, have been investigated using neutron powder diffraction and magnetization measurements. We find that CeMnAsO undergoes a C-type antiferromagnetic order with Mn2+(S = 5/2) moments pointing along the c axis below a relatively high Néel temperature of TN = 347(1) K. Below TSR = 35 K, two simultaneous transitions occur where the Mn moments reorient from the c axis to the ab plane preserving the C-type magnetic order, and Ce moments undergo long-range AFM ordering with antiparallel moments pointing in the ab plane. Another transition tomore » a noncollinear magnetic structure occurs below 7 K. The ordered moments of Mn and Ce at 2 K are 3.32(4) μB and 0.81(4)μB, respectively. We find that CeMnAsO primarily falls into the category of a local-moment antiferromagnetic insulator in which the nearest-neighbor interaction (J1) is dominant with J2 < J1/2 in the context of J1 – J2 – Jc model. The spin reorientation transition driven by the coupling between Ce and the transition metal seems to be common to Mn, Fe, and Cr ions, but not to Co and Ni ions in the isostructural oxypnictides. As a result, a schematic illustration of magnetic structures in Mn and Ce sublattices in CeMnAsO is presented.« less

  11. Mo-99 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mo-99 DOE/NNSA Successfully Establishes Uranium Lease and Takeback Program to Support Critical Medical Isotope Production In January 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) successfully established the Uranium Lease and Take-Back (ULTB) program, as directed in the American Medical Isotopes Production Act of 2012, to support the commercial production of the medical... NNSA's work aids in fight against cancer World Cancer Day encourages citizens

  12. Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO 3 Prev Next Title: Magnetoelectric coupling tuned by competing anisotropies in Mn 1 - x Ni x TiO ...

  13. Development of a Hydronic Rooftop Unit-HyPak-MA

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Lee; Mark Berman

    2009-11-14

    The majority of U.S. commercial floor space is cooled by rooftop HVAC units (RTUs). RTU popularity derives chiefly from their low initial cost and relative ease of service access without disturbing building occupants. Unfortunately, current RTUs are inherently inefficient due to a combination of characteristics that unnecessarily increase cooling loads and energy use. 36% percent of annual U.S. energy, and two-thirds of electricity, is consumed in and by buildings. Commercial buildings consume approximately 4.2 quads of energy each year at a cost of $230 billion per year, with HVAC equipment consuming 1.2 quads of electricity. More than half of all U.S. commercial floor space is cooled by packaged HVAC units, most of which are rooftop units (RTUs). Inefficient RTUs create an estimated 3.5% of U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions, thus contributing significantly to global warming5. Also, RTUs often fail to maintain adequate ventilation air and air filtration, reducing indoor air quality. This is the second HyPak project to be supported by DOE through NETL. The prior project, referred to as HyPak-1 in this report, had two rounds of prototype fabrication and testing as well as computer modeling and market research. The HyPak-1 prototypes demonstrated the high performance capabilities of the HyPak concept, but made it clear that further development was required to reduce heat exchanger cost and improve system reliability before HyPak commercialization can commence. The HyPak-1 prototypes were limited to about 25% ventilation air fraction, limiting performance and marketability. The current project is intended to develop a 'mixed-air' product that is capable of full 0-100% modulation in ventilation air fraction, hence it was referred to as HyPak-MA in the proposal. (For simplicity, the -MA has been dropped when referencing the current project.) The objective of the HyPak Project is to design, develop and test a hydronic RTU that provides a quantum improvement over conventional RTU

  14. Business System Clause - Berta Schreiber, Dir, Office of Policy (MA-61) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Business System Clause - Berta Schreiber, Dir, Office of Policy (MA-61) Business System Clause - Berta Schreiber, Dir, Office of Policy (MA-61) 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop Business System Clause - Berta Schreiber, Dir, Office of Policy (MA-61) (491.41 KB) More Documents & Publications Agenda Agenda_2015 APM Workshop_Final Acquisition Letter No. AL 2013-11

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- C G Sargent and Sons - MA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site Operations: Conducted extruder and drying tests with thorium in the late 1960s. ... Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium MA.17-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes - ...

  16. MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: Materials Science(36); Nuclear Physics & Radiation Physics(73); Particle Accelerators(43); Physics of Elementary Particles & Fields(72) LANL, MaRIE Word ...

  17. 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    .8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  18. EDeMa (Smart Grid Project) (Krefeld, Germany) | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    (Krefeld, Germany) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EDeMa Country Germany Headquarters Location Krefeld, Germany Coordinates 50.652943, 6.339111 Loading map......

  19. MaRIE: Probing Dynamic Processes in Soft Materials Using Advanced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: MaRIE: Probing Dynamic Processes in Soft Materials Using Advanced Light Sources Los ... Authors: Sykora, Milan 1 ; Kober, Edward Martin 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los ...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Tufts College - MA 0-05

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to TUFTS COLLEGE MA.0-05-1 - Aerospace Letter; Young to Wallo; Subject: Elimination Recommendation -- Colleges and Universities; September...

  1. A rational minor actinide (MA) recycling concept based on innovative oxide fuel with high AM content

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kenya; Sato, Isamu; Ishii, Tetsuya; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Asaga, Takeo; Kurosaki, Ken

    2007-07-01

    A rational MA recycle concept based on high Am content fuel has been proposed. A design study of an Am- MOX fabrication plant, which is a key facility for the MA recycle concept, has been done and the facility concept was clarified from the viewpoint of basic process viability. Preliminary cost estimation suggested that the total construction cost of the MA recycle facilities including Am-MOX, Np-MOX and MA recovery could be comparable with that of the large scale LWR-MOX fabrication plant required for plutonium in LWR fuel cycle. (authors)

  2. Model for Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED-2) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    demand based on medium- to long-term scenarios of socio-economic, technological and demographic developments. " References "MAED 2" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  4. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Alice E; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E; May, Andrew F; Williams, Travis J; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B; Aczel, Adam A; Cao, Huibo; Lumsden, Mark D; Christianson, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta=0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (H K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the int

  5. Influence of interstitial Mn on magnetism in room-temperature ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alice E; Berlijn, Tom; Hahn, Steven E; May, Andrew F; Williams, Travis J; Poudel, Lekhanath N; Calder, Stuart A; Fishman, Randy Scott; Stone, Matthew B; Aczel, Adam A; et al

    2015-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the high-TC ferromagnet Mn(1+delta)Sb. Measurements were performed on a large, TC = 434 K, single crystal with interstitial Mn content of delta=0.13. The neutron diffraction results reveal that the interstitial Mn has a magnetic moment, and that it is aligned antiparallel to the main Mn moment. We perform density functional theory calculations including the interstitial Mn, and find the interstitial to be magnetic in agreement with the diffraction data. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements reveal two features in the magnetic dynamics: i) a spin-wave-like dispersion emanating from ferromagnetic Bragg positions (Hmore » K 2n), and ii) a broad, non-dispersive signal centered at forbidden Bragg positions (H K 2n+1). The inelastic spectrum cannot be modeled by simple linear spin-wave theory calculations, and appears to be significantly altered by the presence of the interstitial Mn ions. The results show that the influence of the int« less

  6. CaMn2Al10: Itinerant Mn magnetism on the verge of magnetic order

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Steinke, L.; Simonson, J. W.; Yin, W. -G.; Smith, G. J.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Zellman, S.; Puri, A.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-07-24

    We report the discovery of CaMn2Al10, a metal with strong magnetic anisotropy and moderate electronic correlations. Magnetization measurements find a Curie-Weiss moment of 0.83μB/Mn, significantly reduced from the Hund's rule value, and the magnetic entropy obtained from specific heat measurements is correspondingly small, only ≈ 9% of Rln2. These results imply that the Mn magnetism is highly itinerant, a conclusion supported by density functional theory calculations that find strong Mn-Al hybridization. Consistent with the layered nature of the crystal structure, the magnetic susceptibility χ is anisotropic below 20 K, with a maximum ratio of χ[010]/χ[001] ≈ 3.5. A strong power-lawmore » divergence χ(T) ~ T–1.2 below 20 K implies incipient ferromagnetic order, an Arrott plot analysis of the magnetization suggests a vanishing low Curie temperature TC ~ 0. Our experiments indicate that CaMn2Al10 is a rare example of a system where the weak and itinerant Mn-based magnetism is poised on the verge of order.« less

  7. Opti-MN Impact House Presentation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Opti-MN Impact House Presentation Opti-MN Impact House Presentation Opti-MN was the Grand Winner of the 2015 Race to Zero Student Design Competition. View the presentation for the Opti-MN Impact House below. Read a full list of the winning teams. Opti-MN Presentation (5.74 MB) More Documents & Publications 2015 Race to Zero Competition Grand Winner and Grand Winner Finalist Team Submissions 2016 Race to Zero Competition Winner Team Presentations 2014 Race to Zero Student Design Competition:

  8. NNSA Awards Mo-99 Cooperative Agreement to General Atomics | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Awards Mo-99 Cooperative Agreement to General Atomics September 30, 2015 WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) announced that it will award a cooperative agreement to General Atomics (GA) to support its project for domestic production of molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) without highly enriched uranium (HEU). Mo-99 is the parent isotope of technetium-99m, which is the most widely used radioisotope

  9. Growth mode and structures of magnetic Mn clusters on graphene

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang

    2016-06-22

    We present a systematic study of Mn clusters on graphene by first-principles calculations. We show that the growth of Mn on graphene follows a three-dimensional (3D) mode. Both adsorption and attachment energies show that (Mn)3 and (Mn)6 on graphene are energetically favorable in the size range (Mn)1-7. Moreover, larger formation energy for Mn cluster on graphene implies the incoming Mn atoms are likely to nucleate and grow into bigger and bigger Mn clusters on graphene. The magnetic moments of (Mn)1,5,7 on graphene are enhanced by 11%, 186%, and 26% from their values at free-standing clusters, respectively. By contrast, the netmore » magnetic moment of (Mn)2,3,4,6 on graphene is reduced from that of the corresponding free-standing clusters. The origin of the magnetic moment changes can be attributed to the charge transfer within the Mn clusters and between the clusters and graphene upon adsorption.« less

  10. MoRu/Be multilayers for extreme ultraviolet applications

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa C.; Wall, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    High reflectance, low intrinsic roughness and low stress multilayer systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography comprise amorphous layers MoRu and crystalline Be layers. Reflectance greater than 70% has been demonstrated for MoRu/Be multilayers with 50 bilayer pairs. Optical throughput of MoRu/Be multilayers can be 30-40% higher than that of Mo/Be multilayer coatings. The throughput can be improved using a diffusion barrier to make sharper interfaces. A capping layer on the top surface of the multilayer improves the long-term reflectance and EUV radiation stability of the multilayer by forming a very thin native oxide that is water resistant.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - MO...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Chemical Company) concerning the procurement of enriched uranium; Feb 24, 1960 MO.0-01-5 - AEC Letter; Price to Greenlee (Spencer Chemical Co.) concerning an inspection of ...

  12. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Kinzey...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Kinzey, Bruce R.; Royer, Michael P.; Hadjian, M.; Kauffman, Rick LED streetlighting; field illuminance measurement LED streetlighting; field...

  13. Predicting sigma formation in mo-bearing stainless steels. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Predicting sigma formation in mo-bearing stainless steels. No abstract prepared. Authors: Perricone, Matthew ; Dupont, John Neuman ; Anderson, T. D. 1 ; Robino, Charles ...

  14. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  15. Unexpected crystal and magnetic structures in MnCu4In and MnCu4Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Provino, A.; Paudyal, D.; Fornasini, ML; Dhiman, I.; Dhar, SK.; Das, A.; Mudryk, Y.; Manfrinetti, P.; Pecharsky, VK

    2013-01-29

    We discovered a new compound MnCu4In with its own hexagonal structure type (hP12-P63mc, ternary ordered derivative of the hexagonal MgZn2-type) that becomes ferromagnetic at TC = 540 K. This transition temperature is higher than that found in the MnCu2In and MnCu2Sn alloys. In contrast, the homologous compound MnCu4Sn, which crystallizes in the cubic MgCu4Sn-type, orders antiferromagnetically with TN = 110 K. The neutron diffraction studies show ferromagnetic spin orientation in the {1 0 1} plane in MnCu4In with a magnetic moment of 4.5 ?B/Mn at 22 K, and a corresponding value of 4.7 ?B/Mn in the antiferromagnetic MnCu4Sn with propagation vector View the MathML source. The first-principles electronic structure calculations show that the unexpected difference in both magnetic and crystal structures of MnCu4In and MnCu4Sn is due to the difference in the Mn-3d bands and exchange interactions relating to different crystal anisotropy, coordination numbers, and interatomic distances.

  16. Shell-model states with seniority ν<mo>=>3mn> , 5, and 7 in odd- A neutron-rich Sn isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Iskra, Ł. W.; Broda, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Chiara, C. J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Fornal, B.; Hoteling, N.; Kondev, F. G.; Królas, W.; Lauritsen, T.; Pawłat, T.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I.; Walters, W. B.; Wrzesiński, J.; Zhu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Excited states with seniority ν=3, 5, and 7 have been investigated in odd neutron-rich Sn119,121,123,125 isotopes produced by fusion-fission of 6.9-MeV/ACa48 beams with Pb208 and U238 targets and by fission of a U238 target bombarded with 6.7-MeV/ANi64 beams. Level schemes have been established up to high spin and excitation energies in excess of 6 MeV, based on multifold gamma-ray coincidence relationships measured with the Gammasphere array. In the analysis, the presence of isomers was exploited to identify gamma rays and propose transition placements using prompt and delayed coincidence techniques. Gamma decays of the known 27/2- isomers were expanded by identifying new deexcitation paths feeding 23/2+ long-lived states and 21/2+ levels. Competing branches in the decay of 23/2- states toward two 19/2- levels were delineated as well. In Sn119, a new 23/2+ isomer was identified, while a similar 23/2+ long-lived state, proposed earlier in Sn121, has now been confirmed. In both cases, isomeric half-lives were determined with good precision. In the range of ν=3 excitations, the observed transitions linking the various states enabled one to propose with confidence spin-parity assignments for all the observed states. Above the 27/2- isomers, an elaborate structure of negative-parity levels was established reaching the (39/2-), ν=7 states, with tentative spin-parity assignments based on the observed deexcitation paths as well as on general yrast population arguments. In all the isotopes under investigation, strongly populated sequences of positive-parity (35/2+), (31/2+), and (27/2+) states were established, feeding the 23/2+ isomers via cascades of three transitions. In the Sn121,123 isotopes, these sequences also enabled the delineation of higher-lying levels, up to (43/2+) states. In Sn123, a short half-life was determined for the (35/2+) state. Shell-model calculations were carried out for all the odd Sn isotopes, from Sn129 down to Sn119, and the results were found to reproduce the experimental level energies rather well. Nevertheless, some systematic deviations between calculated and experimental energies, especially for positive-parity states, point to the need to improve some of the two-body interactions used in calculations. The computed wave-function amplitudes provide for a fairly transparent interpretation of the observed level structures. The systematics of level energies over the broad A = 117–129 range of Sn isotopes displays a smooth decrease with mass A, and the observed regularity confirms most of the proposed spin-parity assignments. The systematics of the B(E2) reduced transition probabilities extracted for the 23/2+ and 19/2+ isomers is discussed with an emphasis on the close similarity of the observed A dependence with that of the E2 transition rates established for other ν=2, 3, and 4 isomers in the Sn isotopic chain.

  17. Two nucleon systems at mπ<mo>~>450mn>MeV from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William

    2015-12-23

    Nucleon-nucleon systems are studied with lattice quantum chromodynamics at a pion mass of $m_\\pi\\sim 450~{\\rm MeV}$ in three spatial volumes using $n_f=2+1$ flavors of light quarks. At the quark masses employed in this work, the deuteron binding energy is calculated to be $B_d = 14.4^{+3.2}_{-2.6} ~{\\rm MeV}$, while the dineutron is bound by $B_{nn} = 12.5^{+3.0}_{-5.0}~{\\rm MeV}$. Over the range of energies that are studied, the S-wave scattering phase shifts calculated in the 1S0 and 3S1-3D1 channels are found to be similar to those in nature, and indicate repulsive short-range components of the interactions, consistent with phenomenological nucleon-nucleon interactions. In both channels, the phase shifts are determined at three energies that lie within the radius of convergence of the effective range expansion, allowing for constraints to be placed on the inverse scattering lengths and effective ranges. Thus, the extracted phase shifts allow for matching to nuclear effective field theories, from which low energy counterterms are extracted and issues of convergence are investigated. As part of the analysis, a detailed investigation of the single hadron sector is performed, enabling a precise determination of the violation of the Gell-Mann–Okubo mass relation.

  18. Solid Solution Phases in the Olivine-Type LiMnPO4/MnPO4 System

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Guoying; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2009-04-07

    Nonstoichiometry is reported in the LiMnPO{sub 4}/MnPO{sub 4} system for the first time. As lithium is removed from crystalline LiMnPO{sub 4} by chemical or electrochemical methods, the resulting two phase mixture consists of stoichiometric LiMnPO{sub 4} and a delithiated phase, Li{sub y}MnPO{sub 4}, whose lattice parameters depend upon the global extent of delithiation and on the crystalline domain size of the delithiated phase. This behavior is reproduced during electrochemical insertion of lithium. Again, no evidence for nonstoichiometry was found in the vicinity of LiMnPO{sub 4}. Attempts to create single phase solid solutions by heating mixtures of the two phases failed due to the thermal instability of Li{sub y}MnPO{sub 4}.

  19. Structure and electronic properties of Cu nanoclusters supported on Mo2C(001) and MoC(001) surfaces

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Viñes, Francesc; Rodríguez, José A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-09-15

    In this study, the atomic structure and electronic properties of Cun nanoclusters (n = 4, 6, 7, and 10) supported on cubic nonpolar δ-MoC(001) and orthorhombic C- or Mo-terminated polar β-Mo2C(001) surfaces have been investigated by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations. The electronic properties have been analyzed by means of the density of states, Bader charges, and electron localization function plots. The Cu nanoparticles supported on β-Mo2C(001), either Mo- or C-terminated, tend to present a two-dimensional structure whereas a three-dimensional geometry is preferred when supported on δ-MoC(001), indicating that the Mo:C ratio and the surface polarity playmore » a key role determining the structure of supported clusters. Nevertheless, calculations also reveal important differences between the C- and Mo-terminated β-Mo2C(001) supports to the point that supported Cu particles exhibit different charge states, which opens a way to control the reactivity of these potential catalysts.« less

  20. Cronifer 1925 hMo: A promising high-alloy steel for shelf oil and gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Rockel, M.; Jasner, M.

    1995-02-01

    The Cronifer 1925 hMo steel, which is known as a superaustenitic steel, possesses a high resistance toward pitting corrosion (PC), crevice corrosion (CC), and toward corrosion cracking (CoC) in media with a high chloride content and in hydrogen-sulfide-containing gases and condensates. The nominal chemical composition of Cronifer 1925 hMo is (%): < 0.02 C, 24.5-25.5 Ni, 20.0-21.0 Cr, < 1.0 Mn, < 0.5 Si, 0.8-1.0 Cu, 6.0-6.8 Mo, 0.18-0.20 N, < 0.005 S, and < 0.03 P. As a result of the high chromium and molybdenum content, the pitting resistance equivalent (PRE) is equal, according to the PRE equation to PRE = % Cr + 3.3% Mo - 30% N = 74%. A stainless steel is considered as corrosion-resisting in sea water at PRE {ge} 35%. The increased nickel content makes Cronifer 1925 hMo also resistant toward CoC under stress in sea water and in other media with high chloride contents, a well as in gas condensates which contain hydrogen sulfide. All this makes the steel effective for use in marine conditions and in media encountered in the shelf production of oil and gas. The addition of nickel preserves the austenitic structure and improves the passivation properties. Copper improves the resistance of the steel toward general corrosion in reducing media; however, too high a copper content is harmful when the steel is used in neutral chloride-containing solutions and must be limited (not higher than 1%). Cronifer 1925 hMo can be used in hydrocarbon production on the shelf in the following equipment: in fire-extinguishing systems which use fresh and sea water; in pipe systems which return the separated water and gases (with high chloride contents at high pressures and elevated temperatures) to the well in order to fill cavities or to maintain pressure; in separating and cooling equipment of gas and oil production platforms and in oil and gas refineries; and in underwater installations, collectors, and pipe systems, operating under pressure.

  1. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2011-04-04

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  2. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-04-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision

  3. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2007-03-12

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor

  4. MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF MOED_of_the_Italian_Republic.PDF (209.56 KB) More Documents & Publications Scanned_Agreement.pdf International_Agreements_January_2001_December_2004.pdf Implementing Arrangement Between DOE and METI on R&D Cooperation on Clean Energy Technology - April 2015

  5. Levels in N<mn>12mn> via the N<mn>14mn> (p<mo>, >t) reaction using the JENSA gas-jet target

    SciTech Connect

    Chipps, K. A.; Pain, S. D.; Greife, U.; Kozub, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Kontos, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Matos, M.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2015-09-25

    As one of a series of physics cases to demonstrate the unique benefit of the new Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics gas-jet target for enabling next-generation transfer reaction studies, the ¹⁴N (p, t)¹²N reaction was studied for the first time, using a pure jet of nitrogen, in an attempt to resolve conflicting information on the structure of ¹²N. A new level at 4.561-MeV excitation energy in ¹²N was found.

  6. Materials Data on Mn3Mo2H34C22N16O5 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Mn3Mo2H34C22N16O5 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2015-05-17

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Observation of D<mn>0mn> meson nuclear modifications in Au<mo>+>Au collisions at sNN<mo>=>200mn> GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  9. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near amore » critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.« less

  10. Irradiation induced structural change in Mo2Zr intermetallic phase

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Gan, J.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Eriksson, N.; Sohn, Y. H.; Kirk, M.

    2016-05-14

    The Mo2Zr phase has been identified as a major interaction product at the interface of U-10Mo and Zr. Transmission electron microscopy in-situ irradiation with Kr ions at 200 °C with doses up to 2.0E + 16 ions/cm2 was carried out to investigate the radiation stability of the Mo2Zr. The Mo2Zr undergoes a radiation-induced structural change, from a large cubic (cF24) to a small cubic (cI2), along with an estimated 11.2% volume contraction without changing its composition. The structural change begins at irradiation dose below 1.0E + 14 ions/cm2. Furthermore, the transformed Mo2Zr phase demonstrates exceptional radiation tolerance with the developmentmore » of dislocations without bubble formation.« less

  11. Neutrino scattering off the stable even-even Mo isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Balasi, K. G.; Kosmas, T. S.; Divari, P. C. [Theoretical Physics Section, University of Ioannina, GR 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2009-11-09

    Inelastic neutrino-nucleus reaction cross sections are studied focusing on the neutral current processes. Particularly, we investigate the angular and initial neutrino-energy dependence of the differential and integrated cross sections for low and intermediate energies of the incoming neutrino. The nuclear wave functions for the initial and final nuclear states are constructed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) tested on the reproducibility of the low-lying energy spectrum. The results presented here refer to the isotopes Mo{sup 92}, Mo{sup 94}, Mo{sup 96}, Mo{sup 98} and Mo{sup 100}. These isotopes could play a significant role in supernova neutrino detection in addition to their use in double-beta and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments (e.g. MOON, NEMO III)

  12. Structure of Mo(VI) complexes. VI. Mo(VI) oxodiperoxo complexes with urea and some of its derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Timosheva, A.P.; Kazakova, E.K.; Vul`fson, S.G.

    1995-05-20

    Procedures for synthesizing Mo(VI) oxodiperoxo complexes with urea and some of its derivatives have been described. The dipole moment of the peroxo molybdenum complex with hexametapol and urea, [MoO{sub 5}(HMPT)CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}], has been determined, and its structure has been proposed. 10 refs.

  13. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the

  14. Catalytic activity in lithium-treated core–shell MoOx/MoS2 nanowires

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Kappera, Rajesh; Voiry, Damien; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Jasinski, Jacek; Kelly, Dan; Chhowalla, Manish; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; et al

    2015-09-22

    Significant interest has grown in the development of earth-abundant and efficient catalytic materials for hydrogen generation. Layered transition metal dichalcogenides present opportunities for efficient electrocatalytic systems. Here, we report the modification of 1D MoOx/MoS2 core–shell nanostructures by lithium intercalation and the corresponding changes in morphology, structure, and mechanism of H2 evolution. The 1D nanowires exhibit significant improvement in H2 evolution properties after lithiation, reducing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) onset potential by ~50 mV and increasing the generated current density by ~600%. The high electrochemical activity in the nanowires results from disruption of MoS2 layers in the outer shell, leadingmore » to increased activity and concentration of defect sites. This is in contrast to the typical mechanism of improved catalysis following lithium exfoliation, i.e., crystal phase transformation. As a result, these structural changes are verified by a combination of Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).« less

  15. Mo-O bond doping and related-defect assisted enhancement of photoluminescence in monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoxu; Yu, Zhihao; Cheng, Ying; Yu, Linwei; Wang, Junzhuan Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Hu, Fengrui; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2014-12-15

    In this work, we report a strong photoluminescence (PL) enhancement of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under different treatments. We find that by simple ambient annealing treatment in the range of 200?C to 400?C, the PL emission can be greatly enhanced by a factor up to two orders of magnitude. This enhancement can be attributed to two factors: first, the formation of Mo-O bonds during ambient exposure introduces an effective p-doping in the MoS{sub 2} layer; second, localized electrons formed around Mo-O bonds related defective sites where the electrons can be effectively localized with higher binding energy resulting in efficient radiative excitons recombination. Time resolved PL decay measurement showed that longer lifetime of the treated sample consistent with the higher quantum efficiency in PL. These results give more insights to understand the luminescence properties of the MoS{sub 2}.

  16. Investigations of element spatial correlation in Mn-promoted...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Investigations of element spatial correlation in Mn-promoted Co-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts This content will become publicly available on June 4, 2017 Title: ...

  17. Enhancement of redox- and phase-stability of thermoelectric CaMnO{sub 3−δ} by substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Philipp; Populoh, Sascha; Yoon, Songhak; Weidenkaff, Anke

    2015-09-15

    Redox Reactivity and structural phase transitions have a major impact on transport and me-chemical properties of thermoelectric CaMnO{sub 3−δ}. In this study series of Ca{sub 1−x}A{sub x}Mn{sub 1−y}B{sub y}O{sub 3−δ} (0≤x,y≤0.8) compounds, each with A-site (Dy{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+}) or B-site (Nb{sup 5+}, Ta{sup 5+} and Mo{sup 6+}, W{sup 6+}) substitution, were synthesized and crystallographically analyzed. It was found that the high-temperature oxygen content is widely independent from the substituent. Subsequently, with increasing temperature the differences in the Seebeck coefficient vanish above 1200 K. With increasing substitution the orthorhombic distortion of the perovskite-like phase increases. The orthorhombic distortion and the upper temperature limit of the stability of the orthorhombic crystal structure show an almost linear dependency. Accordingly, the mechanical stability of all-oxides thermoelectric converters at temperatures exceeding 1000 K will be increased employing materials with high substitution level and substituents inducing a high orthorhombic distortion. - Graphical abstract: Thermoelectric n-type CaMn{sub 0.98}W{sub 0.02}O{sub 3−δ}—Transport properties and expansion coefficient of: Oxygen loss (green region) and upper stability limit of the orthorhombic phase (yellow region) strongly affect the transport properties. Both features also cause lattice expansion, which leads to cracking of thermoelectric all-oxide converters. We report how the upper limit for application can be shifted to even higher temperatures. - Highlights: • Level of Mn{sup 3+} at RT determines reduction behavior of Ca{sub 1−x}A{sub x}Mn{sub 1−y}B{sub y}O{sub 3−δ} at HT. • Differences in Seebeck coefficient vanish at T>1200 K independent from substitution. • Substitution increases orthorhombicity of Ca{sub 1−x}A{sub x}Mn{sub 1−y}B{sub y}O{sub 3−δ}. • Linear dependence of orthorhombicity and phase stability. • Design guidelines for

  18. Spin caloritronics in graphene with Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Alberto Lima, Matheus P. Fazzio, A.; Silva, Antnio J. R. da

    2014-02-17

    We show that graphene with Mn adatoms trapped at single vacancies features spin-dependent Seebeck effect, thus enabling the use of this material for spin caloritronics. A gate potential can be used to tune its thermoelectric properties in a way it presents either a total spin polarized current, flowing in one given direction, or currents for both spins flowing in opposite directions without net charge transport. Moreover, we show that the thermal magnetoresistance can be tuned between ?100% and +100% by varying a gate potential.

  19. A novel three dimensional semimetallic MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhen-Kun; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Li-Min; Liu, Hao; Lau, Woon-Ming

    2014-05-28

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have many potential applications, while the performances of TMDs are generally limited by the less surface active sites and the poor electron transport efficiency. Here, a novel three-dimensional (3D) structure of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) with larger surface area was proposed based on first-principle calculations. 3D layered MoS{sub 2} structure contains the basal surface and joint zone between the different nanoribbons, which is thermodynamically stable at room temperature, as confirmed by first principles molecular dynamics calculations. Compared the two-dimensional layered structures, the 3D MoS{sub 2} not only owns the large surface areas but also can effectively avoid the aggregation. Interestingly, although the basal surface remains the property of the intrinsic semiconductor as the bulk MoS{sub 2}, the joint zone of 3D MoS{sub 2} exhibits semimetallic, which is derived from degenerate 3d orbitals of the Mo atoms. The high stability, large surface area, and high conductivity make 3D MoS{sub 2} have great potentials as high performance catalyst.

  20. COLLOQUIUM: The MaRIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    January 27, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: The MaRIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes) Project Dr. Cris Barnes Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  1. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A....

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada geothermal areas: Desert Peak, Humboldt House, Beoware: Guidebook for field trip Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  2. Study of e<mo>+>e<mo>- stretchy='false'>→mo>pp<mo accent='true' stretchy='false'>¯mo>π<mn>0mn> in the vicinity of the ψ<mo stretchy='false'>(mo>>3770mn> stretchy='false'>)mo>

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M.  N.; Ai, X.  C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D.  J.; An, F.  F.; An, Q.; Bai, J.  Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J.  V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J.  M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R.  A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G.  F.; Cetin, S.  A.; Chang, J.  F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.  S.; Chen, J.  C.; Chen, M.  L.; Chen, S.  J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.  R.; Chen, Y.  B.; Cheng, H.  P.; Chu, X.  K.; Chu, Y.  P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H.  L.; Dai, J.  P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z.  Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W.  M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L.  Y.; Dong, M.  Y.; Du, S.  X.; Fan, J.  Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S.  S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C.  Q.; Fu, C.  D.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W.  X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M.  H.; Gu, Y.  T.; Guan, Y.  H.; Guo, A.  Q.; Guo, L.  B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.  P.; Han, Y.  L.; Harris, F.  A.; He, K.  L.; He, M.; He, Z.  Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y.  K.; Hou, Z.  L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H.  M.; Hu, J.  F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G.  M.; Huang, G.  S.; Huang, H.  P.; Huang, J.  S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X.  T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C.  S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q.  P.; Ji, X.  B.; Ji, X.  L.; Jiang, L.  L.; Jiang, L.  W.; Jiang, X.  S.; Jiao, J.  B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D.  P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X.  L.; Kang, X.  S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.  S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C.  H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D.  M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.  B.; Li, J.  C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P.  R.; Li, Q.  J.; Li, T.; Li, W.  D.; Li, W.  G.; Li, X.  L.; Li, X.  N.; Li, X.  Q.; Li, Z.  B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y.  F.; Liang, Y.  T.; Lin, D.  X.; Liu, B.  J.; Liu, C.  L.; Liu, C.  X.; Liu, F.  H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.  B.; Liu, H.  H.; Liu, H.  M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.  P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.  Y.; Liu, P.  L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S.  B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.  B.; Liu, Z.  A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X.  C.; Lu, G.  R.; Lu, H.  J.; Lu, H.  L.; Lu, J.  G.; Lu, X.  R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y.  P.; Luo, C.  L.; Luo, M.  X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.  L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F.  C.; Ma, H.  L.; Ma, Q.  M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.  Y.; Maas, F.  E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q.  A.; Mao, Y.  J.; Mao, Z.  P.; Messchendorp, J.  G.; Min, J.; Min, T.  J.; Mitchell, R.  E.; Mo, X.  H.; Mo, Y.  J.; Moeini, H.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N.  Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I.  B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X.  Y.; Olsen, S.  L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H.  P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J.  L.; Ping, R.  G.; Poling, R.; Q., N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C.  F.; Qin, L.  Q.; Qin, X.  S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z.  H.; Qiu, J.  F.; Rashid, K.  H.; Redmer, C.  F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X.  D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C.  P.; Shen, X.  Y.; Sheng, H.  Y.; Shepherd, M.  R.; Song, W.  M.; Song, X.  Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G.  X.; Sun, J.  F.; Sun, S.  S.; Sun, Y.  J.; Sun, Y.  Z.; Sun, Z.  J.; Sun, Z.  T.; Tang, C.  J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E.  H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G.  S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.  Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L.  L.; Wang, L.  S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.  L.; Wang, Q.  J.; Wang, S.  G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.  F.; Wang, Y.  D.; Wang, Y.  F.; Wang, Y.  Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.  G.; Wang, Z.  H.; Wang, Z.  Y.; Wei, D.  H.; Wei, J.  B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S.  P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L.  H.; Wu, N.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.  G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z.  J.; Xie, Y.  G.; Xiu, Q.  L.; Xu, G.  F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q.  J.; Xu, Q.  N.; Xu, X.  P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W.  B.; Yan, W.  C.; Yan, Y.  H.; Yang, H.  X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.  X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M.  H.; Yu, B.  X.; Yu, C.  X.; Yu, H.  W.; Yu, J.  S.; Yu, S.  P.; Yuan, C.  Z.; Yuan, W.  L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A.  A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S.  L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B.  X.; Zhang, B.  Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C.  B.; Zhang, C.  C.; Zhang, D.  H.; Zhang, H.  H.; Zhang, H.  Y.; Zhang, J.  J.; Zhang, J.  Q.; Zhang, J.  W.; Zhang, J.  Y.; Zhang, J.  Z.; Zhang, S.  H.; Zhang, X.  J.; Zhang, X.  Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.  H.; Zhang, Z.  H.; Zhang, Z.  P.; Zhang, Z.  Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M.  G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q.  W.; Zhao, S.  J.; Zhao, T.  C.; Zhao, X.  H.; Zhao, Y.  B.; Zhao, Z.  G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J.  P.; Zheng, Y.  H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X.  K.; Zhou, X.  R.; Zhou, X.  Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K.  J.; Zhu, X.  L.; Zhu, Y.  C.; Zhu, Y.  S.; Zhu, Z.  A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B.  S.; Zou, J.  H.

    2014-08-22

    The process e+e-→pp¯π0 has been studied by analyzing data collected at √s=3.773 GeV, at s√=3.650 GeV, and during a ψ(3770) line shape scan with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section of pp¯π0 in the vicinity of the ψ(3770) is measured, and the Born cross section of ψ(3770)→pp¯π0 is extracted considering interference between resonant and continuum production amplitudes. Two solutions with the same probability and a significance of 1.5σ are found. The solutions for the Born cross section of ψ(3770)→pp¯π0 are 33.8±1.8±2.1 pb and 0.06+0.10-0.04+0.01-0.01 pb (<0.22 pb at a 90% confidence level). Using the estimated cross section and a constant decay amplitude approximation, the cross section σ(pp¯→ψ(3770)π0) is calculated for the kinematic situation of the planned P¯ANDA experiment. The maximum cross section corresponding to the two solutions is expected to be less than 0.79 nb at 90% confidence level and 122±10 nb at a center-of-mass energy of 5.26 GeV.

  3. MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE: A facility for time-dependent materials science at the mesoscale To meet new and emerging national security issues the Laboratory is stepping up to meet another grand challenge-transitioning from observing to controlling a material's performance. This challenge requires the best of experiment, modeling, simulation,

  4. Cross section for bb<mo>¯> production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN<mo>=>200mn> GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  5. GUT-inspired supersymmetric model for h <mo stretchy="false">?mo> ? ? and the muon g <mo>-> <mn>2mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Ajaib, M. Adeel; Gogoladze, Ilia; Shafi, Qaisar

    2015-05-06

    We study a grand unified theories inspired supersymmetric model with nonuniversal gaugino masses that can explain the observed muon g-2 anomaly while simultaneously accommodating an enhancement or suppression in the h??? decay channel. In order to accommodate these observations and mh?125 to 126 GeV, the model requires a spectrum consisting of relatively light sleptons whereas the colored sparticles are heavy. The predicted stau mass range corresponding to R???1.1 is 100 GeV?m??200 GeV. The constraint on the slepton masses, particularly on the smuons, arising from considerations of muon g-2 is somewhat milder. The slepton masses in this case are predicted to lie in the few hundred GeV range. The colored sparticles turn out to be considerably heavier with mg?4.5 TeV and mt??3.5 TeV, which makes it challenging for these to be observed at the 14 TeV LHC.

  6. Polystyrene/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Altavilla, Claudia; Ciambelli, Paolo; Fedi, Filippo; Sorrentino, Andrea; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    The effects of adding different concentrations of MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nano particles on the thermal and mechanical properties of polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites have been investigated. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy were used to characterize the morphology of the resulting nanocomposites. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites has been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. It has been found that the MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanoparticles have a good compatibility with the PS matrix forming homogeneous dispersion even at high concentrations. The PS/MoS{sub 2}@oleylamine nanocomposites showed enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat polystyrene.

  7. Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray ) The Slow Mo Guys came to GE Global Research in Niskayuna to film our researchers demonstrate a process called "cold spray", in which metal powders are sprayed at high velocities to build a part or add

  8. Diffusion Barrier Selection from Refractory Metals (Zr, Mo and Nb) via Interdiffusion Investigation for U-Mo RERTR Fuel Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    K. Huang; C. Kammerer; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; Y. H. Sohn

    2014-04-01

    U-Mo alloys are being developed as low enrichment monolithic fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Diffusional interactions between the U-Mo fuel alloy and Al-alloy cladding within the monolithic fuel plate construct necessitate incorporation of a barrier layer. Fundamentally, a diffusion barrier candidate must have good thermal conductivity, high melting point, minimal metallurgical interaction, and good irradiation performance. Refractory metals, Zr, Mo, and Nb are considered based on their physical properties, and the diffusion behavior must be carefully examined first with U-Mo fuel alloy. Solid-to-solid U-10wt.%Mo vs. Mo, Zr, or Nb diffusion couples were assembled and annealed at 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 degrees C for various times. The interdiffusion microstructures and chemical composition were examined via scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, respectively. For all three systems, the growth rate of interdiffusion zone were calculated at 1000, 900 and 800 degrees C under the assumption of parabolic growth, and calculated for lower temperature of 700, 600 and 500 degrees C according to Arrhenius relationship. The growth rate was determined to be about 10 3 times slower for Zr, 10 5 times slower for Mo and 10 6 times slower for Nb, than the growth rates reported for the interaction between the U-Mo fuel alloy and pure Al or Al-Si cladding alloys. Zr, however was selected as the barrier metal due to a concern for thermo- mechanical behavior of UMo/Nb interface observed from diffusion couples, and for ductile-to-brittle transition of Mo near room temperature.

  9. γ -soft Ba<mn>146mn> and the role of nonaxial shapes at N<mo>≈>90mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A. J.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Bertone, P. F.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J. A.; Copp, P.; David, H. M.; Deo, A. Y.; DiGiovine, B.; D'Olympia, N.; Dungan, R.; Harding, R. D.; Harker, J.; Hota, S. S.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Kondev, F. G.; Liu, S. H.; Ramayya, A. V.; Rissanen, J.; Savard, G.; Seweryniak, D.; Shearman, R.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Tabor, S. L.; Walters, W. B.; Wang, E.; Zhu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Low-spin states in the neutron-rich, N=90 nuclide Ba146 were populated following β decay of Cs146, with the goal of clarifying the development of deformation in barium isotopes through delineation of their nonyrast structures. Fission fragments of Cs146 were extracted from a 1.7-Ci Cf252 source and mass selected using the CAlifornium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) facility. Low-energy ions were deposited at the center of a box of thin β detectors, surrounded by a highly efficient high-purity Ge array. The new Ba146 decay scheme now contains 31 excited levels extending up to ~2.5 MeV excitation energy, double what was previously known. These data are compared to predictions from the interacting boson approximation (IBA) model. It appears that the abrupt shape change found at N=90 in Sm and Gd is much more gradual in Ba and Ce, due to an enhanced role of the γ degree of freedom.

  10. Structural transition and amorphization in compressed α <mo>-> Sb <mn>2mn> O <mn>3mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhao; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Shibing; Hirai, Shigeto; Zeng, Zhidan; Mao, Wendy L.

    2015-05-27

    Sb₂O₃-based materials are of broad interest in materials science and industry. High-pressure study using diamond anvil cells shows promise in obtaining new crystal and electronic structures different from their pristine states. Here, we conducted in situ angle dispersive synchrotron x-ray-diffraction and Raman spectroscopy experiments on α-Sb₂O₃ up to 50 GPa with neon as the pressure transmitting medium. A first-order structural transition was observed in between 15 and 20 GPa, where the cubic phase I gradually transformed into a layered tetragonal phase II through structural distortion and symmetry breaking. To explain the dramatic changes in sample color and transparency, we performed first-principles calculations to track the evolution of its density of states and electronic structure under pressure. At higher pressure, a sluggish amorphization was observed. Our results highlight the structural connections among the sesquioxides, where the lone electron pair plays an important role in determining the local structures.

  11. Sustained phase separation and spin glass in Co-doped KxFe<mn>2mn><mo>-mo>ySe<mn>2mn> single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Hyejin; Wang, Kefeng; Opacic, M.; Lazarevic, N.; Warren, J. B.; Popovic, Z. V.; Bozin, Emil S.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-11-19

    We describe Co substitution effects in KxFe2-y-zCozSe2 (0.06 ≤ z ≤ 1.73) single crystal alloys. By 3.5% of Co doping superconductivity is suppressed whereas phase separation of semiconducting K2Fe4Se5 and superconducting/metallic KxFe2Se2 is still present. We show that the arrangement and distribution of superconducting phase (stripe phase) is connected with the arrangement of K, Fe and Co atoms. Semiconducting spin glass is found in proximity to superconducting state, persisting for large Co concentrations. At high Co concentrations ferromagnetic metallic state emerges above the spin glass. This is coincident with changes of the unit cell, arrangement and connectivity of stripe conducting phase.

  12. Inclusive cross sections for pairs of identified light charged hadrons and for single protons in e<mo>+mo>e<mo>−> at s<mo>=>10.58mn>GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, R.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Dash, N.; Dingfelder, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsu, C. -L.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Joffe, D.; Joo, K. K.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ribežl, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yelton, J.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2015-11-01

    We report the first double differential cross sections of two charged pions and kaons (e+e- ->hhX) in electron-positron annihilation as a function of the fractional energies of the two hadrons for any charge and hadron combination. The dependence of these di-hadron cross sections on the topology (same, opposite-hemisphere or anywhere) is also studied with the help of the event shape variable combinations directly shed light on the contributing fragmentation functions. For example, we find energies where disfavored fragmentation is expected to be suppressed. These di-hadron results are the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. Extending the previously published single-pion and single-kaon cross sections, single-proton (e+e- -> pX) cross sections are extracted from a 159 fb^-1 data sub-sample.

  13. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidationmore » state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.« less

  14. Charge Disproportionation in Tetragonal La2MoO5 , a Small Band Gap Semiconductor Influenced by Direct Mo–Mo Bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Colabello, Diane M.; Camino, Fernando E.; Huq, Ashfia; Hybertsen, Mark; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2014-12-31

    The structure of the novel compound La2MoO5 has been solved from powder X-ray and neutron diffraction data and belongs to the tetragonal space group P4/m (no. 83) with a = 12.6847(3) Å and c = 6.0568(2) Å and with Z = 8. It consists of equal proportions of bioctahedral (Mo2O10) and square prismatic (Mo2O8) dimers, both of which contain direct Mo-Mo bonds and are arranged in 1D chains. The Mo-Mo bond length in the Mo2O10dimers is 2.684(8) Å, while there are two types of Mo2O8 dimers with Mo-Mo bonds lengths of 2.22(2) and 2.28(2) Å. Although the average Mo oxidation state in La2MoO5 is 4+, the very different Mo-Mo distances reflect the fact that the Mo2O10 dimers contain only Mo5+ (d(1)), while the prismatic Mo2O8 dimers only contain Mo3+ (d3), a result directly confirmed by density function theory calculations. This is due to the complete disproportionation of Mo4+, a phenomenon which has not previously been observed in solid-state compounds. La2MoO5 is diamagnetic, behavior which is not expected for a nonmetallic transition-metal oxide whose cation sites have an odd number of d-electrons. The resistivity displays the Arrhenius-type activated behavior expected for a semiconductor with a band gap of 0.5 eV, exhibiting an unusually small transport gap relative to other diamagnetic oxides. Diffuse reflectance studies indicate that La2MoO5 is a rare example of a stable oxide semiconductor with strong infrared absorbance. Lastly, we show that the d-orbital splitting associated with the Mo2O8 and Mo2O10 dimeric units can be rationalized using simple molecular orbital bonding concepts.

  15. Ethanol Conversion on Cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Fang, Zongtang; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

    2014-03-06

    Oxides of molybdenum and tungsten are an important class of catalytic materials with applications ranging from isomerization of alkanes and alkenes, partial oxidation of alcohols, selective reduction of nitric oxide and metathesis of alkeness.[1-10] While many studies have focused on the structure - function relationships, the nature of high catalytic activity is still being extensively investigated. There is a general agreement that the activity of supported MOx (M = W, Mo) catalysts is correlated with the presence of acidic sites, where the catalytic activity is strongly affected by the type of oxide support, delocalization of electron density, structures of tungsten oxide domains and presence of protons

  16. Co-Mo Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Co-Mo Electric Cooperative provides rebates to its residential and commercial members who install air source, dual fuel, and/or geothermal heat pumps, and certain energy efficient appliances. Heat...

  17. Support effects on hydrotreating activity of NiMo catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. Arce-Estrada, E.M.; Torres-Huerta, A.M.

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the gamma alumina particle size on the catalytic activity of NiMoS{sub x} catalysts prepared by precipitation method of aluminum acetate at pH = 10 was studied. The structural characterization of the supports was measured by using XRD, pyridine FTIR-TPD and nitrogen physisorption. NiMo catalysts were characterized during the preparation steps (annealing and sulfidation) using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Hydrogen TPR studies of the NiMo catalysts were also carried out in order to correlate their hydrogenating properties and their catalytic functionality. Catalytic tests were carried out in a pilot plant at 613, 633 and 653 K temperatures. The results showed that the rate constants of hydrodesulfurization (HDS), hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) and hydrodearomatizing (HDA) at 613-653 K decreased in the following order: A > B > C corresponding to the increase of NiMoS particle size associated to these catalysts.

  18. Structural Insights into FeMo Cofactor Biosynthesis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    a catalytic component and a specific reductase, which, in the standard system, are referred to as the MoFe protein and the Fe protein. At the active site of the...

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Petrolite Corp - MO 08

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Materials Handled: Uranium Flouride & Thorium Oxide MO.08-2 Radiological Survey(s): ... of operations at sites used by National Lead Company of Ohio; July 28, 1986. Attachments. ...

  20. CO2ReMoVe | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of industrial, research and service organizations with experience in CO2 geological storage. References: CO2ReMoVe1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  1. Anisotropy of heat conduction in Mo/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, V. V.; Yakshin, A. E.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Bijkerk, F.; Yang, J.; Schmidt, A. J.; Zoethout, E.

    2015-08-28

    This paper reports on the studies of anisotropic heat conduction phenomena in Mo/Si multilayers with individual layer thicknesses selected to be smaller than the mean free path of heat carriers. We applied the frequency-domain thermoreflectance technique to characterize the thermal conductivity tensor. While the mechanisms of the cross-plane heat conduction were studied in detail previously, here we focus on the in-plane heat conduction. To analyze the relative contribution of electron transport to the in-plane heat conduction, we applied sheet-resistance measurements. Results of Mo/Si multilayers with variable thickness of the Mo layers indicate that the net in-plane thermal conductivity depends on the microstructure of the Mo layers.

  2. Distributed Production of Radionuclide Mo-99 Charles A. Gentile...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    This invention is for the production of Technetium-99m (Tc-99m), a widely used medical isotope in a distributed and in-situ fashion. Tc-99m results when Molybdenum 99 (Mo-99) ...

  3. 9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-11-27

    One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

  4. M.O. Wascko, LSU NuInt05...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    O. Wascko, LSU NuInt05 26 September, 2005 MiniBooNE CC + CCQE Ratio M.O. Wascko, LSU J.R. Monroe, Columbia CC interactions Quasi-Elastic (CCQE) Inclusive Single +...

  5. Magnetic Moment Enhancement for Mn7 Cluster on Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-08-21

    Mn7 cluster on graphene with different structural motifs and magnetic orders are investigated systematically by first-principles calculations. The calculations show that Mn7 on graphene prefers a two-layer motif and exhibits a ferrimagnetic coupling. The magnetic moment of the Mn7 cluster increases from 5.0 ?B at its free-standing state to about 6.0 ?B upon adsorption on graphene. Mn7 cluster also induces about 0.3 ?B of magnetic moment in the graphene layer, leading to an overall enhancement of 1.3 ?B magnetic moment for Mn7 on graphene. Detail electron transfer and bonding analysis have been carried out to investigate the origin of the magnetic enhancement.

  6. Microstructures in rapidly solidified Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaraman, N.; Tewari, S.N.; Hemker, K.J.; Glasgow, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    Ni-Mo alloys of compositions ranging from pure Ni to Ni-40 at % Mo were rapidly solidified by chill block melt spinning in vacuum and were examined by optical metallography, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Rapid solidification resulted in an extension of molybdenum solubility in nickel from 28 to 37.5 at %. A number of different phases and microstructures were seen at different depths (solidification conditions) from the quenched surface of the melt spun ribbons.

  7. Mn4+ emission in pyrochlore oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    For the existing Mn4+ activated red phosphors have relatively low emission energies (or long emission wavelengths) and are therefore inefficient for general lighting. Density functional calculations are performed to study Mn4+ emission in rare-earth hafnate, zirconate, and stannate pyrochlore oxides (RE2Hf2O7, RE2Zr2O7, and RE2Sn2O7). We show how the different sizes of the RE3+ cation in these pyrochlores affect the local structure of the distorted MnO6 octahedron, the Mn–O hybridization, and the Mn4+ emission energy. The Mn4+ emission energies of many pyrochlores are found to be higher than those currently known for Mn4+ doped oxides and should be closer to that of Y2O3:Eu3+ (the current commercial red phosphor for fluorescent lighting). The O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is shown to play an important role in weakening Mn–O hybridization and consequently increasing the Mn4+ emission energy. Our result shows that searching for materials that allow significant O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is an effective approach to find new Mn4+ activated red phosphors with potential to replace the relatively expensive Y2O3:Eu3+ phosphor.

  8. Electrochemical behavior of β-MnO{sub 2} and MnOOH nanorods in different electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chinnasamy, Revathi; Thangavelu, Rajendrakumar Ramasamy

    2015-06-24

    A manganese dioxide (β-MnO{sub 2}) and MnOOH nanoparticles has been synthesized by hydrothermal method. As prepared samples are analyzed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). FESEM showed rod morphology within the diameter of 50–200 and length of few nanometers. These nanorods are immobilized on a Glassy Carbon Electrode (GCE) by drop cast method. The comparative electrochemical behavior of β-MnO{sub 2} and MnOOH rod modified GCE electrodes are analyzed by cyclic Voltammetry (CV) method in different electrolytes of 0.1M KCl, 0.1M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, 0.1M NaOH, 0.1M PBS, 0.1M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. From the cyclic Voltammetry analysis found that in all the electrolytes both β-MnO{sub 2} and MnOOH modified GCE electrodes exhibit electrochemical behavior and KCl shows well redox properties as compared with others. There is also an observable difference in reduction potential value of both crystalline nanostructurers and concluded that β-MnO{sub 2} has high catalytic ability as compared with MnOOH rods.

  9. Substitution studies of Mn and Fe in Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43} (Ln=Gd, Yb) and the structure of Yb{sub 6}Ti{sub 4}Al{sub 43}

    SciTech Connect

    Treadwell, LaRico J.; Watkins-Curry, Pilanda; McAlpin, Jacob D.; Prestigiacomo, Joseph; Stadler, Shane; Chan, Julia Y.

    2014-02-15

    The synthesis and characterization of Mn- and Fe-substituted Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43} (Ln=Gd, Yb) and Yb{sub 6}Ti{sub 4}Al{sub 43} are reported. The compounds adopt the Ho{sub 6}Mo{sub 4}Al{sub 43} structure type with lattice parameters of a∼11 Å and c∼17.8 Å with structural site preferences for Mn and Fe. The magnetization of Yb{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43} is sensitive to Mn and Fe doping, which is evident by an increase in the field dependent magnetization. Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43}, Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 42.31(11)}Mn{sub 0.69(11)}, and Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 41.69(12)}Fe{sub 1.30(12)} order antiferromagnetically in the ab- and c-directions at 15, 14, and 13 K, respectively, with positive Weiss constants, suggesting the presence of ferromagnetic exchange interactions. Anisotropic magnetization data of Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub y} (T=Mn, Fe) analogs are discussed. - Graphical abstract: The magnetic susceptibility of Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4−x}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub x+y} (Ln = Gd, Yb; T= Mn, Fe). Display Omitted - Highlights: • Single crystals of Ln{sub 6}W{sub 4−x}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub x+y} were grown with Al-flux. • Anisotropic magnetic behavior were determined on single crystals. • Gd{sub 6}W{sub 4−x}Al{sub 43−y}T{sub x+y} (T=Mn, Fe) analogs order antiferromagnetically.

  10. Simulation of the Vortex Dynamics in a Real Pinning Landscape of YBa<mn>2mn>Cu<mn>3mn>O<mn>7mn><mo>->δ Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovskyy, I. A.; Koshelev, A. E.; Glatz, A.; Ortalan, V.; Rupich, M. W.; Leroux, M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) to carry very large currents with almost no dissipation makes them irreplaceable for high-power applications. The development and further improvement of HTS-based cables require an in-depth understanding of the superconducting vortex dynamics in the presence of complex pinning landscapes. We present a critical current analysis of a real HTS sample in a magnetic field by combining state-of-the-art large-scale Ginzburg-Landau simulations with reconstructive three-dimensional scanning-transmission-electron-microscopy tomography of the pinning landscape in Dy-doped YBa2Cu3O7-δ. This methodology provides a unique look at the vortex dynamics in the presence of a complex pinning landscape responsible for the high-current-carrying-capacity characteristic of commercial HTS wires. Finally, our method demonstrates very good functional and quantitative agreement of the critical current between simulation and experiment, providing a new predictive tool for HTS wire designs.

  11. Self-assembly of 2D sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene composites for high-performance lithium storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Songmei Wang, Bo; Li, Bin; Liu, Jianhua; Yu, Mei; Wu, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • MFO/GN composites were synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach. • The MFO microspheres are sandwiched between the graphene layers. • Each MFO microsphere is an interstitial cluster of nanoparticles. • The MFO/GN electrode exhibits an enhanced cyclability for Li-ion batteries anodes. - Abstract: In this study, two-dimensional (2D) sandwich-structured MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/graphene (MFO/GN) composites are synthesized by a facile in situ solvothermal approach, using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as cationic surfactant. As a consequence, the nanocomposites of MFO/GN self-assembled into a 2D sandwich structure, in which the interstitial cluster structure of microsphere-type MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is sandwiched between the graphene layers. This special structure of the MFO/GN composites used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries will be favorable for the maximum accessible surface of electroactive materials, fast diffusion of lithium ions and migration of electron, and elastomeric space to accommodate volume changes during the discharge–charge processes. The as-synthesized MFO/GN composites deliver a high specific reversible capacity of 987.95 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 200 mA g{sup −1}, a good capacity retention of 69.27% after 80 cycles and excellent rate performance for lithium storage.

  12. Water dissociation on Mn(1×1)/Ag(100)

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Arble, Chris; Tong, Xiao; Giordano, Livia; Ferrari, Anna Maria; Newberg, John T.

    2016-08-19

    In this work we utilize experimental and simulation techniques to examine the molecular level interaction of water with a MnO(1×1) thin film deposited onto Ag(100). The formation of MnO(1×1)/Ag(100) was characterized by low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) shows MnO(1×1) is thermodynamically more stable than MnO(2×1) by –0.4 eV per MnO. Upon exposure to 2.5 Torr water vapor at room temperature, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy results show extensive surface hydroxylation attributed to reactivity at MnO(1×1) terrace sites. DFT calculations of a water monomer on MnO(1×1)/Ag(100) show the dissociated form is energetically more favorable than molecularmore » adsorption, with a hydroxylation activation barrier 0.4 eV per H2O. Lastly, these results are discussed and contrasted with previous studies of MgO/Ag(100) which show a stark difference in behavior for water dissociation.« less

  13. Coated U(Mo) Fuel: As-Fabricated Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Ann Leenaers; Sven Van den Berghe; Tom Wiencek

    2014-04-01

    As part of the development of low-enriched uranium fuels, fuel plates have recently been tested in the BR-2 reactor as part of the SELENIUM experiment. These fuel plates contained fuel particles with either Si or ZrN thin film coating (up to 1 µm thickness) around the U-7Mo fuel particles. In order to best understand irradiation performance, it is important to determine the starting microstructure that can be observed in as-fabricated fuel plates. To this end, detailed microstructural characterization was performed on ZrN and Si-coated U-7Mo powder in samples taken from AA6061-clad fuel plates fabricated at 500°C. Of interest was the condition of the thin film coatings after fabrication at a relatively high temperature. Both scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed. The ZrN thin film coating was observed to consist of columns comprised of very fine ZrN grains. Relatively large amounts of porosity could be found in some areas of the thin film, along with an enrichment of oxygen around each of the the ZrN columns. In the case of the pure Si thin film coating sample, a (U,Mo,Al,Si) interaction layer was observed around the U-7Mo particles. Apparently, the Si reacted with the U-7Mo and Al matrix during fuel plate fabrication at 500°C to form this layer. The microstructure of the formed layer is very similar to those that form in U-7Mo versus Al-Si alloy diffusion couples annealed at higher temperatures and as-fabricated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with Al-Si alloy matrix fabricated at 500°C.

  14. Inverse spin Hall effect in Pt/(Ga,Mn)As

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, H.; Chen, L.; Chang, H. W.; Ohno, H.; Matsukura, F.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate dc voltages under ferromagnetic resonance in a Pt/(Ga,Mn)As bilayer structure. A part of the observed dc voltage is shown to originate from the inverse spin Hall effect. The sign of the inverse spin Hall voltage is the same as that in Py/Pt bilayer structure, even though the stacking order of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic layers is opposite to each other. The spin mixing conductance at the Pt/(Ga,Mn)As interface is determined to be of the order of 10{sup 19 }m{sup −2}, which is about ten times greater than that of (Ga,Mn)As/p-GaAs.

  15. MaRIE 1.0: The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project, and the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Challenge of Dynamic Mesoscale Imaging (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: MaRIE 1.0: The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project, and the Challenge of Dynamic Mesoscale Imaging Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MaRIE 1.0: The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes Project, and the Challenge of Dynamic Mesoscale Imaging The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes project will build the experimental facility for the time-dependent control of dynamic material

  16. EERE Success Story-MA3T Model Application at ORNL Assesses the Future of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cell Markets | Department of Energy MA3T Model Application at ORNL Assesses the Future of Fuel Cell Markets EERE Success Story-MA3T Model Application at ORNL Assesses the Future of Fuel Cell Markets July 26, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Leveraging funding from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) has developed a model for simulating the market potential of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) and challenges to achieving success over time, including competition with

  17. The cluster compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} containing Mo{sub 14} clusters and the new mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters: Synthesis, crystal structure, and electrical and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, Philippe; Guizouarn, Thierry; Gougeon, Patrick

    2015-07-15

    Single crystals of the new quaternary compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} were obtained by solid state reaction. The crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with unit-cell parameters a=9.4432(14) Å, b=11.4828(12) Å, c=20.299(4) Å and Z=4. Full-matrix least-squares refinement on F{sup 2} using 3807 independent reflections for 219 refinable parameters resulted in R{sub 1}=0.0259 and wR{sub 2}=0.0591. The crystal structure contains in addition to Mo{sub 14} clusters the first examples of mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 14} i.e. Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters. The oxygen framework derives from a stacking along the a direction of close-packed layers with sequence (…ABAC…). The Mo–Mo distances range between 2.6938(5) and 2.8420(6) Å and the Mo–O distances between 1.879(5) and 2.250(3) Å, as usually observed in molybdenum oxide clusters. The indium atoms form In{sub 4}{sup 6+} bent chains with In–In distances of 2.6682(5) and 2.6622(8) Å and the Ti atoms are in highly distorted octahedral sites of oxygen atoms with Ti–O distances ranging between 1.865(4) and 2.161(4) Å. Magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the presence of Ti{sup 4+} cations and the absence of localized moments on the Mo network. Electrical resistivity measurements on a single crystal of In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} show a semimetallic behavior. - Graphical abstract: We present here the synthesis, the crystal structure, and the electrical and magnetic properties of the new compound In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} in which Mo{sub 14} clusters coexist statistically with mono- and bi-capped trioctahedral Mo{sub 14} that is Mo{sub 15} and Mo{sub 16} clusters. - Highlights: • Single crystals of In{sub 4}Ti{sub 1.5}Mo{sub 0.5}Mo{sub 14}O{sub 26} were obtained by solid state

  18. International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Million Cubic Feet) International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  19. Multiphonon resonant Raman scattering in MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Gołasa, K. Grzeszczyk, M.; Wysmołek, A.; Babiński, A.; Leszczyński, P.; Faugeras, C.; Nicolet, A. A. L.; Potemski, M.

    2014-03-03

    Optical emission spectrum of a resonantly (λ = 632.8 nm) excited molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) is studied at liquid helium temperature. More than 20 peaks in the energy range spanning up to 1400 cm{sup −1} from the laser line, which are related to multiphonon resonant Raman scattering processes, are observed. The attribution of the observed lines involving basic lattice vibrational modes of MoS{sub 2} and both the longitudinal (LA(M)) and the transverse (TA(M) and/or ZA(M)) acoustic phonons from the vicinity of the high-symmetry M point of the MoS{sub 2} Brillouin zone is proposed.

  20. Ligand Bridging-Angle-Driven Assembly of Molecular Architectures Based on Quadruply Bonded Mo-Mo Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jian-Rong; Yakovenko, Andrey A; Lu, Weigang; Timmons, Daren J; Zhuang, Wenjuan; Yuan, Daqiang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-12-15

    A systematic exploration of the assembly of Mo?(O?C-)?-based metalorganic molecular architectures structurally controlled by the bridging angles of rigid organic linkers has been performed. Twelve bridging dicarboxylate ligands were designed to be of different sizes with bridging angles of 0, 60, 90, and 120 while incorporating a variety of nonbridging functional groups, and these ligands were used as linkers. These dicarboxylate linkers assemble with quadruply bonded MoMo clusters acting as nodes to give 13 molecular architectures, termed metalorganic polygons/polyhedra with metal cluster node arrangements of a linear shape, triangle, octahedron, and cuboctahedron/anti-cuboctahedron. The syntheses of these complexes have been optimized and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results have shown that the shape and size of the resulting molecular architecture can be controlled by tuning the bridging angle and size of the linker, respectively. Functionalization of the linker can adjust the solubility of the ensuing molecular assembly but has little or no effect on the geometry of the product. Preliminary gas adsorption, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties of selected members were also studied. The present work is trying to enrich metal-containing supramolecular chemistry through the inclusion of well-characterized quadruply bonded MoMo units into the structures, which can widen the prospect of additional electronic functionality, thereby leading to novel properties.

  1. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (sup -1 per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsecsup -2, which is typical...

  2. ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    B&t&@, Tenne66ee, on April 26, 1961. He informed me th&t the rtioMl Northern birislon, Ameic6.n ?ot8rh QI ahnloal Corporation In Hart IUnover, Ma86rohusett8, la pePfopn1 lo8lve...

  3. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L. Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-15

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources – planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.

  4. redMaGiC. Selecting Luminous Red Galaxies from the DES Science Verification Data

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, E.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce redMaGiC, an automated algorithm for selecting Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). The algorithm was developed to minimize photometric redshift uncertainties in photometric large-scale structure studies. redMaGiC achieves this by self-training the color-cuts necessary to produce a luminosity-thresholded LRG sam- ple of constant comoving density. Additionally, we demonstrate that redMaGiC photo-zs are very nearly as accurate as the best machine-learning based methods, yet they require minimal spectroscopic training, do not suffer from extrapolation biases, and are very nearly Gaussian. We apply our algorithm to Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data to produce a redMaGiC catalog sampling the redshift range z ϵ [0.2,0.8]. Our fiducial sample has a comoving space density of 10-3 (h-1Mpc)-3, and a median photo-z bias (zspec zphoto) and scatter (σz=(1 + z)) of 0.005 and 0.017 respectively.The corresponding 5σ outlier fraction is 1.4%. We also test our algorithm with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8) and Stripe 82 data, and discuss how spectroscopic training can be used to control photo-z biases at the 0.1% level.

  5. MA.2

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    C o m m ission in the early years of nuclear energy development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to perform such action. ...

  6. U-Mo Plate Blister Anneal Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Francine J. Rice; Daniel M. Wachs; Adam B. Robinson; Dennis D. Keiser Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Danielle M. Perez; Ross Finlay

    2010-10-01

    Blister thresholds in fuel elements have been a longstanding performance parameter for fuel elements of all types. This behavior has yet to be fully defined for the RERTR U-Mo fuel types. Blister anneal studies that began in 2007 have been expanded to include plates from more recent RERTR experiments. Preliminary data presented in this report encompasses the early generations of the U-Mo fuel systems and the most recent but still developing fuel system. Included is an overview of relevant dispersion fuel systems for the purposes of comparison.

  7. Development of ITER 15 MA ELMy H-mode Inductive Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C. E.; Campbell, D.; Gribov, Y.; Saibene, G.; Ambrosino, G.; Casper, T.; Cavinato, M.; Fujieda, H.; Hawryluk, R.; Horton, L. D.; Kavin, A.; Kharyrutdinov, R.; Koechl, F.; Leuer, J.; Loarte, A.; Lomas, P. J.; Luce, T.; Lukash, V.; Mattei, M.; Nunes, I.; Parail, V.; Polevoi, A.; Portone, A.; Sartori, R.; Sips, A. C.C.; Thomas, P. R.; Welander, A.; Wesley, J.

    2008-10-16

    The poloidal field (PF) coil system on ITER, which provides both feedforward and feedback control of plasma position, shape, and current, is a critical element for achieving mission performance. Analysis of PF capabilities has focused on the 15 MA Q = 10 scenario with a 300-500 s flattop burn phase. The operating space available for the 15 MA ELMy H-mode plasma discharges in ITER and upgrades to the PF coils or associated systems to establish confidence that ITER mission objectives can be reached have been identified. Time dependent self-consistent free-boundary calculations were performed to examine the impact of plasma variability, discharge programming, and plasma disturbances. Based on these calculations a new reference scenario was developed based upon a large bore initial plasma, early divertor transition, low level heating in L-mode, and a late H-mode onset. Equilibrium analyses for this scenario indicate that the original PF coil limitations do not allow low li (<0.8) operation or lower flux states, and the flattop burn durations were predicted to be less than the desired 400 s. This finding motivates the expansion of the operating space, considering several upgrade options to the PF coils. Analysis was also carried out to examine the feedback current reserve required in the CS and PF coils during a series of disturbances and a feasibility assessment of the 17 MA scenario was undertaken. Results of the studies show that the new scenario and modified PF system will allow a wide range of 15 MA 300-500 s operation and more limited but finite 17 MA operation.

  8. CaMn2Al10: Itinerant Mn magnetism on the verge of magnetic order

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, L.; Simonson, J. W.; Yin, W. -G.; Smith, G. J.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Zellman, S.; Puri, A.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-07-24

    We report the discovery of CaMn2Al10, a metal with strong magnetic anisotropy and moderate electronic correlations. Magnetization measurements find a Curie-Weiss moment of 0.83μB/Mn, significantly reduced from the Hund's rule value, and the magnetic entropy obtained from specific heat measurements is correspondingly small, only ≈ 9% of Rln2. These results imply that the Mn magnetism is highly itinerant, a conclusion supported by density functional theory calculations that find strong Mn-Al hybridization. Consistent with the layered nature of the crystal structure, the magnetic susceptibility χ is anisotropic below 20 K, with a maximum ratio of χ[010][001] ≈ 3.5. A strong power-law divergence χ(T) ~ T–1.2 below 20 K implies incipient ferromagnetic order, an Arrott plot analysis of the magnetization suggests a vanishing low Curie temperature TC ~ 0. Our experiments indicate that CaMn2Al10 is a rare example of a system where the weak and itinerant Mn-based magnetism is poised on the verge of order.

  9. Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS...

    Energy Saver

    Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H Policy Flash 2013-71 AL 2013-11 NON M&O CONTRACTOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS CLAUSES FOR SECTION H...

  10. Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production, with virtually no losses in Mo-99 yields or uranium recovery. May 13, 2013 From left, Los ...

  11. Letter on the Office of Science M&O Contract Study and the Univerisity...

    Energy Saver

    of Science M&O Contract Study and the Univerisity of Minnesota 's Institute for Mathematics and its Applications Letter on the Office of Science M&O Contract Study and the ...

  12. Reaction synthesis of MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite using MoO{sub 3}, Al and Si powders

    SciTech Connect

    Deevi, S.C.; Deevi, S.

    1995-10-01

    In-situ synthesis of a composite of MoSi{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was carried out by reacting a thermite mixture consisting of MoO{sub 3}, Al, and Si powders. The reaction was found to be extremely fast and violent, and a diluent was required to moderate the reaction. Thermal behavior of the thermite mixture was studied using DTA at different heating rates, and DTA was interrupted at different temperatures to determine the reaction mechanism. X-ray characterization of the products obtained at different temperatures reveals that the mechanism consists of a reduction of MoO{sub 3} by Al to MoO{sub 2} followed by a simultaneous oxidation of Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and synthesis reaction between reduced Mo and Si to form MoSi{sub 2}. The rate determining step is found to be reduction of MoO{sub 2} by Al and oxidation of Al to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The thermite reaction was moderated by adding Mo and Si to the mixture of MoO{sub 3}, Al, and Si such that the ratio of MoSi{sub 2} to the thermite was in the range of 60:40 to 90:10.

  13. Corrosion report for the U-Mo fuel concept

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Doherty, Ann L.; Fuller, E. S.; Hardy, John S.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2014-08-28

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum (U-Mo) metal fuel for Light Water Reactors (LWR)s. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties, which includes high thermal conductivity for less stored heat energy. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water industry with a melt-resistant accident tolerant fuel with improved safety response. However, the corrosion of this fuel in reactor water environments needs to be further explored and optimized by additional alloying. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of U-Mo fuel. This report documents the results of the effort to characterize and develop the U-Mo metal fuel concept for LWRs with regard to corrosion testing. The results of a simple screening test in buffered water at 30°C using surface alloyed U-10Mo is documented and discussed. The screening test was used to guide the selection of several potential alloy improvements that were found and are recommended for further testing in autoclaves to simulate PWR water conditions more closely.

  14. Strong enhancement of s -wave superconductivity near a quantum critical point of Ca<mn>3mn>Ir>4mn>Sn>13mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, P. K.; Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Chinotti, M.; Li, L.; Wang, Kefeng; Petrovic, C.; Morenzoni, E.

    2015-11-11

    We report microscopic studies by muon spin rotation/relaxation as a function of pressure of the Ca<mn>3mn>Ir>4mn>Sn>13mn> and Sr3Ir4Sn13 system displaying superconductivity and a structural phase transition associated with the formation of a charge density wave (CDW). Our findings show a strong enhancement of the superfluid density and a dramatic increase of the pairing strength above a pressure of ≈ 1.6 GPa giving direct evidence of the presence of a quantum critical point separating a superconducting phase coexisting with CDW from a pure superconducting phase. The superconducting order parameter in both phases has the same s-wave symmetry. In spite of the conventional phonon-mediated BCS character of the weakly correlated (Ca1-xSrx)3Ir4Sn13 system the dependence of the effective superfluid density on the critical temperature puts this compound in the “Uemura” plot close to unconventional superconductors. This system exemplifies that conventional BCS superconductors in the presence of competing orders or multi-band structure can also display characteristics of unconventional superconductors.

  15. Measurements of normalized differential cross sections for tt<mo accent='true' stretchy='false'>¯mo> production in pp collisions at <mo stretchy='false'>(mo>s stretchy='false'>)mo>=>7mn>TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bangert, A.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, K.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christidi, I. A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De La Taille, C.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. 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M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherwood, P.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinnari, L. A.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. 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B.; Virzi, J.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watanabe, I.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. 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    2014-10-13

    We present measurements of normalized differential cross sections for top-quark pair production as a function of the top-quark transverse momentum, and of the mass, transverse momentum, and rapidity of the t¯t system, in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s=7 TeV. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb₋1, recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected in the lepton + jets channel, requiring exactly one lepton and at least four jets with at least one of the jets tagged as originating from a b-quark. The measured spectra are corrected for detector efficiency and resolution effects and are compared to several Monte Carlo simulations and theory calculations. The results are in fair agreement with the predictions in a wide kinematic range. Nevertheless, data distributions are softer than predicted for higher values of the mass of the t¯t system and of the top-quark transverse momentum. Lastly, the measurements can also discriminate among different sets of parton distribution functions.

  16. Tuning magnetism of monolayer MoS{sub 2} by doping vacancy and applying strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Huiling; Yang, Baishun; Han, Ruilin; Du, Xiaobo; Yan, Yu; Wang, Dingdi

    2014-03-31

    In view of important role of inducing and manipulating the magnetism in two-dimensional materials for the development of low-dimensional spintronic devices, the influences of strain on electronic structure and magnetic properties of commonly observed vacancies doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} are investigated using first-principles calculations. It is shown that unstrained V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} systems are nonmagnetic, while the ground state of unstrained V{sub MoS6} doped system is magnetic and the magnetic moment is contributed mainly by six Mo atoms around V{sub MoS6}. In particular, tensile strain can induce magnetic moments in V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} due to the breaking of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around the vacancies, while the magnetization induced by V{sub MoS6} can be effectively manipulated by equibiaxial strain due to the change of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around V{sub MoS6} under strains.

  17. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Ye, Gonglan; Gong, Yongji; Lin, Junhao; Li, Bo; He, Yongmin; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2016-01-13

    MoS2 is a promising, low-cost material for electrochemical hydrogen production due to its high activity and stability during the reaction. Our work represents an easy method to increase the hydrogen production in electrochemical reaction of MoS2 via defect engineering, and helps to understand the catalytic properties of MoS2.

  18. Structure of Oxide Nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr MA/ODS Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; Fluss, M; Kimura, A

    2010-04-06

    Oxide nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr ODS ferritic steel fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) method have been examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. A partial crystallization of oxide nanoparticles was frequently observed in as-fabricated ODS steel. The crystal structure of crystalline oxide particles is identified to be mainly Y{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9} (YAM) with a monoclinic structure. Large nanoparticles with a diameter larger than 20 nm tend to be incoherent and have a nearly spherical shape, whereas small nanoparticles with a diameter smaller than 10 nm tend to be coherent or semi-coherent and have faceted boundaries. The oxide nanoparticles become fully crystallized after prolonged annealing at 900 C. These results lead us to propose a three-stage formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels.

  19. Charge density waves in disordered media circumventing the Imry-Ma argument

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Changlani, Hitesh J.; Tubman, Norm M.; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-08-24

    Two powerful theoretical predictions, Anderson localization and the Imry-Ma argument, impose significant restrictions on the phases of matter that can exist in the presence of even the smallest amount of disorder in one-dimensional systems. These predictions forbid electrically conducting states and ordered states respectively. It was thus remarkable that a mechanism to circumvent Anderson localization relying on the presence of correlated disorder was found, that is also realized in certain biomolecular systems. In a similar manner, we show that the Imry-Ma argument can be circumvented, resulting in the formation of stable ordered states with discrete broken symmetries in disordered onemore » dimensional systems. We then investigate other mechanisms by which disorder can destroy an ordered state.« less

  20. Towards a 100mA Superconducting RF Photoinjector for BERLinPro

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, Axel; Anders, W.; Burrill, Andrew; Jankowiak, Andreas; Kamps, T.; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver; Lauinger, P.; Matveenko, A.N.; Schmeisser, M.; Volker, J.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Nietubyc, R.; Schubert, S.G.; Smedley, John; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Volkov, V.; Will, I.; Zaplatin, Evgeny

    2013-09-01

    For BERLinPro, a 100 mA CW-driven SRF energy recovery linac demonstrator facility, HZB needs to develop a photo-injector superconducting cavity which delivers a at least 1mm*mr emittance beam at high average current. To address these challenges of producing a high peak brightness beam at high repetition rate, at first HZB tested a fully superconducting injector with a lead cathode*,followed now by the design of a SC cavity allowing operation up to 4 mA using CW-modified TTF-III couplers and inserting a normal conducting high quantum efficiency cathode using the HZDR-style insert scheme. This talk will present the latest results and an overview of the measurements with the lead cathode cavity and will describe the design and optimization process, the first production results of the current design and an outlook to the further development steps towards the full power version.

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformations Inc., Custom House, Devens, MA

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Devens, MA, that scored HERS 34 without PV or HERS -21 with PV. This 3,168-square-foot custom home has R-46 double-stud walls, a vented attic with R-67 blown cellulose, plus R-10 rigid XPS under the slab, R-20 closed-cell spray foam on basement walls, triple-pane windows, and mini-split ductless heat pumps.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformation Inc., Production House, Devens, MA

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Devens, MA, that scored HERS 35 without PV or HERS -37 with PV. This 2,508-square-foot custom home has R-46 double-stud walls with open-cell spray foam, a vented attic with R-67 blown cellulose, plus R-10 rigid XPS under the slab, R-20 closed-cell spray foam on basement walls, triple-pane windows, and one mini-split ductless heat pump.

  3. redMaPPer. I. Algorithm and SDSS DR8 catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Reddick, R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Busha, M. T.; Cunha, C. E.; Finoguenov, A.; Evrard, A.; Koester, B. P.; Hao, J.; Nord, B.; Leauthaud, A.; Pierre, M.; Sadibekova, T.; Sheldon, E. S.

    2014-04-20

    We describe redMaPPer, a new red sequence cluster finder specifically designed to make optimal use of ongoing and near-future large photometric surveys. The algorithm has multiple attractive features: (1) it can iteratively self-train the red sequence model based on a minimal spectroscopic training sample, an important feature for high-redshift surveys. (2) It can handle complex masks with varying depth. (3) It produces cluster-appropriate random points to enable large-scale structure studies. (4) All clusters are assigned a full redshift probability distribution P(z). (5) Similarly, clusters can have multiple candidate central galaxies, each with corresponding centering probabilities. (6) The algorithm is parallel and numerically efficient: it can run a Dark Energy Survey-like catalog in ?500 CPU hours. (7) The algorithm exhibits excellent photometric redshift performance, the richness estimates are tightly correlated with external mass proxies, and the completeness and purity of the corresponding catalogs are superb. We apply the redMaPPer algorithm to ?10, 000 deg{sup 2} of SDSS DR8 data and present the resulting catalog of ?25,000 clusters over the redshift range z in [0.08, 0.55]. The redMaPPer photometric redshifts are nearly Gaussian, with a scatter ? {sub z} ? 0.006 at z ? 0.1, increasing to ? {sub z} ? 0.02 at z ? 0.5 due to increased photometric noise near the survey limit. The median value for |?z|/(1 + z) for the full sample is 0.006. The incidence of projection effects is low (?5%). Detailed performance comparisons of the redMaPPer DR8 cluster catalog to X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich catalogs are presented in a companion paper.

  4. Best Practices Case Study: Rural Development, Inc., Wisdom Way Solar Village, Greenfield, MA

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-01

    Wisdom Way Solar Village is an appropriate moniker for the 20-unit community of energy-efficient duplexes in Greenfield, MA. The homes meet the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energys Builders Challenge, achieving HERS scores of 8 to 18 by packing energy efficiency features into the compact, heavily insulated homes and adding solar water heating and photovoltaics on top, to net home owners energy cost savings of at least $2,500 per year per home.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Transformation, Inc., Production House, Devens, MA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Production House Devens, MA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you superior

  6. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  7. The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer MaNDi at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Leighton; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Frost, Matthew J.; He, Junhong; Weiss, Kevin L.; McFeeters, Hana; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Langan, Paul; Iverson, Erik B.

    2015-07-18

    The Macromolecular Neutron Diffractometer (MaNDi) is located on beamline 11B of the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Moreover, the instrument is a neutron time-of-flight wavelength-resolved Laue diffractometer optimized to collect diffraction data from single crystals. Finally, the instrument has been designed to provide flexibility in several instrumental parameters, such as beam divergence and wavelength bandwidth, to allow data collection from a range of macromolecular systems.

  8. Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brager, Howard R.; Garner, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

  9. An Overview of the MaRIE X-FEL and Electron Radiography LINAC RF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Joseph Thomas III; Rees, Daniel Earl; Scheinker, Alexander; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to investigate the performance limits of materials in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility will utilize a 12 GeV linac to drive an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Most of the same linac will also be used to perform electron radiography. The main linac is driven by two shorter linacs; one short linac optimized for X-FEL pulses and one for electron radiography. The RF systems have historically been the one of the largest single component costs of a linac. We will describe the details of the different types of RF systems required by each part of the linacs. Starting with the High Power RF system, we will present our methodology for the choice of RF system peak power and pulselength with respect to klystron parameters, modulator parameters, performance requirements and relative costs. We will also present an overview of the Low Level RF systems that are proposed for MaRIE and briefly describe their use with some proposed control schemes.

  10. Resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of Mn?? acetate

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Lendinez, S.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Terban, M. W.; Espin, J.; Imaz, I.; Maspoch, D.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2015-01-06

    We report measurements and theoretical analysis of resonant spin tunneling in randomly oriented nanospheres of a molecular magnet. Amorphous nanospheres of Mn?? acetate have been fabricated and characterized by chemical, infrared, TEM, X-ray, and magnetic methods. Magnetic measurements have revealed sharp tunneling peaks in the field derivative of the magnetization that occur at the typical resonant field values for the Mn?? acetate crystal in the field parallel to the easy axis.Theoretical analysis is provided that explains these observations. We argue that resonant spin tunneling in a molecular magnet can be established in a powder sample, without the need for amoresingle crystal and without aligning the easy magnetization axes of the molecules. This is confirmed by re-analyzing the old data on a powdered sample of non-oriented micron-size crystals of Mn?? acetate. Our findings can greatly simplify the selection of candidates for quantum spin tunneling among newly synthesized molecular magnets.less

  11. Structure and electronic properties of Cu nanoclusters supported on Mo2C(001) and MoC(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Viñes, Francesc; Rodríguez, José A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-09-15

    In this study, the atomic structure and electronic properties of Cun nanoclusters (n = 4, 6, 7, and 10) supported on cubic nonpolar δ-MoC(001) and orthorhombic C- or Mo-terminated polar β-Mo2C(001) surfaces have been investigated by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations. The electronic properties have been analyzed by means of the density of states, Bader charges, and electron localization function plots. The Cu nanoparticles supported on β-Mo2C(001), either Mo- or C-terminated, tend to present a two-dimensional structure whereas a three-dimensional geometry is preferred when supported on δ-MoC(001), indicating that the Mo:C ratio and the surface polarity play a key role determining the structure of supported clusters. Nevertheless, calculations also reveal important differences between the C- and Mo-terminated β-Mo2C(001) supports to the point that supported Cu particles exhibit different charge states, which opens a way to control the reactivity of these potential catalysts.

  12. Structure and electronic properties of Cu nanoclusters supported on Mo{sub 2}C(001) and MoC(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Posada-Pérez, Sergio; Viñes, Francesc; Illas, Francesc

    2015-09-21

    The atomic structure and electronic properties of Cu{sub n} nanoclusters (n = 4, 6, 7, and 10) supported on cubic nonpolar δ-MoC(001) and orthorhombic C- or Mo-terminated polar β-Mo{sub 2} C(001) surfaces have been investigated by means of periodic density functional theory based calculations. The electronic properties have been analyzed by means of the density of states, Bader charges, and electron localization function plots. The Cu nanoparticles supported on β-Mo{sub 2} C(001), either Mo- or C-terminated, tend to present a two-dimensional structure whereas a three-dimensional geometry is preferred when supported on δ-MoC(001), indicating that the Mo:C ratio and the surface polarity play a key role determining the structure of supported clusters. Nevertheless, calculations also reveal important differences between the C- and Mo-terminated β-Mo{sub 2} C(001) supports to the point that supported Cu particles exhibit different charge states, which opens a way to control the reactivity of these potential catalysts.

  13. Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Amos, Charles D.; Roldan, Manuel A.; Varela, Maria; Goodenough, John B.; Ferreira, Paulo J.

    2016-03-29

    The spinel Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 is a candidate cathode for a Li-ion battery, but its capacity fades over a charge/discharge cycle of Li1–x[Mn2]O4 (0 < x < 1) that is associated with a loss of Mn to the organic-liquid electrolyte. It is known that the disproportionation reaction 2Mn3+ = Mn2+ + Mn4+ occurs at the surface of a Mn spinel, and it is important to understand the atomic structure and composition of the surface of Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 in order to understand how Mn loss occurs. We report a study of the surface reconstructionmore » of Revealing the Restructured Surface of Li[Mn2]O4 by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The atomic structure coupled with Mn-valence and the distribution of the atomic ratio of oxygen obtained by electron energy loss spectroscopy reveals a thin, stable surface layer of Mn3O4, a subsurface region of Li1+x[Mn2]O4 with retention of bulk Li[Mn2]O4. We conclude that this observation is compatible with the disproportionation reaction coupled with oxygen deficiency and a displacement of surface Li+ from the Mn3O4 surface phase. These results provide a critical step toward understanding how Mn is lost from Li[Mn2]O4, once inside a battery.« less

  14. Structure and magnetic properties of LnMnSbO ( Ln=La and Ce)

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qiang; Kumar, C. M. N.; Tian, Wei; Dennis, Kevin W.; Goldman, Alan I.; Vaknin, David

    2016-03-11

    Here, a neutron powder diffraction (NPD) study of LnMnSbO (Ln = La or Ce) reveals differences between the magnetic ground state of the two compounds due to the strong Ce-Mn coupling compared to La-Mn. The two compounds adopt the P4/nmm space group down to 2 K, and whereas magnetization measurements do not show obvious anomaly at high temperatures, NPD reveals a C-type antiferromagnetic (AFM) order below TN = 255K for LaMnSbO and 240 K for CeMnSbO. While the magnetic structure of LaMnSbO is preserved to base temperature, a sharp transition at TSR = 4.5K is observed in CeMnSbO due tomore » a spin-reorientation (SR) transition of the Mn2+ magnetic moments from pointing along the c axis to the ab plane. The SR transition in CeMnSbO is accompanied by a simultaneous long-range AFM ordering of the Ce moments, which indicates that the Mn SR transition is driven by the Ce-Mn coupling. The ordered moments are found to be somewhat smaller than those expected for Mn2+ (S = 5/2) in insulators, but large enough to suggest that these compounds belong to the class of local-moment antiferromagnets. The lower TN found in these two compounds compared to the As-based counterparts (TN = 317 for LaMnAsO, TN = 347K for CeMnAsO) indicates that the Mn-Pn (Pn=As or Sb) hybridization that mediates the superexchange Mn-Pn-Mn coupling is weaker for the Sb-based compounds.« less

  15. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li₂MnO₃

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Torres-Castro, Loraine; Shojan, Jifi; Julien, Christian M.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-08-08

    Li2MnO3 is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li2MnO3 , Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were synthesized by a sol–gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with x-ray diffraction, Raman, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Tap density and BET analyzer. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li2MnO3and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2 - xMn1 - yAlx + yO3 + z) for Al-substituted Li2MnO3compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. X-ray photoelectronmore » spectroscopy for Mn 2p orbital reveals a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g-1 for Li2MnO3, 68 mAh g-1 for Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, 58 mAh g-1 for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and 74 mAh g-1 for Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were obtained. As a result, aluminum substitutions increased the formation of spinel phase which is responsible for cycling.« less

  16. Promotional Effects of In on Non-Oxidative Methane Transformation Over Mo-ZSM-5

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yang; Kidder, Michelle; Ruther, Rose E.; Nanda, Jagjit; Foo, Guo Shiou; Wu, Zili; Narula, Chaitanya K.

    2016-08-16

    In this paper, we present a new class of catalysts, InMo-ZSM-5, which can be prepared by indium impregnation of Mo-ZSM-5. The incorporation of indium dramatically decreases coke formation during methane dehydroaromatization. The benzene and C2 hydrocarbons selectivity among total hydrocarbons over InMo-ZSM-5 remains comparable to that of Mo-ZSM-5 despite reduced methane conversion due to decreased coke formation. We found 1 wt% indium to be optimal loading for reducing coke selectivity to half that of Mo-ZSM-5. Characterization methods were not helpful in discerning the interaction of In with Mo but experiments with bimetallic 1In2Mo-ZSM-5 and mechanical mixture 1In+2Mo-ZSM-5 suggest that Inmore » and Mo need to be in close proximity to suppress coke formation. Finally, this is supported by temperature programmed reduction experiments which show that In incorporation leads to lower Mo reduction temperature in In2Mo-ZMS-5.« less

  17. Confined lattice dynamics of single and quadruple SnSe bilayers in [(SnSe) 1.04 ] m [MoSe 2 ] n ferecrystals

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Klobes, Benedikt; Hu, Michael Y.; Beekman, Matt; Johnson, David C.; Hermann, Raphaël P.

    2015-11-30

    The Sn specific densities of phonon states in the SnSe subunits of [(SnSe)1.04]m[MoSe2]n ferecrystals with (m,n) = (1,1), (4,1) and in bulk SnSe were derived from nuclear inelastic scattering by the 119Sn M ssbauer resonance. When using different measurement configurations, phonons with polarization parallel and perpendicular to the ferecrystal plane were specifically probed. Vibrational properties and phonon spectral weight are found to strongly depend on the phonon polarization and layer count m. Moreover, a highly peculiar feature of these ferecrystal densities of phonon states is the emergence of rather sharp high energy vibrational modes polarized perpendicular to the ferecrystal plane,more » which contrasts with usual findings in thin layered structures and nanostructured materials in general, and a depletion of modes with a gap appearing between acoustic and high energy modes. The spectral weight of these phonons depends on the overall SnSe content, m, but cannot be unambiguously attributed to SnSe MoSe2 interfaces. Considering the low energy part of lattice dynamics, ferecrystals exhibit rather low average phonon group velocities as compared to the speed of sound in the long wavelength limit. For the (1,1) ferecrystal, this effect is most pronounced for vibrations polarized in the ferecrystal plane. Therefore, an experimental microscopic origin for the vibrational and bonding anisotropy in subunits of ferecrystals is provided.« less

  18. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Snchez-Gallego, Jos R.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Aragn-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcn-Barroso, Jsus; Belfiore, Francesco; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 at R ? 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 ({sup 1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup 2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ? 10{sup 9} M {sub ?} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6yr.

  19. Thermal transport properties of metal/MoS{sub 2} interfaces from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Rui; Kong, Byoung Don; Kim, Ki Wook, E-mail: kwk@ncsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7911 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    Thermal transport properties at the metal/MoS{sub 2} interfaces are analyzed by using an atomistic phonon transport model based on the Landauer formalism and first-principles calculations. The considered structures include chemisorbed Sc(0001)/MoS{sub 2} and Ru(0001)/MoS{sub 2}, physisorbed Au(111)/MoS{sub 2}, as well as Pd(111)/MoS{sub 2} with intermediate characteristics. Calculated results illustrate a distinctive dependence of thermal transfer on the details of interfacial microstructures. More specifically, the chemisorbed case with a stronger bonding exhibits a generally smaller interfacial thermal resistance than the physisorbed. Comparison between metal/MoS{sub 2} and metal/graphene systems suggests that metal/MoS{sub 2} is significantly more resistive. Further examination of lattice dynamics identifies the presence of multiple distinct atomic planes and bonding patterns at the interface as the key origins of the observed large thermal resistance.

  20. Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic nanocomposites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic nanocomposites Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stress induced anisotropy in CoFeMn soft magnetic ...

  1. Pulsed laser deposition of Mn doped CdSe quantum dots for improved solar cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Qilin; Wang, Wenyong E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Tang, Jinke E-mail: jtang2@uwyo.edu; Sabio, Erwin M.

    2014-05-05

    In this work, we demonstrate (1) a facile method to prepare Mn doped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} photoanodes by pulsed laser deposition and (2) improved device performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cells of the Mn doped QDs (CdSe:Mn) compared to the undoped QDs (CdSe). The band diagram of photoanode Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} and sensitizer CdSe:Mn QD is proposed based on the incident-photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) data. Mn-modified band structure leads to absorption at longer wavelengths than the undoped CdSe QDs, which is due to the exchange splitting of the CdSe:Mn conduction band by the Mn dopant. Three-fold increase in the IPCE efficiency has also been observed for the Mn doped samples.

  2. Pulsed laser deposition of Mn doped CdSe quantum dots for improved...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pulsed laser deposition of Mn doped CdSe quantum dots for improved solar cell performance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pulsed laser deposition of Mn doped CdSe ...

  3. Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coexistence of charge-density wave and ferromagnetism in Ni2MnGa ...

  4. MoS2 Heterojunctions by Thickness Modulation

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Tosun, Mahmut; Fu, Deyi; Desai, Sujay B.; Ko, Changhyun; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Lien, Der-Hsien; Najmzadeh, Mohammad; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao; Javey, Ali

    2015-06-30

    In this work, we report lateral heterojunction formation in as-exfoliated MoS2 flakes by thickness modulation. Kelvin probe force microscopy is used to map the surface potential at the monolayer-multilayer heterojunction, and consequently the conduction band offset is extracted. Scanning photocurrent microscopy is performed to investigate the spatial photocurrent response along the length of the device including the source and the drain contacts as well as the monolayer-multilayer junction. The peak photocurrent is measured at the monolayer-multilayer interface, which is attributed to the formation of a type-I heterojunction. Finally, the work presents experimental and theoretical understanding of the band alignment andmore » photoresponse of thickness modulated MoS2 junctions with important implications for exploring novel optoelectronic devices.« less

  5. Undercooled and rapidly quenched Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, S.N.; Glasgow, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Hypoeutectic, eutectic, and hypereutectic nickel-molybdenum alloys were rapidly solidified by both bulk undercooling and melt spinning techniques. Alloys were undercooled in both electromagnetic levitation and differential thermal analysis equipment. The rate of recalescence depended upon the degree of initial undercooling and the nature (faceted or nonfaceted) of the primary nucleating phase. Alloy melts were observed to undercool more in the presence of primary Beta (NiMo intermetallic) phase than in gamma (fcc solid solution) phase. Melt spinning resulted in an extension of molybdenum solid solubility in gamma nickel, from 28 to 37.5 at % Mo. Although the microstructures observed by undercooling and melt spinning were similar the microsegregation pattern across the gamma dendries was different. The range of microstructures evolved was analyzed in terms of the nature of the primary phase to nucleate, its subsequent dendritic growth, coarsening and fragmentation, and final solidification of interfenderitic liquid.

  6. Development of uranium metal targets for {sup 99}Mo production

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A substantial amount of high enriched uranium (HEU) is used for the production of medical-grade {sup 99}Mo. Promising methods of producing irradiation targets are being developed and may lead to the reduction or elimination of this HEU use. To substitute low enriched uranium (LEU) for HEU in the production of {sup 99}Mo, the target material may be changed to uranium metal foil. Methods of fabrication are being developed to simplify assembly and disassembly of the targets. Removal of the uranium foil after irradiation without dissolution of the cladding is a primary goal in order to reduce the amount of liquid radioactive waste material produced in the process. Proof-of-concept targets have been fabricated. Destructive testing indicates that acceptable contact between the uranium foil and the cladding can be achieved. Thermal annealing tests, which simulate the cladding/uranium diffusion conditions during irradiation, are underway. Plans are being made to irradiate test targets.

  7. Mixing antiferromagnets to tune NiFe-[IrMn/FeMn] interfacial spin-glasses, grains thermal stability, and related exchange bias properties

    SciTech Connect

    Akmaldinov, K.; Ducruet, C.; Portemont, C.; Joumard, I.; Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B.; Baltz, V.

    2014-05-07

    Spintronics devices and in particular thermally assisted magnetic random access memories require a wide range of ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic (F/AF) exchange bias (EB) properties and subsequently of AF materials to fulfil diverse functionality requirements for the reference and storage. For the reference layer, large EB energies and high blocking temperature (T{sub B}) are required. In contrast, for the storage layer, mostly moderate T{sub B} are needed. One of the present issues is to find a storage layer with properties intermediate between those of IrMn and FeMn and in particular: (i) with a T{sub B} larger than FeMn for better stability at rest-T but lower than IrMn to reduce power consumption at write-T and (ii) with improved magnetic interfacial quality, i.e., with reduced interfacial glassy character for lower properties dispersions. To address this issue, the EB properties of F/AF based stacks were studied for various mixed [IrMn/FeMn] AFs. In addition to EB loop shifts, the F/AF magnetic interfacial qualities and the AF grains thermal stability are probed via measurements of the low- and high-temperature contributions to the T{sub B} distributions, respectively. A tuning of the above three parameters is observed when evolving from IrMn to FeMn via [IrMn/FeMn] repetitions.

  8. IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    M.K. Meyer; J. Gan; J.-F. Jue; D.D. Keiser; E. Perez; A. Robinson; D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G.L. Hofman; Y.-S. Kim

    2014-04-01

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  9. Production of Thin Walled Mo Tubing using FBCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Usov, Igor Olegovich

    2015-06-02

    The goal of this report is to demonstrate our progress towards producing free standing Mo tubing with length up to 12” and wall thickness of 250 µm. Fabrication conditions corresponding to growth of fine grain and high purity Mo material were chosen based on previous work. We focused our effort on execution of prolonged deposition processes and optimization of the FBCVD set up. Our results demonstrated that 12” long Mo tubing can be fabricated by our process. At this point the 12” tube fractured in the middle and resulted in two pieces. Further improvement in one of the fabrication steps will eliminate this drawback. We were not able to produce a tube with 250 µm wall thickness so far. The deposition rate was intentionally kept low (5-6 µm/hr) to form material with fine grain microstructure. Therefore a ~50 hour long deposition run is required to achieve such a wall thickness value, which is quite challenging for the current manually operated FBCVD apparatus. Automation of the set-up is now underway to overcome this problem.

  10. Epitaxial Growth of Intermetallic MnPt Films on Oxides and Large Exchange Bias

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Liu, Zhiqi; Biegalski, Michael D.; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Shang, Shunli; Marker, Cassie; Liu, Jian; Li, Li; Fan, Lisha S.; Meyer, Tricia L.; Wong, Anthony T.; et al

    2015-11-05

    High-quality epitaxial growth of intermetallic MnPt films on oxides is achieved, with potential for multiferroic heterostructure applications. Antisite-stabilized spin-flipping induces ferromagnetism in MnPt films, although it is robustly antiferromagnetic in bulk. Moreover, highly ordered antiferromagnetic MnPt films exhibit superiorly large exchange coupling with a ferromagnetic layer.

  11. Epitaxial growth of intermetallic MnPt films on oxides and large exchange bias

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiqi; Biegalski, Michael D.; Hsu, Shang-Lin; Shang, Shunli; Marker, Cassie; Liu, Jian; Li, Li; Fan, Lisha S.; Meyer, Tricia L.; Wong, Anthony T.; Nichols, John A.; Chen, Deyang; You, Long; Chen, Zuhuang; Wang, Kai; Wang, Kevin; Ward, Thomas Z.; Gai, Zheng; Lee, Ho Nyung; Sefat, Athena S.; Lauter, Valeria; Liu, Zi-kui; Christen, Hans M.

    2015-11-05

    High-quality epitaxial growth of intermetallic MnPt films on oxides is achieved, with potential for multiferroic heterostructure applications. Antisite-stabilized spin-flipping induces ferromagnetism in MnPt films, although it is robustly antiferromagnetic in bulk. Thus, highly ordered antiferromagnetic MnPt films exhibit superiorly large exchange coupling with a ferromagnetic layer.

  12. Neutron scattering study of spin ordering and stripe pinning in superconducting La<mn>1.93mn>Sr>0.07mn>CuO>4mn>

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, H.; Zaliznyak, I. A.; Savici, A. T.; Winn, B. L.; Chang, S.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2015-11-20

    The relationships among charge order, spin fluctuations, and superconductivity in underdoped cuprates remain controversial. We use neutron scattering techniques to study these phenomena in La<mn>1.93mn>Sr>0.07mn>CuO>4mn> a superconductor with a transition temperature of Tc = 20 K. At T<< Tc, we find incommensurate spin fluctuations with a quasielastic energy spectrum and no sign of a gap within the energy range from 0.2 to 15 meV. A weak elastic magnetic component grows below ~ 10 K, consistent with results from local probes. Regarding the atomic lattice, we have discovered unexpectedly strong fluctuations of the CuO6 octahedra about Cu-O bonds, which are associated with inequivalent O sites within the CuO2 planes. Moreover, we observed a weak elastic (3 30) superlattice peak that implies a reduced lattice symmetry. The presence of inequivalent O sites rationalizes various pieces of evidence for charge stripe order in underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4. The coexistence of superconductivity with quasi-static spin-stripe order suggests the presence of intertwined orders; however, the rotation of the stripe orientation away from the Cu-O bonds might be connected with evidence for a finite gap at the nodal points of the superconducting gap function.

  13. Single Phase Melt Processed Powellite (Ba,Ca) MoO{sub 4} For The Immobilization Of Mo-Rich Nuclear Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Marra, James; Fox, Kevin; Reppert, Jason; Crum, Jarrod; Tang, Ming

    2012-09-17

    Crystalline and glass composite materials are currently being investigated for the immobilization of combined High Level Waste (HLW) streams resulting from potential commercial fuel reprocessing scenarios. Several of these potential waste streams contain elevated levels of transition metal elements such as molybdenum (Mo). Molybdenum has limited solubility in typical silicate glasses used for nuclear waste immobilization. Under certain chemical and controlled cooling conditions, a powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO{sub 4} crystalline structure can be formed by reaction with alkaline earth elements. In this study, single phase BaMoO{sub 4} and CaMoO{sub 4} were formed from carbonate and oxide precursors demonstrating the viability of Mo incorporation into glass, crystalline or glass composite materials by a melt and crystallization process. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy indicated a long range ordered crystalline structure. In-situ electron irradiation studies indicated that both CaMoO{sub 4} and BaMoO{sub 4} powellite phases exhibit radiation stability up to 1000 years at anticipated doses with a crystalline to amorphous transition observed after 1 X 10{sup 13} Gy. Aqueous durability determined from product consistency tests (PCT) showed low normalized release rates for Ba, Ca, and Mo (<0.05 g/m{sup 2}).

  14. Single phase melt processed powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO4 for the immobilization of Mo-rich nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin M.; Marra, James C.; Reppert, Jason; Crum, Jarrod V.; Tang, Ming

    2012-10-02

    Crystalline and glass composite materials are currently being investigated for the immobilization of combined High Level Waste (HLW) streams resulting from potential commercial fuel reprocessing scenarios. Several of these potential waste streams contain elevated levels of transition metal elements such as molybdenum (Mo). Molybdenum has limited solubility in typical silicate glasses used for nuclear waste immobilization. Under certain chemical and controlled cooling conditions, a powellite (Ba,Ca)MoO4 crystalline structure can be formed by reaction with alkaline earth elements. In this study, single phase BaMoO4 and CaMoO4 were formed from carbonate and oxide precursors demonstrating the viability of Mo incorporation into glass, crystalline or glass composite materials by a melt and crystallization process. X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy indicated a long range ordered crystalline structure. In situ electron irradiation studies indicated that both CaMoO4 and BaMoO4 powellite phases exhibit radiation stability up to 1000 years at anticipated doses with a crystalline to amorphous transition observed after 1 x 1013 Gy. Aqueous durability determined from product consistency tests (PCT) showed low normalized release rates for Ba, Ca, and Mo (<0.05 g/m2).

  15. Cationic disorder and Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+} charge ordering in the B? and B? sites of Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} perovskite: a comparison with Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect

    Lpez, C.A.; Saleta, M.E.; Pedregosa, J.C.; Snchez, R.D.; Alonso, J.A.; and others

    2014-02-15

    We describe the preparation, crystal structure determination, magnetic and transport properties of two novel Mn-containing perovskites, with a different electronic configuration for Mn atoms located in B site. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+}{sub 2}WO{sub 9} and Ca{sub 3}Mn{sup 3+/4+}{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} were synthesized by standard ceramic procedures; the crystallographic structure was studied from X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and neutron powder diffraction (NPD). Both phases exhibit a monoclinic symmetry (S.G.: P2{sub 1}/n); Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} presents a long-range ordering over the B sites, whereas Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} is strongly disordered. By in-situ NPD, the temperature evolution of the structure study presents an interesting evolution in the octahedral size (?MnO?) for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}, driven by a charge ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} atoms, related to the anomaly observed in the transport measurements at T?160 K. Both materials present a magnetic order below T{sub C}=30 K and 40 K for W and Nb materials, respectively. The magneto-transport measurements display non-negligible magnetoresistance properties in the paramagnetic regime. - Graphical abstract: Comparison between the octahedron size and the magnetic behaviour for Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} in the temperature region where the charge and magnetic order occur. Display Omitted - Highlights: Two novel Mn-containing double perovskites were obtained by solid-state reactions. Both double perovskites are monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) determined by XRPD and NPD. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}WO{sub 9} contains Mn{sup 3+} while Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} includes mixed-valence cations Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+}. Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9} presents a charge-ordering effect between Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} evidenced by NPD. The magnetic and transport studies evidenced the charge ordering in Ca{sub 3}Mn{sub 2}NbO{sub 9}.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: MA3T—Modeling Vehicle Market Dynamics with Consumer Segmentation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about MA3T—modeling...

  17. Performance of the TLS Vacuum Systems Operated at 300 mA of Top-up Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, G. Y.; Chan, C. K.; Hsueh, H. P.; Yang, T. L.; Chang, C. C.; Hsu, S. N.; Yang, C. Y.; Chen, C. L.; Chen, J. R.

    2007-01-19

    The 1.5 GeV Taiwan Light Source (TLS) has been upgraded, subsequently increasing the beam current from 200 mA to 300 mA. Additionally, the operational mode changed from decay mode to the top-up mode in 2006 after the cavities were replaced by a superconducting RF cavity and the chambers in the injection straight section with new ones in 2005. The operation at 400 mA has been tested to ensure regular operations of a stored beam at 300 mA. Efforts have been made to replace the interlock systems, spare parts, utility systems and signal archiving systems to ensure the reliable operation of the storage ring and ultimately avoid damage incurred to the system. The beam test at a high current and the performance of the vacuum system will be described.

  18. Corrosion Resistances of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals with Yttrium and Tungsten Additions in Hot Calcium Chloride Brine & Natural Seawater: Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6 and W-Containing Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J; Day, S; Lian, T; Saw, C; Hailey, P; Choi, J; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peter, W; Payer, J; Branagan, D J

    2006-10-20

    Yttrium-containing SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48.0}Cr{sub 15.0}Mo{sub 14.0}B{sub 6.0}C{sub 15.0}Y{sub 2.0}), has a critical cooling rate (CCR) of approximately 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) with no yttrium has a higher critical cooling rate of approximately 600 Kelvin per second. SAM1651's low CCR enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous material in practical materials processes. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The passive film stability of these Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be superior to that of conventional stainless steels, and comparable to that of Ni-based alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates.

  19. u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA:-.IAGEMENT CENTER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MA:-.IAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Utah State University PROJECT TITLE: Alternative and Unconventional Energy Research and Development Page 1 of2 STATE: UT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number COP DE-EEOOO3114 GF0-0003114-OO2 0 Based on my review or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DO E Order 45 1.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, [IS

  20. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30

    Over the past three decades the Town of Hull, MA has solidified its place in U.S. wind energy history through its leadership in community-based generation. This is illustrated by its commissioning of the first commercial-scale wind turbine on the Atlantic coastline, the first suburban-sited turbine in the continental United States, pursuit of community-based offshore wind, and its push toward creating an energy independent community. The town's history and demographics are briefly outlined, followed by experience in projects to provide wind power, including pre-construction and feasibility efforts, financial aspects, and market/industry factors.

  1. Clarification of enhanced ferromagnetism in Be-codoped InMnP fabricated using Mn/InP:Be bilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shon, Yoon; Lee, Sejoon; Taek Yoon, Im; Jeon, H. C.; Lee, D. J.; Kang, T. W.; Song, J. D.; Yoon, Chong S.; Kim, D. Y.; Park, C. S.

    2011-11-07

    The p-type InMnP:Be epilayers were prepared by the sequential growth of Mn/InP:Be bilayers using molecular-beam-epitaxy and the subsequent in-situ annealing at 200-300 deg. C. In triple-axis x-ray diffraction patterns, the samples revealed a shoulder peak indicative of intrinsic InMnP. The ferromagnetic transition in InMnP:Be was observed to occur at the elevated temperature of {approx}140 K, and the ferromagnetic spin-domains clearly appeared in magnetic force microscopy images. The improved ferromagnetic properties are attributed to the increased p-d hybridation due to high p-type conductivity of InMnP:Be (p {approx} 10{sup 20 }cm{sup -3}). The results suggest that enhanced ferromagnetism can be effectively obtained from Be-codoped InMnP.

  2. Magnetic properties of α−MnO{sub 2} and Co-doped α−MnO{sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Stella, C. Soundararajan, N. Ramachandran, K.

    2014-04-24

    α−MnO{sub 2} and Co-doped α−MnO{sub 2} nanowires (NWs) were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The structural characterization by XRD revealed the tetragonal structure of α−MnO{sub 2}. The formation of one dimensional (1D) NWs of pure and Co-doped α−MnO{sub 2} was confirmed from SEM. From UV-Vis absorption spectra, it is found that both pure and Co-doped α−MnO{sub 2} NWs showed blue shift compared to bulk, which revealed the quantum confinement in the synthesized samples. The magnetic properties were analyzed by VSM, which suggest that pure and doped α−MnO{sub 2} exhibit ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature (RT)

  3. Role of t{sub 2g} electrons in Mn-Tb coupling of multiferroic TbMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y. Y.; Wang, Y. L.; Liu, J.-M.; Wei, T.

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the effect of Cr-doping in polycrystalline TbMn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} (x???6%) ceramics on the magnetism, ferroelectricity, and dielectricity. The Cr substitution gradually suppresses the ferroelectricity induced by the Mn spiral spin ordering, and results in a stronger modulation of polarization by magnetic field with increasing x. However, the transition temperature T{sub Tb} corresponding to onset of Tb magnetic ordering has barely shifted with Cr doping. In other words, although the Cr-doping obviously disrupts the Mn spiral spin ordering, the exchange field J{sub Mn-Tb} acting on the Tb moments from the Mn-spin structure is hardly impacted. Our work demonstrates that the e{sub g} electron of Mn{sup 3+} plays an important role in forming the Mn spiral spin order, but the f-d exchange interaction between the Mn 3d spins and the Tb 4f moments in multiferroic TbMnO{sub 3} almost involves only the t{sub 2g} electrons.

  4. Effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of co-sputtered Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M.; Jin, C.; Bai, H. L.

    2014-11-07

    Motivated by the theoretical calculations that Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si can simultaneously exhibit a high spin polarization with a high Curie temperature to be applied in spintronic devices, and in order to further study the effect of Mn contents on the physical properties of Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si, we have investigated the effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of epitaxial Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si (0≤x≤1) films systematically. The Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si films were epitaxially grown on MgO(001) plane with 45° rotation. The magnetization for various x shows enhanced irreversibility, implying the antiferromagnetic ordering induced by the substitution of Mn. A metal-semiconductor crossover was observed due to the enhanced disorders of interactions and the local lowering of symmetry induced by the substitution of Mn. The single-domain state in the Fe{sub 3−x}Mn{sub x}Si films leads to twofold symmetric curves of the anisotropic magnetoresistance and planar Hall resistivity.

  5. Elemental characterization of LL-MA radioactive waste packages with the associated particle technique

    SciTech Connect

    Perot, B.; Carasco, C.; Toure, M.; El Kanawati, W.; Eleon, C.

    2011-07-01

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R and D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages with analytical methods and with non-destructive nuclear measurements. This paper concerns fast neutron interrogation with the associated particle technique (APT), which brings 3D information about the waste material composition. The characterization of volume elements filled with iron, water, aluminium, and PVC in bituminized and fibre concrete LL-MA waste packages has been investigated with MCNP [1] and MODAR data analysis software [2]. APT provides usable information about major elements presents in the volumes of interest. However, neutron scattering on hydrogen nuclei spreads the tagged neutron beam out of the targeted volume towards surrounding materials, reducing spatial selectivity. Simulation shows that small less than 1 L targets can be characterised up to the half-radius of a 225 L bituminized drum, the matrix of which is very rich in hydrogen. Deeper characterization in concrete is possible but limited by counting statistics due to photon attenuation in this dense matrix and, unless large inspection volumes are considered, by the lack of spatial selectivity of the tagged neutron beam due to neutron scattering. (authors)

  6. Strength Loss in MA-MOX Green Pellets from Radiation Damage to Binders

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Lessing; W.R. Cannon; Gerald W. Egeland; Larry D. Zuck; James K. Jewell; Douglas W. Akers; Gary S. Groenewold

    2013-06-01

    The fracture strength of green Minor Actinides (MA)-MOX pellets containing 75 wt.% DUO2, 20 wt. % PuO2, 3 wt. % AmO2 and 2 wt. % NpO2 was studied as a function of storage time, after mixing in the binder and before sintering, to test the effect of radiation damage on binders. Fracture strength degraded continuously over the 10 days of the study for all three binders studied: PEG binder (Carbowax 8000), microcrystalline wax (Mobilcer X) and Styrene-acrylic copolymer (Duramax B1022) but the fracture strength of Duramax B1022 degraded the least. For instance, for several hours after mixing Carbowax 8000 with MA MOX, the fracture strength of a pellet was reasonably high and pellets were easily handled without breaking but the pellets were too weak to handle after 10 days. Strength measured using diametral compression test showed strength degradation was more rapid in pellets containing 1.0 wt. % Carbowax PEG 8000 compared to those containing only 0.2 wt. %, suggesting that irradiation not only left the binder less effective but also reduced the pellet strength. In contrast the strength of pellets containing Duramax B1022 degraded very little over the 10 day period. It was suggested that the styrene portion of the Duramax B1022 copolymer provided the radiation resistance.

  7. Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    KAPLAN, DANIEL

    2005-09-13

    Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface

  8. Relation between the magnetization and the electrical properties of alloy GaSb-MnSb films

    SciTech Connect

    Koplak, O. V.; Polyakov, A. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Morgunov, R. B.; Talantsev, A. D.; Kochura, A. V.; Fedorchenko, I. V.; Novodvorskii, O. A.; Parshina, L. S.; Khramova, O. D.; Shorokhova, A. V.; Aronzon, B. A.

    2015-06-15

    The influence of the charge carrier concentration on the magnetic properties of GaSb-MnSb alloys is studied. The ferromagnetism of GaSb-MnSb films is caused by the presence of MnSb granules and manifests itself in both magnetometric measurements and the presence of an anisotropic magnetoresistance and the anomalous Hall effect. Electric conduction is executed by charge carriers (holes) in a GaSb matrix. The magnetization of clusters depends on stoichiometry and the concentration of Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} ions, which is specified by the film growth conditions. At high film growth temperatures, ferromagnetic clusters containing Mn{sup 2+} ions mainly form. At low growth temperatures, an antiferromagnetic phase containing Mn{sup 3+} ions forms.

  9. Design and experimental activities supporting commercial U.S. electron accelerator production of Mo-99

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Woloshun, Keith A.; Kelsey IV, Charles T.; Olivas, Eric R.; Holloway, Michael A.; Hurtle, Ken P.; Romero, Frank P.; Dalmas, Dale A.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Vandegrift, George F.; Tkac, Peter; Makarashvili, Vakho; Jonah, Charles D.; Harvey, James T.

    2013-04-19

    {sup 99m}Tc, the daughter isotope of {sup 99}Mo, is the most commonly used radioisotope for nuclear medicine in the United States. Under the direction of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are partnering with North Star Medical Technologies to demonstrate the viability of large-scale {sup 99}Mo production using electron accelerators. In this process, {sup 99}Mo is produced in an enriched {sup 100}Mo target through the {sup 100}Mo({gamma},n){sup 99}Mo reaction. Five experiments have been performed to date at ANL to demonstrate this process. This paper reviews the current status of these activities, specifically the design and performance of the helium gas target cooling system.

  10. Effect of Composition and Heat Treatment on MnBi Magnetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Bowden, Mark E.; Xie, Wei; Li, Guosheng; Nie, Zimin; Zarkevich, Nikolai; Kramer, Matthew J.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-08-17

    The metallic compound MnBi is a promising rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. Compare to other rare-earth-free candidates, MnBi stands out for its high intrinsic coercivity (Hci) and its large positive temperature coefficient. Several groups have demonstrated that the Hci of MnBi compound in thin film or in powder form can exceed 12 kOe and 26 kOe at 300 K and 523 K, respectively. Such steep increase in Hci with increasing temperature is unique to MnBi. Consequently, MnBi is a highly sought-after hard phase for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets. The reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, so Mn tends to precipitate out of the MnBi liquid during the solidification process. As result, the composition of the Mn-Bi alloy with the largest amount of the desired LTP (low temperature phase) MnBi and highest saturation magnetization will be over-stoichiometric and rich in Mn. The amount of additional Mn required to compensate the Mn precipitation depends on solidification rate: the faster the quench speed, the less Mn precipitates. Here we report a systematic study of the effect of composition and heat treatments on the phase contents and magnetic properties of Mn-Bi alloys. In this study, Mn-Bi alloys with 14 compositions were prepared using conventional metallurgical methods such as arc melting and vacuum heat treatment, and the obtained alloys were analyzed for compositions, crystal structures, phase content, and magnetic properties. The results show that the composition with 55 at.% Mn exhibits the highest LTP MnBi content and the highest magnetization. The sample with this composition shows >90 wt.% LTP MnBi content. Its measured saturation magnetization is 68 emu/g with 2.3 T applied field at 300 K; its coercivity is 13 kOe and its energy product is 12 MGOe at 300 K. A bulk magnet fabricated using this powder exhibits an energy product of 8.2 MGOe.

  11. Characterization of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel extruded pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; Hart, M.D.

    1985-04-01

    The fabrication of hot-extruded pipe of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at Cameron Iron Works is described. The report also deals with the tempering response; tensile, Charpy impact, and creep properties; and microstructure of the hot-extruded pipe. The tensile properties of the pipe are compared with the average and average -1.65 standard error of estimate curves for various product forms of several commercial heats of this alloy. The creep-rupture properties are compared with the average curve for various product forms of the commercial heats.

  12. Recovery of Mo/Si multilayer coated optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Baker, S.L.; Vernon, S.P.; Stearns, D.G.

    1997-12-16

    Mo/Si multilayers are removed from superpolished ZERODUR and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. The two step dry etching process removes SiO{sub 2} overlayer with a fluroine-containing gas and then moves molybdenum and silicon multilayers with a chlorine-containing gas. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates. 5 figs.

  13. Recovery of Mo/Si multilayer coated optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Sherry L.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Stearns, Daniel G.

    1997-12-16

    Mo/Si multilayers are removed from superpolished ZERODUR and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. The two step dry etching process removes SiO.sub.2 overlayer with a fluroine-containing gas and then moves molybdenum and silicon multilayers with a chlorine-containing gas. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  14. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  15. Synthesis of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) for lithium ion battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Chuanqi; Ma Jun; Li Hua; Zeng Rong; Guo Zaiping; Liu Huakun

    2009-09-15

    This paper reports the use of a rheological phase reaction method for preparing MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes. The characterization by powder X-ray diffraction indicated that MoS{sub 2} had been formed. High resolution electron microscopy observation revealed that the as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes had started to curve and partly form MoS{sub 2} nanotubes. The lithium intercalation/de-intercalation behavior of as-prepared MoS{sub 2} nanoflake electrode was also investigated. It was found that the MoS{sub 2} nanoflake electrode exhibited higher specific capacity, with very high cycling stability, compared to MoS{sub 2} nanoparticle electrode. The possible reasons for the high electrochemical performance of the nanoflakes electrodes are also discussed. The outstanding electrochemical properties of MoS{sub 2} nanoflakes obtained by this method make it possible for MoS{sub 2} to be used as a promising anode material.

  16. Acquisition Guide Chapter 7.3:Acquisition Planning in the M&O Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Acquisition Letter 2013-03, Acquisition Planning Considerations for M&O Contracts, has been moved to the Acquisition Guide as chapter (7.3).

  17. First-principles characterization of potassium intercalation in the hexagonal 2H-MoS2

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Amity; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Lilga, Michael A.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Mei, Donghai

    2012-01-12

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed to study the structural and electronic properties of potassium intercalated into hexagonal MoS{sub 2} (2H-MoS{sub 2}). Metallic potassium (K) atoms are incrementally loaded in the hexagonal sites of the interstitial spaces between MoS2 sheets of the 2H-MoS{sub 2} bulk structure generating 2H-KxMoS2 (0.125 {<=} x {<=} 1.0) structures. To accommodate the potassium atoms, the interstitial spacing c parameter in the 2H-MoS{sub 2} bulk expands from 12.816 {angstrom} in 2H-MoS{sub 2} to 16.086 {angstrom} in 2H-K{sub 0.125}MoS{sub 2}. The second lowest potassium loading concentration (K{sub 0.25}MoS{sub 2}) results in the largest interstitial spacing expansion (to c = 16.726 {angstrom}). Our calculations show that there is a small gradual contraction of the interstitial spacing as the potassium loading increases with c = 14.839 {angstrom} for KMoS{sub 2}. This interstitial contraction is correlated with an in-plane expansion of the MoS{sub 2} sheets, which is in good agreement with experimental X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The electronic analysis shows that potassium readily donates its 4s electron to the conduction band of the 2H-K{sub x}MoS{sub 2}, and is largely ionic in character. As a result of the electron donation, the 2H-K{sub x}MoS{sub 2} system changes from a semiconductor to a more metallic system with increasing potassium intercalation. For loadings 0.25 {<=} x {<=} 0.625, triangular Mo-Mo-Mo moieties are prominent and tend to form rhombitrihexagonal motifs. Intercalation of H{sub 2}O molecules that solvate the K atoms is likely to occur in catalytic conditions. The inclusion of two H{sub 2}O molecules per K atom in the K{sub 0.25}MoS{sub 2} structure shows good agreement with XRD measurements.

  18. Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production

    SciTech Connect

    Liem, Peng Hong; Tran, Hoai Nam; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Arbie, Bakri

    2014-09-30

    To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor)

  19. Experimental activities supporting commercial U.S. accelerator production of 99-Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E; Chemerisov, Sergey D; Vandegrift, George F

    2010-01-01

    {sup 99m}Tc, the daughter product of {sup 99}Mo, is the most commonly used radioisotope for nuclear medicine in the U.S. Experiments are being performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to demonstrate production of {sup 99}Mo using accelerators. The {sup 100}Mo({gamma},n){sup 99}Mo reaction in an enriched {sup 100}Mo target is currently under investigation. Three scaled low-power production experiments using a 20-MeV electron linac at Argonne have been performed to date. Two of these experiments used natural Mo targets and produced a total of 613 {mu}C of {sup 99}Mo. The third experiment used an enriched {sup 100}Mo target and produced 10.5 mCi of {sup 99}Mo. Following irradiation the targets were dissolved and the low specific activity solution was processed through an ARSII generator from NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes. Yields of {sup 99m}Tc >95% have been observed.

  20. Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen Evolution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen Evolution Reaction This content will become publicly available on January 13, 2017 Prev Next Title: Defects Engineered Monolayer MoS2 for Improved Hydrogen ...

  1. Mechanically Activated Combustion Synthesis of MoSi2-Based Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shafirovich, Evgeny

    2015-09-30

    The thermal efficiency of gas-turbine power plants could be dramatically increased by the development of new structural materials based on molybdenum silicides and borosilicides, which can operate at temperatures higher than 1300 °C with no need for cooling. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. One approach is based on the fabrication of MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites that combine high oxidation resistance of MoSi2 and good mechanical properties of Mo5Si3. Another approach involves the addition of boron to Mo-rich silicides for improving their oxidation resistance through the formation of a borosilicate surface layer. In particular, materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase are promising materials that offer favorable combinations of high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. However, the synthesis of Mo-Si-B multi-phase alloys is difficult because of their extremely high melting temperatures. Mechanical alloying has been considered as a promising method, but it requires long milling times, leading to large energy consumption and contamination of the product by grinding media. In the reported work, MoSi2-Mo5Si3 composites and several materials based on Mo5SiB2 phase have been obtained by mechanically activated self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (MASHS). Short-term milling of Mo/Si mixture in a planetary mill has enabled a self-sustained propagation of the combustion front over the mixture pellet, leading to the formation of MoSi2-T1 composites. Combustion of Mo/Si/B mixtures for the formation of T2 phase becomes possible if the composition is designed for the addition of more exothermic reactions leading to the formation of MoB, TiC, or TiB2. Upon ignition, Mo/Si/B and Mo/Si/B/Ti mixtures exhibited spin combustion, but the products were porous, contained undesired secondary phases, and had low oxidation resistance. It has been shown that use of

  2. Enhanced rate performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 fibers synthesized by electrospinning

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaofeng; chamoun, rita; Shui, Jianglan; Li, James; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Belharouak, IB

    2015-05-29

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) provides a high working potential as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Yet there is a phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure in LNMO during the ~3 V charge/discharge region. To suppress the large volume change and capacity fade inherent with bulk-sized LNMO particles when discharged to below 3.0 V, one-dimensional nano-structured LNMO was prepared by an electrospinning method and a subsequent heat treatment. The well-separated nanofiber precursors combat the growth and aggregation of LNMO particles during the heating procedure and lead to improved capacity, better cycling stability, and improved rate capability of the final LMNO nanofibers. The as-prepared LMNO nanofibers have a diameter as thin as 50100 nm, which is the thinnest of this kind of complex compounds that contain multi-transition metal elements produced through the electrospinning method. In coin cell tests of this material at a current density of 27 mA g-1, the initial discharge capacity was 130 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 3.54.8 V and 300 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 2.04.8 V.

  3. Magnetostructural phase transformations in Tb 1-x Mn 2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zou, Junding; Paudyal, Durga; Liu, Jing; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Karl A.

    2015-01-16

    Magnetism and phase transformations in non-stoichiometric Tb1-xMn2 (x = 0.056, 0.039) have been studied as functions of temperature and magnetic field using magnetization, heat capacity, and X-ray powder diffraction measurements. Lowering the temperature, the compounds sequentially order ferrimagnetically and antiferromagnetically, and finally, exhibit spin reorientation transitions. Moreover, these structural distortions from room temperature cubic to low temperature rhombohedral structures occur at TN, and are accompanied by large volume changes reaching ~-1.27% and -1.42%, respectively. First principles electronic structure calculations confirm the phase transformation from the ferrimagnetic cubic structure to the antiferromagnetic rhombohedral structure in TbMn2.

  4. On the state of Mn impurity implanted in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, A. F.; Bublik, V. T.; Vdovin, V. I.; Agafonov, Yu. A.; Balagurov, L. A.; Zinenko, V. I.; Kulemanov, I. V.; Shcherbachev, K. D.

    2009-07-15

    The state of manganese impurity in implanted silicon at implantation doses of up to 5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It is established that, after short-term vacuum annealing at 850{sup o}C, most of the implanted manganese impurities are in microinclusions up to 20 nm in size formed by a tetragonal silicide phase of the Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26} type.

  5. High-pressure structural study of MnF2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Yao, Yansun; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Konopkova, Zuzana; Raptis, Constantine

    2015-02-01

    In this study, manganese fluoride (MnF2) with the tetragonal rutile-type structure has been studied using a synchrotron angle-dispersive powder x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell up to 60 GPa at room temperature combined with first-principles density functional calculations. The experimental data reveal two pressure-induced structural phase transitions with the following sequence: rutile → SrI2 type (3 GPa)→ α–PbCl2 type (13 GPa). Complete structural information, including interatomic distances, has been determined in the case of MnF2 including the exact structure of the debated first high-pressure phase. First-principles density functional calculations confirm this phase transition sequence, and themore » two calculated transition pressures are in excellent agreement with the experiment. Lattice dynamics calculations also reproduce the experimental Raman spectra measured for the ambient and high-pressure phases. The results are discussed in line with the possible practical use of rutile-type fluorides in general and specifically MnF2 as a model compound to reveal the HP structural behavior of rutile-type SiO2 (Stishovite).« less

  6. Evaluation of Mo catalyst precursors for hydrotreating coal derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.K.; Gibb, D.R.; Kimber, G.M.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1997-04-01

    Numerous studies have examined the use of dispersed catalysts for promoting the dissolution of coal and upgrading high-boiling and residual liquids. Catalysts have been added in various forms, including oil soluble organometallics and carbonyls, with industrial interest for application to a spectrum of residual feedstocks, and demonstration in coal liquefaction at the pilot plant scale. Dispersed catalysts offer certain advantages over supported catalysts for hydroprocessing such feedstocks. Because of their large molecular size, many of the feed constituents cannot access the internal pore structure of supported catalysts, and hence upgrading must proceed by an indirect process, probably involving H-transfer via lower molecular weight species. Another major deficiency of supported catalysts is their susceptibility to deactivation by reactions which cause the deposition of carbon and metals. Dispersed catalysts can overcome the first of these obstacles and may be less susceptible to deactivation. At the same time, there are also difficulties in the utilization of dispersed catalysts. These include: attaining and maintaining adequate dispersion; and converting the precursor to the active phase. Moreover, the effective catalyst metals, such as Mo, are expensive and their application is only economically viable if they can be used at very low concentrations or efficiently recycled. In direct coal liquefaction, the presence of mineral matter and undissolved coal in the products of coal solubilization mean that a solids separation step is necessary and, inevitably, catalyst will be removed with the reject stream. This program studied the effectiveness of dispersed Mo catalysts for hydroprocessing solids-free residual coal liquids.

  7. Characterization of U-Mo Foils for AFIP-7

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Danny J.; Ermi, Ruby M.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Henager, Charles H.; Burkes, Douglas; Senor, David J.

    2012-11-07

    Twelve AFIP in-process foil samples, fabricated by either Y-12 or LANL, were shipped from LANL to PNNL for potential characterization using optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Of these twelve, nine different conditions were examined to one degree or another using both techniques. For this report a complete description of the results are provided for one archive foil from each source of material, and one unirradiated piece of a foil of each source that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Additional data from two other LANL conditions are summarized in very brief form in an appendix. The characterization revealed that all four characterized conditions contained a cold worked microstructure to different degrees. The Y-12 foils exhibited a higher degree of cold working compared to the LANL foils, as evidenced by the highly elongated and obscure U-Mo grain structure present in each foil. The longitudinal orientations for both of the Y-12 foils possesses a highly laminar appearance with such a distorted grain structure that it was very difficult to even offer a range of grain sizes. The U-Mo grain structure of the LANL foils, by comparison, consisted of a more easily discernible grain structure with a mix of equiaxed and elongated grains. Both materials have an inhomogenous grain structure in that all of the characterized foils possess abnormally coarse grains.

  8. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Garner, F. A.; Voyevodin, V.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Melnichenko, V. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high at 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr+ ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No coinjection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450°C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  9. Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,688 5,591 5,465 2,843 5,608 2,865 5,622 5,537 5,424 2012 2,805 2,765 2,721 2,589 2,899 2,837 2013 2,728 2,763 2,806 2,728 2014 2,329 2,806 2,871 2015 2,234 2,373 2,834 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next

  10. Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 10,240 11,488 7,086 8,271 8,126 8,150 7,731 7,870 5,199 5,520 9,264 4,691 2012 9,482 8,458 7,661 1,447 4,940 5,465 6,646 10,377 5,634 4,748 2,553 2,581 2013 5,126 5,003 4,629 5,171 5,626 5,173 8,023 5,961 2,995 2,674 2,583 2014 3,141

  11. Larger sized wire arrays on 1.5 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect

    Safronova, A. S. Kantsyrev, V. L. Weller, M. E. Shlyaptseva, V. V. Shrestha, I. K. Esaulov, A. A. Stafford, A.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Jones, B.

    2014-12-15

    Experiments on the UNR Zebra generator with Load Current Multiplier (LCM) allow for implosions of larger sized wire array loads than at standard current of 1 MA. Advantages of larger sized planar wire array implosions include enhanced energy coupling to plasmas, better diagnostic access to observable plasma regions, and more complex geometries of the wire loads. The experiments with larger sized wire arrays were performed on 1.5 MA Zebra with LCM (the anode-cathode gap was 1 cm, which is half the gap used in the standard mode). In particular, larger sized multi-planar wire arrays had two outer wire planes from mid-atomic-number wires to create a global magnetic field (gmf) and plasma flow between them. A modified central plane with a few Al wires at the edges was put in the middle between outer planes to influence gmf and to create Al plasma flow in the perpendicular direction (to the outer arrays plasma flow). Such modified plane has different number of empty slots: it was increased from 6 up to 10, hence increasing the gap inside the middle plane from 4.9 to 7.7 mm, respectively. Such load configuration allows for more independent study of the flows of L-shell mid-atomic-number plasma (between the outer planes) and K-shell Al plasma (which first fills the gap between the edge wires along the middle plane) and their radiation in space and time. We demonstrate that such configuration produces higher linear radiation yield and electron temperatures as well as advantages of better diagnostics access to observable plasma regions and how the load geometry (size of the gap in the middle plane) influences K-shell Al radiation. In particular, K-shell Al radiation was delayed compared to L-shell mid-atomic-number radiation when the gap in the middle plane was large enough (when the number of empty slots was increased up to ten)

  12. Manganese valence and coordination structure in Mn,Mg-codoped {gamma}-AlON green phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Takashi; Xie, Rong-Jun; Hirosaki, Naoto; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Honma, Tetuso

    2012-10-15

    The valence and coordination structure of manganese in a Mn,Mg-codoped {gamma}-AlON spinel-type oxynitride green phosphor were studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and absorption fine structure measurements. The absorption edge position of the XANES revealed the bivalency of Mn. Two cation sites are available in the spinel structure for cation doping: a tetrahedral site and an octahedral site. The pre-edge of the XANES and the distance to the nearest neighbor atoms obtained from the EXAFS measurement showed that Mn was situated at the tetrahedral site. Rietveld analysis showed that the vacancy occupied the octahedral site. The preferential occupation of the tetrahedral site by Mn and the roles of N and Mg are discussed in relation to the spinel crystal structure. - Graphical Abstract: Fourier transform of EXAFS of Mn K-edge for Mn,Mg-codoped green phosphor and Mn coordination structure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn, Mg-codoped {gamma}-AlON green phosphor for white LED. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The valence of Mn is divalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn occupies the tetrahedral site in the spinel structure.

  13. Ferromagnetic interactions and martensitic transformation in Fe doped Ni-Mn-In shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, D. N.; Priolkar, K. R.; Emura, S.; Nigam, A. K.

    2014-11-14

    The structure, magnetic, and martensitic properties of Fe doped Ni-Mn-In magnetic shape memory alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization, resistivity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and EXAFS. While Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x} (0???x???0.6) alloys are ferromagnetic and non martensitic, the martensitic transformation temperature in Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.5}In{sub 1?y}Fe{sub y} and Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.6}In{sub 1?y}Fe{sub y} increases for lower Fe concentrations (y???0.05) before decreasing sharply for higher Fe concentrations. XRD analysis reveals presence of cubic and tetragonal structural phases in Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1?x}Fe{sub x} at room temperature with tetragonal phase content increasing with Fe doping. Even though the local structure around Mn and Ni in these Fe doped alloys is similar to martensitic Mn rich Ni-Mn-In alloys, presence of ferromagnetic interactions and structural disorder induced by Fe affect Mn-Ni-Mn antiferromagnetic interactions resulting in suppression of martensitic transformation in these Fe doped alloys.

  14. Effect of composition and heat treatment on MnBi magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Polikarpov, Evgueni [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Bowden, Mark E [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Xie, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Li, Guosheng [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Nie, Zimin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Zarkevich, Nikolai [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane [Ames Laboratory

    2014-10-01

    The metallic compound MnBi is a promising rare-earth-free permanent magnet material, unique among all candidates for its high intrinsic coercivity (Hci) and its large positive temperature coefficient. The Hci of MnBi in thin-film or powder form can exceed 12 and 26 kOe at 300 and 523 K, respectively. Such a steep rise in Hci with increasing temperature is unique to MnBi. Consequently, MnBi is a highly sought-after hard phase for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets. However, the reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, and hence Mn tends to precipitate out of the MnBi liquid during the solidification process. As result, when the alloy is prepared using conventional induction or arc-melting casting methods, additional Mn is required to compensate the precipitation of Mn. In addition to composition, post-casting annealing plays an important role in obtaining a high content of MnBi low-temperature phase (LTP) because the annealing encourages the Mn precipitates and the unreacted Bi to react, forming the desired LTP phase. Here we report a systematic study of the effect of composition and heat treatments on the phase content and magnetic properties of MnBi alloys. In this study, 14 compositions were prepared using conventional metallurgical methods, and the compositions, crystal structures, phase content and magnetic properties of the resulting alloys were analyzed. The results show that the composition with 55 at.% Mn exhibits both the highest LTP content (93 wt.%) and magnetization (74 emu g?1 with 9 T applied field at 300 K).

  15. Dynamic study of (De)sodiation in alpha-MnO2 nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Yifei; Ma, Lu; He, Kun; Yao, Wentao; Nie, Anmin; Bi, Xuanxuan; Amine, Khalil; Wu, Tianpin; Lu, Jun; Shahbazian-Yassr, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In this report, the electrochemical sodiation and desodiation in single crystalline alpha-MnO2 nanowires are studied dynamically at both single particle level using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and bulk level using in situ synchrotron X-ray. The TEM results suggest that the first sodiation process starts with tunnel-based Na+ intercalation, experiences the formation of Na0.5MnO2 as a result of tunnel degradation, and ends with the Mn2O3 phase. The inserted Na+ can be partially extracted out of the sodiated products, and the following cycles are dominated by the reversible conversion reaction between Na0.5MnO2 and Mn2O3. The Mn valence evolution inside a cycling coin using alpha-MnO2 nanowire electrode also exhibits partially reversible characteristic, agreeing well with the in situ TEM analysis. The sodiation is compared with lithiation in the same alpha-MnO2 nanowires. Both Na+ and Li+ interact with the tunneled structure via a similar tunnel -driven intercalation mechanism before Mn4+ is reduced to Mn3.5+. For the following deep insertion, the tunnels survive up. to LiMnO2 (Mn3+) during lithiation, while the sodiation proceeds via a different mechanism that involves obvious phase transition and fast tunnel degradation after Mn's valence is below 3.5+. The difference in charge carrier insertion mechanisms can be ascribed to the strong interaction between the tunnel frame and inserted Na+ possessing a larger ionic size than inserted Li+.

  16. Large exchange bias enhancement in (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co trilayers with ultrathin IrMn thanks to interfacial Cu dusting

    SciTech Connect

    Vinai, G. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Moritz, J. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universit de Lorraine, Bd des Aiguillettes, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Bandiera, S. [Crocus Technology, 4 Place Robert Schuman, 38054 Grenoble (France); Prejbeanu, I. L.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, UMR 8191 CEA/CNRS/UJF/Grenoble-INP, CEA/INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2014-04-21

    The magnitude of exchange bias (H{sub ex}) at room temperature can be significantly enhanced in IrMn/Co and (Pt(or Pd)/Co)/IrMn/Co structures thanks to the insertion of an ultrathin Cu dusting layer at the IrMn/Co interface. The combination of trilayer structure and interfacial Cu dusting leads to a three-fold increase in H{sub ex} as compared to the conventional IrMn/Co bilayer structure, with an increased blocking temperature (T{sub B}) and a concave curvature of the temperature dependence H{sub ex}(T), ideal for improved Thermally Assisted-Magnetic Random Access Memory storage layer. This exchange bias enhancement is ascribed to a reduction of the spin frustration at the IrMn/Co interface thanks to interfacial Cu addition.

  17. Search for the lepton flavor violating decay Z<mo stretchy='false'>→mo>eμ in pp collisions at s<mo>=>8mn>TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Kucuk, H.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C. -M.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J. A.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Dobos, D.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, J. I.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S. -C.; Hu, D.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Hurwitz, M.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G. -Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joergensen, M. D.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joshi, K. D.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Jung, C. A.; Jungst, R. M.; Jussel, P.; Juste Rozas, A.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Keung, J.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoo, T. J.; Khoriauli, G.; Khoroshilov, A.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, R. S. B.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. 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M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-10-23

    We use the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider to search for the lepton flavor violating process Z→eμ in pp collisions using 20.3 fb-1 of data collected at √s=8 TeV. An enhancement in the eμ invariant mass spectrum is searched for at the Z-boson mass. The number of Z bosons produced in the data sample is estimated using events of similar topology, Z→ee and μμ, significantly reducing the systematic uncertainty in the measurement. In conclusion, there is no evidence of an enhancement at the Z-boson mass, resulting in an upper limit on the branching fraction, B(Z→eμ)<7.5×10-7 at the 95% confidence level.

  18. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section in pp<mo>¯> collisions at s<mo>=>1.96mn>TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hooper, R.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strom, D.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Xu, C.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W. -C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Zelitch, S.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2011-07-01

    The authors present a new measurement of the production cross section σ(pp = ZZ) at a center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, obtained from the analysis of the four charged lepton final state ℓ+ℓ-ℓ`+ℓ`-(ℓ, ℓ` = e or μ). They observe ten candidate events with an expected background of 0.37 ± 0.13 events. The measured cross section σ(pp =ZZ) = 1.26-0.37+0.47 (stat) ± 0.14 (syst) pb is in agreement with NLO QCD predictions. This result is combined with a previous result from the ZZ = ℓ+ℓ- νν channel resulting in a combined cross section of σ(pp = ZZ) = 1.40-0.37-0.43 (stat) ±0.14 (syst) pb.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li₂MnO₃

    SciTech Connect

    Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Torres-Castro, Loraine; Shojan, Jifi; Julien, Christian M.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-08-08

    Li2MnO3 is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li2MnO3 , Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were synthesized by a sol–gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with x-ray diffraction, Raman, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Tap density and BET analyzer. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li2MnO3and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2 - xMn1 - yAlx + yO3 + z) for Al-substituted Li2MnO3compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for Mn 2p orbital reveals a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g-1 for Li2MnO3, 68 mAh g-1 for Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, 58 mAh g-1 for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and 74 mAh g-1 for Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were obtained. As a result, aluminum substitutions increased the formation of spinel phase which is responsible for cycling.

  20. Broadband ultra-high transmission of terahertz radiation through monolayer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xue-Yong; Deng, Xin-Hua; Su, Fu-Hai; Liu, Nian-Hua; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2015-12-14

    In this study, the terahertz (THz) absorption and transmission of monolayer MoS{sub 2} with different carrier concentrations were investigated theoretically. The calculation shows that the THz absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is very low even under high carrier concentrations and large incident angles. The sum of reflection and absorption losses of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is lower than that of graphene by one to three orders of magnitude. The transmission of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is higher than that of two-dimensional electron gases in traditional GaAs and InAs. The field-effect tube structure formed by monolayer MoS{sub 2}-insulation-layer-graphene is also studied. The THz absorption of graphene can reach saturation under low voltage by tuning the voltage between MoS{sub 2} and graphene layers in the structure. The maximum THz absorption of monolayer MoS{sub 2} is approximately 5%. Thus, monolayer MoS{sub 2} is a promising candidate for THz transparent electrodes.

  1. New Generation of MoSx Based Solid Lubricant Coatings: Recent Developments and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Julfikar; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2011-01-17

    In recent times, there is a growing interest in applying Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub x}) solid lubricant coatings on components to improve the tribological performance (i.e. lower friction coefficient and wear rate). The tribological performance of MoS{sub x} coating is strongly dependent on coating properties and tribological environment. MoS{sub x} coatings are highly successful in certain applications such as in space/vacuum technology, but its effectiveness is questioned in other terrestrial applications such as in cutting tool industry due to its lower hardness and poor oxidation resistance leading to shorter life. In order to circumvent this drawback, the paper identifies that current research is being concentrated on developing MoS{sub x} based coatings using three different approaches: (1) Metal or compound addition in MoS{sub x} coating (2)MoS{sub x} layer on hard coating and (3)MoS{sub x} addition in hard coating matrix. Although the primary objective is same in all three cases, the third approach is considered to be more effective in improving the tribological properties of the coating. Finally, the potential applications of MoS{sub x} based coatings in different industrial sectors have been briefly outlined.

  2. A Solution-Based Approach for Mo-99 Production: Considerations for Nitrate versus Sulfate Media

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Youker, Amanda J.; Chemerisov, Sergey D.; Kalensky, Michael; Tkac, Peter; Bowers, Delbert L.; Vandegrift, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is the parent of Technetium-99m, which is used in nearly 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. The medical community has been plagued by Mo-99 shortages due to aging reactors, such as the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor in Canada. There are currently no US producers of Mo-99, and NRU is scheduled for shutdown in 2016, which means that another Mo-99 shortage is imminent unless a potential domestic Mo-99 producer fills the void. Argonne National Laboratory is assisting two potential domestic suppliers of Mo-99 by examining the effects of a uranyl nitrate versus a uranyl sulfate target solution configuration onmore » Mo-99 production. Uranyl nitrate solutions are easier to prepare and do not generate detectable amounts of peroxide upon irradiation, but a high radiation field can lead to a large increase in pH, which can lead to the precipitation of fission products and uranyl hydroxides. Uranyl sulfate solutions are more difficult to prepare, and enough peroxide is generated during irradiation to cause precipitation of uranyl peroxide, but this can be prevented by adding a catalyst to the solution. A titania sorbent can be used to recover Mo-99 from a highly concentrated uranyl nitrate or uranyl sulfate solution; however, different approaches must be taken to prevent precipitation during Mo-99 production.« less

  3. The magnetic origin of multiferroic Y{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Ting; Zeng, Zhi; Li, X. G.; Lin, H. Q.

    2015-05-07

    It has been found experimentally that the ferroelectricity in Y{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} is driven by a magnetic ordering of collinear up-up-down-down (↑↑↓↓). Here, the origin of the magnetism and thereby ferroelectricity is studied using first-principles calculations. We first confirm that the experimentally observed ↑↑↓↓ antiferromagnetic structure is the ground state of Y{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6}. Additionally, both the Co{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 4+} are in the high-spin state. By analyzing the exchange coupling and corresponding pathways, we conclude that the ↑↑↓↓ spin order in Y{sub 2}CoMnO{sub 6} originates from a subtle competition between the ferromagnetic Co-O-Mn super-exchange and antiferromagnetic Co-Mn direct-exchange along c axis.

  4. Investigation of structure, magnetic, and transport properties of Mn-doped SiC films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xianke; Guo Ruisong; An Yukai; Liu Jiwen

    2013-07-15

    Mn-doped SiC films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The structure, composition, and magnetic and transport properties of the films were investigated. The results show the films have the 3C-SiC crystal structure and the doped Mn atoms in the form of Mn{sup 2+} ions substitute for C sites in SiC lattice. All the films are ferromagnetic at 300 K, and the ferromagnetism in films arises from the doped Mn atoms and some extended defects. In addition, the saturation magnetization increases with the Mn-doped concentration increasing. The Mn doping does not change the semiconductor characteristics of the SiC films.

  5. Photo-oxidation method using MoS2 nanocluster materials

    DOEpatents

    Wilcoxon, Jess P.

    2001-01-01

    A method of photo-oxidizing a hydrocarbon compound is provided by dispersing MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters in a solvent containing a hydrocarbon compound contaminant to form a stable solution mixture and irradiating the mixture to photo-oxide the hydrocarbon compound. Hydrocarbon compounds of interest include aromatic hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbons. MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters with an average diameter less than approximately 10 nanometers are shown to be effective in decomposing potentially toxic aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as phenol, pentachlorophenol, chlorinated biphenols, and chloroform, into relatively non-toxic compounds. The irradiation can occur by exposing the MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters and hydrocarbon compound mixture with visible light. The MoS.sub.2 nanoclusters can be introduced to the toxic hydrocarbons as either a MoS.sub.2 solution or deposited on a support material.

  6. Thermal properties of U–Mo alloys irradiated to moderate burnup and power

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Pool, Karl N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Smith, Frances N.

    2015-09-01

    A variety of physical and thermal property measurements as a function of temperature and fission density were performed on irradiated U-Mo alloy monolithic fuel samples with a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061. The U-Mo alloy density, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are strongly influenced by increasing burnup, mainly as the result of irradiation induced recrystallization and fission gas bubble formation and coalescence. U-Mo chemistry, specifically Mo content, and specific heat capacity was not as sensitive to increasing burnup. Measurements indicated that thermal conductivity of the U-Mo alloy decreased approximately 30% for a fission density of 2.88 × 1021 fissions cm-3 and approximately 45% for a fission density of 4.08 × 1021 fissions cm-3 from unirradiated values at 200 oC. An empirical thermal conductivity degradation model developed previously and summarized here agrees well with the experimental measurements.

  7. Detection of a MoSe{sub 2} secondary phase layer in CZTSe by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Demircioğlu, Özden; Riedel, Ingo; Gütay, Levent; Mousel, Marina; Redinger, Alex; Rey, Germain; Weiss, Thomas; Siebentritt, Susanne

    2015-11-14

    We demonstrate the application of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) for identification of secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} in polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} (CZTSe) samples. A MoSe{sub 2} reference sample was analyzed, and its optical constants (ε{sub 1} and ε{sub 2}) were extracted by SE analysis. This dataset was implemented into an optical model for analyzing SE data from a glass/Mo/CZTSe sample containing MoSe{sub 2} at the back side of the absorber. We present results on the n and k values of CZTSe and show the extraction of the thickness of the secondary phase MoSe{sub 2} layer. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm the SE results.

  8. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have notmore » been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.« less

  9. Cr(OH)₃(s) Oxidation Induced by Surface Catalyzed Mn(II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Namgung, Seonyi; Kwon, M.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lee, Gie Hyeon

    2014-09-16

    This study examined the feasibility of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation mediated by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation under common groundwater pH conditions as a potential pathway of natural Cr(VI) contaminations. Dissolved Mn(II) (50 μM) was reacted with or without synthesized Cr(OH)₃(s) (1.0 g/L) at pH 7 – 9 under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the absence of Cr(OH)₃(s), homogeneous Mn(II) oxidation by dissolved O₂ was not observed at pH ≤ 8.0 for 50 d. At pH 9.0, by contrast, dissolved Mn(II) was completely removed within 8 d and precipitated as hausmannite. When Cr(OH)₃(s) was present, this solid was oxidized and released substantial amounts of Cr(VI) as dissolved Mn(II) was added into the suspension at pH ≥ 8.0 under oxic conditions. Our results suggest that Cr(OH)₃(s) was readily oxidized by a newly formed Mn oxide as a result of Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed on Cr(OH)₃(s) surface. XANES analysis of the residual solids after the reaction between 1.0 g/L Cr(OH)₃(s) and 204 μM Mn(II) at pH 9.0 for 22 d revealed that the product of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation resembled birnessite. The rate and extent of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation was likely controlled by those of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation as the production of Cr(VI) increased with increasing pH and initial Mn(II) concentrations. This study evokes the potential environmental hazard of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)₃(s) that can be a source of Cr(VI) in the presence of dissolved Mn(II).

  10. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    SciTech Connect

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  11. Electronic Structure and Oxidation State Changes in the Mn (4) Ca Cluster of Photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, J.; Pushkar, Y.; Messinger, J.; Bergmann, U.; Glatzel, P.; Yachandra, V.K.; /SLAC

    2012-08-17

    Oxygen-evolving complex (Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster) of Photosystem II cycles through five intermediate states (S{sub i}-states, i = 0-4) before a molecule of dioxygen is released. During the S-state transitions, electrons are extracted from the OEC, either from Mn or alternatively from a Mn ligand. The oxidation state of Mn is widely accepted as Mn{sub 4}(III{sub 2},IV{sub 2}) and Mn{sub 4}(III,IV{sub 3}) for S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} states, while it is still controversial for the S{sub 0} and S{sub 3} states. We used resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to study the electronic structure of Mn{sub 4}Ca complex in the OEC. The RIXS data yield two-dimensional plots that provide a significant advantage by obtaining both K-edge pre-edge and L-edge-like spectra (metal spin state) simultaneously. We have collected data from PSII samples in the each of the S-states and compared them with data from various inorganic Mn complexes. The spectral changes in the Mn 1s2p{sub 3/2} RIXS spectra between the S-states were compared to those of the oxides of Mn and coordination complexes. The results indicate strong covalency for the electronic configuration in the OEC, and we conclude that the electron is transferred from a strongly delocalized orbital, compared to those in Mn oxides or coordination complexes. The magnitude for the S{sub 0} to S{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} to S{sub 2} transitions is twice as large as that during the S{sub 2} to S{sub 3} transition, indicating that the electron for this transition is extracted from a highly delocalized orbital with little change in charge density at the Mn atoms.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of model MgO supported catalyst with Pt-Mo interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Gates, B.C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Shelef, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

    1996-01-04

    MgO supported platinum and platinum-molybdenum catalysts were prepared from organometallic precursors and charaterized structurally to determine how the nature of the bimetallic precursors and the treatment conditions affected the interaction between the two metals. Samples were prepared from [PtCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}], [PtCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}] + [Mo(CO){sub 6}], and [C@Pt[Mo(CO){sub 3}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})]{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}] BC@ characterized by infrared and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies, tranmission electron microscopy, and chemisorption of H{sub 2}, CO, and O{sub 2}. The samples were treated in H{sub 2} at 400{degree}C prior to most of the characterizatons. Incorporation of Mo reduced the chemisorption of CO and of H{sub 2}. EXAFS spectra measured at the Pt L{sub III} edge and at the Mo K edge showed substantial Pt-Mo contributions with a Pt-Mo cordination number of about 2 and an average distance of 2.63 A for the sample prepared from [C@Pt[Mo(CO){sub 3}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5})]{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}] BC@. In constract, no significant Pt-Mo contribution was observed for the sample prepared from [PtCl{sub 2}(PhCN){sub 2}]+ [Mo(CO){sub 6}]. Electron micrographs and EXAFS results show that interaction between Pt and Mo ions in the former sample helped to maintain the platinum in a highly dispersed form, with supported platinum clusters being smaller than about 10 A. 53 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. In operando X-ray studies of the conversion reaction in Mn3O4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the conversion reaction in Mn3O4 lithium battery anodes Citation Details ... energy storage (including batteries and capacitors), hydrogen and fuel ...

  14. Phase stability of the SrMnO[subscript 3] hexagonal perovskite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SrMnOsubscript 3 hexagonal perovskite system at high pressure and temperature Citation ... Country of Publication: United States Language: ENGLISH Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  15. International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) International Falls, MN Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.71 2.03 2.00 2.33 2000's 2.77 4.85 3.01 -- -- 11.20 -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  16. Early time studies of cylindrical liner implosions at 1 MA on COBRA

    SciTech Connect

    Atoyan, L. Byvank, T. Cahill, A. D. Hoyt, C. L. Grouchy, P. W. L. de Potter, W. M. Kusse, B. R. Hammer, D. A.

    2014-12-15

    Tests of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept will make use of the 27 MA Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, to implode a cylindrical metal liner to compress and heat preheated, magnetized plasma contained within it. While most pulsed power machines produce much lower currents than the Z-machine, there are issues that can still be addressed on smaller scale facilities. Recent work on the Cornell Beam Research Accelerator (COBRA) has made use of 10 mm long and 4 mm diameter metal liners having different wall thicknesses to study the initiation of plasma on the liner’s surface as well as axial magnetic field compression [P.-A. Gourdain et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 083006 (2013)]. This report presents experimental results with non-imploding liners, investigating the impact the liner’s surface structure has on initiation and ablation. Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging and optical 12 frame camera imaging were used to observe and assess emission non-uniformities as they developed. Axial and side-on interferometry was used to determine the distribution of plasma near the liner surface, including the impact of non-uniformities during the plasma initiation and ablation phases of the experiments.

  17. Measuring subhalo mass in redMaPPer clusters with CFHT Stripe 82 Survey

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, Ran; Shan, Huanyuan; Kneib, Jean -Paul; Mo, Houjun; Rozo, Eduardo; Leauthaud, Alexie; Moustakas, John; Xie, Lizhi; Erben, Thomas; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; et al

    2016-03-07

    Here, we use the shear catalogue from the CFHT Stripe-82 Survey to measure the subhalo masses of satellite galaxies in redMaPPer clusters. Assuming a Chabrier initial mass function and a truncated NFW model for the subhalo mass distribution, we find that the subhalo mass to galaxy stellar mass ratio increases as a function of projected halo-centric radius rp, from Msub/Mstar = 4.43+6.63–2.23 at rp ε [0.1, 0.3] h–1 Mpc to Msub/Mstar = 75.40+19.73–19.09 at rp ε [0.6, 0.9] h–1 Mpc. We also investigate the dependence of subhalo masses on stellar mass by splitting satellite galaxies into two stellar mass bins:more » 10 < log (Mstar/h–1M⊙) < 10.5 and 11 < log (Mstar/h–1 M⊙) < 12. The best-fitting subhalo mass of the more massive satellite galaxy bin is larger than that of the less massive satellites: log(Msub/h–1M⊙) = 11.14+0.66–0.73 (Msub/Mstar = 19.5+19.8–17.9) versus log(Msub/h–1M⊙) = 12.38+0.16–0.16 (Msub/Mstar = 21.1+7.4–7.7).« less

  18. Nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution: comparison with the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Morrison, Christine N.; Kaiser, Jens T.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-02-01

    Determination of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from C. pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution and comparison to its distinct ortholog from A. vinelandii at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp1) has been determined at 1.08 Å resolution by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Cp1 and the ortholog from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av1) represent two distinct families of nitrogenases, differing primarily by a long insertion in the α-subunit and a deletion in the β-subunit of Cp1 relative to Av1. Comparison of these two MoFe protein structures at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The FeMo cofactors defining the active sites of the MoFe protein are essentially identical between the two proteins. The surrounding environment is also highly conserved, suggesting that this structural arrangement is crucial for nitrogen reduction. The P clusters are likewise similar, although the surrounding protein and solvent environment is less conserved relative to that of the FeMo cofactor. The P cluster and FeMo cofactor in Av1 and Cp1 are connected through a conserved water tunnel surrounded by similar secondary-structure elements. The long α-subunit insertion loop occludes the presumed Fe protein docking surface on Cp1 with few contacts to the remainder of the protein. This makes it plausible that this loop is repositioned to open up the Fe protein docking surface for complex formation.

  19. Mn(II) oxidation by an ascomycete fungus is linked to superoxide production during asexual reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hansel, C. M.; Zeiner, C. A.; Santelli, C. M.; Webb, S. M.

    2012-07-16

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the most reactive minerals within the environment, where they control the bioavailability of carbon, nutrients, and numerous metals. Although the ability of microorganisms to oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides is scattered throughout the bacterial and fungal domains of life, the mechanism and physiological basis for Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. Here, we use a combination of compound-specific chemical assays, microspectroscopy, and electron microscopy to show that a common Ascomycete filamentous fungus, Stilbella aciculosa, oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn oxides by producing extracellular superoxide during cell differentiation. The reactive Mn oxide phase birnessite and the reactive oxygen species superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are colocalized at the base of asexual reproductive structures. Mn oxide formation is not observed in the presence of superoxide scavengers (e.g., Cu) and inhibitors of NADPH oxidases (e.g., diphenylene iodonium chloride), enzymes responsible for superoxide production and cell differentiation in fungi. Considering the recent identification of Mn(II) oxidation by NADH oxidase-based superoxide production by a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp.), these results introduce a surprising homology between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms in the mechanisms responsible for Mn(II) oxidation, where oxidation appears to be a side reaction of extracellular superoxide production. Finally, given the versatility of superoxide as a redox reactant and the widespread ability of fungi to produce superoxide, this microbial extracellular superoxide production may play a central role in the cycling and bioavailability of metals (e.g., Hg, Fe, Mn) and carbon in natural systems.

  20. Electrochemical performance studies of MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers recovered from spent battery

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Gomaa A.M.; Tan, Ling Ling; Jose, Rajan; Yusoff, Mashitah M.; Chong, Kwok Feng

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: MnO{sub 2} is recovered from spent zinccarbon batteries as nanoflowers structure. Recovered MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers show high specific capacitance. Recovered MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers show stable electrochemical cycling up to 900 cycles. Recovered MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers show low resistance in EIS data. - Abstract: The electrochemical performance of MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers recovered from spent household zinccarbon battery is studied by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers are recovered from spent zinccarbon battery by combination of solution leaching and electrowinning techniques. In an effort to utilize recovered MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers as energy storage supercapacitor, it is crucial to understand their structure and electrochemical performance. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms the recovery of MnO{sub 2} in birnessite phase, while electron microscopy analysis shows the MnO{sub 2} is recovered as 3D nanostructure with nanoflower morphology. The recovered MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers exhibit high specific capacitance (294 F g{sup ?1} at 10 mV s{sup ?1}; 208.5 F g{sup ?1} at 0.1 A g{sup ?1}) in 1 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte, with stable electrochemical cycling. Electrochemical data analysis reveal the great potential of MnO{sub 2} nanoflowers recovered from spent zinccarbon battery in the development of high performance energy storage supercapacitor system.

  1. Surface Structures of Cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo Catalyst Nanoparticles from Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guofeng; Van Hove, M.A.; Ross, P.N.; Baskes, M.I.

    2005-03-31

    The surface structures of cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles have been investigated using the Monte Carlo method and modified embedded atom method potentials that we developed for Pt-Mo alloys. The cubo-octahedral Pt-Mo nanoparticles are constructed with disordered fcc configurations, with sizes from 2.5 to 5.0 nm, and with Pt concentrations from 60 to 90 at. percent. The equilibrium Pt-Mo nanoparticle configurations were generated through Monte Carlo simulations allowing both atomic displacements and element exchanges at 600 K. We predict that the Pt atoms weakly segregate to the surfaces of such nanoparticles. The Pt concentrations in the surface are calculated to be 5 to 14 at. percent higher than the Pt concentrations of the nanoparticles. Moreover, the Pt atoms preferentially segregate to the facet sites of the surface, while the Pt and Mo atoms tend to alternate along the edges and vertices of these nanoparticles. We found that decreasing the size or increasing the Pt concentration leads to higher Pt concentrations but fewer Pt-Mo pairs in the Pt-Mo nanoparticle surfaces.

  2. Lattice Mn3+ Behaviors in Li4Ti5O12/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Full Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-05-28

    High voltage spinels LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) with different contents of residual Mn3+ ions have been evaluated in full cells using Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as standard anode. Greatly improved cycling stability has been observed for all spinels in LTO-limited full cell, compared with those in LNMO-limited ones, while the underlying mechanisms are quite different. It has been discovered that the participation of active Mn3+ in the extended cycling and thus its observable contribution to Li+ diffusion kinetics depend on the limiting electrode and the sufficiency of Li+ ions. Potential Mn dissolution has also been discussed to identify the key factors that need to be considered to construct full cells employing high voltage spinel as the cathode.

  3. Quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes in MoS{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Z. X.; Liu, L. Z.; Wu, H. Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Shan, Y.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-06-08

    The low quantum yield (∼10{sup −5}) has restricted practical use of photoluminescence (PL) from MoS{sub 2} composed of a few layers, but the quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes are believed to be able to boost the PL intensity. In this work, PL from 2 to 9 nm MoS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) is excluded from the solvent and the absorption and PL spectra are shown to be consistent with the size distribution. PL from MoS{sub 2} QDs is also found to be sensitive to aggregation due to the size effect.

  4. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Xie, Ya -Hong

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  5. Magnetic and structural properties of Zn doped MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Shahi, Prashant; Shukla, K. K.; Singh, Rahul; Chatterjee, Sandip; Das, A.; Ghosh, A. K.; Nigam, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    The magnetization, Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of Zn doped MnV{sub 2}O{sub 4} as a function of temperature have been measured. It has been observed, with increase of Zn the non-linear orientation of Mn spins with the V spins will decrease which effectively decrease the structural transition temperature more rapidly than Curie Temperature.

  6. Spin correlations and electron transport in MnBi:Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Kharel, P.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    The structural, magnetic, and electron transport properties of Mn{sub 55-x}Au{sub x}Bi{sub 45} (x = 0, 4.5) thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering have been investigated. The magnetization of the MnBi films decreases and the coercivity increases due to Au doping. The temperature dependence of resistivity between 2 to 300 K shows that the films are metallic but the 4.5% Au-doped film shows a Kondo behavior with resistance minimum at 10.2 K. The magnetoresistance is anisotropic and the positive transverse magnetoresistance is significantly enhanced (16.3% at 70 kOe) by Au doping. We interpret these data in terms of a model in which Au atoms preferentially substitute for Mn atoms on the Mn lattice, and some Mn atoms are displaced to interstitial sites in the NiAs structure. These interstitial Mn atoms are coupled antiferromagnetically to the Mn atoms on the original Mn lattice leading to the large decrease in magnetization, Kondo effect, and the positive magnetoresistance.

  7. Impedance studies of the thin film LiMn2O4/electrolyteinterface

    SciTech Connect

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Sakai, E.; Cairns, Elton J.

    2001-04-07

    Room-temperature impedance measurements of a thin-film LiMn2O4/LiPF6-EC-DMC interface have been used to identify the spontaneous formation Li2Mn2O4 at the interface at room temperature at voltages of 3.7 and higher. The impedance of the LiMn2O4 films exhibited two time constants: at about 14 kHz and 60 to 200 Hz. The high frequency loop is dependent on film morphology and was attributed to the substrate/oxide interface. The low frequency behavior was dependent on both state-of-charge (SOC) and time at a given SOC. At full charge the impedance in this electrolyte was stable at room temperature over several days. At high lithium contents, film OCV and impedance tended to grow logarithmically with time, with lower rates for lower Mn3+ content in the film. The increased impedance was removed by oxidation of the film to 4.5V vs. Li/Li+. The observations are consistent with a reversible disproportionation of part of the LiMn2O4 into Li2Mn2O4 and a lithium-deficient spinel. With extended constant current cycling part of the Li2Mn2O4 degrades to the Mn2O3 and the process is no longer reversible.

  8. Room temperature spin-polarizations of Mn-based antiferromagnetic nanoelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Toyo Kazu; Vazquez de Parga, Amadeo L.

    2014-11-03

    Antiferromagnets produce no stray field, and therefore, a tip electrode made of antiferromagnetic material has been considered to be the most suitable choice to measure such as magnetoresistance (MR) through single isolated magnetic nanoparticles, molecules, and ultrathin films. Spin polarizations (P) of antiferromagnetic 3-nm, 6-nm, and annealed 3-nm Mn films grown on W tips with a bcc(110) apex as well as bulk-NiMn tips were obtained at 300?K by measuring MR in ultrahigh vacuum by means of spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy using a layerwise antiferromagnetically stacking bct-Mn(001) film electrode. The Mn-coated tips with coverages of 3 and 6?nm exhibited P values of 1??1% and 3??2%, respectively, which tips likely contain ?- or strained Mn. With a thermal assist, the crystalline quality and the magnetic stability of the film could increase. The annealed tip exhibited P?=?9??2%. The bulk-NiMn tips exhibit spin polarizations of 0 or 6??2% probably depending on the chemical species (Mn or Ni) present at the apex of the tip. Fe-coated W tips were used to estimate the bct-Mn(001) film spin polarization.

  9. Site Determination and Magnetism of Mn Doping in Protein Encapsulated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, V.; Klem, M.; Jolley, J.; Arenholz, E.A.; Douglas, T.; Young, M.; Idzerda, Y.U.

    2010-01-11

    Soft-X-ray absorption spectroscopy, soft-X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and alternating current magnetic susceptibility were performed on 6.7 nm iron oxide nanoparticles doped with (5-33%) Mn grown inside the horse-spleen ferritin protein cages and compared to similarly protein encapsulated pure Fe-oxide and Mn-oxide nanoparticles to determine the site of the Mn dopant and to quantify the magnetic behavior with varying Mn concentration. The Mn dopant is shown to substitute preferentially as Mn{sup +2} and prefers the octahedral site in the defected spinel structure. The Mn multiplet structure for the nanoparticles is simpler than for the bulk standards, suggesting that the nanoparticle lattices are relaxed from the distortions present in the bulk. Addition of Mn is found to alter the host Fe-oxide lattice from a defected ferrimagnetic spinel structure similar to {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to an non-ferromagnetic spinel structure with a local Fe environment similar to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}.

  10. Electric-Field Modulation of Curie Temperature in (Ga, Mn)As Field-Effect Transistor Structures with Varying Channel Thickness and Mn Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishitani, Y.; Endo, M.; Chiba, D.; Matsukura, F.; Ohno, H.

    2010-01-04

    We have investigated the change of T{sub C} of ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga, Mn)As by changing hole concentration p. The field effect transistor structure was utilized to change p. The relation T{sub C}propor top{sup 0.2} is obtained for three samples, despite the difference of their Mn composition and thickness, indicating that the relation holds over 2 decades of p.

  11. K and Mn co-doped BaCd{sub 2}As{sub 2}: A hexagonal structured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    K and Mn co-doped BaCdsub 2Assub 2: A hexagonal structured bulk diluted magnetic semiconductor with large magnetoresistance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: K and Mn ...

  12. Density functional theory investigation of the electronic structure and thermoelectric properties of layered MoS{sub 2}, MoSe{sub 2} and their mixed-layer compound

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhoon; Hong, Jisook; Lee, Wang Ro; Kim, Dae Yeon; Shim, Ji Hoon

    2014-03-15

    First principles density functional theory calculations were carried out for the 2H-MoQ{sub 2} (Q=S and Se) and their hypothetical mixed-layer compound. Due to the different electronegativities of S and Se atoms on MoQ{sub 2}, the band gap size could be adjusted in mixed-layer compound MoS{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2}. Also, the indirect band gap in pure MoQ{sub 2} compounds is changed to the pseudo direct band gap in mixed-layer MoS{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} which is similar to the monolayer compound. The layer mixing enhances the thermoelectric properties because of the increased density of states around the Fermi level and the decreased band gap size. Therefore, we suggest that this layer mixing approach should be regarded as a useful way to modulate their electronic structures and to improve their thermoelectric properties. -- Graphical abstract: On the basis of density functional calculations we predict that the mixed-layer compounds 2H-MoS{sub 2}/2H-MoSe{sub 2}, in which two different layers 2H-MoS{sub 2} and 2H-MoSe{sub 2}, have enhanced thermoelectric properties because of the increased density of states around the Fermi level and the decreased band gap size. Highlights: • We explored a way of improving TE properties of 2H-MoQ{sub 2} on DFT methods. • The mixed-layer compounds MoS{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} have enhanced thermoelectric properties. • This is caused by modulated electronic structure of mixed layer compound. • Layer mixing approach should be regarded as a useful way to improve TE properties.

  13. Magnetic properties and photoabsorption of the Mn-doped CeO{sub 2} nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chuanhui; Science College of Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 ; Hu, Chenguo; Chen, Peng; Wan, Buyong; He, Xiaoshan; Tian, Yongshu; Chongqing Communication College, Chongqing 400035

    2010-07-15

    Mn-doped CeO{sub 2} nanorods have been prepared from CeO{sub 2} particles through a facile composite-hydroxide-mediated (CHM) approach. The analysis from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the manganese doped in CeO{sub 2} exists as Mn{sup 2+}. The magnetic measurement of the Mn-doped CeO{sub 2} nanorods exhibits an enhanced ferromagnetic property at room temperature with a remanence magnetization (Mr) of 1.36 x 10{sup -3} emu/g and coercivity (Hc) of 22 Oe. Comparative UV-visible spectra reveal the shift of the absorption peak of the CeO{sub 2} from ultraviolet region to visible light region after being doped with Mn. The room temperature ferromagnetic properties and light absorption of the Mn-doped CeO{sub 2} nanorods would have potential applications in photocatalysis and building of photovoltaic devices.

  14. Giant atomic displacement at a magnetic phase transition in metastable Mn3O4

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Shigeto; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F; Shapiro, Max C; Molaison, Jamie J; Pradhan, Neelam; Guthrie, Malcolm; Tulk, Christopher A; Fisher, Ian R; Mao, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    We present x-ray, neutron scattering, and heat capacity data that reveal a coupled first-order magnetic and structural phase transition of the metastable mixed-valence postspinel compound Mn3O4 at 210 K. Powder neutron diffraction measurements reveal a magnetic structure in which Mn3+ spins align antiferromagnetically along the edge-sharing a axis, with a magnetic propagation vector k = [1/2,0,0]. In contrast, the Mn2+ spins, which are geometrically frustrated, do not order until a much lower temperature. Although the Mn2+ spins do not directly participate in the magnetic phase transition at 210 K, structural refinements reveal a large atomic shift at this phase transition, corresponding to a physical motion of approximately 0.25 angstrom, even though the crystal symmetry remains unchanged. This "giant" response is due to the coupled effect of built-in strain in the metastable postspinel structure with the orbital realignment of the Mn3+ ion.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M.; Marti, X.; Holy, V.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-03-12

    We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

  16. Electrochemical Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Lister; R. E. Mizia; H. Tian

    2005-10-01

    The waste package site recommendation design specified a boron-containing stainless steel, Neutronit 976/978, for fabrication of the internal baskets that will be used as a corrosion-resistant neutron-absorbing material. Recent corrosion test results gave higher-than-expected corrosion rates for this material. The material callout for these components has been changed to a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ASTM-B 932-04, UNS N06464) that is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. This report discusses the results of initial corrosion testing of this material in simulated in-package environments that could contact the fuel baskets after breach of the waste package outer barrier. The corrosion test matrix was executed using the potentiodynamic and potentiostatic electrochemical test techniques. The alloy performance shows low rates of general corrosion after initial removal of a gadolinium-rich second phase that intersects the surface. The high halide-containing test solutions exhibited greater tendencies toward initiation of crevice corrosion.

  17. Thermo-physical Properties of DU-10 wt.% Mo Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Cynthia A. Papesch; Andrew P. Maddison; Thomas Hartmann; Francine J. Rice

    2010-08-01

    Low-enriched uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum is under consideration by the Global Threat Reduction Initiative reactor convert program as a very high density fuel to enable the conversion of high-performance research reactors away from highly-enriched uranium fuels. As with any fuel development program, the thermophysical properties of the fuel as a function of temperature are extremely important and must be well characterized in order to effectively model and predict fuel behavior under normal and off-normal irradiation conditions. For the alloy system under investigation, there is a lack of thermophysical property data, and in most cases, the data is relatively inconsistent and lacks sufficient explanation. Available literature on this alloy system comes mainly from studies done during the 1960s and 1970s, and often does not include sufficient information on fabrication history or conditions to draw conclusions for the current application. The current paper has investigated specific heat capacity, coefficient of linear thermal expansion, density, and thermal diffusivity that were then used to calculate alloy thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. The data obtained from this investigation was compared to available literature on similar U-Mo alloys, and in most cases are in good agreement.

  18. MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons as promising thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, D. D.; Liu, H. J. Cheng, L.; Jiang, P. H.; Shi, J.; Tang, X. F.

    2014-09-29

    The thermoelectric properties of MoS{sub 2} armchair nanoribbons with different width are studied by using first-principles calculations and Boltzmann transport theory, where the relaxation time is predicted from deformation potential theory. Due to the dangling bonds at the armchair edge, there is obvious structure reconstruction of the nanoribbons which plays an important role in governing the electronic and transport properties. The investigated armchair nanoribbons are found to be semiconducting with indirect gaps, which exhibit interesting width-dependent oscillation behavior. The smaller gap of nanoribbon with width N = 4 (Here, N represents the number of dimer lines or zigzag chains across the ribbon width) leads to a much larger electrical conductivity at 300 K, which outweighs the relatively larger electronic thermal conductivity when compared with those of N = 5, 6. As a result, the ZT values can be optimized to 3.4 (p-type) and 2.5 (n-type) at room temperature, which significantly exceed the performance of most laboratory results reported in the literature.

  19. Elevated temperature stability of a 6% Mo superaustenitic stainless alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Grubb, J.F.

    1996-11-01

    A 6% Mo superaustenitic stainless alloy (UNS N08367) was exposed at temperatures in the 1,000 to 1,900 F (538 to 1,038 C) range for times up to 10,000 hours. The effect of these exposures on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance has been examined. Exposure of N08367 alloy at 1,900 F (1,056 C) for 1 to 10 hours does not result in precipitation of intermetallic phases, does not embrittle it, and does not degrade its corrosion resistance. Exposure of N08367 alloy at 1,300 to 1,800 F (704 to 982 C) does precipitate intermetallic phases, does embrittle it, and does degrade its corrosion resistance. Short-term exposure of N08367 alloy at 1,000 or 1,100 F (538 to 593 C) does not cause precipitation of intermetallic phases, with consequent embrittlement and loss of corrosion resistance, but long-term exposures do. Extrapolation of the embrittlement time vs. temperature curves shows that the current 800 F (427 C) use temperature limit for N08367 alloy is safe.

  20. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MO.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MO.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Missouri Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  1. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O J-8 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O J-9 Draft PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) OCTOBER 1 (2012) through SEPTEMBER 30, (2013) Contract No. ...

  2. Microscopic origin of low frequency noise in MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhamoy; Jain, Manish; Ghosh, Arindam; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Sarma, D. D.

    2014-09-01

    We report measurement of low frequency 1/f noise in molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors in multiple device configurations including MoS{sub 2} on silicon dioxide as well as MoS{sub 2}-hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructures. All as-fabricated devices show similar magnitude of noise with number fluctuation as the dominant mechanism at high temperatures and density, although the calculated density of traps is two orders of magnitude higher than that at the SiO{sub 2} interface. Measurements on the heterostructure devices with vacuum annealing and dual gated configuration reveals that along with the channel, metal-MoS{sub 2} contacts also play a significant role in determining noise magnitude in these devices.

  3. Large theoretical thermoelectric power factor of suspended single-layer MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Babaei, Hasan E-mail: babaei@auburn.edu; Khodadadi, J. M.; Sinha, Sanjiv

    2014-11-10

    We have calculated the semi-classical thermoelectric power factor of suspended single-layer (SL)- MoS{sub 2} utilizing electron relaxation times derived from ab initio calculations. Measurements of the thermoelectric power factor of SL-MoS{sub 2} on substrates reveal poor power factors. In contrast, we find the thermoelectric power factor of suspended SL-MoS{sub 2} to peak at ∼2.8 × 10{sup 4} μW/m K{sup 2} at 300 K, at an electron concentration of 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. This figure is higher than that in bulk Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, for example. Given its relatively high thermal conductivity, suspended SL-MoS{sub 2} may hold promise for in-plane thin-film Peltier coolers, provided reasonable mobilities can be realized.

  4. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O J-15 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    15 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J ATTACHMENT D: ... WIPP M&O J-16 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION ...

  5. Exceptionally high glass-forming ability of an FeCoCrMoCBY alloy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exceptionally ... Here we report the exceptionally high GFA of an FeCoCrMoCBY ... OSTI Identifier: 20702296 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  6. A pseudo binary y-Gd solidification diagram for Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: A pseudo binary y-Gd solidification diagram for Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys. No abstract prepared. Authors: Dupont, John Neuman 1 ; Minicozzi, Michael J. 1 ; Robino, Charles ...

  7. Surface confined quantum well state in MoS{sub 2}(0001) thin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Our findings of scQWS in MoSsub 2 shed some light on understanding the electronic properties of 2D materials with implications in future 2D electronic devices. Authors: Sun, ...

  8. Substrate interactions with suspended and supported monolayer MoS2: Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jin, Wencan; Yeh, Po -Chun; Zaki, Nader; Zhang, Datong; Liou, Jonathan T.; Dadap, Jerry I.; Barinov, Alexey; Yablonskikh, Mikhail; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Sutter, Peter; et al

    2015-03-17

    We report the directly measured electronic structure of exfoliated monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) using micrometer-scale angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Measurements of both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ elucidate the effects of interaction with a substrate. Thus, a suggested relaxation of the in-plane lattice constant is found for both suspended and supported monolayer MoS₂ crystals. For suspended MoS₂, a careful investigation of the measured uppermost valence band gives an effective mass at Γ¯ and Κ¯ of 2.00m₀ and 0.43m₀, respectively. We also measure an increase in the band linewidth from the midpoint of Γ¯Κ¯ to the vicinity of Κ¯ and briefly discussmore » its possible origin.« less

  9. Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography. ... Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase ...

  10. Giant and tunable valley degeneracy splitting in MoTe 2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on September 7, 2016 Title: Giant and tunable valley degeneracy splitting in MoTe 2 Authors: Qi, Jingshan ; Li, Xiao ; Niu, Qian ; Feng, ...

  11. Bonding between graphene and MoS{sub 2} monolayers without and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    layer and in-gap states with linear dispersion contributed mostly by the graphene layer. ... Moreover, we calculate the dielectric function of the Li intercalated grapheneMoSsub 2 ...

  12. Phase Development in a U-7 wt.% Mo vs. Al-7 wt.% Ge Diffusion Couple

    SciTech Connect

    E. Perez; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; Y.H. Sohn

    2013-10-01

    Fuel development for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program has demonstrated that U-Mo alloys in contact with Al develop interaction regions with phases that have poor irradiation behavior. The addition of Si to the Al has been considered with positive results. Compositional modification to replace Si with Ge is now under evaluation to attempt to further improve irradiation behavior. In this study, the microstructural and phase development of a diffusion couple of U-7 wt.% Mo in contact with Al-7 wt.% Ge was examined by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The interdiffusion zone developed a microstructure that included the cubic-UGe3 phase and amorphous phases. The UGe3 phase was observed with and without Mo and Al solid solutioning developing a (U,Mo)(Al,Ge)3 phase.

  13. AB INITIO Modeling of Thermomechanical Properties of Mo-Based Alloys for Fossil Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2013-12-31

    In this final scientific/technical report covering the period of 3.5 years started on July 1, 2011, we report the accomplishments on the study of thermo-mechanical properties of Mo-based intermetallic compounds under NETL support. These include computational method development, physical properties investigation of Mo-based compounds and alloys. The main focus is on the mechanical and thermo mechanical properties at high temperature since these are the most crucial properties for their potential applications. In particular, recent development of applying ab initio molecular dynamic (AIMD) simulations to the T1 (Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}) and T2 (Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}) phases are highlighted for alloy design in further improving their properties.

  14. NNSA Works to Establish a Reliable Supply of Mo-99 Produced Without...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOENNSA's objective is to accelerate the establishment of a reliable, commercial Mo-99 supply network that avoids a single point of failure and does not use proliferation-sensitiv...

  15. Monolayers of MoS{sub 2} as an oxidation protective nanocoating material

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, H. Sener; Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.; Durgun, E.

    2014-08-28

    First-principle calculations are employed to investigate the interaction of oxygen with ideal and defective MoS{sub 2} monolayers. Our calculations show that while oxygen atoms are strongly bound on top of sulfur atoms, the oxygen molecule only weakly interacts with the surface. The penetration of oxygen atoms and molecules through a defect-free MoS{sub 2} monolayer is prevented by a very high diffusion barrier indicating that MoS{sub 2} can serve as a protective layer for oxidation. The analysis is extended to WS{sub 2} and similar coating characteristics are obtained. Our calculations indicate that ideal and continuous MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} monolayers can improve the oxidation and corrosion-resistance of the covered surface and can be considered as an efficient nanocoating material.

  16. Magneto-optical characterizations of FeTe???Se??? thin films with critical current density over 1 MA/cm

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yue; Li, Qiang; Tsuchiya, Yuji; Pyon, Sunseng; Tamegai, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Cheng; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    We performed magneto-optical (MO) measurements on FeTe???Se??? thin films grown on LaAlO? (LAO) and Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) single-crystalline substrates. These thin films show superconducting transition temperature Tc ~19 K, 4 K higher than the bulk sample. Typical roof-top patterns can be observed in the MO images of thin films grown on LAO and YSZ, from which a large and homogeneous critical current density Jc ~ 3 - 4 x 10? A/cm at 5 K was obtained. Magnetic flux penetration measurement reveals that the current is almost isotropically distributed in the two thin films. Compared with bulk crystals, FeTe???Se??? thin film demonstrates not only higher Tc, but also much larger Jc, which is attractive for applications.

  17. Influence of the support of CoMo sulfide catalysts and of the addition of potassium and platinum on the catalytic performances for the hydrodeoxygenation of carbonyl, carboxyl, and guaiacol-type molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centeno, A.; Laurent, E.; Delmon, B. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)] [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    1995-07-01

    The present work corresponds to part of a program aimed at upgrading oil obtained by pyrolysis of biomass by hydrotreatment (hydrodeoxygenation HDO). CoMo sulfide catalysts, nonsupported, supported on different supports (alumina, carbon, silica), or modified by K or Pt, were used. The authors used a model reacting mixture containing compounds representative of the molecules that must react to permit a primary stabilisation of the pyrolytic oil: 4-methy lacetophenone (4-MA), diethylsebacate (DES), and guaiacol (GUA). In the reaction of the carbonyl group of the 4-MA it is shown that no important role is played by any acid-base mechanism; dispersion determines the activity. Acidity of the support influences the formation of active sites for decarboxylation and hydrogenation of the carboxyl group of DES. It was confirmed that guaiacol-type molecules lead to coking reactions. The role of acidity in the mechanism of these reactions is confirmed, but the modifications made in the catalysts in this work are still not sufficient to control coke deposition. The catalysts supported on carbon lead to the direct elimination of the methoxyl group of the guaiacol. Carbon, on the whole, seems to be a promising support. This work suggests that appropriate modifications of the hydrotreating catalysts can lead to a more effective process for stabilisation of the bio-oils by reaction with hydrogen. 55 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-10

    An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

  19. A WSe{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} heterostructure photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect

    Flöry, Nikolaus; Jain, Achint; Bharadwaj, Palash; Parzefall, Markus; Novotny, Lukas; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji

    2015-09-21

    We report on the photovoltaic effect in a WSe{sub 2}/MoSe{sub 2} heterojunction, demonstrating gate tunable current rectification with on/off ratios of over 10{sup 4}. Spatially resolved photocurrent maps show the photovoltaic effect to originate from the entire overlap region. Compared to WSe{sub 2}/MoS{sub 2} heterostructures, our devices perform better at long wavelengths and yield higher quantum efficiencies, in agreement with Shockley-Queisser theory.

  20. Climate Action Champions: Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO Climate Action Champions: Mid-America Regional Council, KS and MO The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) is a nonprofit association of city and county governments and the metropolitan planning organization for the bistate Kansas City region. They provide a forum for the region to work together to advance social, economic and environmental progress. MARC received the Climate Action Champion designation in consortium with the City

  1. Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO (Technical Report)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of LED Street Lighting in Kansas City, MO Nine different streetlighting products were installed on various streets in Kansas City, Missouri during February, 2011, to evaluate their performance relative to the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) lighting. The applications investigated included 100 W, 150 W, 250 W, and 400 W HPS installations. Initial measurements

  2. Irradiation Creep and Swelling from 400 C to 600 C of the Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Alloy MA957

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Gelles, David S.; Garner, Francis A.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Abe, Katsunori

    2004-04-24

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications. As part of an extensive study performed at PNNL on the ODS steel MA957 [1], irradiation creep tests were performed on pressurized tubes made from MA957 by two different methods. The tubes were made either by gun drilling alone or by a combination of rod drawing and gun drilling. The different fabrication methods were explored because ODS steels have been difficult to form. The pressurized tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 dpa to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 C to 600 C. The effective stresses resulting from the pressurization of the tubes ranged from 0 MPa to 175 MPa.

  3. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stir zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.

  4. Ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures for spintronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wosinski, Tadeusz; Andrearczyk, Tomasz; Figielski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Wrobel, Jerzy; Sadowski, Janusz

    2013-12-04

    Magneto-resistive, cross-like nanostructures have been designed and fabricated by electron-beam lithography patterning and chemical etching from thin epitaxial layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As. The nanostructures, composed of two perpendicular nanostripes crossing in the middle of their length, represent four-terminal devices, in which an electric current can be driven through any of the two nanostripes. In these devices, a novel magneto-resistive memory effect, related to a rearrangement of magnetic domain walls in the central part of the device, has been demonstrated. It consists in that the zero-field resistance of a nanostripe depends on the direction of previously applied magnetic field. The nanostructures can thus work as two-state devices providing basic elements of nonvolatile memory cells.

  5. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.

  6. High reflectance and low stress Mo2C/Be multilayers

    DOEpatents

    Bajt, Sasa; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2001-01-01

    A material for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayers that will reflect at about 11.3 nm, have a high reflectance, low stress, and high thermal and radiation stability. The material consists of alternating layers of Mo.sub.2 C and Be deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on a substrate, such as silicon. In one example a Mo.sub.2 C/Be multilayer gave 65.2% reflectance at 11.25 nm measured at 5 degrees off normal incidence angle, and consisted of 70 bilayers with a deposition period of 5.78 nm, and was deposited at 0.83 mTorr argon (Ar) sputtering pressure, with the first and last layers being Be. The stress of the multilayer is tensile and only +88 MPa, compared to +330 MPa of a Mo/Be multilayers of the same thickness. The Mo.sub.2 C/Be multilayer was capped with carbon which produced an increase in reflectivity of about 7% over a similar multilayer with no carbon capping material, thus raising the reflectivity from 58.3% to over 65%. The multilayers were formed using either Mo.sub.2 C or Be as the first and last layers, and initial testing has shown the formation of beryllium carbide at the interfaces between the layers which both stabilizes and has a smoothing effect, and appear to be smoother than the interfaces in Mo/Be multilayers.

  7. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.

  8. MoS{sub 2} nanotube exfoliation as new synthesis pathway to molybdenum blue

    SciTech Connect

    Visic, B.; Gunde, M. Klanjsek; Kovac, J.; Iskra, I.; Jelenc, J.; Remskar, M.; Centre of Excellence Namaste, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: ? New synthesis approach to obtaining molybdenum blue via exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes. ? Material is prone to self assembly and is stable in high vacuum. ? Molecules are as small as 2 nm and their clusters are up to tens of nanometers. ? Change in absorption and oxidation states from the precursor MoS{sub 2}. -- Abstract: Molybdenum blue-type materials are usually obtained by partially reducing Mo{sup VI+} in acidic solutions, while in the presented method it is formed in ethanol solution of exfoliated MoS{sub 2} nanotubes, where the MoS{sub 2} flakes are the preferential location for their growth. Material was investigated by means of scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, showing the structure and self assembly, while also confirming that it is stable in high vacuum with molecules as small as 1.6 nm and the agglomerates of few tens of nanometres. The ultravioletvisible and photoelectron spectrometry show the change in absorption properties and oxidation states from MoS{sub 2} structure to molybdenum blue, while the presence of sulphur suggests that this is a new type of molybdenum blue material.

  9. Effects of thermal treatment on the co-rolled U-Mo fuel foils

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Cynthia R. Breckenridge; Brady L. Mackowiak; Glenn A. Moore; Barry H. Rabin; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2014-11-01

    A monolithic fuel type is being developed to convert US high performance research and test reactors such as Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). The interaction between the cladding and the U-Mo fuel meat during fuel fabrication and irradiation is known to have negative impacts on fuel performance, such as mechanical integrity and dimensional stability. In order to eliminate/minimize the direct interaction between cladding and fuel meat, a thin zirconium diffusion barrier was introduced between the cladding and U-Mo fuel meat through a co-rolling process. A complex interface between the zirconium and U-Mo was developed during the co-rolling process. A predictable interface between zirconium and U-Mo is critical to achieve good fuel performance since the interfaces can be the weakest link in the monolithic fuel system. A post co-rolling annealing treatment is expected to create a well-controlled interface between zirconium and U-Mo. A systematic study utilizing post co-rolling annealing treatment has been carried out. Based on microscopy results, the impacts of the annealing treatment on the interface between zirconium and U-Mo will be presented and an optima annealing treatment schedule will be suggested. The effects of the annealing treatment on the fuel performance will also be discussed.

  10. Stability of precipitate phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the and phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the phase is stable at high temperature and transformed into the phase at lowmoretemperature. The other is that both the and phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.less

  11. Thermal stability of intermetallic phases in Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yang, Ying; Tan, Lizhen; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-06-12

    Understanding the stability of precipitate phases in the Fe-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys is critical to the alloy design and application of Mo-containing Austenitic steels. Coupled with thermodynamic modeling, stability of the chi and Laves phases in two Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloys were investigated at 1000, 850 and 700 °C for different annealing time. The morphologies, compositions and crystal structures of the matrix and precipitate phases were carefully examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Microanalysis, X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The two key findings resulted from this work. One is that the chi phase is stable at high temperature and transformed intomore » the Laves phase at low temperature. The other is that both the chi and Laves phases have large solubilites of Cr, Mo and Ni, among which the Mo solubility has a major role on the relative stability of the precipitate phases. The developed thermodynamic models were then applied to evaluating the Mo effect on the stability of precipitate phases in AISI 316 and NF709 alloys.« less

  12. Atomic oxygen interaction with nickel multilayer and antimony oxide doped MoS{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.

    1994-12-31

    Sputtered MoS{sub 2} is a solid lubricant capable of ultralow friction coefficients (below 0.05) load-bearing capacity. Since it exhibits low friction in vacuum, low outgassing rate, is non-migrating and lacks organic binders, this material is an attractive lubricant for space mechanisms. To exploit these new materials to their fullest potential, designers of space-based motion systems require data on the effects of atomic oxygen exposure on dense, sputtered MoS{sub 2}. This paper describes the effects of atomic oxygen in low earth orbit on the friction and surface composition of sputtered MoS{sub 2} films. Sputtered multilayer films of MoS{sub 2} with nickel (0.7 nm Ni per 10 nm MoS{sub 2}, for 1 {mu}m total film thickness), and MoS{sub 2} cosputtered with antimony oxide (nominally 2 {mu}m thick) were exposed to 2.2 to 2.5 x 10{sup 20} oxygen/cm{sup 2} over a period of 42.25 hours in earth orbit on the United States space shuttle. Identical specimens were kept as controls in desiccated storage for the duration of the mission, and another set was exposed to an equivalent fluence of atomic oxygen in the laboratory. The friction coefficient in air and vacuum, and the composition of worn surfaces, were determined prior to the shuttle flight and again after the shuttle flight. Results are described.

  13. Synthesis of MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles for azo dye degradation by catalytic ozonation

    SciTech Connect

    Manivel, Arumugam; Lee, Gang-Juan; Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Jing-Heng; Ma, Shih-Hsin; Horng, Tzzy-Leng; Wu, Jerry J.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of one-dimensional MoO{sub 3} nanostructures using hydrothermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. • Sonochemical synthesized MoO{sub 3} presents the best efficiency for the dye removal by catalytic ozonation. • Efficient environmental remediation process. - Abstract: One-dimensional molybdenum trioxide nanostructures were prepared in three different approaches, including thermal, microwave, and sonochemical methods. The physicochemical properties of the obtained MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were investigated by diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis. Among the methods as investigated, sonochemical synthesis gave well-dispersed fine MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles compared with the other approaches. All the synthesized MoO{sub 3} nanostructures were examined for the catalytic ozonation to degrade azo dye in aqueous environment. Different performances were obtained for the catalyst prepared in different methods and the catalytic efficiencies were found to be the order of sonochemical, microwave, and then thermal methods. The sonochemical MoO{sub 3} catalyst allowed the total dye removal within 20 min and its good performance was justified according to their higher surface area with higher number of active sites that provide effective dye interaction for better degradation.

  14. Impedance analysis of MnCoCuO NTC ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Song, S.G. . E-mail: song-ph0@wpmail.paisley.ac.uk; Ling, Z.; Placido, F.

    2005-07-12

    Impedance spectroscopy is often used to analyse the electrical properties of ceramic materials having high-resistive grain boundaries, such as ZnO and SrTiO{sub 3}. Fewer attempts have been made at using this technique for the analysis of inhomogeneous electronic ceramics consisting of grains with differing composition, such as those occurring in negative temperature coefficient (NTC) thermistors. In this study, we have attempted to adopt ac impedance spectroscopy together with other techniques to analyse an NTC thermistor ceramic material. An Mn, Co and Cu multielements transition metal oxide (MnCoCuO) ceramic was prepared by using homogeneous precipitation employing oxalic acid. This material displayed a typical NTC effect, showing an electrical resistance decrease with temperature when dc electrical measurement was performed. The ac impedance spectroscopy analysis showed that there were two peaks in impedance and conductance versus frequency plot. By using an alternative representation of impedance spectra Z'/f versus Z', three distinct relaxation frequency ranges were identified. They are believed to originate, respectively, from the electrode, phase 1 (rich-Cu phase) and phase 2 (poor-Cu phase) grains existing in this ceramic. SEM observation and EDX analysis clearly showed existence of two distinct phase grains. The resistance values were derived from phases 1 and 2 grains based on ac impedance data. The sum of the resistance values was in good agreement with that from dc measurement in the temperature range of 30-95 deg. C. The material constant, B, for the two phases was also calculated, giving 3100 and 3600 K for phases 1 and 2, respectively.

  15. Collective electronic behaviors of laterally heterostructured armchair MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Nannan; Zhou, Wenzhe; Zou, Hui; Chen, Yu; Yang, Zhixiong; Xiong, Xiang; Ouyang, Fangping

    2015-08-28

    Based on density functional theory, we have investigated the electronic properties of molybdenum disulfide-niobium disulfide hybrid nanoribbons (MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NRs). It is found that the MoS{sub 2} edge, MoS{sub 2} center, NbS{sub 2} edge, and NbS{sub 2} center have distinct contributions to the collective electronic behaviors of MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NRs. Its behavior, metallic or semiconductor, depends on whether the central area of NR contains NbS{sub 2} chain or not. This dependence has been also revealed in the electronic structures of NbS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NR and MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2}-MoS{sub 2} NR, of which the former is semiconductor and the latter is metal. In comparison with MoS{sub 2} NR of the same width, the hybrid has a different bandgap that was caused by the coupled effects between NbS{sub 2} edge and MoS{sub 2} edge. This fact makes MoS{sub 2}-NbS{sub 2} NRs a possible candidate for nanoelectronic devices based on heterostructured transition-metal dichalcogenide.

  16. Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Junhao; Feng, Wei; Xiao, Kai; Qiu, Yunfeng; Chen, XiaoShuang; Liu, Guangbo; Cao, Wenwu; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Zhou, Wu; et al

    2016-07-19

    2D layered MoS2 has drawn intense attention for its applications in flexible electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. Most of the MoS2 atomic layers grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition techniques are n-type due to the abundant sulfur vacancies. Facile production of MoS2 atomic layers with p-type behavior, however, remains challenging. Here, a novel one-step growth has been developed to attain p-type MoS2 layers in large scale by using Mo-containing sol–gel, including 1% tungsten (W). Atomic-resolution electron microscopy characterization reveals that small tungsten oxide clusters are commonly present on the as-grown MoS2 film due to the incomplete reduction of W precursormore » at the reaction temperature. These omnipresent small tungsten oxide clusters contribute to the p-type behavior, as verified by density functional theory calculations, while preserving the crystallinity of the MoS2 atomic layers. The Mo containing sol–gel precursor is compatible with the soft-lithography techniques, which enables patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers into regular arrays with different shapes, holding great promise for highly integrated device applications. Lastly, an atomically thin p–n junction is fabricated by the as-prepared MoS2, which shows strong rectifying behavior.« less

  17. Ab initio study of Fe{sub 2}MnZ (Al, Si, Ge) Heusler alloy using GGA approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Vivek Kumar Jain, Vishal Lakshmi, N. Venugopalan, K.

    2014-04-24

    Density functional theory based on FP-LAPW method used to investigate the electronic structure of Fe{sub 2}MnZ, shows that the total spin magnetic moment shows a trend consistent with the Slater–Pauling curve. The Fe and Mn magnetic moment depend on choice of Z element although the magnetic moment of Z element is negative and less than 0.1 μ{sub B}. Spin polarization calculations evidence 100% spin polarization for Fe{sub 2}MnSi. Fe{sub 2}MnAl and Fe{sub 2}MnGe show metallic behavior with 93%, 98% spin polarization.

  18. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  19. Recent progress of magnetocaloric effect and magnetic refrigerant materials of Mn compounds (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, H. Takahara, T.; Katagiri, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Soejima, K.; Yamashita, K.

    2015-05-07

    Magnetocaloric and related properties of Ru and Ni substituted (MnFe){sub 2}(PSi) are presented. It is found that Ru and Ni are effective doping elements to reduce the thermal hysteresis of (MnFe){sub 2}(PSi). The origin of the thermal hysteresis is discussed on the basis of a thermodynamic model. It is shown that the elastic energy is responsible for the thermal hysteresis. We also show recent developments of the production process of Mn compounds in an industrial scale.

  20. Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Maniraj, M.; D?Souza, S. W.; Rai, Abhishek; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Barman, S. R.

    2015-08-20

    Momentum resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy measurements show that the dispersion of the unoccupied bands of Ni2MnGa is significant in the austenite phase. Furthermore, in the martensite phase, it is markedly reduced, which is possibly related to the structural transition to an incommensurate modulated state in the martensite phase. Finally, based on the first principle calculations of the electronic structure of NiMnGa, we show that the modification of the spectral shape with surface composition is related to change in the hybridization between the Mn 3d and Ni 3d-like states that dominate the unoccupied conduction band.

  1. Unique light-induced degradation in yellow-emitting K₂SiF₆:Mn²⁺ phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Takuya; Adachi, Sadao

    2014-10-07

    Photo-induced luminescence intensity degradation in yellow-emitting K₂SiF₆:Mn²⁺ phosphor is studied using x-ray diffraction measurement, photoluminescence (PL) analysis, PL excitation (PLE) spectroscopy, PL decay analysis, and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement. The yellow-emitting K₂SiF₆:Mn²⁺ phosphor exhibits remarkable degradation in the PL intensity under Xe lamp exposure. Coherent laser irradiation also induces degradation and its degree is in the order of He–Cd (λ = 325 nm) > Ar⁺ (488 nm) > He–Ne laser (632.8 nm). The degradation mechanism is proposed to be due to change in the valence state of manganese ions from Mn²⁺ to Mn³⁺ by the photooxidation (Mn²⁺ → Mn³⁺) or disproportionation reaction (2Mn²⁺ → Mn⁺ + Mn³⁺). The ESR measurement confirms the decreased Mn²⁺ spin density in the sample exposed with Xe lamp. The PLE spectrum suggests that the excitation of Mn³⁺ ions occurs through energy transfer upon absorption of exciting radiation by the Mn²⁺ ions. Thermal annealing of the degraded samples at ≥200 °C causes a blueshift in the PL emission band with an appearance of the Mn⁴⁺-related sharp red emission lines.

  2. Role of Cu-Ion Doping in Cu-α-MnO2 Nanowire Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Davis, Danae J.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Vigil, Julian A.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Brumbach, Michael T.; Coker, Eric N.; Limmer, Steven J.

    2014-07-09

    The role of Cu-ion doping in α-MnO2 electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline electrolyte was investigated. Copper doped α-MnO2 nanowires (Cu-α-MnO2) were prepared with varying amounts of Cu2+ using a solvothermal method. The electrocatalytic dataindicates that Cu-α-MnO2 nanowires have higher terminal current densities, enhanced kinetic rate constants, and improved charge transfer resistances that trend with Cu-content, exceeding values attained by α-MnO2 alone. The observed improvement in catalytic behavior correlates with an increase in Mn3+ content for the Cu-α-MnO2 nanowires. The Mn3+/Mn4+ couple is themediator for the rate-limiting redox driven O2-/OH- exchange. It is proposed that O2 adsorbs viaanmore » axial site (the eg orbital on the Mn3+ d4 ion) at the surface, or at edge defects, of the nanowireand that the increase in covalent nature of the nanowire with Cu-ion doping leads to stabilization of O2 adsorbates and faster rates of reduction. This work is applicable to other manganese oxide electrocatalysts and shows for the first time there is a correlation for manganese oxides between electrocatalytic activity for the ORR in alkaline electrolyte and an increase in Mn3+ character of the oxide.« less

  3. Search for Scalar Diphoton Resonances in the Mass Range 65–600 GeV with the ATLAS Detector in pp Collision Data at s<mo>=>8mn>TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. 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M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-10-20

    A search for scalar particles decaying via narrow resonances into two photons in the mass range 65–600 GeV is performed using 20.3 fb₋1 of √s=8 TeV pp collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The recently discovered Higgs boson is treated as a background. No significant evidence for an additional signal is observed. The results are presented as limits at the 95% confidence level on the production cross section of a scalar boson times branching ratio into two photons, in a fiducial volume where the reconstruction efficiency is approximately independent of the event topology. Lastly, the upper limits set extend over a considerably wider mass range than previous searches.

  4. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN<mo>=>200mn> GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Caldern de la Barca Snchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at ?sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to the model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (< 1%) deviation is observed.

  5. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at sNN<mo>=>2.76mn> TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. 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    2015-09-01

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using √sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 μb-1. Thevm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistent with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ε2 and ε3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with εm-εn correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.

  6. Search for Dark Matter in Events with Missing Transverse Momentum and a Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Photons in pp Collisions at s<mo>=>8mn> TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. 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R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. 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E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. 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M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. 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Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    The results of our search for new phenomena in events with large missing transverse momentum and a Higgs boson decaying to two photons are reported. Data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 have been collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Moreover the data we observed are well described by the expected standard model backgrounds. Upper limits on the cross section of events with large missing transverse momentum and a Higgs boson candidate are also placed. Exclusion limits are presented for models of physics beyond the standard model featuring dark-matter candidates.

  7. Charged-to-neutral correlation at forward rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN<mo>=>200mn> GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandacz, A.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-03-20

    Event-by-event fluctuations of the ratio of inclusive charged to photon multiplicities at forward rapidity in Au+Au collision at √sNN=200 GeV have been studied. Dominant contribution to such fluctuations is expected to come from correlated production of charged and neutral pions. We search for evidences of dynamical fluctuations of different physical origins. Observables constructed out of moments of multiplicities are used as measures of fluctuations. Mixed events and model calculations are used as baselines. Results are compared to the dynamical net-charge fluctuations measured in the same acceptance. A non-zero statistically significant signal of dynamical fluctuations is observed in excess to the model prediction when charged particles and photons are measured in the same acceptance. Thus, we find that, unlike dynamical net-charge fluctuation, charge-neutral fluctuation is not dominated by correlation due to particle decay. Results are compared to the expectations based on the generic production mechanism of pions due to isospin symmetry, for which no significant (< 1%) deviation is observed.

  8. Measurements of dielectron production in Au + Au collisions at sNN<mo>=>200mn> GeV from the STAR experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, K.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, X.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, H.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-08-24

    We report on measurements of dielectron (e⁺e⁻) production in Au+Au collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 200 GeV per nucleon-nucleon pair using the STAR detector at RHIC. Systematic measurements of the dielectron yield as a function of transverse momentum (pT) and collision centrality show an enhancement compared to a cocktail simulation of hadronic sources in the low invariant-mass region (Mee < 1GeV/c2). This enhancement cannot be reproduced by the ρ-meson vacuum spectral function. In minimum-bias collisions, in the invariant-mass range of 0.30 – 0.76GeV/c², integrated over the full pT acceptance, the enhancement factor is 1.76±0.06(stat.)±0.26(sys.)±0.29(cocktail). The enhancement factor exhibits weak centrality and pT dependence in STAR's accessible kinematic regions, while the excess yield in this invariant-mass region as a function of the number of participating nucleons follows a power-law shape with a power of 1.44±0.10. Models that assume an in-medium broadening of the ρ-meson spectral function consistently describe the observed excess in these measurements. In addition, we report on measurements of ω- and Φ-meson production through their e⁺e⁻ decay channel. These measurements show good agreement with Tsallis blast-wave model predictions, as well as, in the case of the Φ meson, results through its K⁺K⁻ decay channel. In the intermediate invariant-mass region (1.1 < Mee < 3GeV/c²), we investigate the spectral shapes from different collision centralities. Physics implications for possible in-medium modification of charmed hadron production and other physics sources are discussed.

  9. β -Decay Half-Lives of 110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei across the N<mo>=>82mn> Shell Gap: Implications for the Mechanism and Universality of the Astrophysical r Process

    SciTech Connect

    Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S.; Xu, Z. Y.; Jungclaus, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P. -A.; Watanabe, H.; Browne, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Gey, G.; Jung, H. S.; Meyer, B.; Sumikama, T.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Wu, J.; Baba, H.; Benzoni, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kajino, T.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y. -K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Lane, G. J.; Li, Z.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Schury, P.; Shibagaki, S.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wendt, A.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.

    2015-05-01

    The β -decay half-lives of 110 neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from Rb 37 to Sn 50 were measured at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 40 new half-lives follow robust systematics and highlight the persistence of shell effects. The new data have direct implications for r -process calculations and reinforce the notion that the second (A≈130 ) and the rare-earth-element (A≈160 ) abundance peaks may result from the freeze-out of an (n,γ)⇌(γ,n) equilibrium. In such an equilibrium, the new half-lives are important factors determining the abundance of rare-earth elements, and allow for a more reliable discussion of the r process universality. It is anticipated that universality may not extend to the elements Sn, Sb, I, and Cs, making the detection of these elements in metal-poor stars of the utmost importance to determine the exact conditions of individual r -process events.

  10. Erratum: Evidence of b-jet quenching in PbPb collisions at sNN<mo>=>2.76mn>TeV [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 , 132301 (2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-07-10

    In our Letter, there was a component of the statistical uncertainty from the simulated PbPb Monte Carlo samples. This uncertainty was not propagated to all of the results. Figures 3 and 4 have been updated to reflect this source of uncertainty. In this case, the statistical uncertainties remain smaller than the systematic uncertainties in all cases such that the conclusions of the Letter are unaltered.

  11. C -parameter distribution at N <mn>3mn> LL <mo>'> including power corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-15

    We compute the e⁺e⁻ C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(α3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments Ωn. To eliminate an O(ΛQCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter Ω1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in Ω1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for αs(mZ) and Ω1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ≅ 2.5% at Q=mZ.

  12. First-principles study of spin-transfer torque in Co{sub 2}MnSi/Al/Co{sub 2}MnSi spin-valve

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Ling Yang, Zejin

    2013-11-21

    The spin-transfer torque (STT) in Co{sub 2}MnSi(CMS)/Al/Co{sub 2}MnSi spin-valve system with and without interfacial disorder is studied by a first-principles noncollinear wave-function-matching method. It is shown that in the case of clean interface the angular dependence of STT for CoCo/Al (the asymmetry parameter Λ≈4.5) is more skewed than that for MnSi/Al (Λ≈2.9), which suggests the clean CoCo/Al architecture is much more efficient for the application on radio frequency oscillation. We also find that even with interfacial disorder the spin-valve of half-metallic CMS still has a relatively large parameter Λ compared to that of conventional ferromagnet. In addition, for clean interface the in-plane torkance of MnSi/Al is about twice as large as that of CoCo/Al. However, as long as the degree of interfacial disorder is sufficiently large, the CoCo/Al and MnSi/Al will show approximately the same magnitude of in-plane torkance. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that CMS/Al/CMS system has very high efficiency of STT to switch the magnetic layer of spin-valve.

  13. Planar Hall effect in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. Zou, L. K.

    2014-12-29

    The planar Hall effect of IrMn on an yttrium iron garnet (YIG = Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) was measured in the magnetic field rotating in the film plane. The magnetic field angular dependence of planar Hall resistance (PHR) was observed in YIG/IrMn bilayer at different temperatures, while the Gd{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub 12}/IrMn film shows constant PHR for different magnetic field angles at both 10 K and 300 K. This provides evidence that IrMn has interfacial spins which can be led by ferrimagnetic layer in YIG/IrMn structure. A hysteresis can be observed in PHR-magnetic field angle loop of YIG/IrMn film at 10 K, indicative of the irreversible switching of IrMn interfacial spins at low temperature.

  14. Doping against the native propensity of MoS₂: Degenerate hole doping by cation substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Joonki; Park, Tae-Eon; Lin, Der-Yuh; Fu, Deyi; Park, Joonsuk; Jung, Hee Joon; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Jang, Chaun; Sun, Yinghui; Sinclair, Robert; Chang, Joonyeon; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-12-10

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) draw much attention as the key semiconducting material for two-dimensional electrical, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. For most of these applications, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction. However, typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) is natively an n-type presumably due to omnipresent electron-donating sulfur vacancies, and stable/controllable p-type doping has not been achieved. The lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p–n junctions of MoS₂, as well as limits carrier conduction to spin-degenerate conduction bands instead of the more interesting, spin-polarized valence bands. Traditionally, extrinsic p-type doping in TMDs has been approached with surface adsorption or intercalation of electron-accepting molecules. However, practically stable doping requires substitution of host atoms with dopants where the doping is secured by covalent bonding. In this work, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS₂ by substitutional niobium (Nb) doping, leading to a degenerate hole density of ~3 × 10¹⁹ cm⁻³. Structural and X-ray techniques reveal that the Nb atoms are indeed substitutionally incorporated into MoS₂ by replacing the Mo cations in the host lattice. van der Waals p–n homojunctions based on vertically stacked MoS₂ layers are fabricated, which enable gate-tunable current rectification. A wide range of microelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices can be envisioned from the demonstrated substitutional bipolar doping of MoS₂. From the miscibility of dopants with the host, it is also expected that the synthesis technique demonstrated here can be generally extended to other TMDs for doping against their native unipolar propensity.

  15. MCNPX-CINDER'90 Simulation of Photonuclear Mo-99 Production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chemerizov, Sergey D. [Argonne National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harvey, James T. [NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes; Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory; Vandegrift, George R III [Argonne National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    The MCNPX and CINDER'90 codes were used to support design of experiments investigating Mo-99 production with a 20-MeV electron beam. Bremsstrahlung photons produced by the electron beam interacting with the target drive the desired Mo-100({gamma},n)Mo-99 reaction, as well as many undesired reactions important to accurate prediction of radiation hazards. MCNPX is a radiation transport code and CINDER'90 is a transmutation code. They are routinely used together for accelerator activation calculations. Low energy neutron fluxes and production rates for nonneutron and high energy neutron induced reactions computed using MCNPX are inputs to CINDER'90. CINDER'90 presently has only a neutron reaction cross section library up to 25 MeV and normally the other reaction rates come from MCNPX physics models. For this work MCNPX photon flux tallies modified by energy response functions prepared from evaluated photonuclear cross section data were used to tally the reaction rates for CINDER'90 input. The cross section evaluations do not provide isomer to ground state yield ratios so a spin based approximation was used. Post irradiation dose rates were calculated using MCNPX with CINDER'90 produced decay photon spectra. The sensitivity of radionuclide activities and dose rates to beam parameters including energy, position, and profile, as well as underlying isomer assumptions, was investigated. Three experimental production targets were irradiated, two natural Mo and one Mo-100 enriched. Natural Mo foils upstream of the targets were used to analyze beam position and profile by exposing Gafchromic film to the foils after each irradiation. Activation and dose rate calculations were rerun after the experiments using measured beam parameters for comparison with measured Mo-99 activities and dose rates.

  16. In Situ Time-Resolved Characterization of Ni-MoO2 Catalysts for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wen,W.; Calderon, J.; Brito, J.; Marinkovic, N.; Hanson, J.; Rodriquez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Active catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS, CO + H2O ? H2 + CO2) reaction were synthesized from nickel molybdates ({beta}-NiMoO4 and nH2O{center_dot}NiMoO4) as precursors, and their structural transformations were monitored using in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. In general, the nickel molybdates were not stable and underwent partial reduction in the presence of CO or CO/H2O mixtures at high temperatures. The interaction of {beta}-NiMoO4 with the WGS reactants at 500 C led to the formation of a mixture of Ni (24 nm particle size) and MoO2 (10 nm particle size). These Ni-MoO2 systems displayed good catalytic activity at 350, 400, and 500 C. At 350 and 400 C, catalytic tests revealed that the Ni-MoO2 system was much more active than isolated Ni (some activity) or isolated MoO2 (negligible activity). Thus, cooperative interactions between the admetal and oxide support were probably responsible for the high WGS activity of Ni-MoO2. In a second synthetic approach, the NiMoO4 hydrate was reduced to a mixture of metallic Ni, NiO, and amorphous molybdenum oxide by direct reaction with H2 gas at 350 C. In the first pass of the water-gas shift reaction, MoO2 appeared gradually at 500 C with a concurrent increase of the catalytic activity. For these catalysts, the particle size of Ni (4 nm) was much smaller than that of the MoO2 (13 nm). These systems were found to be much more active WGS catalysts than Cu-MoO2, which in turn is superior to commercial low-temperature Cu-ZnO catalysts.

  17. Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    shape memory alloy This content will become publicly available on August 20, 2016 Prev Next Title: Unoccupied electronic structure of Ni2MnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy ...

  18. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MN.pdf | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MN.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Minnesota Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  19. Pressure-Induced Metallization of the Mott Insulator MnO (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pressure-Induced Metallization of the Mott Insulator MnO Citation ... Publication Date: 2004-01-12 OSTI Identifier: 15013737 Report Number(s): UCRL-JRNL-201933 Journal ID: ISSN ...

  20. In-situ Electrical Conductivity of LixMnO2 Nanowires as a Function...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of LixMnO2 Nanowires as a Function of "x" and Size Authors: Le, Mya ; Liu, Yu ; Wang, Hui ; Dutta, Rajen ; Yan, Wenbo ; Hemminger, John C ; Wu, Ruqian ; Penner, Reginald...

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Two-Phase Fe30Ni20Mn20Al30...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Two-Phase Fe30Ni20Mn20Al30 Alloy Authors: Wu, Xiaolan 1 ; Baker, Ian 1 ; Wu, H 1 ; Miller, Michael K 2 ; More, Karren ...

  2. Magnetocaloric effect of Pr2Fe17-x Mn x alloys (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Magnetocaloric effect of Pr2Fe17-x Mn x ... OSTI Identifier: 1221829 Report Number(s): IS-J 8426 Journal ID: ISSN 1001-0521; PII: 134 ...

  3. X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Mn(4) Ca Cluster in the Water-Oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ca Cluster in the Water-Oxidation Complex of Photosystem II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-Ray Spectroscopy of the Mn(4) Ca Cluster in the Water-Oxidation Complex ...

  4. Effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of co-sputtered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on the transport properties of co-sputtered Fesub 3-xMnsub xSi epilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of ...

  5. Spectroscopic properties of (PVA+ZnO):Mn{sup 2+} polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Ch.; Raju, D. Siva; Bindu, S. Hima; Krishna, J. Suresh; Raju, Ch. Linga

    2015-05-15

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), optical absorption and infrared spectral studies have been carried out on Mn{sup 2+} ions doped in poly(vinyl alcohol) complexed with zinc oxide polymer films prepared by solution cast technique. The EPR spectra of 1 mol% Mn{sup 2+} ions doped polymer complex (PVA+ZnO) at room temperature exhibit sextet hyperfine structure (hfs), centered at 2.01. The spin-Hamiltonian parameter values indicate that the ground state of Mn{sup 2+} ion in d{sup 5} and the site symmetry around Mn{sup 2+} ions in tetragonally distorted octa hedral site. The optical absorption spectra exhibits two bands centered at 275nm at 437nm. The FTIR spectrum exhibits bands characteristic of stretching and banding vibrations of O-H, C-H and C=C groups.

  6. Modeling and Characterization of the Magnetocaloric Effect in Ni2MnGa Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Don M; Odbadrakh, Khorgolkhuu; Rios, Orlando; Hodges, Jason P; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Porter, Wallace D; Sefat, A. S.; Rusanu, Aurelian; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys have great promise as magneto-caloric effect refrigerant materials due to their combined magnetic and structural transitions. Computational and experimental research is reported on the Ni2MnGa material system. The magnetic states of this system have been explored using the Wang-Landau statistical approach in conjunction with the Locally Self-consistent Multiple-Scattering (LSMS) method to explore the magnetic states responsible for the magnet-caloric effect in this material. The effects of alloying agents on the transition temperatures of the Ni2MnGa alloy were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Neutron scattering experiments were performed to observe the structural and magnetic phase transformations at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on alloys of Ni-Mn-Ga and Ni-Mn-Ga-Cu-Fe. Data from the observations are discussed in comparison with the computational studies.

  7. Electrochemical Performances of LiMnPO4 Synthesized from Non...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Li1.1MnPO4 exhibits the most stable cycling ability probably because of the existence of a trace amount of Li3PO4 impurity that functions as a solid-state electrolyte on...

  8. Synthesis and characterization of MnPS{sub 3} for hydrogen sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, N.; Temerk, Y.M.; El-Meligi, A.A.; Badr, M.A.; Madian, M.

    2010-05-15

    Single phase MnPS{sub 3} powder was prepared by solid state reaction between Mn, S and P carried out at 650 deg. C in evacuated silica tube. The structure, morphology and sorption characteristics of the prepared solid were investigated. The results revealed that the obtained MnPS{sub 3} compound was capable of adsorbing 3.5 wt% hydrogen at -193 deg. C and a pressure of 30 bar. Little amount of hydrogen (0.07 wt%) was adsorbed at room temperature. The hydrogen adsorption/desorption cycles at various temperatures did not result in irreversible chemical structural changes of the MnPS{sub 3} compound, but the microstructure after hydrogen cycling diminished and became finer. - Graphical abstract: Atomic building of MPS{sub 3}

  9. Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Ralph G.; Christian, Jerry D.; Grover, S. Blaine; Petti, David A.; Terry, William K.; Yoon, Woo Y.

    1998-01-01

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

  10. Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1998-09-01

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

  11. Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2017 Title: Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor 2D layered MoS2 has drawn intense attention for its applications in flexible electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. Most of the MoS2 atomic layers grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition techniques are n-type due to the abundant

  12. Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2017 Title: Patterned growth of p-type MoS2 atomic layers using sol-gel as precursor 2D layered MoS2 has drawn intense attention for its applications in flexible electronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. Most of the MoS2 atomic layers grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition

  13. Surface oxidation energetics and kinetics on MoS{sub 2} monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    KC, Santosh; Longo, Roberto C.; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-04-07

    In this work, surface oxidation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} (one of the representative semiconductors in transition-metal dichalcogenides) has been investigated using density functional theory method. Oxygen interaction with MoS{sub 2} shows that, thermodynamically, the surface tends to be oxidized. However, the dissociative absorption of molecular oxygen on the MoS{sub 2} surface is kinetically limited due to the large energy barrier at low temperature. This finding elucidates the air stability of MoS{sub 2} surface in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the presence of defects significantly alters the surface stability and adsorption mechanisms. The electronic properties of the oxidized surface have been examined as a function of oxygen adsorption and coverage as well as substitutional impurities. Our results on energetics and kinetics of oxygen interaction with the MoS{sub 2} monolayer are useful for the understanding of surface oxidation, air stability, and electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides at the atomic scale.

  14. FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

    2003-04-22

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  15. Elementary Steps of Syngas Reactions on Mo2C(001): Adsorption Thermochemistry and Bond Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Medford, Andrew

    2012-02-16

    Density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio thermodynamics are applied in order to investigate the most stable surface and subsurface terminations of Mo{sub 2}C(001) as a function of chemical potential and in the presence of syngas. The Mo-terminated (001) surface is then used as a model surface to evaluate the thermochemistry and energetic barriers for key elementary steps in syngas reactions. Adsorption energy scaling relations and Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relationships are established and used to place Mo{sub 2}C into the context of transition metal surfaces. The results indicate that the surface termination is a complex function of reaction conditions and kinetics. It is predicted that the surface will be covered by either C{sub 2}H{sub 2} or O depending on conditions. Comparisons to transition metals indicate that the Mo-terminated Mo{sub 2}C(001) surface exhibits carbon reactivity similar to transition metals such as Ru and Ir, but is significantly more reactive towards oxygen.

  16. Fragile structural transition in Mo3Sb7

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Jiaqiang -Q.; McGuire, Michael A; May, Andrew F; Parker, David S.; Mandrus, D. G.; Sales, Brian C.

    2015-08-10

    Mo3Sb7 single crystals lightly doped with Cr, Ru, or Te are studied in order to explore the interplay between superconductivity, magnetism, and the cubic-tetragonal structural transition. The structural transition at 53 K is extremely sensitive to Ru or Te substitution which introduces additional electrons, but robust against Cr substitution. We observed no sign of a structural transition in superconducting Mo2.91Ru0.09Sb7 and Mo3Sb6.975Te0.025. In contrast, 3 at.% Cr doping only slightly suppresses the structural transition to 48 K while leaving no trace of superconductivity above 1.8 K. Analysis of magnetic properties suggests that the interdimer interaction in Mo3Sb7 is near a critical value and essential for the structural transition. Futhermore, all dopants suppress the superconductivity of Mo3Sb7. The tetragonal structure is not necessary for superconductivity.

  17. Embrittlement of Cr-Mo steels after low fluence irradiation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this work is the determination of the possible effect of the simultaneous formation of helium and displacement damage during irradiation on the Charpy impact behavior. Subsize Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Sandvik HT9) steels and 12Cr-1MoVW with 2%Ni (12Cr-1MOVW-2Ni) were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 300 and 400{degree}C to damage levels up to 2.5 dpa. The objective was to study the effect of the simultaneous formation of displacement damage and transmutation helium on impact toghness. Despite the low fluence relative to previous irradiations of these steels, significant increases in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) occurred. The 12Cr-1MoVW-2Ni steel irradiated at 400{degree}C had the largest increase in DBTT and displayed indications of intergranular fracture. A mechanism is proposed to explain how helium can affect the fracture behaviour of this latter steel in the present tests, and how it affected all three steels in previous experiments, where the steels were irradiated to higher fluences.

  18. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  19. Superior magnetic and mechanical property of MnFe 3 N driven by electron

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    correlation and lattice anharmonicity (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Superior magnetic and mechanical property of MnFe 3 N driven by electron correlation and lattice anharmonicity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Superior magnetic and mechanical property of MnFe 3 N driven by electron correlation and lattice anharmonicity Authors: Wu, Hao ; Sun, Hong ; Chen, Changfeng Publication Date: 2015-02-05 OSTI Identifier: 1180768 Grant/Contract Number: NA0001982 Type:

  20. Understanding the Structural and Electronic Evolution of Li2MnO3 During

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Irradiation Via Electron Microscopy - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research November 17, 2014, Research Highlights Understanding the Structural and Electronic Evolution of Li2MnO3 During Electron Irradiation Via Electron Microscopy In-situ electron beam irradiation induces localized pockets of damage (a) and (b) characterized by the Mn atoms migrating to occupy Li sites, as shown in the annular bright field image of (c). This effect is clearly visible in an intensity line profile

  1. The role of C and Mn at the austenite/pearlite reaction front during non-steady-state pearlite growth in a Fe-C-Mn steel

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Capdevila, Carlos

    2015-04-18

    The role of C and Mn during the growth of pearlite under non-steady state conditions is analyzed by comparing the phase compositions of austenite, ferrite and cementite (γ+α+θ) through the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and atom probe tomography (APT) measurements across the austenite/pearlite interface. Furthermore, a local Mn enrichment and C depletion at the austenite/pearlite interface has been measured, which causes a change in the driving force with time during divergent pearlite growth.

  2. Features of ZnS-powder doping with a Mn impurity during synthesis and subsequent annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Korsunska, N. E. Bacherikov, Yu. Yu.; Stara, T. R.; Kladko, V. P.; Baran, N. P.; Polishchuk, Yu. O.; Kuchuk, A. V.; Zhuk, A. G.; Venger, Ye. F.

    2013-05-15

    Luminescence, electron spin resonance, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods were used to investigate the features of ZnS-powder doped by Mn impurity during self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and subsequent annealing. The obtained powder consists of ZnS microcrystals with mainly hexagonal phase (80 {+-} 5)%. It was found, that after synthesis Mn presents not only in the form of non-uniformly distributed microscopic impurities in ZnS, but also in the form of Mn metal nanocrystals. Thermal annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C leads to the additional doping of ZnS from metallic Mn, to the redistribution of the embedded Mn in the volume of microcrystals, and to the ZnS oxidation. At the same time, the ratio between the cubic and hexagonal phases does not change. It was shown that annealing causes a decrease in the concentration of the defects responsible for the luminescence-excitation bands, which correspond to transitions from the ground to the excited states of the Mn{sup 2+} ion. As a result of annealing, there is also a change in XRD coherent domain size. Simultaneously, the intensity of peaks in the luminescence-excitation spectrum with wavelengths of 375 and 395 nm was changed. The causes of these changes and the nature of the corresponding bands are discussed.

  3. The structure of the Caenorhabditis elegans manganese superoxide dismutase MnSOD-3-azide complex

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hunter, Gary J.; Trinh, Chi H.; Bonetta, Rosalin; Stewart, Emma E.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Hunter, Therese

    2015-08-27

    C. elegans MnSOD-3 has been implicated in the longevity pathway and its mechanism of catalysis is relevant to the aging process and carcinogenesis. The structures of MnSOD-3 provide unique crystallographic evidence of a dynamic region of the tetrameric interface (residues 41–54). We have determined the structure of the MnSOD-3-azide complex to 1.77-Å resolution. The analysis of this complex shows that the substrate analog, azide, binds end-on to the manganese center as a sixth ligand and that it ligates directly to a third and new solvent molecule also positioned within interacting distance to the His30 and Tyr34 residues of the substratemore » access funnel. This is the first structure of a eukaryotic MnSOD-azide complex that demonstrates the extended, uninterrupted hydrogen-bonded network that forms a proton relay incorporating three outer sphere solvent molecules, the substrate analog, the gateway residues, Gln142, and the solvent ligand. This configuration supports the formation and release of the hydrogen peroxide product in agreement with the 5-6-5 catalytic mechanism for MnSOD. The high product dissociation constant k₄ of MnSOD-3 reflects low product inhibition making this enzyme efficient even at high levels of superoxide.« less

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn vanadate nanosheets and visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methyl blue

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.Z. Xie, Y.K.; Pei, Y.Q.; Jiang, Y.X.; Yu, H.Y.; Cai, Z.Y.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. The formation of Mn vanadate nanosheets can be controlled by growth conditions. Mn vanadate nanosheets exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route using ammonium metavanadate and Mn acetate as the raw materials, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the Mn vanadate nanosheets are composed of monoclinic MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation indicates that the nanosheets have the average thickness of about 50 nm, length of 210 ?m and width of 800 nm to 2 ?m. The growth process of the Mn vanadate nanosheets has also been discussed based on the analysis of the roles of the growth conditions on the formation of the Mn vanadate nanosheets. The nanosheets show good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. About 72.96% MB can be degraded after visible light irradiation for 1 h over 10 mg Mn vanadate nanosheets in 10 mL MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup ?1}.

  5. Controlling the metal to semiconductor transition of MoS2 and WS2 in solution

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Chou, Stanley Shihyao; Yi-Kai Huang; Kim, Jaemyung; Kaehr, Bryan James; Foley, Brian M.; Lu, Ping; Conner Dykstra; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Jiaxing Huang; et al

    201