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Sample records for kuwait libya nigeria

  1. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  2. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  3. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  4. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi...

  5. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Total OPEC Includes Algeria, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Venezuela. In addition, it included Ecuador in 1978-1992 ...

  6. Kuwait Petroleum Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    in the world. The corporation brings all state-owned corporations under one corporate umbrella. References "Kuwait Petroeum Corporation" "About KPC" Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Measuring the Costs of U.S. Oil Dependence and the Benefits of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    exporters operating as OPEC." Prof. M. Adelman, MIT, 2004. Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia UAE Venezuela 0 20 40 60 80 100 120...

  8. Kuwait: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Country Profile Name Kuwait Population 2,213,403 GDP 173,438,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.19 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code KW 3-letter ISO code KWT Numeric ISO...

  9. U.S. Energy Secretary Visits Kuwait | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Kuwait U.S. Energy Secretary Visits Kuwait November 15, 2005 - 2:30pm Addthis Stop included meeting with U.S. business leaders and military troops KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT - On Monday, November 14, 2005, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman toured the EQUATE petrochemical plant and met with U.S. business representatives while visiting Kuwait, as part of his trip through the Middle East. The EQUATE petrochemical plant is a joint venture between Kuwait's Petrochemical Industries Company

  10. Diversity in the Mideast; Kuwait and Yemen

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1991-12-02

    This paper reports on two types of action which mark oil industry activity at opposite ends of the Arabian Peninsula. In Kuwait, the astounding achievements of firefighting teams have captured world headlines. Some 1,200 miles to the south, Yemen is establishing itself as a center for exploration and production.

  11. Successful operation of a large LPG plant. [Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Shtayieh, S.; Durr, C.A.; McMillan, J.C.; Collins, C.

    1982-03-01

    The LPG plant located at Mina-Al Ahmadi, Kuwait, is the heart of Kuwait Oil Co.'s massive Gas Project to use the associated gas from Kuwait's oil production. Operation of this three-train plant has been very successful. A description is given of the three process trains consisting of four basic units: extraction, fractionation, product treating, and refrigeration. Initial problems relating to extraction, fractionation, product treating and, refrigeration are discussed. 1 ref.

  12. Seismicity and Improved Velocity Structure in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, R M; Rodgers, A J; Al-Enezi, A

    2006-01-26

    The Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN) began operation in 1997 and consists of nine three-component stations (eight short-period and one broadband) and is operated by the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research. Although the region is largely believed to be aseismic, considerable local seismicity is recorded by KNSN. Seismic events in Kuwait are clustered in two main groups, one in the south and another in the north. The KNSN station distribution is able to capture the southern cluster within the footprint of the network but the northern cluster is poorly covered. Events tend to occur at depths ranging from the free surface to about 20 km. Events in the northern cluster tend to be deeper than those in south, however this might be an artifact of the station coverage. We analyzed KNSN recordings of nearly 200 local events to improve understanding of seismic events and crustal structure in Kuwait, performing several analyses with increasing complexity. First, we obtained an optimized one-dimensional (1D) velocity model for the entire region using the reported KNSN arrival times and routine locations. The resulting model is consistent with a recently obtained model from the joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities. Crustal structure is capped by the thick ({approx} 7 km) sedimentary rocks of the Arabian Platform underlain by normal velocities for stable continental crust. Our new model has a crustal thickness of 44 km, constrained by an independent study of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities by Pasyanos et al (2006). Locations and depths of events after relocation with the new model are broadly consistent with those reported by KISR, although a few events move more than a few kilometers. We then used a double-difference tomography technique (tomoDD) to jointly locate the events and estimate three-dimensional (3D) velocity structure. TomoDD is based on hypoDD relocation algorithm and it makes use of both absolute and

  13. An option pricing theory explanation of the invasion of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Muhtaseb, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to explain the invasion of Kuwait by making an analogy between a call option and the Iraq-Kuwait situation before the invasion on August 2, 1990. A number of factors contributed to the issuance of a deep-in-the money European call option to Iraq against Kuwait. The underlying asset is the crude oil reserves under Kuwait. Price of crude oil is determined in world spot markets. The exercise price is equal to the cost of permanently annexing and retaining Kuwait. The volatility is measured by the annualized variance of the weekly rate of return of the spot price of crude oil. Time-to-expiration is equal to the time period between decision date and actual invasion date. Finally, since crude oil prices are quoted in U.S. dollars, the U.S. Treasury bill rate is assumed to be the risk-free rate. In a base-case scenario, Kuwait`s oil reserves amount to 94,500 million barrels valued at $18 a barrell in early February 1990 resulting in a market value of $1,701 billion. Because the cost of the war to Iraq is not known, we assume it is comparable to that of the U.S.-led coalition of $51.0 billion. Time-to-expiration is six months. The treasury bill rate in early 1990 was around 7.5 percent. Annualized standard deviation of weekly rates of return is 0.216. The value of Kuwait`s invasion option is $1,642.25 billion. Depending on the scenario, the value of this special option ranged between $1,450 billion and $3.624 billion. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Fate and control of blistering chemical warfare agents in Kuwait`s desalination industry

    SciTech Connect

    Khordagui, H.K.

    1997-01-01

    Kuwait, as most of the other states located along the Western shores of the Arabian Gulf, relies upon the Gulf as its main drinking water resource via desalination. In case of seawater contamination with blistering chemical warfare agents, traces of the agents and/or degradation products in the finished water might pose a serious health hazard. The objective of the present review is to study the potential contamination, transport, fate, effect and control of blistering chemical warfare agents (CWAs), in the Kuwaiti desalination industry. In general, all the environmental factors involved in the aquatic degradation of CWAs in Kuwait marine environment except for the high salinity in case of blistering agents such as sulphur mustard, and in favor of a fast degradation process. In case of massive releases of CWAs near the Kuwaiti shorelines, turbulence resulting from tidal cycles and high temperature will affect the dissolution process and extend the toxicity of the insoluble agent. Post- and pre-chlorination during the course of seawater desalination will catalyze and significantly accelerate the hydrolysis processes of the CWAs. The heat exerted on CWAs during the power generation-desalination processes is not expected to thermally decompose them. However, the steam heat will augment the agent`s rate of hydrolysis with subsequent acceleration in their rate of detoxification. Conventional pretreatment of feed seawater for reverse-osmosis desalination is theoretically capable of reducing the concentration of CWAs by coprecipitation and adsorption on flocs formed during coagulation. Prechlorination and prolonged detention in time in pretreatment units will simultaneously promote hydrolysis reactions. 50 refs.

  15. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman Meets with U.S. Troops in Kuwait |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Meets with U.S. Troops in Kuwait Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman Meets with U.S. Troops in Kuwait November 13, 2005 - 2:24pm Addthis ARIFJAN, KUWAIT - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman and his wife Diane Bodman had dinner and conversed with Pfc. James Clark, Logistics Task Force 28, Capt. Zachary Lange, Headquarters and Headquarters Company 37th Transportation Group and Spc. Anna Goicoechea, Logistics Task Force 180, during their visit to Arifjan, Kuwait on

  16. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet) Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 0 0 0 0 3,610 0 0 0

  17. Wedotebary Nigeria Limited | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Name: Wedotebary Nigeria Limited Place: Bukuru, Nigeria Product: Nigeria-based manufacturing conglomerate. Coordinates: 9.79017, 8.85481 Show Map Loading map......

  18. Nigeria Country Analysis Brief

    Reports and Publications

    Nigeria is currently the largest oil producer in Africa and was the world's fourth-largest exporter of LNG in 2015. Nigeria's oil production is hampered by instability and supply disruptions, while its natural gas sector is restricted by the lack of infrastructure to commercialize natural gas that is currently flared (burned off).

  19. Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Million Cubic

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Feet) Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet) Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 3,610 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait

  20. Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet) Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 0 0 0 0 3,610 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait

  1. Detection of Local/Regional Events in Kuwait Using Next-Generation Detection Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Gok, M. Rengin; Al-Jerri, Farra; Dodge, Douglas; Al-Enezi, Abdullah; Hauk, Terri; Mellors, R.

    2014-12-10

    Seismic networks around the world use conventional triggering algorithms to detect seismic signals in order to locate local/regional seismic events. Kuwait National Seismological Network (KNSN) of Kuwait Institute of Scientific Research (KISR) is operating seven broad-band and short-period three-component stations in Kuwait. The network is equipped with Nanometrics digitizers and uses Antelope and Guralp acquisition software for processing and archiving the data. In this study, we selected 10 days of archived hourly-segmented continuous data of five stations (Figure 1) and 250 days of continuous recording at MIB. For the temporary deployment our selection criteria was based on KNSN catalog intensity for the period of time we test the method. An autonomous event detection and clustering framework is employed to test a more complete catalog of this short period of time. The goal is to illustrate the effectiveness of the technique and pursue the framework for longer period of time.

  2. Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cubic Feet) Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 -- -- -- -- 3.27 -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit U.S. Liquefied

  3. Price of Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Dollars

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 3 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit Sabine Pass,

  4. Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Net Imports by Country Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Gabon Indonesia Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman

  5. U.S. Imports from All Countries

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Imports by Country of Origin Import Area: U.S. Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Gabon Indonesia Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3b : Non-OPEC Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply (Million Barrels per Day) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player - = no data available OPEC = Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries: Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Gabon, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Venezuela. Notes: The

  7. NNSA Signs Memorandum with Kuwait to Increase Cooperation on Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    ScienceCinema

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2016-07-12

    On June 23, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation on nuclear safeguards and other nonproliferation topics with the Kuwait National Nuclear Energy Committee (KNNEC). NNSA Administrator Thomas D'Agostino and KNNEC's Secretary General, Dr. Ahmad Bishara, signed the memorandum at a ceremony at U.S. Department of Energy headquarters in Washington.

  8. Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Kuwait (Dollars

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) No chart available. Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2016 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Country

  9. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect

    El-Baz, F. . Center for Remote Sensing); Al-Ajmi, D. . Environmental and Earth Sciences Div.)

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait.

  10. Nigeria-Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector ...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Nigeria-Low Carbon Development Planning in the Power Sector Name Nigeria-Low Carbon...

  11. AIR SHIPMENT OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL FROM ROMANIA AND LIBYA

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Landers; Igor Bolshinsky; Ken Allen; Stanley Moses

    2010-07-01

    In June 2009 Romania successfully completed the world’s first air shipment of highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent nuclear fuel transported in Type B(U) casks under existing international laws and without special exceptions for the air transport licenses. Special 20-foot ISO shipping containers and cask tiedown supports were designed to transport Russian TUK 19 shipping casks for the Romanian air shipment and the equipment was certified for all modes of transport, including road, rail, water, and air. In December 2009 Libya successfully used this same equipment for a second air shipment of HEU spent nuclear fuel. Both spent fuel shipments were transported by truck from the originating nuclear facilities to nearby commercial airports, were flown by commercial cargo aircraft to a commercial airport in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and then transported by truck to their final destinations at the Production Association Mayak facility in Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both air shipments were performed under the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Romania air shipment of 23.7 kg of HEU spent fuel from the VVR S research reactor was the last of three HEU fresh and spent fuel shipments under RRRFR that resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. Libya had previously completed two RRRFR shipments of HEU fresh fuel so the 5.2 kg of HEU spent fuel air shipped from the IRT 1 research reactor in December made Libya the 4th RRRFR participating country to remove all HEU. This paper describes the equipment, preparations, and license approvals required to safely and securely complete these two air shipments of spent nuclear fuel.

  12. Petroleum prices and profits in the 90 days following the invasion of Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    For the third in the past 20 years the world has experienced an interruption in the flow of oil from the Persian Gulf. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait on August 2, 1990, and shut down of Kuwait oil production capacity followed by the United Nations boycott of Iraqi oil removed 8 percent of the world's oil supply. The result was a sharp increase in the process of crude oil and petroleum products. These events raised numerous questions about the performance of energy markets and energy firms. This report supplies a first answer for some of those questions. At the time this report was prepared the invasion has been in effect for 90 days. Not all the data is available to fully answer every question. Some issues can only be completely resolved after more time has passed in which the invasion and its effects have had an opportunity to be fully assimilated. This report was specifically requested by W. Henson Moore, Deputy Secretary of Energy as a way of supplying the American public with what could be said about the current situation. Rumors abound and mixconceptions have proliferated. This report strives to give a proper perspective on some of the more vexing issues which the invasion produced. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has addressed many questions in this report. By the way of summary these are the 10 most most frequently asked questions and EIA's quick answers. The page references tell the reader where to look in the report for further explanation. These are not the only issues addressed and EIA hopes that readers will be able to satisfy their curiosity about their own questions within the pages of this report.

  13. Fact #836: September 1, Non-OPEC Countries Supply Nearly Two...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Notes: Petroleum imports include crude oil and petroleum products. Other OPEC Countries include Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Gabon, Indonesia, Iran, Qatar, and ...

  14. Word Pro - S3

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 3.3c Petroleum Trade: Imports From OPEC Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria a Angola b Ecuador c Iraq Kuwait d Libya e Nigeria f Saudi Arabia d Vene- zuela Other g Total OPEC 1960 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 22 182 e ( ) f ( ) 84 911 34 1,233 1965 Average ...................... a ( ) b ( ) c ( ) 16 74 42 f ( ) 158 994 155 1,439 1970 Average ...................... 8 b ( ) c ( ) - 48

  15. Nigeria: after crude, the gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    Misinterpretation of the laws of the marketplace have already brought Nigeria to the brink of a catastrophe in 1978, when the government had built up heavy stocks expecting a substantial increase in price. When it did not materialize and the production had to be dropped to 50% of the previous rate, in a country where crude constitutes 90% of the export revenues, the system was changed. The new plan is intended to reduce the dependence of Nigeria on oil exports. The production rate is set at between 2.2 and 2.5 million bpd. Due to a significant increase in domestic demand, the 2 existing refineries cannot fill the gap; 2 more refineries are planned. There also are substantial gas reserves; the associated gas, now flared, is to be recovered. A gas liquefaction plant also is in operation, with one-half of the output going to Europe and one-half to the US. Some of the oil and gas is earmarked for local petrochemical plants.

  16. Nigeria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Country Profile Name Nigeria Population 140,431,790 GDP 594,257,000,000 Energy Consumption 1.09 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code NG 3-letter ISO code NGA Numeric ISO...

  17. Influence of process conditions and catalyst properties on catalyst deactivation during hydroprocessing of Kuwait vacuum residue

    SciTech Connect

    Absi-Halabi, M.; Stanislaus, A.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive study of catalyst deactivation during hydroprocessing of Kuwait vacuum residue in trickle-bed reactors was carried out. The influence of selected process and catalyst parameters including temperature, hydrogen pressure, liquid hourly space velocity, presulfiding and catalyst pore size on coke and metals deposition was investigated. Increasing reactor temperature increased both coke and metal deposition on the catalyst, while increasing pressure decreased coke deposition. Vanadium deposition on the other hand increased with increasing pressure. Increasing feed flow rates increased the rate of deactivation by metals, but decreased coke deposition. Catalyst pore size distribution had a significant effect on catalyst deactivation. The rate of deactivation by both coke and metals deposition was found to be higher for catalysts having predominantly narrow pores. Presulfiding of the catalyst reduced coking and led to better distribution of foulant metals within the catalyst pellet. The effect of the studied parameters on surface area and pore volume of the catalyst was determined. Mechanistic arguments will be presented to explain the results.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Busness, K M; Hales, J M; Hannigan, R V; Thorp, J M; Tomich, S D; Warren, M J; Al-Sunaid, A A; Daum, P H; Mazurek, M

    1992-11-01

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

  19. MHK Projects/Akwanga Nigeria SHP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Project Phase Phase 4 Project Phase Date 20140425 Project Details Smart Hydro Power is installing thirteen additional kinetic water turbines in Nigeria. The...

  20. Nigeria-IAEA Energy Planning | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Agency Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http:www-tc.iaea.orgtcwebt Program Start 2005 Country Nigeria Western Africa References IAEA project database1...

  1. MHK Projects/Akwanga Nigeria SHP | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    25 Project Details Smart Hydro Power is installing thirteen additional kinetic water turbines in Nigeria. The installation of these thirteen new turbines is planned for the first...

  2. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    586-8800",,,"01292016 9:45:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103NG2" "Date","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas...

  3. Price of Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Sabine Pass, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic ...

  4. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9,213 8,935 8,527 7,730 7,344 7,363 1910-2015 Persian Gulf 1,694 1,849 2,140 1,994 1,851 1,487 1973-2015 OPEC* 4,553 4,209 4,031 3,493 3,005 2,673 1973-2015 Algeria 328 178 120 29 6 3 1973-2015 Angola 383 335 222 201 139 124 1973-2015 Ecuador 210 203 177 232 213 225 1973-2015 Gabon 47 34 42 24 16 10 1993-2015 Indonesia 33 20 6 18 20 36 1973-2015 Iran 1973-2001 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1973-2015 Kuwait 195 191 303 326 309 204 1973-2015 Libya 43 9 56 43 5 3 1973-2015 Nigeria 983 767 406 239 58

  5. U.S. Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2,580 2,501 2,071 2,129 1,897 2,086 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 17 13 16 15 24 19 1993-2015 OPEC* 354 347 240 227 232 221 1993-2015 Algeria 182 181 122 86 104 105 1993-2015 Angola 10 11 11 14 15 13 1994-2015 Ecuador 2 2 4 4 2 5 1993-2015 Gabon 0 1 1 2 2 1993-2015 Indonesia 4 1 2 5 5 5 1993-2015 Iraq 0 0 2004-2013 Kuwait 1 1 2 2 2 0 1993-2015 Libya 27 6 5 15 2 4 2004-2015 Nigeria 39 51 36 42 34 26 1993-2015 Qatar 1 1 5 7 9 8 1995-2015 Saudi Arabia 14 8 4 4 7 7 1993-2015 United Arab Emirates 1 3 3 1 0

  6. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    11,793 11,436 10,598 9,859 9,241 9,449 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 1,711 1,861 2,156 2,009 1,875 1,507 1973-2015 OPEC* 4,906 4,555 4,271 3,720 3,237 2,894 1973-2015 Algeria 510 358 242 115 110 108 1973-2015 Angola 393 346 233 216 154 136 1973-2015 Ecuador 212 206 180 236 215 231 1993-2015 Gabon 47 34 43 25 18 12 1973-2015 Indonesia 37 21 7 24 25 41 1973-2015 Iran 1973-2001 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1973-2015 Kuwait 197 191 305 328 311 204 1973-2015 Libya 70 15 61 59 6 7 1973-2015 Nigeria 1,023 818

  7. Word Pro - S11

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    70 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 11.1a World Crude Oil Production: Selected OPEC Members (Thousand Barrels per Day) Algeria Angola Ecuador Indo- nesia Iran Iraq Kuwait a Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia a United Arab Emirates Vene- zuela Total OPEC b 1973 Average ................ 1,097 162 209 1,339 5,861 2,018 3,020 2,175 2,054 570 7,596 1,533 3,366 R 31,150 1975 Average ................ 983 165 161 1,307 5,350 2,262 2,084 1,480 1,783 438

  8. Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 541,439 604,817 670,834 718,478 764,835 812,181 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 20,913 18,297 11,397 14,291 12,302 12,559 1993-2015 OPEC* 59,140 28,181 15,713 14,841 12,302 12,559 1993-2015 Algeria 29,969 8,429 4,074 380 1993-2015 Angola 4,619 1,012 1993-2011 Ecuador 1993-2007 Gabon 72 1995-2012 Iraq 101 2,654 1995-2011 Kuwait 949 1995-2013 Libya 2005-2009 Nigeria 3,401 1993-2010 Qatar 2 1995-2015 Saudi Arabia 20,812 15,643 11,397 13,342 12,302

  9. Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History All Countries 74,799 65,198 63,812 59,575 64,573 71,666 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 1,199 2,627 1,100 802 1,120 804 1993-2016 OPEC* 1,199 2,627 1,100 802 1,120 804 1993-2016 Algeria 1993-2015 Angola 1993-2011 Ecuador 1993-2007 Gabon 1995-2012 Iraq 1995-2011 Kuwait 1995-2013 Libya 2005-2009 Nigeria 1993-2010 Qatar 1 1 1 1995-2016 Saudi Arabia 1,199 2,626 1,100 801 1,119 804 1993-2016 Venezuela 1993-2013 Non OPEC* 73,600 62,571 62,712 58,773 63,453

  10. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    8,042 7,637 7,946 7,611 8,092 8,035 1920-2016 Persian Gulf 1,753 1,684 1,917 1,690 1,743 1,792 1993-2016 OPEC* 3,271 3,091 3,406 3,024 3,502 3,118 1973-2016 Algeria 19 20 42 79 1973-2016 Angola 160 217 161 128 287 137 1973-2016 Ecuador 264 176 225 223 228 253 1993-2016 Gabon 1993-2015 Indonesia 33 34 53 34 42 44 1973-2016 Iran 1973-2002 Iraq 365 349 555 434 369 477 1973-2016 Kuwait 123 196 177 135 323 156 1973-2016 Libya 59 17 1973-2016 Nigeria 269 218 241 234 272 160 1973-2016 Qatar 1973-2011

  11. WWS_LorrieC157L_0915

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ireland Italy Japan Kenya Latvia Lesotho Libya Lithuania Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Mauritius Mexico Mozambique Nepal The Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Nigeria Norway ...

  12. WorldWide Science.org

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Libya Lithuania Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Mauritius Mexico Mozambique Nepal The Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Nigeria Norway Philippines Poland Portugal Russia Rwanda Saudi ...

  13. Labor, nationalism, and imperialism in eastern Arabia: Britain, the Shaikhs, and the Gulf oil workers in Bahrain, Kuwait and Qatar, 1932-1956

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, H.M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the lack of a noticeable indigenous labor movement in the contemporary Gulf Arab countries of Bahrain, Kuwait and Qatar; it focuses on the emergence, after the discovery of oil, of an industrial Gulf labor force, and on the evolution of the British policy towards oil and Gulf oil workers. The period examined begins with the discovery of oil in Bahrain in 1932 (the first such discovery on the Arab side of the Gulf), and ends with the Suez Crisis of 1956. The latter is a watershed event in Gulf history. It is argued that the Suez Crisis was in large part responsible for the long-term defeat of the indigenous labor movement in the Gulf. Attention is given to the parts played by the British Government of India, the Foreign Office, the local Shaikhs, the Gulf nationalists, and by the workers themselves. Policies towards workers passed through two different periods. In the first, 1932-1945, the Government of India had no direct interest in the Gulf labor situation; in the second, 1946-1956, the Foreign Office took increased interest in the welfare of local oil workers, primarily because of the importance of oil to reconstruction of the British economy after the war. However, the Suez Crisis in 1956 convinced the British to withdraw their support for the workers.

  14. Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Natural Gas LNG ... U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports ...

  15. Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Nigeria (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG ... U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports ...

  16. Price of Elba Island, GA Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Nigeria (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Elba Island, GA Natural Gas LNG ... U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Elba Island, GA LNG Imports ...

  17. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103NG3" "Date","Price of U.S....

  18. Integrating community perceptions and cultural diversity in social impact assessment in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Nzeadibe, Thaddeus Chidi; Ajaero, Chukwuedozie Kelechukwu; Okonkwo, Emeka Emmanuel; Okpoko, Patrick Uche; Akukwe, Thecla Iheoma; Njoku-Tony, Roseline Feechi

    2015-11-15

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Act of 1992 aimed to make the environment a central theme in development in Nigeria. Nevertheless, the extent of engagement with local cultures in the Nigerian EIA process is not statutorily guaranteed. While most EIAs in Nigeria have been for oil and gas projects in the Niger Delta, and have focused strongly on the biophysical environment, socio-economic and cultural aspects have remained marginal. The palpable neglect of community perceptions and cultural diversity in social impact assessment (SIA) in this region prone to conflict has tended to alienate the people in the decision-making process. Thus, despite claims to compliance with regulatory requirements for EIAs, and numerous purported sustainable development initiatives by international oil companies (IOCs), the region continues to face multiple sustainability challenges. This paper situates local perceptions and cultural diversity in participatory development and canvasses the integration of community perceptions and cultural diversity into SIA in the Niger Delta region. It is argued that doing this would be critical to ensuring acceptance and success of development actions within the context of local culture while also contributing to sustainable development policy in the region. - Highlights: • Nigeria EIA Act aimed to make the environment central to development in Nigeria. • Engagement with local communities in the process is not statutorily guaranteed. • SIAs in Nigeria neglect community perceptions and cultural diversity. • Article canvasses integrating community perceptions and cultural diversity in SIA. • Local acceptance in context of culture would yield sustainable development outcomes.

  19. ,"U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (MMcf)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nigeria (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103ng2m.xls"

  20. Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,362 2013 2,590 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from

  1. Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Price) From Nigeria (Dollars per

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Price) From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas LNG Imports (Price) From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's 6.43 -- -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  2. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  3. ,"Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  4. Libya: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Natural Gas Reserves 1,539,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 23 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves 47,000,000,000 Barrels (bbl) 9 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

  5. Legal and institutional framework of environmental impact assessment in Nigeria: An initial assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Olokesusi, F.

    1998-03-01

    Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, has high rates of urbanization and industrialization. Until recently, decisions on most large-scale projects such as expressways, harbors, industries, dams, and irrigation were considered with an emphasis on traditional technical and cost-benefit analysis. Spurred by massive environmental degradation and persistent community agitation in oil producing areas, environmental impact assessment (EIA) legislation was passed in late 1992. The main purpose of this article is to review and assess the content of this legislation and the guidelines produced by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA), the institution responsible for EIA administration. Some EIA reports have been prepared and reviewed by FEPA since 1994. There are some positive outcomes and expectations, but some problems have been identified as well, including: deliberate restriction of public involvement and participation by proponents and/or their consultants, interagency conflict leading to high cost and project delays especially in the oil industry, and restriction of public access to final EIA reports. These are discussed, and recommendations for improving the process are made.

  6. Material flows of mobile phones and accessories in Nigeria: Environmental implications and sound end-of-life management options

    SciTech Connect

    Osibanjo, Oladele Nnorom, Innocent Chidi

    2008-02-15

    Presently, Nigeria is one of the fastest growing Telecom markets in the world. The country's teledensity increased from a mere 0.4 in 1999 to 10 in 2005 following the liberalization of the Telecom sector in 2001. More than 25 million new digital mobile lines have been connected by June 2006. Large quantities of mobile phones and accessories including secondhand and remanufactured products are being imported to meet the pent-up demand. This improvement in mobile telecom services resulted in the preference of mobile telecom services to fixed lines. Consequently, the contribution of fixed lines decreased from about 95% in year 2000 to less than 10% in March 2005. This phenomenal progress in information technology has resulted in the generation of large quantities of electronic waste (e-waste) in the country. Abandoned fixed line telephone sets estimated at 120,000 units are either disposed or stockpiled. Increasing quantities of waste mobile phones estimated at 8 million units by 2007, and accessories will be generated. With no material recovery facility for e-waste and/or appropriate solid waste management infrastructure in place, these waste materials end up in open dumps and unlined landfills. These practices create the potential for the release of toxic metals and halocarbons from batteries, printed wiring boards, liquid crystal display and plastic housing units. This paper presents an overview of the developments in the Nigerian Telecom sector, the material in-flow of mobile phones, and the implications of the management practices for wastes from the Telecom sector in the country.

  7. State of Kuwait Ministry of Oil | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    of the rules or laws organizing the drilling and exploring process simultaneously with production and export operations and to protect such wealth for the next generations....

  8. NREL: Technology Transfer - Kuwait Visitors Interested in NREL...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    to improve energy efficiency in their refining operations. KOC may also apply concentrated solar power technology to produce some of the steam needed in the company's operations...

  9. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  10. The post-war Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Tempest, P.

    1992-03-09

    The Middle East remains today the global energy fulcrum. One year after the Persian Gulf war, the region is in greater turmoil and political uncertainty than it has known in modern times. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and subsequent external military intervention forced neighboring states to question the need for a foreign military presence in the future. The rift between the secular revolutionary states in the region led by Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Algeria, and Syria and the traditional monarchy of Saudi Arabia and the emirates of the gulf has widened. Egypt provides, at present, an uncomfortable bridge. The balance of political forces may be shifting. This paper attempts to answer the following questions: Where will we see the new leadership in the Middle East Will it again play a role through the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and determination of the oil price in shaping the structure of global energy supply and demand

  11. East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History All Countries 52,343 59,570 56,245 63,583 62,424 59,566 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 3,951 2,738 3,343 3,487 3,820 3,752 1993-2016 OPEC* 12,417 15,062 14,321 14,771 18,757 15,181 1993-2016 Algeria 421 66 577 1,489 994 1993-2016 Angola 1,276 2,971 1,458 1,671 4,308 2,956 1993-2016 Ecuador 174 171 176 1995-2016 Gabon 156 1993-2016 Indonesia 26 165 138 56 54 1995-2016 Iraq 1,705 584 3,343 1,493 1,800 2,753 1995-2016 Kuwait 90 1995-2016 Libya

  12. TABLE23.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    3. PAD District II-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,219 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,253 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 4,966 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 4,136 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria ...................................... 540 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Venezuela ................................. 3,596 0 0

  13. TABLE24.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    4. PAD District III-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 38,701 294 2,258 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 294 1,174 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ........................................ 5,270 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 33,431 0 1,084 0 0 0 0 443 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 41,555 0 1,652 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nigeria

  14. Africa: Unrest and restrictive terms limit abundant potential. [Oil and gas exploration and development in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes the drilling and exploration activity of the oil and gas industries of Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Nigeria, Cameroon, Gabon, the Congo, Angola, and South Africa. Information is provided on current and predicted trends in well drilling activities (both onshore and offshore), numbers of new wells, footage information, production statistics and what fields accounted for this production, and planned new exploration activities. The paper also describes the current status of government policies and political problems affecting the oil and gas industry.

  15. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  16. Turmoil doesn`t dampen enthusiasm

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the African gas and oil industries. Though Africa remains politically and economically volatile, its vast energy potential is becoming increasingly attractive to foreign oil and gas companies. Separate evaluations are given for Algeria, Egypt, Nigeria, Angola, Libya, Congo, Gabon, Tunisia, Cameroon, Cote D`Ivoire, and briefly for South Africa, Sudan, Equatorial Guinea, Ghana, Zaire, Benin, Mozambique, Chad, Namibia, Tanzania, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Senegal, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, Ethiopia, Niger, Madagascar, Rwanda, Mauritania, Seychelles, Uganda, and Liberia.

  17. Estimated use of explosives in the mining industries of Algeria, Iran, Iraq, and Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Wilburn, D.R.; Russell, J.A.; Bleiwas, D.I.

    1995-09-01

    This work was performed under Memorandum of Agreement B291534 Between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the United States Bureau of Mines. The Bureau of Mines authors are members of the Minerals Availability Field Office (MAFO) in Denver, CO, which uses an extensive network of information sources to develop and maintain the Minerals Availability database concerning mining and minerals properties worldwide. This study was initiated and directed by F. Heuze at LLNL. A previous study on the same subject had been commissioned by LLNL from the Mining Journal Research Services (MJRS) in London ,UK. Its results were integrated into this report. MJRS is shown as one of the numerous sources which were used for this work. All sources are listed in the report. This document is arranged in four sections, one for each country, in alphabetical order. Thie outline is the same for each country.

  18. Nigeria: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MWhyear 35 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 209.44 Million Short Tons 49 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 5,246,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 8 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves...

  19. U.S. LNG Imports from Nigeria

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    13,306 41,733 2,362 0 2,590 0 1997-2014 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices 3.56 4.39 9.31 -- 15.74 -- 1994...

  20. U.S. LNG Imports from Nigeria

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7-2016 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices -- -- -- -- -- -- 1994

  1. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Persian Gulf Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United ... and 2016-present), Iran (1960present), Iraq (1960present), Kuwait (1960present), ...

  2. Planning and care mark repair of 14-year old leak in Kuwait Oil Co. LPG tank 95

    SciTech Connect

    Shtayieh, S.

    1983-01-10

    This paper points out that the leak, which had been present for such a long time, completely saturated the perlite insulation with hydrocarbons, thus rendering the entire operation of inspection, repair, and maintenance of the inner tank a hazardous operation. It emphasizes the safety aspects, which were complicated by the saturated perlite as well as by the fact that the tank is situated in the middle of the LPG storage area with LPG tanks on either side. Tank design, making preparations, inspection, and repair are discussed. The fact that the leaking flanges were originally installed damaged, indicated the future need of tighter company quality control of all contractors work.

  3. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  4. Africa: the emphasis is exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    Individual country reports on drilling, oil and gas production, and petroleum exploration and reserves are given for Africa. Nigeria was the continent's largest oil producer in 1979, averaging 2.3 million bpd, followed closely by Libya with 2.07 million bpd. Algeria cut production of crude oil in 1979 to a level of 1,194,350 bpd, and increased gas production to 2031 mmcfd. In Egypt, the return of Israeli-occupied oil fields and a surge in productive capacity enabled production averaging 524,000 bpd. Brief country reports are included for Gabon, Angola, Republic of the Congo, Cameroun, Tunisia, Morocco, Zaire, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Niger, Chad, Republic of South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Equatorial Guinea, Seychelles Islands, Mauritania, Republic of Mali, Benin, Kenya, Madagascar, Botswana, Gambia, Mozambique, and Senegal.

  5. Smokes from the oil fires following the Gulf War: A review and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Radke, L.F.

    1996-12-31

    Emissions resulting from the oil fires in Kuwait and environmental effects from those emissions are described.

  6. Need for refining capacity creates opportunities for producers in Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M.S.S. )

    1994-07-11

    Oil industry interest in refining has revived in the past few years in response to rising oil consumption. The trend creates opportunities, for countries in the Middle East, which do not own refining assets nearly in proportion to their crude oil reserved. By closing this gap between reserves and refining capacity, the countries can ease some of the instability now characteristic of the oil market. Some major oil producing countries have begun to move downstream. During the 1980s, Venezuela, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Libya, and other members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries acquired refining assets through direct total purchase or joint ventures. Nevertheless, the oil industry remains largely unintegrated, with the Middle East holding two thirds of worldwide oil reserves but only a small share downstream. As worldwide refining capacity swings from a period of surplus toward one in which the need for new capacity will be built. The paper discusses background of the situation, shrinking surplus, investment requirements, sources of capital, and shipping concerns.

  7. Heavy metal distribution in sediments from Calabar River, southeastern Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Ntekim, E.E.U.; Ekwere, S.J.; Ukpong, E.E.

    1993-08-01

    The concentration and areal distribution of selected metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, Fe, and Cr) in the sediments of the Calabar River were studied to determine the extent of anthropogenic input and to estimate the effects of dumping industrial waste materials into the river. The concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu indicate relatively moderate pollution mainly on the left-hand side of the river while Ni, Cr, Co, Cd, and Fe levels are below values found to have adverse effects on the lives of marine biota. High metal contents are found close to industrial establishments and so enhanced metal concentrations are related to industrial sewage and metal leaching from garbage and solid waste dumps. 15 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Nigeria-Clean Technology Fund (CTF) | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    and Development, Inter-American Development Bank, World Bank Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Geothermal, Transportation Topics Background analysis,...

  9. ORISE: Radiation Emergency Training for Iraq, South Africa and...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    International Training REACTS Provides International Radiation Emergency Medical Response ... REACTS has conducted radiation emergency medical response training in Iraq, Kuwait, ...

  10. Political dynamics of economic sanctions: a case study of Arab oil embargoes

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The general question is considered of the effectiveness of economic sanctions in international politics, in terms of the Arabs' use of oil as a political weapon in 1956, 1967, and 1973. Chapter 3 focuses on the impact of the interruption of oil supplies to Western Europe throughout the 1956 Suez crisis. By 1967, pressure on the conservative governing elites of Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Libya, and the Gulf Sheikdoms obliged these states to join Iraq and Algeria in imposing production cutbacks and an embargo. Yet the conservative regimes' ties to the West, and the control exerted by multinational oil corporations over all phases of their oil industry, insured that the embargo was not enforced. Chapter 4 explains historically how, by the late 1960s, relinquishment of old concessions, nationalization acts, and participation agreements had caused a decline in the multinationals' domination of the oil industry. The rise of OPEC and OAPEC, which by 1970 had united and organized the producing governments, channeled their demands, and created an international forum for their political grievances, is discussed. Chapter 5 considers how by 1973 international and Arab political developments had forced states like Saudi Arabia, which had sought to dissociate oil and politics, to unsheathe the oil weapon and wave it in the faces of their Western allies. The author concludes from analysis of these complex cases that scholarship has exaggerated the inefficacy of sanctions. The effectiveness of sanctions is seen to depend upon how the demands are formulated and presented and to what extent they can be negotiated, as well as upon the sociopolitical, cultural, and psychological characteristics of the target population.

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Billion Dollars 1 ) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Colombia Mexico Norway United Kingdom Total Non-OPEC 4 1973 1.7 W 1.5 0.9 0.8 5.2 1.9 W - 0.0 0.0 2.4 7.6 1974 4.4 W 3.3 1.9 1.3 11.6 3.3 .0 W - .0 4.1 15.6 1975 5.2 W 3.5 3.2 1.8 14.9 2.8 .0 .3 .1 - 4.1 19.0 1976 8.7 W 5.1 5.8 1.0 22.2 1.8 - .4 .2 W 3.6 25.8

  12. Africa gaining importance in world LPG trade

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.R.; Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.

    1997-05-12

    Major LPG projects planned or under way in Africa will increase the importance of that region`s presence in world LPG trade. Supplies will nearly double between 1995 and 2005, at which time they will remain steady for at least 10 years. At the same time that exports are leveling, however, increasing domestic demand for PG is likely to reduce export-market participation by Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, and Libya. The growth of Africa`s participation in world LPG supply is reflected in comparisons for the next 15--20 years. Total world supply of LPG in 1995 was about 165 million metric tons (tonnes), of which Africans share was 7.8 million tonnes. By 2000, world supply will grow to slightly more than 200 million tonnes, with Africa`s share expected to increase to 13.2 million tonnes (6.6%). And by 2005, world LPG supply will reach nearly 230 million tonnes; Africa`s overall supply volumes by that year will be nearly 16.2 million tonnes (7%). World LPG supply for export in 1995 was on order of 44 million tonnes with Africa supply about 4 million tonnes (9%). By 2005, world export volumes of LPG will reach nearly 70 million tonnes; Africa`s share will have grown by nearly 10 million tonnes (14.3%).

  13. Governance for Sustainable Development in the Arab Region | Open...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Resource Type Guidemanual Website http:www.escwa.un.orginform Country Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  14. Best Practices and Tools for Large-scale Deployment of Renewable...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    www.escwa.un.orginformationpublicationsedituploadsdpd-09-TP3.pdf Country: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  15. United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Background Membership "ESCWA comprises 14 Arab countries in Western Asia: Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab...

  16. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    table below indicates, Persian Gulf producers (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Iran) appear to have accounted for 80 percent of the overall cutback over...

  17. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  18. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    of individual company data. a Free on Board. See Glossary. b Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. c Includes...

  19. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  20. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Baharain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes...

  1. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    No data reported. W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  2. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. 2 Includes...

  3. untitled

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    W Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. a Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. b Includes Algeria,...

  4. --No Title--

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    to avoid disclosure of individual company data. 3 Free on Board. See Glossary. 1 Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates....

  5. National Technology Enterprises Co | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Technology Enterprises Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: National Technology Enterprises Co Place: Kuwait Sector: Services Product: Services & Support (Clean Energy) (...

  6. Shipping and Receiving

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Shipping materials to Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria is prohibited; contact Berkeley Lab Procurement for more information. Arranging Transport Several independent ...

  7. JPRS report: Nuclear developments, [March 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1988-03-14

    This report contains information concerning the nuclear developments of the following countries: Libya, India, Pakistan, Soviet Union, Austria, Federal Republic of Germany, and Finland.

  8. Shipping and Receiving

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    necessary; regular shipping should be used at all other times. Shipping materials to Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria is prohibited; contact Berkeley Lab...

  9. Shipping and Receiving

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    shipping should be used at all other times. Shipping materials to Cuba, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, and Syria is prohibited; contact Berkeley Lab Procurement for more...

  10. Katherine F. Crouch | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and South Asia, including Libya, China, Taiwan, Singapore, UAE, Yemen, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. ...

  11. Katherine F. Crouch (Acting) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) in Asia, Middle East and North Africa, and South Asia, including Libya, China, Taiwan, Singapore, UAE, Yemen, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. ...

  12. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    and political pressures that have already curtailed output. Libya's precarious security environment creates downside production risk from the potential for additional disruptions...

  13. 06-14-2010 NNSA-B-10-0269

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    optimal desalination techniques for application to Libyan seawater. Sandia Site Office Libyan Desalination Pilot Demonstration Program Tripoli, Libya LACY,SUSAN DOYLENE 0614

  14. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 2,488 2,496 2,510 2,658 2,503 0 0 2001 2,478 5,068 2,535 4,822 5,067 7,547 2,888 2,606 4,955 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,720 0 5,403 0 0 2003 0 0 0 2,604 11,288 11,237 2,770 8,132 8,250 5,787 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 2,983 2,931 0 2,917 0 0 2,986 2005 2,681 0 0 0 0 0 0 2,574 0 2,895 0 0 2006 3,028 3,053 0 5,991 3,100 5,996 6,129 6,199 6,025 8,957

  15. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars per

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1995 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1996 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1997 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1998 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1999 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 2000 -- -- -- -- -- 4.14 4.86 3.56 3.52 5.80 -- -- 2001 10.79 6.26 9.05 5.43 5.43 4.93 5.09 2.99 3.30 -- -- -- 2002 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 3.61 -- 3.01 -- -- 2003 -- -- -- 5.02

  16. Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Dollars per

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 7.95 -- -- 6.86 -- 3.79 2010's -- 9.31 -- 15.74 -- --

  17. Price of Cove Point, MD Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Dollars per

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 9.31 2013 15.74

  18. Price of U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Dollars per

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's -- -- -- -- -- -- 2000's 4.37 5.56 3.21 4.66 6.20 10.11 6.78 7.05 9.56 3.56 2010's 4.39 9.31 -- 15.74

  19. U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 0 0 2000's 12,654 37,966 8,123 50,067 11,818 8,149 57,292 95,028 12,049 13,306 2010's 41,733 2,362 0 2,59

  20. Used-Oil Generation and Its Disposal along East-West Road, Port Harcourt Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Zitte, LF Awi-Waadu, GDB; Okorodike, CG

    2015-12-07

    Environmental Pollution from anthropogenic activities has contributed greatly towards the loss of biodiversity, and some organisms are at the verge of extinction and total extermination. Used oil as one of the wastes from automobile engines have contribute immensely towards the degradation of the environment and the problem of this has been traced to the poor handling of used oil and the ignorance of the major disposers of this used-oil. Out of 20 automobile mechanics interviewed in this study, 60% admitted that they dispose of used-oil on the land, 30% said that they sell it and only 10% acknowledge that they reuse it. On the issue of awareness about recycling, 50% admitted that they are aware, 30% claimed ignorance while 20% do not see the need for recycling. While considering storage method, 55% said that they do not store used oil, 25% store it in a metal drum, and 20% store in plastic drum. The mechanics estimated that about 418 cars are serviced weekly and a total of 1628.50 litres of used-oil are produced. For this result it is worth knowing that indiscriminate disposal of used oil as is commonly observed in our society can be of great environmental concern.

  1. Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-06

    This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

  2. Table 5.20 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Value of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries, 1973-2011 (Thousand Dollars 1) Year Persian Gulf 3 Selected OPEC 2 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 2 Countries Total 5 Kuwait ...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    from September 2008 production levels. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Qatar accounted for about three-fourths of the 2.6 million bbld of actual...

  4. TABLE37.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  5. TABLE42.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Zaire. e Includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. (s) Less than 500 barrels per day. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components...

  6. Minerals Yearbook, 1988. The mineral industries of the Arabian Peninsula and Persian Gulf countries. International review

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, B.; Antonides, L.E.; Morgan, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The document contains commodity reviews (metals, mineral fuels, industrial minerals where applicable) for the following countries: Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, People's Democratic Republic of Yeman, and Yeman Arab Republic.

  7. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    by an average of 0.8 million bbld in September and October 2013. Increased global crude oil production, particularly from Libya and Iraq, in the past two months, at a time when...

  8. The Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    boosted global liquid fuels production relative to year-ago levels. However, OPEC crude oil production decreased slightly from year-ago levels, as production gains in Libya and...

  9. Bahattin Buyuksahin

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Saudi Arabia other OPEC Effective Spare Capacity (wS.A.) VenNig Iraq Libya OECDIEA 2010 Demand to Reach 91.0 mbd in 2012 3 Source: IEA Oil Market Report 89.5 mbd in ...

  10. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    of political unrest in North Africa, including violent uprisings in Libya that have led to the shutdown of much of its oil production. The spot prices for West Texas...

  11. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    that it will respect existing contracts, IOCs seeking to purchase oil from Libya or invest in the country's oil sector must be able to identify their institutional and financial...

  12. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    in July, down from 1.5 million bbld in April. Additional deterioration in the security environment in Iraq or Libya could further reduce OPEC production in the short term. In...

  13. Middle East oil and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The following subjects are covered in this publication: (1) position of preeminence of the Middle East; (2) history of area's oil operations for Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, neutral zone, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman and Egypt; (3) gas operations of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Iraq and United Arab Emirates; (4) changing relationships with producing countries; (5) a new oil pricing environment; (6) refining and other industrial activities; and (7) change and progress. 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Nigeria " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. LNG Imports from Nigeria ...

  15. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    Licensed oil acreage in the 6 North Africa countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan and Tunisia) totaled 1,500,000 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1986, down 290,000 km/sup 2/ from 1985. About 50% of the relinquishments were in Libya. Most oil and gas discoveries were made in Egypt (16 oil and 2 gas). Several oil finds were reported in onshore Libya, and 1 was reported in Algeria in the southeastern Sahara. According to available statistics, development drilling decreased from 1985 levels, except in Tunisia. A 6.3% decline in oil production took place in 1986, falling below the 3 million bbl level (2,912,000 b/d). Only sparse data are released on the gas output in North Africa. 6 figures, 27 tables.

  16. The impact of the oil industry on the indigenous population in the oil-producing areas of Nigeria: As measured by ecological factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ikein, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Exploration and exploitation of the petroleum resource has created some of the largest fortunes and has helped to achieve some of the most impressive economic growth and development, yet little or no attention has been directed to its impact on the producing areas, particularly in developing countries. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to measure the impact of the oil industry on the inhabitants of the oil-producing areas as measured by certain ecological factors. The factors considered were education, health, housing, power, roads, water, and pollution. The selected socio-economic factors are thought to influence the social well being of the inhabitants.

  17. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  18. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Carol T.; Bender, Donald A.; Bowman, Barry R.; Burnham, Alan K.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Comfort, III, William J.; Guymon, Lloyd G.; Henning, Carl D.; Pedersen, Knud B.; Sefcik, Joseph A.; Smith, Joseph A.; Strauch, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  19. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  20. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Kuwait (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  1. Workbook Contents

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Vessel to Kuwait (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","8/2016" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","11/30/2016" ,"Excel File

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Drilling Productivity Report Assessing the productivity of oil and natural gas drilling operations- November report › Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2016 Energy projections for supply, demand, and prices › Winter heating fuels data Access EIA's pricing and storage data on propane, heating oil, and natural gas from a single webpage › AEO Table Browser Graph and view forecasts of U.S. energy supply, demand, and prices through 2040 › Kuwait Country Analysis Brief Kuwait was the world's

  3. The unstable Gulf, Threats from within

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Martin offers an analysis of disputes along the borders of countries in the Persian Gulf region and a description of the religious, ethnic, and ideological tensions among the peoples. The pros and cons of various options for protecting American interests are outlined. The discussion covers Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, North and South Yemen, Oman, Soudi Arabia, U.A.E., Bahrain, and Qatar.

  4. Iraq cracks a few heads in the Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, J.

    1990-08-20

    Last month Saddam Hussein charged that oil overproduction by his neighbors was costing Iraq dearly. When an OPEC meeting collapsed last week, he sent 100,000 troops to seize Kuwait, which he had accused of stealing oil. The US is scrambling to organize a Western boycott, but some analysts question just how effective such a more would be.

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Kazakhstan 85 1.2 Egypt 77 1.1 Canada 70 1 Norway 68 1 Uzbekistan 65 0.9 Kuwait 63 0.9 Rest of world 591 8.5 Source: "Worldwide look at reserves and production," Oil & Gas ...

  6. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1981 totaled 5,741,096,000 bbl, or an average rate of 15,729,030 BOPD, down 14.9% from 1980. Increases were in Oman, Dubai, and Turkey. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were made in Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Abu Dhabi.

  7. PRESENTATION TITLE ON ONE OR MORE LINES

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... 47 44 41 39 39 38 38 36 35 36 Russia imports 126 116 118 119 112 114 116 119 122 124 Algeria pipe imports 35 30 35 33 33 33 33 33 33 33 Libya pipe imports 10 9 9 2 7 11 11 11 11 ...

  8. Fact #934: July 18, 2016 OPEC Accounts for Less than One-third...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Crude Oil Production by State and Federal Offshore Region, 2015 Year Canada Mexico Russia Other Non-OPEC Nigeria Saudi Arabia Venezuela Other OPEC Countries Total Imports Percent ...

  9. --No Title--

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook

    or 75 percent of all deliveries. In recent years, several African countries, including Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Nigeria, and Algeria, also have been suppliers of LNG to the...

  11. DOE - Fossil Energy:

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    States. The United States imports natural gas from Canada, Mexico, Algeria, Australia, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Malaysia, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Qatar, Trinidad and Tobago, and...

  12. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Annual Energy Outlook

    The flow of investment money into commodities markets and ongoing geopolitical concerns in a number of producing countries, including Nigeria, Iraq, and Venezuela, have contributed ...

  13. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    attention. Arresting earlier declines, the region's top two producers, Nigeria and Angola, have each managed relatively robust production and export performances, helping...

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Twenty-one instruments of four different types from 10countries participated, including Switzerland, Germany, Japan, Israel, Nigeria, Australia, Canada, Saudi Arabia, Holland and ...

  15. No Slide Title

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Indonesia Malaysia Australia Nigeria Trinidad & Tobago Algeria Russian Federation Oman Egypt All Others 5 Source: ENI 2012, from BP Statistical Review 2011 (data for CY 2010). ...

  16. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)-Finance Initiative...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    guidelines needed to systematically integrate climate change factors into operational and strategic decision making." Members "*Allianz (Germany) Access Bank (Nigeria) Aviva...

  17. LADOL Integrated Logistics Free Zone Enterprise LILE | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    LADOL Integrated Logistics Free Zone Enterprise LILE Jump to: navigation, search Name: LADOL Integrated Logistics Free Zone Enterprise (LILE) Place: Lagos, Nigeria Product:...

  18. Middle East: Iran isn't missed much

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    A concerted effort to further develop productive capacity is evident in most Middle Eastern Countries, through exploration, field development, and secondary recovery. Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Abu Dhabi all plan expanded petroleum industry programs in 1980. Oil production in Saudi Arabia through the first one-half of 1980 averaged 9.5 million bpd, and the Saudis are proceeding with the large-scale associated gas utilization and industrialization program. Iraq's near-term interest is in development of the Majnoon Discovery. Abu Dhabi is continuing efforts to complete development of a giant offshore field and finalize an onshore/offshore associated gas utilization facility. Only Iran and Kuwait are expected to be relatively inactive in petroleum programs during the remainder of 1980. Individual country reports are presented for Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, Kuwait, the Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain, Syria, Turkey, Israel, Jordan, South Yemen, and Yemen Arab Republic.

  19. Global arms proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, D.

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that the United States delivered some US $11 billion of military hardware to Iran between 1969 and 1979, in the hopes of helping stabilize a volatile situation in the Middle East. That did not work. When Iran used the weapons against Iraq, the USSR, France, and a number of developing countries helped arm Iraq. It was this vast arsenal that Iraq deployed in its Kuwait-Persian Gulf War venture. Granted, those weapons were augmented by some U.S.-made equipment like TOW antitank missiles and Hawk antiaircraft missiles that were captured in the Iraqi attack on Kuwait. A report issued by the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) in June cited that chain of events to demonstrate that the U.S. and other major exporters are gradually losing control of the weapons transferred (to other countries) as well as the technology and industry necessary to produce and support them.

  20. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  1. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.C.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,839,817 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1985, a decrease of 3% from the 1,896,446 km/sup 2/ held at the end of 1984. This decrease mainly is due to significant relinquishments made in Algeria, Egypt, and Tunisia. Morocco, however, had an increase of 18,087 km/sup 2/. Oil discoveries were reported in Algeria (possibly 5), Libya (at least 2), and Egypt (16). Only 1 gas find was made (in Morocco). According to sparse information, development drilling may have decreased markedly during 1985. Oil and condensate production increased by 3.1% to approximately 3,054,000 b/d compared to about 2,963,400 b/d in 1984. No statistics are currently available on gas production in North Africa. 8 figures, 27 tables.

  2. NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News Release Archives

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 November 17, 2015 New Geothermal Lab Manager Joins NREL Henry (Bud) Johnston joined NREL on October 12 as the new Laboratory Program Manager for the Geothermal Technologies Program. June 10, 2015 Geothermal Energy Association Honors Two NRELians with Top Recognition Dan Getman and Jordan Macknick were recognized by the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) during its National Geothermal Summit on June 3, 2015, in Reno, Nevada. June 8, 2015 Kuwait Visitors Interested in NREL Solar and Geothermal

  3. Concentrating Solar Power Projects by Country | Concentrating Solar Power |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Country In this section, you can select a country from the map or the following list of countries. You can then select a specific concentrating solar power (CSP) project and review a profile covering project basics, participating organizations, and power plant configuration data for the solar field, power block, and thermal energy storage. Javascript must be enabled to view Flash movie Algeria Australia Canada Chile China Egypt France Germany India Israel Italy Kuwait Mexico Morocco

  4. JPRS report: Arms control, [November 3, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-11-03

    This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on arms control. Titles include: 5-Power Defense Arrangement Exercise Opens; Paper Sees Growing Danger of Nuclear War; 3rd Round of Conventional Forces Talk; General Notes Inadequate Discipline in Army; Arianespace Assures Liquid Fuel Technology; King Hussain Warns of Nuclear Threat in Region; Kuwait Defense Minister on Weapons Development, GCC; Commentary on Change in NATO Count of Combat Aircraft; and others.

  5. Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

  6. Petroleum developments in Middle East countries in 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1980-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries in 1979 totaled 7,779,619,000 bbl at an average rate of 21,314,024 b/d, up 0.4% from 1978. Principal increases were in Iraq, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, and Saudi Arabia. Significant new discoveries were made in Saudi Arabia, Oman, and Abu Dhabi. New areas were explored in Oman, Syria, offshore South Yemen, Dubai, and Qatar.

  7. Somebody better find some rigs

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries of the Middle East. Field development projects abound, as the larger exporting nations pursue ambitious policies of production expansion. However, their plans may be hampered by the growing worldwide shortage of rigs. Separate evaluations are given for Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Yemen, Syria, Dubai, Turkey, Sharjah, and briefly for Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, UAE-Ajman, and UAE-Ras al-Khaimah.

  8. Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  9. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Hatch, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1982 totaled 4,499,464,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,162,915 BOPD), down 21.5% from 1981. Increases were in Iraq, Iran, and Oman. Significant decreases occurred in Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were reported in Oman, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.

  10. TABLE29.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    9. Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country, (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 1,726 37 20 0 (s) 41 -3 (s) 296 391 2,116 Algeria ...................................... 0 37 0 0 0 27 0 0 252 316 316 Iraq ........................................... 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 36 Kuwait ....................................... 252 0 0 0 0 0 0 (s) (s) (s) 252 Qatar ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources:

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Libya Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 2015 September 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the

  12. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 Section J, Appendix D

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION J APPENDIX D SENSITIVE FOREIGN NATIONS CONTROL 1. Pursuant to the Contract Section I Clause 952.204-71 entitled "Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls," "sensitive foreign nations" is one of the countries listed below: Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China (People's Republic of China) Cuba Georgia Hong Kong India Iran Iraq Israel Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Libya Moldova North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) Pakistan Russia Sudan Syria Taiwan Tajikistan

  13. Turnabout. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Roggero, F.F.

    1993-04-19

    The proliferation of ideas and strategies is equally as important as the proliferation of weapons. This paper challenges the reader to search for counters to historically successful strategies which could be turned against the US. Specifically, consider the following scenario: In 1994 Iraq, Syria, Kazakhstan, and Azerbaijan form an alliance called the Southwest Asia Consortium (SAC). In 1996 Iraq invades Kuwait to reclaim its title to the province, and a limited US-led coalition immediately begins to build up a conventional force in the Persian Gulf region. SAC members recognize Iraq's claim to Kuwait and remind the world in a joint statement that an attack on any of its members would be considered an attack on the entire alliance. Furthermore, SAC reserves the right to respond to any attack at an appropriate level, including conventional weapons, battlefield nuclear weapons, intermediate range nuclear missiles or ICBMs. As Iraq prepares a defense of Kuwait with its national forces and token SAC troop deployments, the Consortium's strategy and capability of responding to a potential attack with a full spectrum of weapons confounds America's response to the crisis.

  14. RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    CO ",190,"TUSCALOOSA","AL","ALABAMA",3 "applicationvnd.ms-excel","ATLANTIC TRADING MARKETING ",14,025,"Crude Oil",1003,"NEWARK, NJ","NEW JERSEY",1,670,"NIGERIA",60,0.02,71.4,"IM...

  15. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    has arrived without a single hurricane affecting oil facilities in the Gulf of Mexico and with no storms likely to arrive within at least the next week. Nigeria, where...

  16. Property:Project State/Province | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Wight + MHK ProjectsAHERC 5kW deployment + Alaska + MHK ProjectsAdmirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + Washington + MHK ProjectsAkwanga Nigeria SHP + Nasarawa State + MHK...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bcf from the Point Fortin plant. Algeria was the source of approximately 52 Bcf, while Egypt supplied 5.7 Bcf. Nigeria, Malaysia, Oman, and Qatar delivered the remaining 14 Bcf....

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Bcf from the Point Fortin plant. Algeria was the source of approximately 52 Bcf, while Egypt supplied 5.7 Bcf. Nigeria, Malaysia, Oman, and Qatar delivered the remaining 14 Bcf....

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Office of Fossil Energy. Five countries supplied U.S. LNG imports during the year: Egypt, Trinidad and Tobago, Nigeria, Norway, and Qatar. (See Figure 1, LNG Imports to the...

  20. MHK Projects | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    information: Loading... 40MW Lewis project ADM 3 ADM 4 ADM 5 AHERC 5kW deployment AW Energy EMEC AWS II Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Agucadoura Akwanga Nigeria SHP...

  1. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    consumers of African crude oil, primarily light sweet crude from Nigeria, Algeria, and Angola, with the United States taking 2 million bbld, or about one-quarter, of African crude...

  2. Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    OPEC Algeria Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC b Total OPEC c 1978 ... 14.12 13.61 13.24 14.05...

  3. Property:Device Units Sold? | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    using this property. M MHK ProjectsAHERC 5kW deployment + No + MHK ProjectsAkwanga Nigeria SHP + Yes + MHK ProjectsEvopod E35 35kW grid connected demonstrator + No + MHK...

  4. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    oil imports from Saudi Arabia increased sharply, along with crude oil imports from Nigeria. Venezuelan crude oil imports, for the second week in a row, continue on a path...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - Session2_Rogers.pptx

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... Equatorial Guinea Egypt B i Malaysia Nigeria ORD INSTITUT 200 Brunei Australia Angola Algeria Malaysia Indonesia Australia OXFO - Jan-08 Apr-08 Jul-08 Oct-08 Jan-09 Apr-09 Jul-09 ...

  6. Table 25. Landed Costs of Imported Crude Oil by Selected Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    OPEC Algeria Canada Indonesia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela Other Countries Arab OPEC a Total OPEC b 1978 ... 14.93 14.41 14.65...

  7. Category:Economic Community of West African States | Open Energy...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    15 pages are in this category, out of 15 total. B Benin Burkina Faso C Cape Verde G Gambia Ghana G cont. Guinea Guinea-Bissau I Ivory Coast L Liberia M Mali N Niger Nigeria...

  8. Pan African Vision for the Environment (PAVE) | Open Energy Informatio...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    to: navigation, search Name: Pan African Vision for the Environment (PAVE) Address: P.O.BOX 494, Ijanikin Place: Lagos, Nigeria Year Founded: 1998 Phone Number: +234-8033510419...

  9. The impact of oil on a developing country

    SciTech Connect

    Ikein, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of the impact of the oil industry on a particular developing country, Nigeria over a period of 32 years. Arguing that previous studies on the oil industry in developing countries have tended to focus only on the economic significance of oil, ignoring its societal costs, the author uses a multidimensional approach that enables him to identify the linkage between the performance of the oil industry and the pattern of Nigeria's national and regional development.

  10. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.Ch.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984, an increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North Africa ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was up 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries.

  11. Oil and gas developments in North Africa in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum rights in the 6 North African countries (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia) covered in this paper were 1,906,065 km/sup 2/ at the end of 1984. An increase of 4.6% from the 1,821,966 km/sup 2/ in force at the end of 1983. This increase is due to large awards in the Sudan despite significant relinquishments elsewhere. Seismic surveys conducted during 1984 decreased to about 510.5 crew-months onshore and 29.5 crew-months offshore. However, exploration in and off Egypt was higher compared to 1983. Exploratory drilling was lower, with only 125 wells drilled compared to 179 tests completed in 1983. The main decrease was in Egypt and Sudan, but drilling in Libya resulted in 20 more completions. A significant oil discovery was made in the offshore part of the Sirte basin, off southwest Cyrenaica. The success rate in North America ranged from 19% to 50% (Libya). Development drilling increased during 1984, as higher activity appears to have taken place in 3 countries. Oil production, with an estimated daily rate of 2,952,570 bbl, was 2.8% from 1983 (2,871,460 BOPD). In Egypt, 7 fields located in the Gulf of Suez area went on stream during the year. Political unrest, which prevailed in southern Sudan during most of 1984, will likely delay the start-up of production in several fields. No statistics are available on gas production in North African countries. 9 figures, 27 tables.

  12. Crude imports to U. S. Gulf Coast refineries to accelerate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-27

    The largest crude oil commodity market in the world--the US Gulf Coast--has experienced an important change in recent years. The decline in domestic production and the increase in imports appear destined to accelerate in the coming decades. Latin American countries will continue to be a major source of US imports, and that the shortfall will have to be made up using Middle Eastern crudes, primarily those from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The paper discusses economics, US production, imports, and future trends.

  13. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  14. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1987-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1986 totaled 4,493,973,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,312,254 BOPD), up 22.3% from the revised 1985 total of 3,673,729,000 bbl. Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, and Oman had significant increased; Iran was the only Middle East country with a significant decrease. New fields went on production in Oman and Yemen Arab Republic, and significant discoveries were reported in Iraq, Yemen Arab Republic, Oman, and Syria. However, exploration was generally down in most countries. Exploration and production operations continued to be affected by war in Iraq and Iran. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed.

  16. Crude Oil and Gasoline Price Monitoring

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    What drives crude oil prices? November 8, 2016 | Washington, DC An analysis of 7 factors that influence oil markets, with chart data updated monthly and quarterly price per barrel (real 2010 dollars) imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events November 8, 2016 2 Low spare capacity Iraq invades Kuwait Saudis abandon swing producer

  17. TABLE21.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    1. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the United States by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC .................................. 53,500 1,139 2,258 115 625 0 0 1,267 0 0 Algeria ...................................... 0 1,139 1,174 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 7,822 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia ............................. 44,568 0 1,084 0 625 0 0 443 0 0 Other

  18. TABLE25A.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    PAD District V PAD District IV January 1998 Non OPEC .................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Canada ..................................... 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Total .............................................. 3,980 424 0 0 13 0 140 0 0 0 Arab OPEC .................................. 2,409 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Iraq ........................................... 1,110 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kuwait ....................................... 1,299 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Saudi Arabia

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the

  20. Apr2003z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    World War II, Y-12 has carried the national security banner and led with a can-do attitude. Recent world events have renewed that spirit and willingness to go above and beyond the call of duty to serve our country's national security needs. And that is what Y-12 did in January on very short notice when it received Libya's stash of nuclear materials and prepared for a planeload of reporters and dignitaries to descend upon the BWXTYmes April 2004 A newsletter for the employees and friends of the

  1. DOE/EIA-0191(2009)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Cove Point, MD Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Nigeria (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,362 2013 2,590 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 10/31/2016 Next Release Date: 11/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from

  2. Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History All Countries 9,114 7,678 8,211 7,785 7,534 8,487 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 1995-2003 OPEC* 2003-2012 Algeria 2007-2010 Nigeria ...

  3. Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Area (Dollars per Barrel) Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series ... Mexico 25.19 29.65 31.91 39.67 42.50 40.68 1975-2016 Nigeria 39.44 42.86 W W 51.05 W ...

  4. Fact #569: May 4, 2009 Gasoline Prices Around the World | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    India (Delhi)* 3.75 Australia 3.32 South Africa 3.24 Bangladesh* 2.42 Russia 2.38 Mexico 2.36 Vietnam* 2.27 United States 2.23 China* 1.93 Malaysia* 1.93 Nigeria 1.85 ...

  5. Slide 1

    Energy Saver

    ... Nigeria - 2.9 Trinidad &Tobago - 2.1 Equitorial Guinea - 0.5 Oman - 1.5 UAE - 0.8 USA - 0.2 Peru - 0.6 Source: Waterborne, Cheniere Research 26 Q4 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q2 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q2 ...

  6. The Pathway to Energy Security

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Canada 2.04 (16.4%) US Domestic 7.38 Venezuela 1.54 (12.4%) Mexico 1.56 (12.5%) Other OPEC 0.78 (6.3%) Iraq 0.77 (6.2%) Nigeria 1.07 (8.6%) Other Non-OPEC 3.0 (24.1%) Saudi Arabia ...

  7. Office of Fossil Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    91 Email: ngreports@hq.doe.gov 2016 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Egypt - - 0.0 Nigeria - - 0.0 Norway - - 0.0 Qatar - - 0.0 Trinidad 12.0 9.6 ...

  8. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

  9. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  10. Middle Eastern power systems; Present and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Middle Eastern Power systems have evolved independently of each other over many decades. The region covers a wide geographical area of over 4 million square kilometers with an estimated population in 1990 of over 120 million people. This paper discusses the present status and future power system developments in the Middle East with emphasis on the Mashrequ Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, and the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Interconnections within MAC and possible extensions to Turkey, Europe, and Central Africa are discussed. A common characteristic of the MAC power systems is that they are all operated by government or semi-government bodies. The energy resources in the region are varied. Countries such as Iraq, Egypt, and Syria have significant hydro power resources. On the other hand, the GCC countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel reserves.

  11. Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Total All Countries 9,441 8,450 7,393 6,237 5,065 4,711 1973-2015 Persian Gulf 1,705 1,842 2,149 1,988 1,861 1,494 1993-2015 OPEC* 4,787 4,429 4,093 3,483 2,996 2,654 1993-2015 Algeria 510 355 241 108 109 105 1993-2015 Angola 393 346 233 215 154 136 1993-2015 Ecuador 135 147 117 153 116 108 1993-2015 Gabon 46 34 43 23 18 12 1993-2015 Indonesia 37 20 6 23 24 38 1993-2015 Iran 0 0 1993-2014 Iraq 415 459 476 341 369 229 1996-2015 Kuwait 197 191 305 328 311

  12. Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 Aug-16 View History Total All Countries 5,000 4,674 4,525 4,836 5,298 5,196 1973-2016 Persian Gulf 1,805 1,707 1,923 1,712 1,751 1,808 1993-2016 OPEC* 3,423 3,179 3,420 3,154 3,563 3,220 1993-2016 Algeria 147 130 91 171 191 169 1993-2016 Angola 172 242 161 128 299 159 1993-2016 Ecuador 175 95 144 124 134 143 1993-2016 Gabon 6 0 5 1993-2016 Indonesia 38 43 43 53 48 51 1993-2016 Iran 1993-2014 Iraq 365 349 555 434 390 488 1996-2016 Kuwait 123 199 177 135 323 156

  13. Gas importers still resisting price parity with crude oil

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1981-02-23

    The pricing of natural gas on a parity with crude oil has become an important issue in the international energy market. A prime example of the hostility that can arise over this issue is the ongoing argument between the US and Algeria over the price of SONATRACH's LNG exports to El Paso Co. Because LNG shipping and regasification costs add substantially to its delivered (c.i.f.) cost, price parity at the point of export (f.o.b.) would put LNG's price far above that of crude oil or natural gas. Other LNG exporters, such as Indonesia and Libya, seem to be adopting Algeria's pricing stance. Most European LNG customers believe that if f.o.b. price parity - or even some of the c.i.f. price-calculation methods - becomes the established formula, LNG will be priced out of many industrial markets. Without the big contracts from industry, existing LNG projects might not be economical.

  14. SPECIAL SEMINAR - The NOTTE experiment, or how to become a Total Solar Eclipse chaser

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-08

    The NOTTE experiment (Neutrino Oscillations with Telescope during Total Eclipse) aims at searching for visible photons emitted through a possible radiative decay of solar neutrinos. The experiment and the expeditions organized by a group of physicists and astrophysicists from INFN and INAF Bologna hunting for Total Solar Eclipses from 1998 to 2006 wil be described. The results of observations performed during total solar eclipse expeditions in 2001 (Zambia) and 2006 (Sahara desert, Libya) are presented and a beautiful photo gallery will be shown. Other peculiar observations that can be made during a solar eclipse are also illustrated. The seminar will be followed by a brief presentation of future camps for solar eclipse chasers and scientists organized in 2008 in Russia, Kazakhstan, China and Mongolia, in 2009 in Shanghai and on the Easter Island in 2010.

  15. SPECIAL SEMINAR - The NOTTE experiment, or how to become a Total Solar Eclipse chaser

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    The NOTTE experiment (Neutrino Oscillations with Telescope during Total Eclipse) aims at searching for visible photons emitted through a possible radiative decay of solar neutrinos. The experiment and the expeditions organized by a group of physicists and astrophysicists from INFN and INAF Bologna hunting for Total Solar Eclipses from 1998 to 2006 wil be described. The results of observations performed during total solar eclipse expeditions in 2001 (Zambia) and 2006 (Sahara desert, Libya) are presented and a beautiful photo gallery will be shown. Other peculiar observations that can be made during a solar eclipse are also illustrated. The seminar will be followed by a brief presentation of future camps for solar eclipse chasers and scientists organized in 2008 in Russia, Kazakhstan, China and Mongolia, in 2009 in Shanghai and on the Easter Island in 2010.

  16. Feasibility study Part I - Thermal hydraulic analysis of LEU target for {sup 99}Mo production in Tajoura reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bsebsu, F.M.; Abotweirat, F. E-mail: abutweirat@yahoo.com; Elwaer, S.

    2008-07-15

    The Renewable Energies and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDRC), Libya, will implement the technology for {sup 99}Mo isotope production using LEU foil target, to obtain new revenue streams for the Tajoura nuclear research reactor and desiring to serve the Libyan hospitals by providing the medical radioisotopes. Design information is presented for LEU target with irradiation device and irradiation Beryllium (Be) unit in the Tajoura reactor core. Calculated results for the reactor core with LEU target at different level of power are presented for steady state and several reactivity induced accident situations. This paper will present the steady state thermal hydraulic design and transient analysis of Tajoura reactor was loaded with LEU foil target for {sup 99}Mo production. The results of these calculations show that the reactor with LEU target during the several cases of transient are in safe and no problems will occur. (author)

  17. Latest Jurassic-early Cretaceous regressive facies, northeast Africa craton

    SciTech Connect

    van Houten, F.B.

    1980-06-01

    Nonmarine to paralic detrital deposits accumulated in six large basins between Algeria and the Arabo-Nubian shield during major regression in latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time. The Ghadames Sirte (north-central Libya), and Northern (Egypt) basins lay along the cratonic margin of northeastern Africa. The Murzuk, Kufra, and Southern (Egypt) basins lay in the south within the craton. Data for reconstructing distribution, facies, and thickness of relevant sequences are adequate for the three northern basins only. High detrital influx near the end of Jurassic time and in mid-Cretaceous time produced regressive nubian facies composed largely of low-sinuosity stream and fahdelta deposits. In the west and southwest the Ghadames, Murzuk, and Kufra basins were filled with a few hundred meters of detritus after long-continued earlier Mesozoic aggradation. In northern Egypt the regressive sequence succeeded earlier Mesozoic marine sedimentation; in the Sirte and Southern basins correlative deposits accumulated on Precambrian and Variscan terranes after earlier Mesozoic uplift and erosion. Waning of detrital influx into southern Tunisia and adjacent Libya in the west and into Israel in the east initiated an Albian to early Cenomanian transgression of Tethys. By late Cenomanian time it had flooded the entire cratonic margin, and spread southward into the Murzuk and Southern basins, as well as onto the Arabo-Nubian shield. Latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous transgressions across northeastern Africa recorded in these sequences may reflect worldwide eustatic sea-level rises. In contrast, renewed large supply of detritus during each regression and a comparable subsidence history of intracratonic and marginal basins imply regional tectonic control. 6 figures.

  18. Potential seen for doubling U. S. LNG imports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-21

    According to a U.S. Office of Technology Assessment report, Nigeria, Indonesia, Australia, Malaysia, Trinidad, Colombia, and Chile are the most likely sources of U.S. imports of LNG, although the areas with the greatest amounts of exportable surplus LNG are the Persian Gulf, with > 231 trillion cu ft/yr, and the U.S.S.R., with 439 trillion cu ft/yr. The import of LNG would increase the U.S. balance of payments deficit, but LNG imports seem preferable to oil imports. LNG producers have a tendency to sell to Europe or Japan, since these areas are closer to the LNG sources. Maritime Administration and Export-Import Bank programs favor the use of domestic rather than foreign LNG tankers, which tends to reduce the financial stake of foreign suppliers in uninterrupted deliveries. Exportable LNG surpluses (in trillions of cu ft/yr) include: Algeria, 8; Nigeria, 33; Southeast Asia, 41; and Western Hemisphere, 19.

  19. Investigation of therapeutic potentials of some selected medicinal plants using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abubakar, Sani; Isa, Nasiru Fage; Usman, Ahmed Rufa’i; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Abubakar, Nuraddeen

    2015-04-24

    Series of attempts were made to investigate concentrations of trace elements and their therapeutic properties in various medicinal plants. In this study, samples of some commonly used plants were collected from Bauchi State, Nigeria. They includes leaves of azadirachta indica (neem), Moringa Oleifera (moringa), jatropha curcas (purgin Nut), guiera senegalensis (custard apple) and anogeissus leiocarpus (African birch). These samples were analyzed for their trace elements contents with both short and long irradiation protocols of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Nigerian Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The level of trace elements found varies from one sample to another, with some reported at hundreds of mg/Kg dry weight. The results have been compared with the available literature data. The presence of these trace elements indicates promising potentials of these plants for relief of certain ailments.

  20. Landed Costs of Imported Crude by Area

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    107.07 103.00 88.29 1973-2014 Angola 61.32 80.61 114.05 114.95 110.81 99.25 1973-2014 Mexico 57.35 72.86 101.21 102.45 99.06 87.48 1973-2014 Nigeria 68.01 83.14 116.43 116.88...

  1. A global perspective on energy markets and economic integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Arnold Barry

    2006-04-01

    What will be the effect of Iraqi domestic instability on Iraqi oil production Negotiations for Iranian nuclear technology on Iranian oil supplies Saudi commitment to expanded oil production President Putin's policies on Russian oil and natural gas supplies President Chavez's policies on Venezuelan oil supplies Instability in Nigeria Higher oil prices on world economic growth Effect of economic growth on oil demand in China, India, U.S., etc. Higher oil prices on non-OPEC oil supplies

  2. The Methane to Markets Coal Mine Methane Subcommittee meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    The presentations (overheads/viewgraphs) include: a report from the Administrative Support Group; strategy updates from Australia, India, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, Poland and the USA; coal mine methane update and IEA's strategy and activities; the power of VAM - technology application update; the emissions trading market; the voluntary emissions reduction market - creating profitable CMM projects in the USA; an Italian perspective towards a zero emission strategies; and the wrap-up and summary.

  3. State companies dominate OGJ100 list of non-U. S. oil producers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-20

    State owned oil and gas companies dominate the OGJ100 list of non-U.S. producers. Because many of them report only operating information, companies on the worldwide list cannot be ranked by assets or revenues. The list, therefore, is organized regionally, based on location of companies' corporate headquarters. The leading nongovernment company in both reserves and production is Royal Dutch/Shell. It ranks sixth in the world in liquids production and 11th in liquids reserves, as it has for the past 2 years. British Petroleum is the next largest nongovernment company. BP ranks 11th in liquids production and 16th in liquids reserves. Elf Aquitaine, 55.8% government-controlled, ranked 17th in liquids production. AGIP was 20th in liquids production. Kuwait Petroleum returned to the list of top 20 producers, ranking 12th, as it restored production shut in by facilities damage sustained during the Persian Gulf crisis. New to the top 20 reserves list is Petroleo Brasileiro, which moved to 20th position. The top 20 companies in the OGJ100 held reserves estimated at 869.3 billion bbl in 1992 vs. 869.5 billion bbl in 1991 and 854.2 billion bbl in 1990.

  4. Domestic petroleum-product prices around the world. Survey: free market or government price controls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-27

    In this issue, Energy Detente draws from their regular Western and Eastern Hemisphere Fuel Price/Tax Series, each produced monthly, and adds other survey data and analysis for a broad view of 48 countries around the world. They find that seven Latin American nations, including OPEC members Venezuela and Ecuador, are among the ten countries with lowest gasoline prices. In this Fourth Special Price Report, Energy Detente provides a first-time presentation of which prices are government-controlled, and which are free to respond to market forces. South Korea, with fixed prices since 1964, has the highest premium-grade gasoline price in our survey, US $5.38 per gallon. Paraguay, with prices fixed by PETROPAR, the national oil company, has the second highest premium gasoline price, US $4.21 per gallon. Nicaragua, also with government price controls, ranks third highest in the survey, with US $3.38 per gallon for premium gasoline. Kuwait shows the lowest price at US $0.55 per gallon. Several price changes from the previous survey reflect changes in currency exchange as all prices are converted to US dollars. The Energy Detente fuel price/tax series is presented for Western Hemisphere countries.

  5. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  6. Worldwide measurements of radioxenon background near isotope production facilities, a nuclear power plant and at remote sites: the ‘‘EU/JA-II’’ Project

    SciTech Connect

    Saey, P.R.J.; Ringbom, Anders; Bowyer, Ted W.; Zahringer, M.; Auer, Matthias; Faanhof, A.; Labuschagne, C.; Al-Rashidi, M. S.; Tippawan, U.; Verboomen, B.

    2013-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) specifies that radioxenon measurements should be performed at 40 or more stations worldwide within the International Monitoring System (IMS). Measuring radioxenon is one of the principle techniques to detect underground nuclear explosions. Specifically, presence and ratios of different radioxenon isotopes allows determining whether a detection event under consideration originated from a nuclear explosion or a civilian source. However, radioxenon monitoring on a global scale is a novel technology and the global civil background must be characterized sufficiently. This paper lays out a study, based on several unique measurement campaigns, of the worldwide concentrations and sources of verification relevant xenon isotopes. It complements the experience already gathered with radioxenon measurements within the CTBT IMS programme and focuses on locations in Belgium, Germany, Kuwait, Thailand and South Africa where very little information was available on ambient xenon levels or interesting sites offered opportunities to learn more about emissions from known sources. The findings corroborate the hypothesis that a few major radioxenon sources contribute in great part to the global radioxenon background. Additionally, the existence of independent sources of 131mXe (the daughter of 131I) has been demonstrated, which has some potential to bias the isotopic signature of signals from nuclear explosions.

  7. The impact of rising energy prices on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns: The Persian Gulf crisis as a case example

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, L.J. ); Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. . Energy Systems Div.)

    1992-09-01

    The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered immediate increases in world oil prices. Increases in world petroleum prices and in US petroleum imports resulted in higher petroleum prices for US customers. In this report, the effects of the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath are used to demonstrate the potential impacts of petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and nonpoor households. The analysis is done by using the Minority Energy Assessment Model developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The differential impacts of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raise significant issues for a variety of government agencies, including DOE. Although the Persian Gulf crisis is now over and world oil prices have returned to their prewar levels, the differential impacts of rising energy prices on poor and minority households as a result of any future crisis in the world oil market remains a significant long-term issue.

  8. Automatic control in petroleum, petrochemical and desalination industries

    SciTech Connect

    Kotob, S.

    1986-01-01

    This is the second IFAC workshop on the subject of Automatic Control in Oil and Desalination Industries. Presentations and discussions underscored the priorities of oil and desalination industries in getting better overall quality, improved energy use, lower cost, and better safety and security. These factors will take on added importance to oil exporting nations that have been hit recently by large oil price declines, which are forcing them to improve the efficiency of their industries and rationalize all new capital expenditures. Papers presented at the workshop included reviews of theoretical developments in control and research in modelling, optimization, instrumentation and control. They included the latest developments in applications of control systems to petroleum, petrochemical and desalination industries such as refineries, multi-stage flash desalination, chemical reactors, and bioreactors. The papers covered the latest in the applications of adaptive control, robust control, decentralized control, bilinear control, measurement techniques, plant optimization and maintenance, and artificial intelligence. Several case studies on modernization of refineries and controls and its economics were included. Two panel discussions, on new projects at the Kuwait National Petroleum Company (KNPC) and needs for control systems were held. Participation in the workshop came from the oil industry and academic institutions.

  9. Electric network interconnection of Mashreq Arab Countries

    SciTech Connect

    El-Amin, I.M.; Al-Shehri, A.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    Power system interconnection is a well established practice for a variety of technical and economical reasons. Several interconnected networks exist worldwide for a number of factors. Some of these networks cross international boundaries. This presentation discusses the future developments of the power systems of Mashreq Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Yemen. Mac power systems are operated by government or semigovernment bodies. Many of these countries have national or regional electric grids but are generally isolated from each other. With the exception of Saudi Arabia power systems, which employ 60 Hz, all other MAC utilities use 50 Hz frequency. Each country is served by one utility, except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi Consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The energy resources in MAC are varied. Countries such as Egypt, Iraq, and Syria have significant hydro resources.The gulf countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel, The variation in energy resources as well as the characteristics of the electric load make it essential to look into interconnections beyond the national boundaries. Most of the existing or planned interconnections involve few power systems. A study involving 12 countries and over 20 utilities with different characteristics represents a very large scale undertaking.

  10. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  11. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Big questions cloud Iraq's future role in world oil market

    SciTech Connect

    Tippee, B.

    1992-03-09

    This paper reports that Iraq raises questions for the world oil market beyond those frequently asked about when and under what circumstances it will resume exports. Two wars since 1981 have obscured encouraging results from a 20 year exploration program that were only beginning to come to light when Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990. Those results indicate the country might someday be able to produce much more than the 3.2 million b/d it was flowing before a United Nations embargo blocked exports. If exploratory potential is anywhere near what officials asserted in the late 1980s, and if Iraq eventually turns hospitable to international capital, the country could become a world class opportunity for oil companies as well as an exporter with productive capacity approaching that of Saudi Arabia. But political conditions can change quickly. Under a new, secular regime, Iraq might welcome non-Iraqi oil companies and capital as essential to economic recovery. It's a prospect that warrants a new industry look at what the country has revealed about its geology and exploration history.

  13. North Korea: The next nuclear nightmare

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, L.S.; Smith, J.R.

    1991-03-01

    The crisis in the Persian Gulf has reawakened concerns over the spread of nuclear arms. Even before its invasion of Kuwait, Iraq's history of aggression and support for international terrorism triggered fears in Washington that its acquisition of nuclear weapons might damage international stability and US interests far more than the emergence of India, Israel, Pakistan, and South Africa as de facto nuclear powers. Thus, when the Gulf War began on January 16, Iraq's nuclear sites were among the first attacked by allied air strikes. Unfortunately, Iraq has not been the only hostile proliferator looming on the horizon. North Korea, which has been no less dedicated than Iraq to the use of violence to advance its expansionist goals, has also tenaciously pursued a nuclear-weapons capability. Moreover, the North Korean program is considerably closer to bearing fruit than the Iraqi effort. And although North Korea, like Iraq, has signed the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, unlike Iraq it has refused to conclude the safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency that the treaty requires.

  14. The motor gasoline industry: Past, present, and future. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Motor gasoline constitutes the largest single component of US demand for petroleum products and is the Nation's most widely used transportation fuel. Because of its importance as a transportation fuel, motor gasoline has been the focus of several regulatory and tax policy initiatives in recent years. Much of the US refining capacity is specifically geared toward maximizing motor gasoline production, and future investments by the petroleum industry in refining infrastructure are likely to be made largely to produce larger volumes of clean motor gasoline. This report addresses major events and developments that have had an impact on motor gasoline supply, distribution, prices, and demand. The report provides historical perspective as well as analyses of important events from the 1970's and 1980's. Long-term forecasts are provided for the period from 1990 to 2010 in an effort to present and analyze possible future motor gasoline trends. Other forecasts examine the near-term impact of the invasion of Kuwait. 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Global warming and the regions in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Alvi, S.H.; Elagib, N.

    1996-12-31

    The announcement of NASA scientist James Hansen made at a United States Senate`s hearing in June 1988 about the onset of global warming ignited a whirlwind of public concern in United States and elsewhere in the world. Although the temperature had shown only a slight shift, its warming has the potential of causing environmental catastrophe. According to atmosphere scientists, the effect of higher temperatures will change rainfall patterns--some areas getting drier, some much wetter. The phenomenon of warming in the Arabian Gulf region was first reported by Alvi for Bahrain and then for Oman. In the recent investigations, the authors have found a similar warming in other regions of the Arabian Gulf and in several regions of Sudan in Africa. The paper will investigate the observed data on temperature and rainfall of Seeb in Oman, Bahrain, International Airport in Kuwait as index stations for the Arabian Gulf and Port Sudan, Khartoum and Malakal in the African Continent of Sudan. Based on various statistical methods, the study will highlight a drying of the regions from the striking increase in temperature and decline of rainfall amount. Places of such environmental behavior are regarded as desertifying regions. Following Hulme and Kelly, desertification is taken to mean land degradation in dryland regions, or the permanent decline in the potential of the land to support biological activity, and hence human welfare. The paper will also, therefore, include the aspect of desertification for the regions under consideration.

  16. Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-15

    This August 15, 1991, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities related to the site development, oil acquisition, budget and cost of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1991, through June 30, 1991. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities development program is proceeding on schedule. The Reserve's capacity is currently 726 million barrels. A total of 5.5 million barrels of new gross cavern volume was developed at Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw during the quarter. There were no crude oil deliveries to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during the calendar quarter ending June 30, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of June 30, 1991, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory was 568.5 million barrels. The reorganization of the Office of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve became effective June 28, 1991. Under the new organization, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office in Louisiana will report to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program Office in Washington rather than the Oak Ridge Field Office in Tennessee. 2 tabs.

  17. Biggest oil spill tackled in gulf amid war, soft market

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-04

    Industry is scrambling to cope with history's biggest oil spill against the backdrop of a Persian Gulf war and a softening oil market. U.S. and Saudi Arabian officials accused Iraq of unleashing an oil spill of about 11 million bbl into the Persian Gulf off Kuwait last week by releasing crude from the giant Sea Island tanker loading terminal at Mina al Ahmadi. Smart bombs delivered by U.S. aircraft hit two onshore tank farm manifold stations, cutting off the terminal's source of oil flow Jan. 26. A small volume of oil was still leaking from 13 mile feeder pipelines to the terminal at presstime. Press reports quoted U.S. military and Saudi officials as estimating the slick at 35 miles long and 10 miles wide but breaking up in some areas late last week. Meantime, Iraq reportedly opened the valves at its Mina al Bakr marine terminal at Fao to spill crude into the northern gulf. BBC reported significant volumes of crude in the water off Fao 24 hr after the terminal valves were opened. Mina al Bakr is a considerably smaller terminal than Sea Island, suggesting that the resulting flow of oil would be smaller than that at Sea Island.

  18. Fate of asphaltenes during hydroprocessing of heavy petroleum residues

    SciTech Connect

    Stanislaus, A.; Absi-Halabi, M.; Khan, Z.

    1994-12-31

    Formation of coke like sediments or particulates is a serious problem in the hydroprocessing of heavy residues for high conversion. The sediments can cause both operability problems and rapid catalyst deactivation. The macromolecules of the heavy feedstocks such as asphaltenes are believed to contribute significantly to sediment formation and coke deposition. As part of an extensive research program on the factors which influence sludge or solids formation during residue hydroprocessing, the authors have examined the nature of changes that take place in the characteristics of the asphaltenic fraction of Kuwait vacuum residue under different operating conditions. The studies revealed that sediment formation is the result of reduction in solubilization efficiency of asphaltenes in the product medium compared with feedstock. Molecular size distribution of the product asphaltenes showed that operating at high temperatures enhanced depolymerization and fragmentation of asphaltenes to low molecular weight materials. A portion of the low molecular weight asphaltene fragments with relatively low H/C ratio resisted further cracking even at high temperatures and led to the formation of coke like sediments. Large pore catalysts were observed to reduce the problem of sediments formation. The role of catalyst pore size on asphaltenes conversion is discussed.

  19. U.S. Crude Oil Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    249,300 229,100 246,323 228,320 250,845 249,099 1920-2016 Persian Gulf 54,342 50,533 59,425 50,705 54,047 55,543 1993-2016 OPEC* 101,402 92,723 105,585 90,723 108,568 96,653 1993-2016 Algeria 604 599 1,253 2,449 1993-2016 Angola 4,951 6,516 4,995 3,837 8,892 4,248 1993-2016 Ecuador 8,188 5,292 6,962 6,702 7,069 7,854 1993-2016 Gabon 1993-2015 Indonesia 1,020 1,021 1,632 1,013 1,311 1,351 1993-2016 Iraq 11,326 10,480 17,213 13,011 11,429 14,792 1996-2016 Kuwait 3,812 5,881 5,478 4,052 10,025

  20. U.S. Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    310,060 294,858 315,660 302,286 325,716 319,629 1981-2016 Persian Gulf 56,422 51,276 59,920 51,466 55,597 56,261 1993-2016 OPEC* 110,857 100,517 112,899 99,098 117,900 106,087 1993-2016 Algeria 4,558 4,113 3,161 5,487 5,926 5,240 1993-2016 Angola 5,323 7,265 4,995 3,837 9,277 4,942 1993-2016 Ecuador 8,188 5,466 7,133 6,702 7,245 7,854 1993-2016 Gabon 200 158 1993-2016 Indonesia 1,172 1,291 1,904 1,601 1,493 1,601 1993-2016 Iraq 11,326 10,480 17,213 13,011 12,094 15,120 1996-2016 Kuwait 3,812

  1. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Husseini, M.; Chimblo, R.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  2. The current state of the Russian reduced enrichment research reactors program

    SciTech Connect

    Aden, V.G.; Kartashov, E.F.; Lukichev, V.A.

    1997-08-01

    During the last year after the 16-th International Conference on Reducing Fuel Enrichment in Research Reactors held in October, 1993 in Oarai, Japan, the conclusive stage of the Program on reducing fuel enrichment (to 20% in U-235) in research reactors was finally made up in Russia. The Program was started late in 70th and the first stage of the Program was completed by 1986 which allowed to reduce fuel enrichment from 80-90% to 36%. The completion of the Program current stage, which is counted for 5-6 years, will exclude the use of the fuel enriched by more than 20% from RF to other countries such as: Poland, Czeck Republick, Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria, Libya, Viet-Nam, North Korea, Egypt, Latvia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. In 1994 the Program, approved by RF Minatom authorities, has received the status of an inter-branch program since it was admitted by the RF Ministry for Science and Technical Policy. The Head of RF Minatom central administrative division N.I.Ermakov was nominated as the Head of the Russian Program, V.G.Aden, RDIPE Deputy Director, was nominated as the scientific leader. The Program was submitted to the Commission for Scientific, Technical and Economical Cooperation between USA and Russia headed by Vice-President A. Gore and Prime Minister V. Chemomyrdin and was given support also.

  3. Why the Gulf War still matters: Foreign perspectives on the war and the future of international security. Report No. 16

    SciTech Connect

    Garrity, P.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) project that examined how a number of nations other than the United States have reacted to the course and outcome of the Persian Gulf War of 1991. The project was built around studies of key countries on which the Gulf War might reasonably be expected to have had a significant impact: Argentina, the ASEAN states, Brazil, China, Cuba, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Libya, North Korea, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Spain, Syria, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Vietnam, and the states of the former Yugoslavia. These country studies were written by well-recognized independent experts following a common set of guidelines provided by CNSS. When the country studies were completed, they were reviewed and supplemented through a series of peer assessments and workshops. The report represents a synthesis of material generated through this process, and is intended to stimulate thought and further analysis on the critical topics discussed herein.

  4. Deterring regional threats from nuclear proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, L.S.

    1992-03-12

    The most prominent shift in the National Military Strategy is from the global Soviet threat to a new focus on regional contingencies. No threat looms larger in these contingencies than the proliferation of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles. This study examines proliferation trends and proposes a predominately diplomatic strategy for containing the problem. Dr. Spector identifies three waves of proliferation: the first is the five states with declared weapons and doctrine-the United States, Russia, Great Britain, France, and China; the second includes a less visible group that developed a covert capability, without testing weapons or declaring a doctrine of deterrence-for example, Israel, India, and probably Pakistan; and, a third wave of would-be proliferators includes radical states like Iraq, Iran, Libya, and North Korea. Spector's political approach is based on the common interest of wave one and two states to prevent further proliferation. Political-economic incentives have already worked in the cases of Brazil, Argentina, Taiwan, and South Africa-states which appear to have abandoned their nuclear weapons programs. Spector does not rule out the option of military force. Force, especially under international sanctions, can be a powerful tool to back diplomatic efforts. Use of force, however, remains a last resort.

  5. Methanol market slowly tightens as Brazil starts soaking up material

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.

    1992-11-25

    Although the US methanol market's response to mandated oxygen requirements in reformulated gasoline has been disappointing, the European market has surprisingly been tightening in recent weeks and looks set for a price rise in first-quarter 1993. The tightness is being felt mainly in the Mediterranean market, where the Libyan methanol plant is running at only 70% because of problems with gas feedstock supplies. More significantly, the Brazilian government has now given the go-ahead for a yearlong extension on imports of methanol for use as an ethanol replacement in fuel blending. The new authorization sets a monthly import limit of 48,000 m.t. during that period. Libya is an important supplier of methanol to the Brazilian market and has already shipped about 20,000 m.t. since the authorization was given. Another major supplier to Brazil is Russia, from its two giant 750,000-m.t./year plants at Gubakha and Tomsk. The material is shipped from the terminal at Yuzhnyy on the Black Sea, in Ukrainian territory since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

  6. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-04-03

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

  7. Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Grace C.; Deshmukh, Ranjit; Ndhlukula, Kudakwashe; Radojicic, Tijana; Reilly, Jessica

    2015-07-01

    Multi-criteria Analysis for Planning Renewable Energy (MapRE) is a study approach developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with the support of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The approach combines geospatial, statistical, energy engineering, and economic methods to comprehensively identify and value high-quality wind, solar PV, and solar CSP resources for grid integration based on techno-economic criteria, generation profiles (for wind), and socio-environmental impacts. The Renewable Energy Zones for the Africa Clean Energy Corridor study sought to identify and comprehensively value high-quality wind, solar photovoltaic (PV), and concentrating solar power (CSP) resources in 21 countries in the East and Southern Africa Power Pools to support the prioritization of areas for development through a multi-criteria planning process. These countries include Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The study includes the methodology and the key results including renewable energy potential for each region.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh and smoked fish samples from three Nigerian cities

    SciTech Connect

    Akpan, V.; Lodovici, M.; Dolara, P. )

    1994-08-01

    Nigeria is a major producer of crude oil in sub-Saharan Africa. In-shore and off-shore wells are located in richly watered creeks in the southern part of the country. Although published data on environmental impact assessment of the petroleum industry in Nigeria are lacking, there is a growing concern about the possible contamination of estuarine and coastal waters and of marine species by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). PAHs are ubiquitous priority pollutants that occur naturally in crude oil, automobile exhaust emissions and smoke condensates from incomplete combustion of carbonaceous materials. PAHs with high molecular weight are less readily biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms in some regions, and given their marked hydrophobic characteristics, may persist in the aqueous environment, thus contaminating the food chain by bioaccumulating in aquatic species like fish and mussels. Major Nigerian oil wells are located in the vicinity of breeding and harvesting sites serving the fresh-water fishing industry. Large hauls of fresh fish are normally consumed cooked in soups or smoke cured in handcrafted traditional ovens using freshly cut red mangrove (Rhizophora racemosa) wood as fuel. Though smoke curing is economical and may ensure longer conservation of fish, it undoubtedly increases the burden of PAHs in finished products as a result of partial charring and from smoke condensates or mangroves that also contain PAHs in measurable quantities as reported by Asita et al. (1991). Apart from PAHs analyzed by Emerole (1980) in smoked food samples from Ibadan using simple analytical methods, those from industrial and other anthropogenic sources have rarely been analyzed in Nigeria. We tried therefore to update the data and address this discrepancy. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Word Pro - S4

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 4.2 Natural Gas Trade by Country (Billion Cubic Feet) Imports Exports a Algeria b Canada c Egypt b Mexico c Nigeria b Qatar b Trinidad and Tobago b Other b,d Total Canada c Japan b Mexico c Other b,e Total 1950 Total .................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 23 0 26 1955 Total .................... 0 11 0 (s) 0 0 0 0 11 11 0 20 0 31 1960 Total .................... 0 109 0 47 0 0 0 0 156 6 0 6 0 11 1965 Total

  10. Word Pro - S9

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    34 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2016 Table 9.2 F.O.B. Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ................. W W - 7.81 3.25 - 5.39 3.68 5.43 4.80 1975 Average .................. 10.97 - 11.44 11.82 10.87 - 11.04 10.88 11.34 10.62 1980 Average ..................

  11. Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels Percent 1960 NA [8] [9] 30,786 333,046 450,799 31,454 -620 -4,267 12,553 139,406

  12. LPG export growth will exceed demand by 2000

    SciTech Connect

    True, W.R.

    1994-08-08

    LPG supplies for international trade will increase sharply through 2000 and begin to outstrip demand by 1997 or 1998. This outlook depends on several production projects proceeding as planned. Leading the way to increased volumes are projects in Algeria, Nigeria, and Australia, among others. Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, projected this trend earlier this year at an international LPG seminar near Houston. Representatives from LPG-supplying countries also presented information to support this view and subsequently supplied more specifics to OGJ in response to questions. This paper discusses this information. Trends in Africa, Australia, North America, and South America are forecast.

  13. Integrated rural energy planning

    SciTech Connect

    El Mahgary, Y.; Biswas, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on integrated community energy systems in developing countries. Topics considered include an integrated rural energy system in Sri Lanka, rural energy systems in Indonesia, integrated rural food-energy systems and technology diffusion in India, bringing energy to the rural sector in the Philippines, the development of a new energy village in China, the Niaga Wolof experimental rural energy center, designing a model rural energy system for Nigeria, the Basaisa village integrated field project, a rural energy project in Tanzania, rural energy development in Columbia, and guidelines for the planning, development and operation of integrated rural energy projects.

  14. World frontiers beckon oil finders

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

  15. TABLE22.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    2. PAD District I-Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Country of Origin, a January 1998 Arab OPEC ................................... 6,171 845 0 115 625 0 0 824 0 0 Algeria ....................................... 0 845 0 115 0 0 0 824 0 0 Saudi Arabia .............................. 6,171 0 0 0 625 0 0 0 0 0 Other OPEC .................................. 13,975 0 280 588 1,644 776 715 2,024 3 0 Nigeria ....................................... 8,825 0 0 0 0 0 0 166 0 0 Venezuela

  16. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 5.7 Petroleum Net Imports by Country of Origin, Selected Years, 1960-2011 Year Persian Gulf 2 Selected OPEC 1 Countries Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries Total Net Imports Total Net Imports as Share of Consumption 5 Net Imports From OPEC 1 Algeria Nigeria Saudi Arabia 3 Venezuela Total OPEC 4 Canada Mexico United Kingdom U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Total Non-OPEC 4 Share of Total Net Imports 6 Share of Consumption 7 Thousand Barrels per Day Percent 1960 NA 8 ( ) 9 ( ) 84 910 1,232 86

  17. Interest grows in African oil and gas opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1997-05-12

    As African countries continue a slow drift towards democratic government and market economics, the continent is increasingly attractive to international oil and gas companies. Though Africa remains politically diverse, and its volatile politics remains a major barrier to petroleum companies, a number of recent developments reflect its growing significance for the industry. Among recent projects and events reflecting changes in Africa: oil and gas exporter Algeria has invited foreign oil companies to help develop major gas discoveries, with a view to boosting exports to Europe; oil and gas producer Egypt invited foreign companies to explore in the Nile Delta region, and the result appears to be a flowering world scale gas play; west African offshore exploration has entered deep water and new areas, and a number of major projects are expected in years to come; Nigeria`s reputation as a difficult place to operate has been justified by recent political and civil events, but a long-planned liquefied natural gas (LNG) export plant is being built there; South Africa, which has returned to the international scene after years of trade isolation because of apartheid, is emerging as a potential driver for energy industry schemes throughout the continent. Activities are discussed.

  18. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, J.B.; Walker, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    Significant rightholding changes took place in central and southern Africa during 1987. Angola, Benin, Congo, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Mauritania, Seychelles, Somali Republic, Tanzania, Zaire, and Zambia announced awards or acreage open for bidding. Decreases in exploratory rightholdings occurred in Cameroon, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, and Tanzania. More wells and greater footage were drilled in 1987 than in 1986. Total wells increased by 18% as 254 wells were completed compared to 217 in 1986. Footage drilled during the year increased by 46% as about 1.9 million ft were drilled compared to about 1.3 million ft in 1986. The success rate for exploration wells in 1987 improved slightly to 36% compared to 34% in 1986. Significant discoveries were made in Nigeria, Angola, Congo, and Gabon. Seismic acquisition in 1987 was the major geophysical activity during the year. Total oil production in 1987 was 773 million bbl (about 2.1 million b/d), a decrease of 7%. The decrease is mostly due to a 14% drop in Nigerian production, which comprises 60% of total regional production. The production share of OPEC countries (Nigeria and Gabon) versus non-OPEC countries of 67% remained unchanged from 1986. 24 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. A General Investigation of Optimized Atmospheric Sample Duration

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Miley, Harry S.

    2012-11-28

    ABSTRACT The International Monitoring System (IMS) consists of up to 80 aerosol and xenon monitoring systems spaced around the world that have collection systems sensitive enough to detect nuclear releases from underground nuclear tests at great distances (CTBT 1996; CTBTO 2011). Although a few of the IMS radionuclide stations are closer together than 1,000 km (such as the stations in Kuwait and Iran), many of them are 2,000 km or more apart. In the absence of a scientific basis for optimizing the duration of atmospheric sampling, historically scientists used a integration times from 24 hours to 14 days for radionuclides (Thomas et al. 1977). This was entirely adequate in the past because the sources of signals were far away and large, meaning that they were smeared over many days by the time they had travelled 10,000 km. The Fukushima event pointed out the unacceptable delay time (72 hours) between the start of sample acquisition and final data being shipped. A scientific basis for selecting a sample duration time is needed. This report considers plume migration of a nondecaying tracer using archived atmospheric data for 2011 in the HYSPLIT (Draxler and Hess 1998; HYSPLIT 2011) transport model. We present two related results: the temporal duration of the majority of the plume as a function of distance and the behavior of the maximum plume concentration as a function of sample collection duration and distance. The modeled plume behavior can then be combined with external information about sampler design to optimize sample durations in a sampling network.

  20. Oil prices in a new light

    SciTech Connect

    Fesharaki, F. )

    1994-05-01

    For a clear picture of how oil prices develop, the author steps away from the price levels to which the world is accustomed, and evaluates scientifically. What makes prices jump from one notch to another The move results from a political or economic shock or the perception of a particular position by the futures market and the media. The shock could range from a war or an assassination to a promise of cooperation among OPEC members (when believed by the market) or to speculation about another failure at an OPEC meeting. In the oil market, only a couple of factual figures can provide a floor to the price of oil. The cost of production of oil in the Gulf is around $2 to $3/bbl, and the cost of production of oil (capital and operating costs) in key non-OPEC areas is well under $10/bbl. With some adjustments for transport and quality, a price range of $13/bbl to $16/bbl would correspond to a reasonable sustainable floor price. The reason for prices above the floor price has been a continuous fear of oil supply interruptions. That fear kept prices above the floor price for many years. The fear factor has now almost fully disappeared. The market has gone through the drama of the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, the tanker war, the invasion of Kuwait, and the expulsions of the Iraqis. And still the oil flowed -- all the time. It has become abundantly clear that fears above the oil market were unjustified. Everyone needs to export oil, and oil will flow under the worst circumstances. The demise of the fear factor means that oil prices tend toward the floor price for a prolonged period.

  1. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Steinhaeusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-07

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (<20% U 235) or highly enriched uranium (>20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  2. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  3. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    LNG World LNG Imports 1964 - 2007 World LNG Imports 1964 - 2007 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 1964 1968 1972 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 Americas Total Europe Total Asia in mtpa 7.7%pa 2 LNG 0 4 8 12 16 1 9 6 8 1 9 7 3 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 8 2 0 0 3 Algeria Trinidad Egypt Nigeria Eq. Guinea M. East Pacific Basin in mtpa US LNG Imports by Source 1968-2007 US LNG Imports by Source 1968-2007 3 LNG Regional LNG Production 1990 - 2007 Regional LNG Production 1990

  4. Word Pro - S9

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Table 9.3 Landed Costs of Crude Oil Imports From Selected Countries (Dollars a per Barrel) Selected Countries Persian Gulf Nations b Total OPEC c Total Non-OPEC c Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1973 Average d ............... W 5.33 W - 9.08 5.37 - 5.99 5.91 6.85 5.64 1975 Average ................ 11.81 12.84 - 12.61 12.70 12.50 - 12.36 12.64 12.70 12.70 1980 Average ................ 34.76 30.11 W 31.77 37.15 29.80 35.68 25.92 30.59 33.56 33.99 1985

  5. Rocky Mountain Research Station and LANL build

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History All Countries 89,636 82,068 91,687 95,299 95,725 107,024 1981-2015 Persian Gulf 1995-2002 OPEC* 6 7 2005-2012 Algeria 6 2007-2010 Nigeria 1995-2002 United Arab Emirates 1995-2002 Venezuela 7 2005-2012 Non OPEC* 89,630 82,068 91,680 95,299 95,725 107,024 1993-2015 Brazil 8 2006-2010 Canada 89,615 82,068 91,662 95,299 95,725 107,024 1993-2015 Egypt 18 2012-2012 Mexico 1995-2006 Norway 2007-2007 Russia 7 2010-2010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  6. Microsoft Word - table_08.doc

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    25 Table 8. Summary of U.S. natural gas imports, 2011-2015 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada a 3,117,081 2,962,827 2,785,427 2,634,375 2,625,359 Mexico 2,672 314 1,069 1,426 933 Total Pipeline Imports 3,119,753 2,963,140 2,786,496 2,635,801 2,626,291 LNG by Truck Canada 0 0 555 132 437 LNG by Vessel Egypt 35,120 2,811 0 0 0 Nigeria 2,362 0 2,590 0 0 Norway 15,175 6,212 5,627 5,616 12,194 Peru 16,620 0 0 0 0 Qatar 90,972 33,823 7,320 0 0 Trinidad/Tobago 128,620 112,207 69,744

  7. Gas in developing countries: Volume 2, Country studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains detailed case-studies of the history and prospects for natural gas utilization in eight developing countries: Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand and Tunisia. All of these countries have been visited by members of the research team, with the exception of Pakistan. Running through all the case-histories is the importance of defining a clear market for the gas. In some cases this can prove remarkably difficult, especially when the oil price is relatively low. In other cases a market does exist, but is very limited in relation to the size of available reserves. The other theme which recurs over and over again is the importance of the relationship between the government and its agencies, and the foreign oil companies which are involved in exploration and development of gas reserves. These two issues are addressed in detail in each case study. But it is also the case that each country highlights specific aspects of the gas story.

  8. Marginal cost of natural gas in developing countries: concepts and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mashayekhi, A.

    1983-01-01

    Many developing nations are facing complex questions regarding the best strategy for developing their domestic gas reserves. The World Bank has addressed these questions in studies on the cost and prices of gas and its optimal allocation among different markets. Based on the average incremental method, an estimate of the marginal cost of natural gas in 10 developing countries proved to be $0.61-1.79/1000 CF or $3.59-10.54/bbl of oil equivalent, far below the border prices of competing fuels in these nations. Moreover, the cost of gas is not expected to rise in these countries within the next 20 years while the reserves/production ratios remain high. The sample involves a variety of gas compositions and production conditions among the countries of Bangladesh, Cameroon, Egypt, India, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Tunisia.

  9. Natural gas: Governments and oil companies in the Third World

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.; Hurst, C.; Mabro, R.

    1988-01-01

    It is asserted that oil companies claim to be generally receptive to gas development proposals; however, the lack of potential markets for gas, problems of foreign exchange convertibility, and lack of a legal framework often hinders their engagement. Governments, on the other hand, need to secure domestic energy supply and, if possible, gain some export earnings or royalties. An extensive discussion on the principles of pricing and fiscal regimes, potential points of disagreement is provided. A course of action is outlined from the managerial point of view to circumvent the most common pitfalls in planning and financing a gas project. Eight very detailed case studies are presented for Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Tunisia and Thailand.

  10. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 3, India and China

    SciTech Connect

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J.; Ravindranath, N.H.; Somashekhar, B.S.; Gadgil, M.; Deying, Xu

    1992-08-01

    As part of the effort to understand the sources of carbon dioxide and other major greenhouse gases, the Tropical Forestry and Global Climate Change Research Network (F-7) was established. The countries taking part in the F-7 Network -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria and Thailand -- possess large tracts of tropical forests and together experience the bulk of large scale tropical deforestation. Integreation of work of indigenous researchers and institutions from the participating countries should allow for the gathering of on-site information into the more general and universally available base of knowledge. The information contained in this report represents the results of the first phase of the F-7 project, which had the explicit aim of providing quantitative data on forestry-related carbon emissions from India and China.

  11. An environmental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Geerling, C.

    1996-11-01

    The Shell Petroleum Development Company is operating in southern Nigeria in the delta of the Niger River. This delta covers an area 70,000 square kin of coastal ridge barriers, mangroves, freshwater swamp forest and lowland rain forests. Over the past decades considerable changes has occurred through coastal zone modifications, upstream urban and hydrological infrastructure, deforestation, agriculture, fisheries, industrial development, oil operation, as well as demographic changes. The problems associated with these changes are: (1) over-exploitation of renewable natural resources and breakdown of traditional management structures; (2) impact from industry such as pollution and physical changes, and (3) a perception of lack of social and economic equity. This paper describes approaches to help counteract theses problems.

  12. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. ); Ravindranath, N.H.; Somashekhar, B.S.; Gadgil, M. . Center for Ecological Sciences and ASTRA); Deying, Xu . Research Inst. of Forestry)

    1992-08-01

    As part of the effort to understand the sources of carbon dioxide and other major greenhouse gases, the Tropical Forestry and Global Climate Change Research Network (F-7) was established. The countries taking part in the F-7 Network -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria and Thailand -- possess large tracts of tropical forests and together experience the bulk of large scale tropical deforestation. Integreation of work of indigenous researchers and institutions from the participating countries should allow for the gathering of on-site information into the more general and universally available base of knowledge. The information contained in this report represents the results of the first phase of the F-7 project, which had the explicit aim of providing quantitative data on forestry-related carbon emissions from India and China.

  13. Central and southern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    Exploration in central and southern Africa continued to expand during 1980. The greatest concentration of activity was in Nigeria. However, there was considerable increase in the level of exploratory work in Cameroon and Congo. Significant new finds have been made in Ivory Coast. Geological and geophysical activity was carried out in 18 of the countries, with those in the western part having the largest share. Seismic work involved 225 party months of operation. Most of this time was spent on land, but marine operations accounted for 73,389 km of new control. Gravity and magnetic data were recorded during the marine surveys, and several large aeromagnetic projects were undertaken to obtain a total of 164,498 line km of data. Exploratory and development drilling accounted for a total of 304 wells and 2,605,044 ft (794,212 m) of hole. The 92 exploratory wells that were drilled resulted in 47 oil and gas discoveries. In development drilling 89% of the 212 wells were successful. At the end of the year, 27 exploratory wells were underway, and 34 development wells were being drilled for a total of 61. Oil production from the countries that this review covers was 918,747,009 bbl in 1980, a drop of about 9% from the previous year. Countries showing a decline in production were Nigeria, Gabon, Cabinda, and Zaire. Increases were recorded in Cameroon, Congo, and Ghana. A new country was added to the list of producers when production from the Belier field in Ivory Coast came on stream. 33 figures, 15 tables.

  14. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Ulkue, Dincer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-19

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference {approx}133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member

  15. The Russian Federation's Ministry of Atomic Energy: Programs and Developments

    SciTech Connect

    CM Johnson

    2000-07-24

    monitored--particularly those negotiated with Cuba, Iran, Libya and Syria. (6) Waste management has also risen in importance for Minatom. Opportunities for raising funds by reprocessing, storing and permanently disposing of spent fuel from foreign states are being explored. Although currently prohibited by federal law, the Russian Parliament will likely pass legislation in support of this program.

  16. Attitude towards littering as a mediator of the relationship between personality attributes and responsible environmental behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ojedokun, Oluyinka

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Independently, altruism and locus of control contributed significantly toward attitude towards littering. > Altruism and locus of control jointly contributed significantly to attitude towards littering. > The results further show a significant joint influence of altruism and locus of control on REB. > The independent contributions reveal that altruism and locus of control contribute significantly to REB. > Attitude towards littering mediates the relationship between locus of control and REB. - Abstract: The study tested whether attitude towards littering mediates the relationship between personality attributes (altruism and locus of control) and responsible environmental behavior (REB) among some residents of Ibadan metropolis, Nigeria. Using multistage sampling technique, measures of each construct were administered to 1360 participants. Results reveal significant independent and joint influence of personality attributes on attitude towards littering and responsible environmental behavior, respectively. Attitude towards littering also mediates the relationship between personality characteristics and REB. These findings imply that individuals who possess certain desirable personality characteristics and who have unfavorable attitude towards littering have more tendencies to engage in pro-environmental behavior. Therefore, stakeholders who have waste management as their priority should incorporate this information when guidelines for public education and litter prevention programs are being developed. It is suggested that psychologists should be involved in designing of litter prevention strategies. This will ensure the inclusion of behavioral issues in such strategies. An integrated approach to litter prevention that combines empowerment, cognitive, social, and technical solutions is recommended as the most effective tool of tackling the litter problem among residents of Ibadan metropolis.

  17. Feasibility of petroleum as a weapon. [USA as target of future embargo

    SciTech Connect

    Olabode, O.O.

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the feasibility of the oil weapon in relation to the 1973-74 Arab oil embargo and the odds attending the successful use of a future embargo with the United States as the target. The following are examined: applying economic sanctions by both developing and developed nations and factors of economic interdependence consequent of the attendant paradox of world food crisis; the growing dependence of developing nations on Western technology; the strategic dependence on critical minerals as determinants of world economic progress; the growth of Western dependence on oil; and the future outlook for a successful application of the oil embargo, including the strategy and tactics of oil-weapon diplomacy and the bases for a successful application without a boomerang on the poorer developing nations. The study brings Nigeria into focus as a candidate likely to apply the weapon and its potentialities for success; it deals with hypothetical scenarios involving successful application of the oil weapon stemming from regional conflict and the provisional arrangement for such an exercise.

  18. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    F.O.B.[a] costs of imported crude oil by selected country dollars per barrel Year month Selected countries Persian Gulf[b] Total OPEC[c] Non OPEC Angola Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1996 20.71 21.33 19.14 21.27 19.28 19.43 17.73 19.22 18.94 19.65 1997 18.81 18.85 16.72 19.43 15.16 18.59 15.33 15.24 16.26 17.51 1998 12.11 12.56 10.49 12.97 8.87 12.52 9.31 9.09 10.20 11.21 1999 17.46 17.20 15.89 17.32 17.65 19.14 14.33 17.15 15.90 16.84 2000 27.90 29.04 25.39 28.70

  19. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Landed costs of imported crude oil by selected country dollars per barrel Year month Selected countries Persian Gulf[a] Total OPEC[b] Non OPEC Angola Canada Colombia Mexico Nigeria Saudi Arabia United Kingdom Venezuela 1996 21.86 19.94 22.02 19.64 21.95 20.49 20.88 18.59 20.45 20.14 20.47 1997 20.24 17.63 19.71 17.30 20.64 17.52 20.64 16.35 17.44 17.73 18.45 1998 13.37 11.62 13.26 11.04 14.14 11.16 13.55 10.16 11.18 11.46 12.22 1999 18.37 17.54 18.09 16.12 17.63 17.48 18.26 15.58 17.37 16.94

  20. World`s LPG supply picture will change by 2000

    SciTech Connect

    True, W.R.

    1995-11-06

    Middle East LPG producers will continue to dominate world export markets in 1996. Led by Saudi Arabia, the Middle East will produce nearly 26 million metric tons of LPG in million metric tons of LPG in 1996, more than 54% of the world`s almost 48 million metric tons of export LPG. In 2000, however, with world exports of LPG expanding to 58.9 million metric tons, Middle East suppliers; share will have remained flat, making up 31.7 million metric tons, or 53.9%. Saudi Arabia`s contribution will exceed 15 million metric tons, reflecting essentially no growth since 1995. These and other patterns, from data compiled by Purvin and Gertz, Dallas, and published earlier this year, show other suppliers of LPG, especially African (Algeria/Nigeria), North Sea, and Latin American (Venezuela/Argentina), picking up larger shares in the last 5 years of this decade. This scenario assumes completion of several major supply projects that are either panned, under construction, or nearing start up in most of these areas. The paper discusses the global picture, the supply situation in the Middle East, Africa, the North Sea, and South America.

  1. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  2. World heavy oil and bitumen riches - update 1983: Part two, production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-08

    Despite world recession, overabundance of conventional oil and light product supplies, softer oil prices, and certain important reversals in development policies, worldwide production of heavy and extra-heavy crude oil increased 11.3% in 1982 compared to 1981; latest 1983 data confirm this trend. For the top ten heavy-oil-producing nations, the increase was 17.7% over the same period, mainly due to increases in Venezuela, Mexico, and Nigeria. In 1981, world heavy and extra-heavy crude production was 6.1% of world conventional oil production; in 1982 it increased to 7.2%. Bitumen production in Canada, the only country with 1982 production figures, increased 46% over 1981. It is probable that further technological advances and experimentation in other countries, including the Soviet Union, have resulted in other bitumen production increases as well. Although multinational cooperation in research for extraction, upgrading, and transportation of heavy crudes and bitumens has not grown to the extent that many industry experts had hoped, several broad areas of cooperation stand supported and many of them have been strengthened. Such progress in the face of economic and political uncertainties are demonstrations of world leadership for the next petroleum age. This issue presents the Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for June 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  3. Constructing rigorous and broad biosurveillance networks for detecting emerging zoonotic outbreaks

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Brown, Mac; Moore, Leslie; McMahon, Benjamin; Powell, Dennis; LaBute, Montiago; Hyman, James M.; Rivas, Ariel; Jankowski, Mark; Berendzen, Joel; Loeppky, Jason; et al

    2015-05-06

    Determining optimal surveillance networks for an emerging pathogen is difficult since it is not known beforehand what the characteristics of a pathogen will be or where it will emerge. The resources for surveillance of infectious diseases in animals and wildlife are often limited and mathematical modeling can play a supporting role in examining a wide range of scenarios of pathogen spread. We demonstrate how a hierarchy of mathematical and statistical tools can be used in surveillance planning help guide successful surveillance and mitigation policies for a wide range of zoonotic pathogens. The model forecasts can help clarify the complexities ofmore » potential scenarios, and optimize biosurveillance programs for rapidly detecting infectious diseases. Using the highly pathogenic zoonotic H5N1 avian influenza 2006-2007 epidemic in Nigeria as an example, we determined the risk for infection for localized areas in an outbreak and designed biosurveillance stations that are effective for different pathogen strains and a range of possible outbreak locations. We created a general multi-scale, multi-host stochastic SEIR epidemiological network model, with both short and long-range movement, to simulate the spread of an infectious disease through Nigerian human, poultry, backyard duck, and wild bird populations. We chose parameter ranges specific to avian influenza (but not to a particular strain) and used a Latin hypercube sample experimental design to investigate epidemic predictions in a thousand simulations. We ranked the risk of local regions by the number of times they became infected in the ensemble of simulations. These spatial statistics were then complied into a potential risk map of infection. Finally, we validated the results with a known outbreak, using spatial analysis of all the simulation runs to show the progression matched closely with the observed location of the farms infected in the 2006-2007 epidemic.« less

  4. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1983

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, H.J.

    1984-10-01

    All exploratory activity in central and southern Africa decreased in 1983, reflecting world economic conditions and excess productive capacity. Seismic activity has declined sharply from its peak year of 1981. Land operations suffered the greatest drop in 1983, whereas party-months of marine work increased slightly. 3-D recording continued to be used but at a reduced rate compared with 1982. Large aeromagnetic surveys were made in several countries; however, the coverage was less than in 1982. Gravity continues to be used to supplement other geophysical work, but other exploratory techniques are being used infrequently. Total wells drilled dropped from 464 in 1982 to 387 in 1983. Most of the decline was in exploratory drilling, which dropped from 132 to 86 wells. This was reflected in the number of discoveries, which decreased from 48 to 27 while the success rate continued about the same. Development drilling continued at a high level in Cameroon and Congo, whereas in Nigeria the emphasis shifted to the drilling of appraisal wells. In all, 2,937,708 ft (895,643 m) of hole was drilled, a decrease of about 20% from 1982. Oil production of 673,075,667 bbl in 1983 was an increase of 1.7% over 1982's production, bringing cumulative production to over 12 billion bbl. Marked increases in production were recorded in Cabinda, Ivory Coast, and Congo. Production from Nigerian fields continued to dominate this part of the world as they contributed about 67% of the annual production and 75% of the cumulative production. 44 figures, 15 tables.

  5. Oil and gas developments in central and southern Africa in 1981

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, H.J.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory activity in central and southern Africa continued to grow during 1981. Geophysical operations reached nearly record levels and the number of wells increased markedly. Oil production suffered from the adverse conditions that existed throughout the world and dropped by a significant amount. New Concession acquisitions occurred in several of the countries in northeast Africa. Elsewhere, the operating companies negotiated new concessions and renewed those that were expiring. In several countries where production has been proven, the operators were assigned exploitation concessions. Seismic crews and marine geophysical vessels were active throughout the countries in this area. A total of 365 party-months of work was done to yield 98,035 km of new lines. A moderate amount of 3-D recording was carried out in connection with field development. Some aeromagnetic work was done, principally in northeast Africa and in Mozambique. Forty-four new fields or pools were discovered by drilling 115 new-field wildcat and exploratory wells. These wells accounted for 1,060,254 ft (323,248 m) of hole. Appraisal and development drilling resulted in 321 wells with a total of 2,533,305 ft (772,349 m) of hole drilled. At year end, 25 exploratory wells were under way or resting, and 49 rigs were active in development drilling. Oil production for the year was 691,995,939 bbl, a decrease of nearly 25% from 1980. Nigeria suffered the greatest drop in production; however, increases were achieved in Cameroon, Congo, and Zaire. The cumulative production from this part of Africa passed the 10 billion bbl mark.

  6. MNSR transient analyses and thermal hydraulic safety margins for HEU and LEU cores using the RELAP5-3D code

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.; Thomas, J.; Liaw, J.; Matos, J.E.

    2008-07-15

    For safety analyses to support conversion of MNSR reactors from HEU fuel to LEU fuel, a RELAP5-3D model was set up to simulate the entire MNSR system. This model includes the core, the beryllium reflectors, the water in the tank and the water in the surrounding pool. The MCNP code was used to obtain the power distributions in the core and to obtain reactivity feedback coefficients for the transient analyses. The RELAP5-3D model was validated by comparing measured and calculated data for the NIRR-1 reactor in Nigeria. Comparisons include normal operation at constant power and a 3.77 mk rod withdrawal transient. Excellent agreement was obtained for core coolant inlet and outlet temperatures for operation at constant power, and for power level, coolant inlet temperature, and coolant outlet temperature for the rod withdrawal transient. In addition to the negative reactivity feedbacks from increasing core moderator and fuel temperatures, it was necessary to calculate and include positive reactivity feedback from temperature changes in the radial beryllium reflector and changes in the temperature and density of the water in the tank above the core and at the side of the core. The validated RELAP5-3D model was then used to analyze 3.77 mk rod withdrawal transients for LEU cores with two UO{sub 2} fuel pin designs. The impact of cracking of oxide LEU fuel is discussed. In addition, steady-state power operation at elevated power levels was evaluated to determine steady-state safety margins for onset of nucleate boiling and for onset of significant voiding. (author)

  7. Constructing rigorous and broad biosurveillance networks for detecting emerging zoonotic outbreaks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Mac; Moore, Leslie; McMahon, Benjamin; Powell, Dennis; LaBute, Montiago; Hyman, James M.; Rivas, Ariel; Jankowski, Mark; Berendzen, Joel; Loeppky, Jason; Manore, Carrie; Fair, Jeanne; Viboud, Cecile

    2015-05-06

    Determining optimal surveillance networks for an emerging pathogen is difficult since it is not known beforehand what the characteristics of a pathogen will be or where it will emerge. The resources for surveillance of infectious diseases in animals and wildlife are often limited and mathematical modeling can play a supporting role in examining a wide range of scenarios of pathogen spread. We demonstrate how a hierarchy of mathematical and statistical tools can be used in surveillance planning help guide successful surveillance and mitigation policies for a wide range of zoonotic pathogens. The model forecasts can help clarify the complexities of potential scenarios, and optimize biosurveillance programs for rapidly detecting infectious diseases. Using the highly pathogenic zoonotic H5N1 avian influenza 2006-2007 epidemic in Nigeria as an example, we determined the risk for infection for localized areas in an outbreak and designed biosurveillance stations that are effective for different pathogen strains and a range of possible outbreak locations. We created a general multi-scale, multi-host stochastic SEIR epidemiological network model, with both short and long-range movement, to simulate the spread of an infectious disease through Nigerian human, poultry, backyard duck, and wild bird populations. We chose parameter ranges specific to avian influenza (but not to a particular strain) and used a Latin hypercube sample experimental design to investigate epidemic predictions in a thousand simulations. We ranked the risk of local regions by the number of times they became infected in the ensemble of simulations. These spatial statistics were then complied into a potential risk map of infection. Finally, we validated the results with a known outbreak, using spatial analysis of all the simulation runs to show the progression matched closely with the observed location of the farms infected in the 2006-2007 epidemic.

  8. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-28

    , covering more than a third of the continent’s population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairman’s Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets

  9. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continent’s population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairman’s Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i

  10. Three Blind Men and the Elephant

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J S

    2007-02-13

    2/3 of the world's oil. They see oil and gas being used by Russia to exert political power using the gas tap and Hugo Chavez in Venezuela clearly anti-American and now a virtual dictator who controls 15% of our oil imports. Conflicts in Nigeria over oil wealth and corruption affected our oil supply. Countries such as China are at best unwilling to join political action against countries such as Sudan that supply them oil, and at worst, selling them arms in order to cement their relationships with respect to importing oil. This security constituency favors ending our vulnerability by ending our ''addiction to foreign oil''. This group thinks that there is no domestic source of energy that is bad. They will be happy to see our corn turned into ethanol; our coal turned into liquid fuel for transportation. No matter that the price of tortillas doubles in Mexico, we expand corn farming at the expense of the environment, our tanks and pipes in gas stations corrode and leak, or we make liquid fuel from coal, thus increasing the carbon footprint by 30% per unit of energy. The economic vitality group sees increasing international demand for oil occurring simultaneously with a peaking supply of light sweet crude. They see an oil market where higher prices drive more production of oil which is heavier and more sour (supply follows demand). However, fast growth in world-wide demand increases even faster and prices will go up. For example, China adds 10,000 cars per month, and there is an uncanny correlation between the price of oil and the amount of oil imported by China. The security contingent also worries about reliability of supply as affected by pipeline leaks in Alaska or hurricanes or potential terrorism. This constituency thinks the problem is one of capacity and favors solutions that will increase oil production, reservoirs, pipelines and refineries. They believe that the energy system will be determined by the market and want solutions that favor investment in