National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for jet propulsion laboratory

  1. Eagleworks Laboratories: Advanced Propulsion | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    November 17, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium Eagleworks Laboratories: Advanced Propulsion Dr. Harold "Sonny" White NASA The colloquium will discuss a pilot wave model used to predict the performance of a q-thruster test article, and the origin and history of the pilot wave line of thinking will be outlined. Analysis results of a pilot wave model of the hydrogen atom will be presented and discussed. The methodology and results from a vacuum test campaign documented in a

  2. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ≈ ni ~ 10¹⁶ cm⁻³, Te ≈ Ti ≈ 1.4 eV, Vjet ≈ 30–100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}$ ≈ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ≈ 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.

  3. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ? ni ~ 10? cm?, Te ? Ti ? 1.4 eV, Vjet ? 30100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}$ ? 1, sonic Mach number Ms ? Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ? 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.

  4. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; et al

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ≈ ni ~ 10¹⁶ cm⁻³, Te ≈ Ti ≈ 1.4 eV, Vjet ≈ 30–100 km/s, mean chargemore » $$\\bar{Z}$$ ≈ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ≈ 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.« less

  5. Dedicated Laboratory Setup for CO{sub 2} TEA Laser Propulsion Experiments at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador, Israel I.; Kenoyer, David; Myrabo, Leik N.; Notaro, Samuel

    2010-10-08

    Laser propulsion research progress has traditionally been hindered by the scarcity of photon sources with desirable characteristics, as well as integrated specialized flow facilities in a dedicated laboratory environment. For TEA CO{sub 2} lasers, the minimal requirements are time-average powers of >100 W), and pulse energies of >10 J pulses with short duration (e.g., 0.1 to 1 {mu}s); furthermore, for the advanced pulsejet engines of interest here, the laser system must simulate pulse repetition frequencies of 1-10 kilohertz or more, at least for two (carefully sequenced) pulses. A well-equipped laser propulsion laboratory should have an arsenal of sensor and diagnostics tools (such as load cells, thrust stands, moment balances, pressure and heat transfer gages), Tesla-level electromagnet and permanent magnets, flow simulation facilities, and high-speed visualization systems, in addition to other related equipment, such as optics and gas supply systems. In this paper we introduce a cutting-edge Laser Propulsion Laboratory created at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, one of the very few in the world to be uniquely set up for beamed energy propulsion (BEP) experiments. The present BEP research program is described, along with the envisioned research strategy that will exploit current and expanded facilities in the near future.

  6. Large-Scale Testing and High-Fidelity Simulation Capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories to Support Space Power and Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2008-01-21

    Sandia National Laboratories, as a Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency, has major responsibility to ensure the safety and security needs of nuclear weapons. As such, with an experienced research staff, Sandia maintains a spectrum of modeling and simulation capabilities integrated with experimental and large-scale test capabilities. This expertise and these capabilities offer considerable resources for addressing issues of interest to the space power and propulsion communities. This paper presents Sandia's capability to perform thermal qualification (analysis, test, modeling and simulation) using a representative weapon system as an example demonstrating the potential to support NASA's Lunar Reactor System.

  7. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  8. Particle-in-cell simulations of collisionless shock formation via head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Hsu, S. C.

    2013-08-15

    We describe numerical simulations, using the particle-in-cell (PIC) and hybrid-PIC code lsp[T. P. Hughes et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 2, 110401 (1999)], of the head-on merging of two laboratory supersonic plasma jets. The goals of these experiments are to form and study astrophysically relevant collisionless shocks in the laboratory. Using the plasma jet initial conditions (density ?10{sup 14}10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}, temperature ? few eV, and propagation speed ?20150 km/s), large-scale simulations of jet propagation demonstrate that interactions between the two jets are essentially collisionless at the merge region. In highly resolved one- and two-dimensional simulations, we show that collisionless shocks are generated by the merging jets when immersed in applied magnetic fields (B?0.11 T). At expected plasma jet speeds of up to 150 km/s, our simulations do not give rise to unmagnetized collisionless shocks, which require much higher velocities. The orientation of the magnetic field and the axial and transverse density gradients of the jets have a strong effect on the nature of the interaction. We compare some of our simulation results with those of previously published PIC simulation studies of collisionless shock formation.

  9. Naval Nuclear Propulsion | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Naval Nuclear Propulsion Klotz visits Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Lt. Gen. Frank G. Klotz, DOE Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator, visited the Bettis ...

  10. A Review of Laser Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Claude; Bohn, Willy; Lippert, Thomas; Sasoh, Akihiro; Schall, Wolfgang; Sinko, John

    2010-10-08

    Laser Ablation Propulsion is a broad field with a wide range of applications. We review the 30-year history of laser ablation propulsion from the transition from earlier pure photon propulsion concepts of Oberth and Saenger through Kantrowitz's original laser ablation propulsion idea to the development of air-breathing 'Lightcraft' and advanced spacecraft propulsion engines. The polymers POM and GAP have played an important role in experiments and liquid ablation fuels show great promise. Some applications use a laser system which is distant from the propelled object, for example, on another spacecraft, the Earth or a planet. Others use a laser that is part of the spacecraft propulsion system on the spacecraft. Propulsion is produced when an intense laser beam strikes a condensed matter surface and produces a vapor or plasma jet. The advantages of this idea are that exhaust velocity of the propulsion engine covers a broader range than is available from chemistry, that it can be varied to meet the instantaneous demands of the particular mission, and that practical realizations give lower mass and greater simplicity for a payload delivery system. We review the underlying theory, buttressed by extensive experimental data. The primary problem in laser space propulsion theory has been the absence of a way to predict thrust and specific impulse over the transition from the vapor to the plasma regimes. We briefly discuss a method for combining two new vapor regime treatments with plasma regime theory, giving a smooth transition from one regime to the other. We conclude with a section on future directions.

  11. Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Developed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory. Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems (2.02 MB) More Documents

  12. Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

  13. Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory June 17, 2014 Unclassified 'Wolf' system to advance many fields of science LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 17, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory recently installed a new high-performance computer system, called Wolf, which will be used for unclassified research. "This machine modernizes our mid-tier resources available to Laboratory scientists," said Bob Tomlinson, of the Laboratory's High Performance Computing group.

  14. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.; Johnson, D.R.

    1999-04-26

    The objective of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is to develop the enabling materials technology for the clean, high-efficiency diesel truck engines of the future. The development of cleaner, higher-efficiency diesel engines imposes greater mechanical, thermal, and tribological demands on materials of construction. Often the enabling technology for a new engine component is the material from which the part can be made. The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program is a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE), and the diesel engine companies in the United States, materials suppliers, national laboratories, and universities. A comprehensive research and development program has been developed to meet the enabling materials requirements for the diesel engines of the future. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications.

  15. Overview of Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Office of Vehicles Technologies Materials Program Jerry Gibbs Technology Development Manager Propulsion Materials Vehicle Technologies Program Overview of Propulsion Materials Project ID PM000 Vehicle Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Materials for Combustion Systems / High Efficiency Engines Turbocharger, Valve Train, Fuel Injection, Structural Components Head/Block, Sensors, Materials/Fuel Compatibility Materials for Exhaust and Energy Recovery DPFs, Catalysts, Thermoelectric Materials,

  16. Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Builders place final beam in first phase of CMRR project at Los Alamos National Laboratory July 22, 2008 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 22, 2008- Workers hoisted the final steel beam ...

  17. Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory June 26, 2011 Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 26, 2011, 6:07pm-The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12...

  18. Functions and Requirements for a Waste Conveyance Jet Pump for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    OD Mullen

    1998-11-05

    Since the mid 1940's, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have conducted research and development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of urgent national interests in the fields of nuclear weaponry and nuclear energy. Some of these activities resulted in radiologically hazardous waste being temporarily deposited at ORNL in Waste Area Grouping 1. At this location, waste is stored in several underground storage tanks, awaiting ultimate final disposal. There are tanks of two basic categories; one category is referred to as the "gunite" tanks, and the other category is `associated" tanks. The ORNL Gunite and Associated Tanks Treatability Study (GMT-TS) project was initiated in fiscal year (FY) 1994 to support a record of decision in selecting from seven different options of technologies for retrieval and remediation of these tanks. This decision process is part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), Remedial investigation and Feasibility Study (R1/FS) presented to DOE and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). As part of this decision process, new waste retrieval technologies were evaluated at the 25-ft diameter gunite tanks in the North Tank Farm.

  19. Advanced propulsion on a shoestring

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, E.J.

    1990-05-01

    Consideration is given to propulsion concepts under study by NASA Advanced Propulsion Research Program. These concepts include fusion, antimatter-matter annihilation, microwave electrothermal, and electron cyclotron resonance propulsion. Results from programs to develop fusion technologies are reviewed, including compact fusion devices and inertial confinement experiments. Problems concerning both antimatter and fusion propulsion concepts are examined and the economic issues related to propulsion research are discussed.

  20. Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2015 Students gain new insights into their ancestry LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 24, 2015-San Ildefonso Pueblo's Summer Education Enhancement Program brought together academic and cultural learning in the form of a recent tour of Cave Kiva Trail in Mortandad Canyon."Opening up this archaeological site and sharing it with the descendants of its first inhabitants is a

  1. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  2. Contributions Regarding the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrica, Bogdan; Petre, Marian; Dima, Mihai Octavian; Stanciu, Virgil; Petre, Carmelia; Precup, Irinel

    2010-01-21

    The possibility to use a nuclear reactor for airplanes propulsion was investigated taking in to account 2 possible solutions: the direct cycle (where the fluid pass through the reactor's core) and the indirect cycle (where the fluid is passing through a heat exchanger). Taking in to account the radioprotection problems, the only realistic solution seems to be the indirect cycle, where the energy transfer should be performed by a heat exchanger that must work at very high speed of the fluid. The heat exchanger will replace the classical burning room. We had performed a more precise theoretical study for the nuclear jet engine regarding the performances of the nuclear reactor, of the heat exchanger and of the jet engine. It was taken in to account that in the moment when the burning room is replaced by a heat exchanger, a new model for gasodynamic process from the engine must be performed. Studies regarding the high flow speed heat transfer were performed.

  3. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D. ); Sikes, W.C. )

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  4. Propulsion engineering study for small-scale Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.

    1995-09-12

    Rocket propulsion options for small-scale Mars missions are presented and compared, particularly for the terminal landing maneuver and for sample return. Mars landing has a low propulsive {Delta}v requirement on a {approximately}1-minute time scale, but at a high acceleration. High thrust/weight liquid rocket technologies, or advanced pulse-capable solids, developed during the past decade for missile defense, are therefore more appropriate for small Mars landers than are conventional space propulsion technologies. The advanced liquid systems are characterize by compact lightweight thrusters having high chamber pressures and short lifetimes. Blowdown or regulated pressure-fed operation can satisfy the Mars landing requirement, but hardware mass can be reduced by using pumps. Aggressive terminal landing propulsion designs can enable post-landing hop maneuvers for some surface mobility. The Mars sample return mission requires a small high performance launcher having either solid motors or miniature pump-fed engines. Terminal propulsion for 100 kg Mars landers is within the realm of flight-proven thruster designs, but custom tankage is desirable. Landers on a 10 kg scale also are feasible, using technology that has been demonstrated but not previously flown in space. The number of sources and the selection of components are extremely limited on this smallest scale, so some customized hardware is required. A key characteristic of kilogram-scale propulsion is that gas jets are much lighter than liquid thrusters for reaction control. The mass and volume of tanks for inert gas can be eliminated by systems which generate gas as needed from a liquid or a solid, but these have virtually no space flight history. Mars return propulsion is a major engineering challenge; earth launch is the only previously-solved propulsion problem requiring similar or greater performance.

  5. Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop...

    Energy Saver

    Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program ...

  6. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Determination of

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol and Surface Reflectance Characteristics at the ARM CART Site Using MISR Observations Determination of Aerosol and Surface Reflectance Characteristics at the ARM CART Site Using MISR Observations Martonchik, John Jet Propulsion Laboratory Diner, David Jet Propulsion Laboratory Kahn, Ralph Jet Propulsion Laboratory Abdou, Wedad Jet Propulsion Laboratory Gaitley, Barbara Jet Propulsion Laboratory Aerosol optical depth and surface directional reflectance at the ARM CART site are

  7. Evaporation of water with single and multiple impinging air jets

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Obot, N.T. )

    1991-08-01

    An experimental investigation of impingement water evaporation under a single jet and arrays of circular jets was made. The parametric study included the effects of jet Reynolds number and standoff spacing for both single and multiple jets, as well as surface-to-nozzle diameter ratio and fractional nozzle open area for single and multiple jets, respectively. The nozzle exit temperature of the air jet, about the same as that of the laboratory, was 3-6C higher than that of the evaporating water. Predictive equations are provided for mass transfer coefficient in terms of the flow and geometric conditions.

  8. Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

  9. Nuclear Propulsion in Space (1968)

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-23

    Project NERVA was an acronym for Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application, a joint program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and NASA managed by the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (SNPO) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Jackass Flats, Nevada U.S.A. Between 1959 and 1972, the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office oversaw 23 reactor tests, both the program and the office ended at the end of 1972.

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratories - PA 44 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bettis Atomic Power ... follow of nuclear reactor propulsion plants for Naval surface and submarine vessels. ...

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory - NY 16 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Knolls Atomic Power ... facility dedicated to support of the United States Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. ...

  12. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  13. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 2015 CX-014279: Categorical Exclusion Determination Lower Level Guard Post Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11, B1.15, B2.2 Date: 09/25/2015 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program July 6, 2015 CX-013878:

  14. Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise Computation |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility High-fidelity simulation of exhaust nozzle under installed configuration Umesh Paliath, GE Global Research; Joe Insley, Argonne National Laboratory Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise Computation PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI Email: paliath@ge.com Institution: GE Global Research Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 105 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Engineering GE Global Research is using the Argonne Leadership

  15. ON THE STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF MAGNETIC TOWER JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G.; Ciardi, A.; Hartigan, P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2012-09-20

    Modern theoretical models of astrophysical jets combine accretion, rotation, and magnetic fields to launch and collimate supersonic flows from a central source. Near the source, magnetic field strengths must be large enough to collimate the jet requiring that the Poynting flux exceeds the kinetic energy flux. The extent to which the Poynting flux dominates kinetic energy flux at large distances from the engine distinguishes two classes of models. In magneto-centrifugal launch models, magnetic fields dominate only at scales {approx}< 100 engine radii, after which the jets become hydrodynamically dominated (HD). By contrast, in Poynting flux dominated (PFD) magnetic tower models, the field dominates even out to much larger scales. To compare the large distance propagation differences of these two paradigms, we perform three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations of both HD and PFD stellar jets formed via the same energy flux. We also compare how thermal energy losses and rotation of the jet base affects the stability in these jets. For the conditions described, we show that PFD and HD exhibit observationally distinguishable features: PFD jets are lighter, slower, and less stable than HD jets. Unlike HD jets, PFD jets develop current-driven instabilities that are exacerbated as cooling and rotation increase, resulting in jets that are clumpier than those in the HD limit. Our PFD jet simulations also resemble the magnetic towers that have been recently created in laboratory astrophysical jet experiments.

  16. FY2014 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-01

    The Propulsion Materials Program actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of VTO by investigating and identifying the materials properties that are most essential for continued development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light-duty powertrains. The technical approaches available to enhance propulsion systems focus on improvements in both vehicle efficiency and fuel substitution, both of which must overcome the performance limitations of the materials currently in use. Propulsion Materials Program activities work with national laboratories, industry experts, and VTO powertrain systems (e.g., Advanced Combustion Engines [ACE], Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines [APEEM], and fuels) teams to develop strategies that overcome materials limitations in future powertrain performance. The technical maturity of the portfolio of funded projects ranges from basic science to subsystem prototype validation. Projects within a Propulsion Materials Program activity address materials concerns that directly impact critical technology barriers within each of the above programs, including barriers that impact fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, improved reliability, and reduced manufacturing costs. The program engages only the barriers that result from material property limitations and represent fundamental, high-risk materials issues.

  17. Magnetized and collimated millimeter scale plasma jets with astrophysical relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Parrish C.; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Valanju, Prashant M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, Todd

    2012-01-15

    Magnetized collimated plasma jets are created in the laboratory to extend our understanding of plasma jet acceleration and collimation mechanisms with particular connection to astrophysical jets. In this study, plasma collimated jets are formed from supersonic unmagnetized flows, mimicking a stellar wind, subject to currents and magnetohydrodynamic forces. It is found that an external poloidal magnetic field, like the ones found anchored to accretion disks, is essential to stabilize the jets against current-driven instabilities. The maximum jet length before instabilities develop is proportional to the field strength and the length threshold agrees well with Kruskal-Shafranov theory. The plasma evolution is modeled qualitatively using MHD theory of current-carrying flux tubes showing that jet acceleration and collimation arise as a result of electromagnetic forces.

  18. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  19. Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power DOE Operations Annual Site Environmental Report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, R. J.

    1997-11-10

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test operations sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion & Power of Boeing North American. Inc. (formerly Rockwell International Corporation). These are identified as the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL and the De Soto site. The sites have been used for manufacturing; R&D, engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields, primarily rocket engine propulsion and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site essentially comprises office space and light industry with no remaining radiological operations, and has little potential impact on the environment. The SSFL site, because of its large size (2.668 acres), warrants comprehensive monitoring to ensure protection of the environment.

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Propulsion Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Vehicle Technologies Office Propulsion Materials Technologies Jerry Gibbs eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $35.6 M Lightweight Materials $28.5 M Values are FY15 enacted Propulsion Materials $7.1 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M $11.9 M FY14

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Funding by State

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Sandia National ... 20.7M Los Alamos National Laboratory NASA Sandia National Laboratory New York 10.1M ...

  2. Space propulsion: The antimatter advantage (Journal Article)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Space propulsion: The antimatter advantage Citation Details In-Document ... Publication Date: 1993-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 5657366 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  3. HYPERSONIC BUCKSHOT: ASTROPHYSICAL JETS AS HETEROGENEOUS COLLIMATED PLASMOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yirak, Kristopher; Frank, Adam; Cunningham, Andrew J.; Mitran, Sorin

    2009-04-20

    Herbig-Haro jets are commonly thought of as homogeneous beams of plasma traveling at hypersonic velocities. Structure within jet beams is often attributed to periodic or 'pulsed' variations of conditions at the jet source. Simulations based on this scenario result in knots extending across the jet diameter. Observations and recent high energy density laboratory experiments shed new light on structures below this scale and indicate they may be important for understanding the fundamentals of jet dynamics. In this paper, we offer an alternative to 'pulsed' models of protostellar jets. Using direct numerical simulations we explore the possibility that jets are chains of subradial clumps propagating through a moving interclump medium. Our models explore an idealization of this scenario by injecting small (r < r {sub jet}), dense ({rho}>{rho}{sub jet}) spheres embedded in an otherwise smooth interclump jet flow. The spheres are initialized with velocities differing from the jet velocity by {approx}15%. We find that the consequences of shifting from homogeneous to heterogeneous flows are significant as clumps interact with each other and with the interclump medium in a variety of ways. Structures which mimic what is expected from pulsed-jet models can form, as can be previously unseen, 'subradial' behaviors including backward facing bow shocks and off-axis working surfaces. While these small-scale structures have not been seen before in simulation studies, they are found in high-resolution jet observations. We discuss implications of our simulations for the interpretation of protostellar jets with regard to characterization of knots by a 'lifetime' or 'velocity history' approach as well as linking observed structures with central engines which produce the jets.

  4. ChemCam rock laser for Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity"

    ScienceCinema

    Wiens, Roger

    2014-08-12

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. The Flight Model was shipped in August, 2010 for installation on the rover at JPL. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components were concurrently assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2011. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  5. ChemCam Rock Laser for the Mars Science Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    LANL

    2009-09-01

    Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instr... Los Alamos has a long history of space-related instruments, tied primarily to its role in defense-related treaty verification. Space-based detectors have helped determine the differences between signals from lightning bolts and potential nuclear explosions. LANL-developed gamma-ray detection instruments first revealed the existence of what we now know as gamma-ray bursts, an exciting area of astrophysical research. And the use of LANL instruments on varied space missions continues with such products as the ChemCam rock laser for NASA, shown here. The Engineering Model of the ChemCam Mars Science Laboratory rover instrument arrived at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on February 6, 2008. ChemCam will use imaging and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to determine rock and soil compositions on Mars, up to 9 meters from the rover. The engineering model is being integrated into the rover test bed for the development and testing of the rover software. The actual flight model components are concurrently being assembled at Los Alamos and in Toulouse, France, and will be delivered to JPL in July. The Mars Science Laboratory is scheduled to launch in 2009. Animations courtesy of JPL/NASA.

  6. HybriDrive Propulsion System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HybriDrive ® Propulsion System Cleaner, smarter power for transit DOE/FTA Fuel Cell Research Priorities Workshop Washington, DC 7 June 2010 Bart W. Mancini Sr. Principal Systems Engineer BAE Systems Ph: 607-770-4103 bart.mancini@baesystems.com 2 Overview 3 * BAE Systems FC Experience / Deployments * Technology gaps/barriers to full commercialization of fuel cell buses * Well-to-wheels energy efficiency and emissions * Cost metrics * Bus integration issues * Fuel cell bus R&D needs * Future

  7. Study of Jet Transverse Momentum and Jet Rapidity Dependence on Dijet Azimuthal Decorrelations

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthula, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    In a collision experiment involving highly energetic particles such as hadrons, processes at high momentum transfers can provide information useful for many studies involving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One way of analyzing these interactions is through angular distributions. In hadron-hadron collisions, the angular distribution between the two leading jets with the largest transverse momentum (pT ) is affected by the production of additional jets. While soft radiation causes small differences in the azimuthal angular distribution of the two leading jets produced in a collision event, additional hard jets produced in the event have more pronounced influence on the distribution of the two leading jets produced in the collision. Thus, the dijet azimuthal angular distribution can serve as a variable that can be used to study the transition from soft to hard QCD processes in a collision event. This dissertation presents a triple-differential study involving the azimuthal angular distribution and the jet transverse momenta, and jet rapidities of the first two leading jets. The data used for this research are obtained from proton-antiproton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions occurring at a center of mass energy of 1.96TeV, using the DØ detector in Run II of the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in Illinois, USA. Comparisons are made to perturbative QCD (pQCD) predictions at next-to-leading order (NLO).

  8. Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-03-30

    This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the experimental technique developed for determination of specific impulses from plasma plume imaging with an intensified CCD camera.

  9. Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Cohen, Timothy; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2004-03-30

    This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the newest results of our experimental study of specific impulses and coupling coefficients achieved by double-pulsed ablation of graphite, aluminum, copper and lead targets.

  10. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion This presentation ...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    08 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report PDF icon 2008propulsionmaterials.pdf More ...

  12. Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology Looking From A Hilltop: Automotive Propulsion System Technology Outlook for global fuel economy requirements and ...

  13. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 12. Propulsion Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2. Propulsion Materials 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 12. Propulsion Materials DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review 2008meritreview12.pdf (2.52 MB) More ...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    PDF icon 2013ProgressReportforPropulsionMaterials.pdf More Documents & Publications NOx sensor development Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual ...

  15. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces...

  16. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites ...

  17. Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    GE propulsion systems Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise Computation PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI Email: paliath@ge.com Institution: GE Global Research ...

  18. Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

  19. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Jets in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, M.H.

    1996-02-01

    Many analyses at the collider utilize the hadronic jets that are the footprints of QCD partons. These are used both to study the QCD processes themselves and increasingly as tools to study other physics, for example top mass reconstruction. However, jets are not fundamental degrees of freedom in the theory, so we need an {ital operational} {ital jet} {ital definition} and {ital reliable} {ital methods} {ital to} {ital calculate} {ital their} {ital properties}. This talk covers both of these important areas of jet physics. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Titanium … Propulsion Applications Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm_22_lavender.pdf (668.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications Low Cost Titanium … Propulsion Applications

  2. Inflatable concentrators for solar propulsion and dynamic space power

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; Williams, G. )

    1990-11-01

    This paper describes the development of an inflatable concentrator for solar propulsion, providing the source of heat to a hydrogen engine aboard the Solar Rocket. The latter is a device designed to carry payloads from a low earth orbit (LEO) to a geosynchronous orbit (GEO) at significant mass savings in comparison to chemical propulsion; it involves two light-weight parabolic reflectors in an off-axis configuration focusing solar radiation into the absorbers of the engine, which causes the emission of a hot hydrogen jet. Each of the reflectors has an elliptical rim with a 40 m major axis, providing heat to the propellant sufficient to produce about 40 lbs. of thrust. The same concentrator concept is contemplated for space power application to focus solar radiation on a conversion device, e.g., a photovoltaic array or the high temperature end of a dynamic engine. Under the present project, a one-fourth scale, 9X7 m off-axis inflatable concentrator has been under development as a pilot for the full-scale flight unit. The reflector component consists of a reflective membrane made of specially designed gores and a geometrically identical transparent canopy. The two form together an inflatable lenslike structure which, upon inflation, assumes the accurate paraboloidal shape. This inflatable structure is supported along its rim by a strong, bending-resistant torus. The paper describes the development of this system including the analysis leading to determination of the gore shapes, the reflector membrane design and testing, the analysis of the supporting torus, and a discussion of the effects of the space environment.

  3. NASA @ APS | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA @ APS NASA engineers developing rocket propulsion hardware 1 of 8 NASA engineers developing rocket propulsion hardware Patrick McManamen, a propulsion system engineer at NASA, ...

  4. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  5. Analysis of the Space Propulsion System Problem Using RAVEN

    SciTech Connect

    diego mandelli; curtis smith; cristian rabiti; andrea alfonsi

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the solution of the space propulsion problem using a PRA code currently under development at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment) is a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities. It is designed to derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures) and to perform both Monte- Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Event Tree based analysis. In order to facilitate the input/output handling, a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data-mining module are available. RAVEN allows also to interface with several numerical codes such as RELAP5 and RELAP-7 and ad-hoc system simulators. For the space propulsion system problem, an ad-hoc simulator has been developed and written in python language and then interfaced to RAVEN. Such simulator fully models both deterministic (e.g., system dynamics and interactions between system components) and stochastic behaviors (i.e., failures of components/systems such as distribution lines and thrusters). Stochastic analysis is performed using random sampling based methodologies (i.e., Monte-Carlo). Such analysis is accomplished to determine both the reliability of the space propulsion system and to propagate the uncertainties associated to a specific set of parameters. As also indicated in the scope of the benchmark problem, the results generated by the stochastic analysis are used to generate risk-informed insights such as conditions under witch different strategy can be followed.

  6. Development of a jet-assisted polycrystalline diamond drill bit

    SciTech Connect

    Pixton, D.S.; Hall, D.R.; Summers, D.A.; Gertsch, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    A preliminary investigation has been conducted to evaluate the technical feasibility and potential economic benefits of a new type of drill bit. This bit transmits both rotary and percussive drilling forces to the rock face, and augments this cutting action with high-pressure mud jets. Both the percussive drilling forces and the mud jets are generated down-hole by a mud-actuated hammer. Initial laboratory studies show that rate of penetration increases on the order of a factor of two over unaugmented rotary and/or percussive drilling rates are possible with jet-assistance.

  7. Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels Life Cycle GHG Emissions Modeling Jim Hileman U.S. Federal Aviation Administration May 18, 2012 2 Federal Aviation Administration Life Cycle GHG Emissions Stage #1: Extraction of resource (e.g., crude oil, natural gas, coal, biomass) Stage #2: Pipeline, tanker, rail and truck transport to refinery Stage #3: Refinement to produce transportation fuel (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) Stage #4: Pipeline transportation, blending with additives, transport to

  8. Dynamic simulator for PEFC propulsion plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraide, Masataka; Kaneda, Eiichi; Sato, Takao

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC propulsion system for surface ships, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quote}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The work presented here focuses on a simulation study on PEFC propulsion plant performance, and particularly on the system response to changes in load. Using a dynamic simulator composed of system components including fuel cell, various simulations were executed, to examine the performance of the system as a whole and of the individual system components under quick and large load changes such as occasioned by maneuvering operations and by racing when the propeller emerges above water in heavy sea.

  9. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Chiravalle, Vincent P

    2012-07-23

    This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these devices have been used to accomplish two recent space missions. The microwave thruster is then described and it is explained how the thrust and specific impulse of the thruster can be measured. Calculations of the gas temperature and plasma properties in the microwave thruster are discussed. In addition a potential mission for the microwave thruster involving the orbit raising of a space station is explored.

  10. A development approach for nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1992-01-01

    The cost and time to develop nuclear thermal propulsion systems are very approach dependent. The objectives addressed are the development of an acceptable'' nuclear thermal propulsion system that can be used as part of the transportation system for people to explore Mars and the enhancement performance of other missions, within highly constrained budgets and schedules. To accomplish this, it was necessary to identify the cost drivers considering mission parameters, safety of the crew, mission success, facility availability and time and cost to construct new facilities, qualification criteria, status of technologies, management structure, and use of such system engineering techniques as concurrent engineering.

  11. A development approach for nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1992-09-01

    The cost and time to develop nuclear thermal propulsion systems are very approach dependent. The objectives addressed are the development of an ``acceptable`` nuclear thermal propulsion system that can be used as part of the transportation system for people to explore Mars and the enhancement performance of other missions, within highly constrained budgets and schedules. To accomplish this, it was necessary to identify the cost drivers considering mission parameters, safety of the crew, mission success, facility availability and time and cost to construct new facilities, qualification criteria, status of technologies, management structure, and use of such system engineering techniques as concurrent engineering.

  12. Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Energy Systems Division About ... UChicago Argonne, LLC. ANLESD08-3 Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion ...

  13. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  14. 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2013 and 2014 within the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program.

  15. Laser Propulsion - Is it another myth or a real potential?

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Joung R.

    2008-04-28

    This paper discusses different principles of inducing propulsive power using lasers and examines the performance limits along with pros and cons with respect to different space propulsion applications: satellite launching, orbital transfer, space debris clearing, satellite propulsion, and space travels. It concludes that a use of electrical propulsion, in conjunction with laser power beaming, is the most feasible application with technological and economic advantages for commercial use within the next decades.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO Propulsion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Material Technologies | Department of Energy Propulsion Material Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Overview of VTO Propulsion Material Technologies Presentation given by U.S. Department of Energy at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about overview of VTO Propulsion Material Technologies. pm000_gibbs_2015_o.pdf (1.5 MB) More Documents & Publications Overview of Propulsion

  17. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  18. Radial flow pulse jet mixer (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radial flow pulse jet mixer Title: Radial flow pulse jet mixer The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing ...

  19. Measurement Issues In Pulsed Laser Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Sinko, John E.; Scharring, Stefan; Eckel, Hans-Albert; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2010-05-06

    Various measurement techniques have been used throughout the over 40-year history of laser propulsion. Often, these approaches suffered from inconsistencies in definitions of the key parameters that define the physics of laser ablation impulse generation. Such parameters include, but are not limited to the pulse energy, spot area, imparted impulse, and ablated mass. The limits and characteristics of common measurement techniques in each of these areas will be explored as they relate to laser propulsion. The idea of establishing some standardization system for laser propulsion data is introduced in this paper, so that reported results may be considered and studied by the general community with more certain understanding of particular merits and limitations. In particular, it is the intention to propose a minimum set of requirements a literature study should meet. Some international standards for measurements are already published, but modifications or revisions of such standards may be necessary for application to laser ablation propulsion. Issues relating to development of standards will be discussed, as well as some examples of specific experimental circumstances in which standardization would have prevented misinterpretation or misuse of past data.

  20. 2012 NISE Awards Summary Table

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    in Laboratory and Space Plasmas Colleen Kaul, ... Junjie Liu, Jet Propulsion Laboratory m189 ... m1451 1,100,000 NP Nuclear Theory Mean-Field ...

  1. Mirror fusion propulsion system: A performance comparison with alternate propulsion systems for the manned Mars Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, N.R.; Carpenter, S.A.; Deveny, M.E.; Oconnell, T.

    1993-06-01

    The performance characteristics of several propulsion technologies applied to piloted Mars missions are compared. The characteristics that are compared are Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO), mission flexibility, and flight times. The propulsion systems being compared are both demonstrated and envisioned: Chemical (or Cryogenic), Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) solid core, NTR gas core, Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and a mirror fusion space propulsion system. The proposed magnetic mirror fusion reactor, known as the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS), is described. The description is an overview of a design study that was conducted to convert a mirror reactor experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) into a viable space propulsion system. Design principles geared towards minimizing mass and maximizing power available for thrust are identified and applied to the LLNL reactor design, resulting in the MFPS. The MFPS' design evolution, reactor and fuel choices, and system configuration are described. Results of the performance comparison shows that the MFPS minimizes flight time to 60 to 90 days for flights to Mars while allowing continuous return-home capability while at Mars. Total MFPS IMLEO including propellant and payloads is kept to about 1,000 metric tons.

  2. Mirror fusion propulsion system - A performance comparison with alternate propulsion systems for the manned Mars mission

    SciTech Connect

    Deveny, M.; Carpenter, S.; O'connell, T.; Schulze, N.

    1993-06-01

    The performance characteristics of several propulsion technologies applied to piloted Mars missions are compared. The characteristics that are compared are Initial Mass in Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO), mission flexibility, and flight times. The propulsion systems being compared are both demonstrated and envisioned: Chemical (or Cryogenic), Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) solid core, NTR gas core, Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and a mirror fusion space propulsion system. The proposed magnetic mirror fusion reactor, known as the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS), is described. The description is an overview of a design study that was conducted to convert a mirror reactor experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) into a viable space propulsion system. Design principles geared towards minimizing mass and maximizing power available for thrust are identified and applied to the LLNL reactor design, resulting in the MFPS. The MFPS' design evolution, reactor and fuel choices, and system configuration are described. Results of the performance comparison shows that the MFPS minimizes flight time to 60 to 90 days for flights to Mars while allowing continuous return-home capability while at Mars. Total MFPS IMLEO including propellant and payloads is kept to about 1,000 metric tons. 50 refs.

  3. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2016-05-03

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  4. Organic vapor jet printing system

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2012-10-23

    An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

  5. Jet Fuel from Microalgal Lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-07-01

    A fact sheet on production of jet fuel or multi-purpose military fuel from lipids produced by microalgae.

  6. ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Rodney J. Mason

    2011-09-07

    Plasma jets provide an alternate approach to the creation of high energy density laboratory plasmas (HEDLP). For the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), typically 30 partially ionized argon jets, produced with mini-rail guns, will be focused into a central volume for subsequent magnetic compression into high density plasma liners that can reach high (0.1 Mbar) peak pressures upon stagnation. The jets are typically 2.5 cm in radius traveling at Mach number 30. Ultimate success will require optimized tuning of the rail configurations, the nozzles injecting the gases, and the careful implementation of pre-ionization. The modeling of plasma jet transport is particularly challenging, due the large space (100 sq cm) and time scales (microseconds) involved. Even traditional implicit methods are insufficient, due to the usual need to track electrons explicitly on the mesh. Wall emission and chemistry must be managed, as must ionization of the jet plasma. Ions in the jets are best followed as particles to account properly for collisions upon jet merger. This Phase I Project developed the code ePLAS to attack and successfully surmount many of these challenges. It invented a new 'super implicit' electromagnetic scheme, using implicit electron moment currents that allowed for modeling of jets over multi-cm and multi-picoseconds on standard, single processor 2 GHz PCs. It enabled merger studies of two jets, in preparation for the multi-jet merger problem. The Project explored particle modeling for the ions, and prepared for the future addition of a grid-base jet ion collision model. Access was added to tabular equations of state for the study of ionization effects in merging jets. The improved code was discussed at the primary plasma meetings (IEEE and APS) during the Project period. Collaborations with National Laboratory and industrial partners were nurtured. Code improvements were made to facilitate code use. See: http://www.researchapplicationscorp.com. The ePLAS code enjoys EAR

  7. Tuning laser produced electron-positron jets for lab-astrophysics experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hui; Fiuza, F.; Hazi, A.; Kemp, A.; Link, A.; Pollock, B.; Marley, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M.; Shepherd, R.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Williams, G. J.; Barnak, D.; Chang, P-Y.; Fiksel, G.; Glebov, V.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Stoeckel, C.; Nakai, M.; Arikawa, Y.; Azechi, H.; Fujioka, S.; Hosoda, H.; Kojima, S.; Miyanga, N.; Morita, T.; Moritaka, T.; Nagai, T.; Namimoto, T.; Nishimura, H.; Ozaki, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Takabe, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2015-02-23

    This paper reviews the experiments on the laser produced electron-positron jets using large laser facilities worldwide. The goal of the experiments was to optimize the parameter of the pair jets for their potential applications in laboratory-astrophysical experiment. Results on tuning the pair jet’s energy, number, emittance and magnetic collimation will be presented.

  8. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  9. Three-dimensional MHD simulation of the Caltech plasma jet experiment: first results

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai E-mail: pbellan@caltech.edu E-mail: sli@lanl.gov

    2014-08-10

    Magnetic fields are believed to play an essential role in astrophysical jets with observations suggesting the presence of helical magnetic fields. Here, we present three-dimensional (3D) ideal MHD simulations of the Caltech plasma jet experiment using a magnetic tower scenario as the baseline model. Magnetic fields consist of an initially localized dipole-like poloidal component and a toroidal component that is continuously being injected into the domain. This flux injection mimics the poloidal currents driven by the anode-cathode voltage drop in the experiment. The injected toroidal field stretches the poloidal fields to large distances, while forming a collimated jet along with several other key features. Detailed comparisons between 3D MHD simulations and experimental measurements provide a comprehensive description of the interplay among magnetic force, pressure, and flow effects. In particular, we delineate both the jet structure and the transition process that converts the injected magnetic energy to other forms. With suitably chosen parameters that are derived from experiments, the jet in the simulation agrees quantitatively with the experimental jet in terms of magnetic/kinetic/inertial energy, total poloidal current, voltage, jet radius, and jet propagation velocity. Specifically, the jet velocity in the simulation is proportional to the poloidal current divided by the square root of the jet density, in agreement with both the experiment and analytical theory. This work provides a new and quantitative method for relating experiments, numerical simulations, and astrophysical observation, and demonstrates the possibility of using terrestrial laboratory experiments to study astrophysical jets.

  10. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  11. Safety questions relevant to nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1991-10-15

    Nuclear propulsion is necessary for successful Mars exploration to enhance crew safety and reduce mission costs. Safety concerns are considered by some to be an implements to the use of nuclear thermal rockets for these missions. Therefore, an assessment was made of the various types of possible accident conditions that might occur and whether design or operational solutions exist. With the previous work on the NERVA nuclear rocket, most of the issues have been addressed in some detail. Thus, a large data base exist to use in an agreement. The assessment includes evaluating both ground, launch, space operations and disposal conditions. The conclusion is that design and operational solutions do exist for the safe use of nuclear thermal rockets and that both the environment and crews be protected against harmful radiation. Further, it is concluded that the use of nuclear thermal propulsion will reduce the radiation and mission risks to the Mars crews.

  12. Evolutionary use of nuclear electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, K.J.; George, J.A.; Riehl, J.P.; Gilland, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    Evolving new propulsion technologies through a rational and conscious effort to minimize development costs and program risks while maximizing the performance benefits is intuitively practical. A phased approach to the evolution of nuclear electric propulsion from use on planetary probes, to lunar cargo vehicles, and finally to manned Mars missions with a concomitant growth in technology is considered. Technology levels and system component makeup are discussed for nuclear power systems and both ion and magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. Mission scenarios are described, which include analysis of a probe to Pluto, a lunar cargo mission, Martian split, all-up, and quick-trip mission options. Evolutionary progression of the use of NEP in such missions is discussed. 26 refs.

  13. Fast Track'' nuclear thermal propulsion concept

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.; Zweig, H.R. ); Cooper, M.H.; Wett, J. Jr. )

    1993-01-10

    The objective of the Space Exploration Initiative ( America at the Threshold...,'' 1991) is the exploration of Mars by man in the second decade of the 21st century. The NASA Fast Track'' approach (NASA-LeRC Presentation, 1992) could accelerate the manned exploration of Mars to 2007. NERVA-derived nuclear propulsion represents a viable near-term technology approach to accomplish the accelerated schedule. Key milestones in the progression to the manned Mars mission are (1) demonstration of TRL-6 for the man-rateable system by 1999, (2) a robotic lunar mission by 2000, (3) the first cargo mission to Mars by 2005, and (4) the piloted Mars mission in 2007. The Rocketdyne-Westinghouse concept for nuclear thermal propulsion to achieve these milestones combines the nuclear reactor technology of the Rover/NERVA programs and the state-of-the-art hardware designs from hydrogen-fueled rocket engine successes like the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME).

  14. Fluidic electrodynamics: Approach to electromagnetic propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Alexandre A.; Pinheiro, Mario J.

    2009-03-16

    We report on a new methodological approach to electrodynamics based on a fluidic viewpoint. We develop a systematic approach establishing analogies between physical magnitudes and isomorphism (structure-preserving mappings) between systems of equations. This methodological approach allows us to give a general expression for the hydromotive force, thus re-obtaining the Navier-Stokes equation departing from the appropriate electromotive force. From this ground we offer a fluidic approach to different kinds of issues with interest in propulsion, e.g., the force exerted by a charged particle on a body carrying current; the magnetic force between two parallel currents; the Magnus's force. It is shown how the intermingle between the fluid vector fields and electromagnetic fields leads to new insights on their dynamics. The new concepts introduced in this work suggest possible applications to electromagnetic (EM) propulsion devices and the mastery of the principles of producing electric fields of required configuration in plasma medium.

  15. Interplanetary space transport using inertial fusion propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, C.D.

    1998-04-20

    In this paper, we indicate how the great advantages that ICF offers for interplanetary propulsion can be accomplished with the VISTA spacecraft concept. The performance of VISTA is expected to surpass that from other realistic technologies for Mars missions if the energy gain achievable for ICF targets is above several hundred. Based on the good performance expected from the U. S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), the requirements for VISTA should be well within the realm of possibility if creative target concepts such as the fast ignitor can be developed. We also indicate that a 6000-ton VISTA can visit any planet in the solar system and return to Earth in about 7 years or less without any significant physiological hazards to astronauts. In concept, VISTA provides such short-duration missions, especially to Mars, that the hazards from cosmic radiation and zero gravity can be reduced to insignificant levels. VISTA therefore represents a significant step forward for space-propulsion concepts.

  16. Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop Outbrief Carol Schutte, PhD Team Lead for Materials Technology eere.energy.gov Vehicle Technologies Program Vehicle Technologies Program May 16, 2012 Will Joost Materials Engineer Workshop Particulars Objectives: identify targets and technology gaps to overcome * 135 participants representing light duty vehicles (LDV) and heavy duty vehicles (HDV): - OEMs (36) - Material & Tier 1 suppliers (43) - U.S. Government experts (8) -

  17. SERAPHIM: A propulsion technology for fast trains

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, B.; Turman, B.; Marder, B.; Rohwein, G.; Aeschliman, D.; Cowan, B.

    1995-06-01

    The Segmented Rail Phased Induction Motor (SERAPHIM) is a compact, pulsed linear induction motor (LIM) offering a unique capability for very high speed train propulsion. It uses technology developed for the Sandia coilgun, an electromagnetic launcher designed to accelerate projectiles to several kilometers per second. Both aluminum cylinders and plates were accelerated to a kilometer per second (Mach 3) by passing through a sequence of coils which were energized at the appropriate time. Although this technology was developed for ultra-high velocity, it can be readily adapted to train propulsion for which, at sea level, the power required to overcome air resistance limits the operational speed to a more modest 300 mph. Here, the geometry is reversed. The coils are on the vehicle and the ``projectiles`` are fixed along the roadbed. SERAPHIM operates not by embedding flux in a conductor, but by excluding it. In this propulsion scheme, pairs of closely spaced coils on the vehicle straddle a segmented aluminum reaction rail. A high frequency current is switched on as a coil pair crosses an edge and remains off as they overtake the next segment. This induces surface currents which repel the coil. In essence, the pulsed coils push off segment edges because at the high frequency of operation, the flux has insufficient time to penetrate. In contrast to conventional LIMs, the performance actually improves with velocity, even for a minimal motor consisting of a single coil pair reacting with a single plate. This paper will present results of proof-of-principle tests, electromagnetic computer simulations, and systems analysis. It is concluded that this new linear induction motor can be implemented using existing technology and is a promising alternative propulsion method for very high speed rail transportation.

  18. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Cassenti, Brice; Kammash, Terry

    2008-01-21

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  19. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM ACCRETION DISKS. II. THE FORMATION OF ASYMMETRIC JETS AND COUNTER JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian; Sheikhnezami, Somayeh E-mail: nezami@mpia.de

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the jet launching from accretion disks, in particular the formation of intrinsically asymmetric jet/counter jet systems. We perform axisymmetric MHD simulations of the disk-jet structure on a bipolar computational domain covering both hemispheres. We apply various models such as asymmetric disks with (initially) different scale heights in each hemisphere, symmetric disks into which a local disturbance is injected, and jets launched into an asymmetric disk corona. We consider both a standard global magnetic diffusivity distribution and a novel local diffusivity model. Typical disk evolution first shows substantial disk warping and then results in asymmetric outflows with a 10%-30% mass flux difference. We find that the magnetic diffusivity profile is essential for establishing a long-term outflow asymmetry. We conclude that bipolar asymmetry in protostellar and extragalactic jets can indeed be generated intrinsically and maintained over a long time by disk asymmetries and the standard jet launching mechanism.

  20. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  1. Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Aviation Administration Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels Update on ASTM Approval Nate Brown U.S. Federal Aviation Administration May 18, 2012 2 Federal Aviation Administration How a Fuel Gets Approved ASTM Balloting Process Specification Properties Engine/APU Testing Fit-For-Purpose Properties Component/Rig Testing ASTM Research Report ASTM Specification Accept ASTM Review & Ballot Re-Eval As Required Reject ASTM Specification Accept ASTM Review & Ballot Re-Eval As Required Reject ASTM

  2. Propulsive options for a manned Mars transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, R.D.; Blersch, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    In this investigation, five potential manned Mars transportation systems are compared. These options include: (1) a single vehicle, chemically propelled (CHEM) option, (2) a single vehicle, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) option, (3) a single vehicle solar electric propulsion (SEP) option, (4) a single vehicle hybrid nuclear electric propulsion (NEP)/CHEM option, and (5) a dual vehicle option (NEP cargo spacecraft and CHEM manned vehicle). In addition to utilizing the initial vehicle weight in low-earth orbit as a measure of mission feasibility, this study addresses the major technological barriers each propulsive scenario must surpass. It is shown that instead of a single clearly superior propulsion system, each means of propulsion may be favored depending upon the specified program policy and the extent of the desired manned flight time. Furthermore, the effect which aerobraking and multiple transfer cycles have upon mission feasibility is considered. 18 refs.

  3. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces radiation, shielding is placed around the reactor to protect the crew. Despite close proximity to a reactor core, a typical crewmember receives less exposure to radiation than one who remains ashore and works in an office building. In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor

  4. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces radiation, shielding is placed around the reactor to protect the crew. Despite close proximity to a reactor core, a typical crewmember receives less exposure to radiation than one who remains ashore and works in an office building. In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor

  5. Jet initiation of PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    This report details the progress of an effort to determine the quantitative aspects of the initiation of PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F 800) by copper jets. The particular jet used was that produced by the LAW warhead (66-mm diameter, 42/sup 0/ angle cone, copper-lined, conical shaped charge). Fifteen experiments, in various configurations, have been fired to define the essential parameters for quantitatively measuring the jet performance and initiation of bare PBX 9502. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Integrated Mathematical Modeling Software Series of Vehicle Propulsion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mathematical Modeling Software Series of Vehicle Propulsion System: (1) Tractive Effort (T sub ew) of Vehicle Road WheelTrack Sprocket Integrated Mathematical Modeling Software ...

  7. MHK Technologies/Wave Energy Propulsion | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Wave Energy Propulsion.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kneider Innovations...

  8. FY2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the progress made during 2013 on the research and development projects funded by the Propulsion Materials subprogram in the Vehicle Technologies Office.

  9. OSTIblog Articles in the spaceship propulsion Topic | OSTI, US...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ribbons of colors from a fluorescent green to brilliant purple to a vivid crimson ... physics, chemistry, energy security, advanced space propulsion, and material science. ...

  10. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these ...

  11. Marine Hybrid Propulsion Market Revenue is anticipated to Reach...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    ferry operators are the major adopters of marine hybrid propulsion systems across the world. These vessels primarily operate in coastal areas and inland waterways, where emission...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: Propulsion Materials for Cars and Trucks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturers use propulsion (or powertrain) materials in the components that move vehicles of every size and shape. Conventional vehicles use these materials in components such as the engine,...

  13. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion Chiravalle, Vincent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report PDF icon 2008propulsionmaterials.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle ...

  15. Large-Eddy Simulation for Green Energy and Propulsion Systems...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Large-Eddy Simulation for Green Energy and Propulsion Systems PI Name: Umesh Paliath PI Email: paliath@ge.com Institution: General Electric Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation ...

  16. A compact reactor for space nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kammash, T.; Galbraith, D.L. )

    1993-01-01

    The open-cycle gas-core fission reactor (GCR) has been mentioned as one of the most promising advanced propulsion schemes that could readily meet the objectives of the space exploration initiative of sending a manned mission to Mars in the early part of the next century. The principle of operation in this system involves a critical fissile core in the form of a gaseous plasma that heats, through radiation, a hydrogen propellant, which is expelled through a nozzle, thereby converting thermal energy into thrust, as illustrated in Fig. 1.

  17. Nuclear propulsion system options for Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Emrich, W.J. Jr.; Young, A.C. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper focuses on the use of a nuclear thermal rocket to accomplish a variety of space missions with emphasis on the manned Mars mission. The particle-bed-reactor type nuclear engine was chosen as the baseline engine because of its perceived versatility over other nuclear propulsion systems in conducting a wide variety of tasks. This study indicates that the particle-bed-reactor engine with its high engine thrust-to-weight ratio (about 20) and high specific impulse (about 950 to 1050 sec) offers distinct advantages over the larger and heavier NERVA-type nuclear engines.

  18. Nuclear propulsion tradeoffs for manned Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, L.A.; Malloy, J.D. )

    1991-01-05

    A conjunction class split/sprint manned Mars exploration mission was studied to evaluate tradeoffs in performance characteristics of nuclear thermal rockets. A Particle Bed Reactor-based nuclear thermal rocket was found to offer a 38% to 52% total mass savings compared with a NERVA-based nuclear thermal rocket for this mission. This advantage is primarily due to the higher thrust-to-weight ratio of the Particle Bed Reactor nuclear rocket. The mission is enabled by nuclear thermal rockets. It cannot be performed practically using chemical propulsion.

  19. SIMULATION AND MOCKUP OF SNS JET-FLOW TARGET WITH WALL JET FOR CAVITATION DAMAGE MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Felde, David K

    2014-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory induce cavitation damage on the stainless steel target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. Severe through-wall cavitation damage on an internal wall near the beam entrance window has been observed in spent-targets. Surprisingly though, there is very little damage on the walls that bound an annular mercury channel that wraps around the front and outside of the target. The mercury flow through this channel is characterized by smooth, attached streamlines. One theory to explain this lack of damage is that the uni-directional flow biases the direction of the collapsing cavitation bubble, reducing the impact pressure and subsequent damage. The theory has been reinforced by in-beam separate effects data. For this reason, a second-generation SNS mercury target has been designed with an internal wall jet configuration intended to protect the concave wall where damage has been observed. The wall jet mimics the annular flow channel streamlines, but since the jet is bounded on only one side, the momentum is gradually diffused by the bulk flow interactions as it progresses around the cicular path of the target nose. Numerical simulations of the flow through this jet-flow target have been completed, and a water loop has been assembled with a transparent test target in order to visualize and measure the flow field. This paper presents the wall jet simulation results, as well as early experimental data from the test loop.

  20. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  1. Advanced hybrid vehicle propulsion system study

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.

    1982-05-01

    Results of a study of an advanced heat engine/electric automotive hybrid propulsion system are presented. The system uses a rotary stratified charge engine and an ac motor/controller in a parallel hybrid configuration. The three tasks of the study were (1) parametric studies involving five different vehicle types, (2) design trade-off studies to determine the influence of various vehicle and propulsion system parameters on system performance fuel economy and cost, and (3) a conceptual design establishing feasibility at the selected approach. Energy consumption for the selected system was .034 l/km (61.3 mpg) for the heat engine and .221 kWh/km (.356 kWh/mi) for the electric power system over a modified J227a schedule D driving cycle. Life cycle costs were 7.13 cents/km (11.5 cents/mi) at $2/gal gasoline and 7 cents/kWh electricity for 160,000 km (100,000 mi) life.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report | Department of Energy 8 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2008_propulsion_materials.pdf (16.36 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Propulsion Materials

  3. Shroud for a submerged jet cutting nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Schwab, Thomas L.

    1978-01-01

    A shroud for a submerged jet cutting nozzle is described which separates the jet from surrounding fluid environment and enhances the cutting effect.

  4. Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications An Update on FAA Alternative Jet Fuel Efforts Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Emissions Modeling: ...

  5. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  6. Propulsion and stabilization system for magnetically levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Coffey, Howard T.

    1993-06-29

    A propulsion and stabilization system for an inductive repulsion type magnetically levitated vehicle which is propelled and stabilized by a system which includes propulsion windings mounted above and parallel to vehicle-borne suspension magnets. A linear synchronous motor is part of the vehicle guideway and is mounted above and parallel to superconducting magnets attached to the magnetically levitated vehicle.

  7. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-01-16

    The Propulsion Materials program focuses on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines. Projects within the Propulsion Materials Program address materials concerns that directly impact the critical technical barriers in each of these programs—barriers such as fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, and reduced manufacturing costs.

  8. Initiative for the 21st century: Advanced space power and propulsion based on lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.

    1989-02-01

    This paper discusses the use of lasers in spacecraft propulsion systems. Cost, efficiencies and comparisons with other propulsion systems are discussed. (LSP)

  9. Laboratory Director

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Director Charles F. McMillan has demonstrated success at balancing mission performance with security and safety. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) ...

  10. New Technology and Lunar Power Option for Power Beaming Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J; Early, J; Krupke, W; Beach, R

    2004-10-11

    Orbit raising missions (LEO to GEO or beyond) are the only missions with enough current traffic to be seriously considered for near-term power beaming propulsion. Even these missions cannot justify the development expenditures required to deploy the required new laser, optical and propulsion technologies or the programmatic risks. To be deployed, the laser and optics technologies must be spin-offs of other funded programs. The manned lunar base nighttime power requirements may justify a major power beaming program with 2MW lasers and large optical systems. New laser and optical technologies may now make this mission plausible. If deployed these systems could be diverted for power beaming propulsion applications. Propulsion options include a thermal system with an Isp near 1000 sec., a new optical coupled thermal system with an Isp over 2000 sec. photovoltaic-ion propulsion systems with an Isp near 3000 sec., and a possible new optical coupled thermal system with an Isp over 2000 sec.

  11. Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. ...

  12. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  13. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  14. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  15. Jet fuel from LPG

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, R.E.; Jones, J.R.

    1983-02-01

    Explains how jet fuel can be manufactured from propane and/or butane with attractive rates of return. This scheme is advantageous where large reserves of LPG-bearing gas is available or LPG is in excess. The following sequence of processes in involved: dehydrogenation of propane (and/or butane) to propylene (and/or butylene); polymerization of this monomer to a substantial yield of the desired polymer by recycling undesired polymer; and hydrotreating the polymer to saturate double bonds. An attribute of this process scheme is that each of the individual processes has been practiced commercially. The process should have appeal in those parts of the world which have large reserves of LPG-bearing natural gas but little or no crude oil, or where large excesses of LPG are available. Concludes that economic analysis shows attractive rates of return in a range of reasonable propane costs and product selling prices.

  16. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  17. System model development for nuclear thermal propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Hannan, N.A.; Perkins, K.R.; Buksa, J.J.; Worley, B.A.; Dobranich, D.

    1992-10-01

    A critical enabling technology in the evolutionary development of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) is the ability to predict the system performance under a variety of operating conditions. Since October 1991, US (DOE), (DOD) and NASA have initiated critical technology development efforts for NTP systems to be used on Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions to the Moon and Mars. This paper presents the strategy and progress of an interagency NASA/DOE/DOD team for NTP system modeling. It is the intent of the interagency team to develop several levels of computer programs to simulate various NTP systems. An interagency team was formed for this task to use the best capabilities available and to assure appropriate peer review. The vision and strategy of the interagency team for developing NTP system models will be discussed in this paper. A review of the progress on the Level 1 interagency model is also presented.

  18. Assessment of fuel cell propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Altseimer, J.H.; Frank, J.A.; Nochumson, D.H.; Thayer, G.R.; Rahm, A.M.; Williamson, K.D. Jr.; Hardie, R.W.; Jackson, S.V.

    1983-11-01

    This report assesses the applicability of fuel cells to a wide variety of transportation vehicles and compares them with competing propulsion systems. The assessments include economic evaluations (initial capital cost and levelized-life-cycle costs) and noneconomic evaluations (vehicle performance, power plant size, environmental effects, safety, convenience and reliability). The report also recommends research and development areas to support the development of fuel cell systems. The study indicates that fork-lift trucks are an excellent application for fuel cells. Fuel cell use in urban delivery vans and city buses is promising because it would reduce air pollution. Fuel-cell-powered automobiles, pickup trucks, and intercity buses only look promising over the long term. Based on economic criteria, the use of fuel cells for small marine craft does not appear feasible. Because of economic uncertainties, further study is needed to assess the application of fuel cell systems to freight locomotives and large marine craft.

  19. Nuclear propulsion apparatus with alternate reactor segments

    DOEpatents

    Szekely, Thomas

    1979-04-03

    1. Nuclear propulsion apparatus comprising: A. means for compressing incoming air; B. nuclear fission reactor means for heating said air; C. means for expanding a portion of the heated air to drive said compressing means; D. said nuclear fission reactor means being divided into a plurality of radially extending segments; E. means for directing a portion of the compressed air for heating through alternate segments of said reactor means and another portion of the compressed air for heating through the remaining segments of said reactor means; and F. means for further expanding the heated air from said drive means and the remaining heated air from said reactor means through nozzle means to effect reactive thrust on said apparatus.

  20. Heatpipe space power and propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.; Ranken, W.A.

    1995-12-01

    Safe, reliable, low-mass space power and propulsion systems could have numerous civilian and military applications. This paper discusses two fission-powered concepts: The Heatpipe Power System (HPS), which provides power only; and the Heatpipe Bimodal System (HBS), which provides both power and thermal propulsion. Both concepts have 10 important features. First, only existing technology and recently tested fuel forms are used. Second, fuel can be removed whenever desired, which greatly facilitates system fabrication and handling. Third, full electrically heated system testing of all modes is possible, with minimal operations required to replace the heaters with fuel and to ready the system for launch. Fourth, the systems are passively subcritical during launch accidents. Fifth, a modular approach is used, and most technical issues can be resolved with inexpensive module tests. Sixth, bonds between dissimilar metals are minimized. Seventh, there are no single-point failures during power mode operation. Eighth, the fuel burnup rate is quite low to help ensure >10-yr system life. Ninth, there are no pumped coolant loops, and the systems can be shut down and restarted without coolant freeze/thaw concerns. Finally, full ground nuclear test is not needed, and development costs will be low. One design for a low-power HPS uses SNAP-10A-style thermoelectric power converters to produce 5 kWe at a system mass of {approximately}500 kg. The unicouple thermoelectric converters have a hot-shoe temperature of 1275 K and reject waste heat at 775 K. This type of thermoelectric converter has been used extensively by the space program and has demonstrated an operational lifetime of decades. A core with a larger number of smaller modules (same overall size) can be used to provide up to 500 kWt to a power conversion subsystem, and a slightly larger core using a higher heatpipe to fuel ratio can provide >1 MWt.

  1. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Jet Propulsion Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  2. Local Hero

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... temporary nuclear facilities at Kennedy Space Center, implementing a rigorous Unreviewed Safety Question process for the DOE, Kennedy Space Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory ...

  3. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. ... System Grid, data replication, system monitoring Word Cloud More Like This Full Text ...

  4. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the German Climate Computing Centre, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The...

  5. Project Profile: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators Project Profile: Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators JPL logo The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), with funding from the 2012 SunShot ...

  6. Nanosegregated Cathode Catalysts with Ultra-Low Platinum Loading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More * Jet Propulsion Laboratory - NASA - S.R. Narayan * Brown University - Shouheng Sun * Indiana University Purdue - Goufeng Wang * 3M Company - Radoslav Atanasoski Overview ...

  7. Research Teams - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Teams Research Teams Associates Greg Smith, Senior Research Chemist, SRI ... Colin Smith, Thermal Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Previously co-sponsored by ...

  8. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Birkan, Mitat

    2008-04-28

    One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be overcome. Part 1 presents a world-wide review of beamed energy propulsion research, including both laser and microwave arenas.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories | NISAC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACSandia National Laboratories

  10. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Subpanel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.C.; Warren, J.W.; Martinell, J.; Clark, J.S.; Perkins, D.

    1993-04-01

    On 20 Jul. 1989, in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Apollo 11 lunar landing, President George Bush proclaimed his vision for manned space exploration. He stated, 'First for the coming decade, for the 1990's, Space Station Freedom, the next critical step in our space endeavors. And next, for the new century, back to the Moon. Back to the future. And this time, back to stay. And then, a journey into tomorrow, a journey to another planet, a manned mission to Mars.' On 2 Nov. 1989, the President approved a national space policy reaffirming the long range goal of the civil space program: to 'expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system.' And on 11 May 1990, he specified the goal of landing Astronauts on Mars by 2019, the 50th anniversary of man's first steps on the Moon. To safely and ever permanently venture beyond near Earth environment as charged by the President, mankind must bring to bear extensive new technologies. These include heavy lift launch capability from Earth to low-Earth orbit, automated space rendezvous and docking of large masses, zero gravity countermeasures, and closed loop life support systems. One technology enhancing, and perhaps enabling, the piloted Mars missions is nuclear propulsion, with great benefits over chemical propulsion. Asserting the potential benefits of nuclear propulsion, NASA has sponsored workshops in Nuclear Electric Propulsion and Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and has initiated a tri-agency planning process to ensure that appropriate resources are engaged to meet this exciting technical challenge. At the core of this planning process, NASA, DOE, and DOD established six Nuclear Propulsion Technical Panels in 1991 to provide groundwork for a possible tri-agency Nuclear Propulsion Program and to address the President's vision by advocating an aggressive program in nuclear propulsion. To this end the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Technology Panel has focused it energies.

  11. High Power Electric Propulsion System for NEP: Propulsion and Trajectory Options

    SciTech Connect

    Koppel, Christophe R.; Duchemin, Olivier; Valentian, Dominique

    2006-01-20

    Recent US initiatives in Nuclear Propulsion lend themselves naturally to raising the question of the assessment of various options and particularly to propose the High Power Electric Propulsion Subsystem (HPEPS) for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). The purpose of this paper is to present the guidelines for the HPEPS with respect to the mission to Mars, for automatic probes as well as for manned missions. Among the various options, the technological options and the trajectory options are pointed out. The consequences of the increase of the electrical power of a thruster are first an increase of the thrust itself, but also, as a general rule, an increase of the thruster performance due to its higher efficiency, particularly its specific impulse increase. The drawback is as a first parameter, the increase of the thruster's size, hence the so-called 'thrust density' shall be high enough or shall be drastically increased for ions thrusters. Due to the large mass of gas needed to perform the foreseen missions, the classical xenon rare gas is no more in competition, the total world production being limited to 20 -40 tons per year. Thus, the right selection of the propellant feeding the thruster is of prime importance. When choosing a propellant with lower molecular mass, the consequences at thruster level are an increase once more of the specific impulse, but at system level the dead mass may increase too, mainly because the increase of the mass of the propellant system tanks. Other alternatives, in rupture with respect to the current technologies, are presented in order to make the whole system more attractive. The paper presents a discussion on the thruster specific impulse increase that is sometime considered an increase of the main system performances parameter, but that induces for all electric propulsion systems drawbacks in the system power and mass design that are proportional to the thruster specific power increase (kW/N). The electric thruster specific

  12. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  13. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.F.; Allen, G.C.; Shipers, L.R.; Dobranich, D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Harmon, C.D.; Fan, W.C. ); Todosow, M. )

    1992-09-22

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized.

  14. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  15. Fragmentation inside an identified jet

    SciTech Connect

    Procura, Massimiliano; Stewart, Iain W.

    2011-05-23

    Using Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) we derive factorization formulae for semi-inclusive processes where a light hadron h fragments from a jet whose invariant mass is measured. Our analysis yields a novel 'fragmenting jet function' G{sub i}{sup h}(s,z) that depends on the jet invariant mass {radical}(s), and on the fraction z of the large light-cone momentum components of the hadron and the parent parton i. We show that G{sub i}{sup h}(s,z) can be computed in terms of perturbatively calculable coefficients, J{sub ij}(s,z/x), integrated against standard non-perturbative fragmentation functions, D{sub j}{sup h}(x). Our analysis yields a simple replacement rule that allows any factorization theorem depending on a jet function J{sub i} to be converted to a semi-inclusive process with a fragmenting hadron h.

  16. Jet-Induced Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    van Breugel, W; Fragile, C; Anninos, P; Murray, S

    2003-12-16

    Jets from radio galaxies can have dramatic effects on the medium through which they propagate. We review observational evidence for jet-induced star formation in low ('FR-I') and high ('FR-II') luminosity radio galaxies, at low and high redshifts respectively. We then discuss numerical simulations which are aimed to explain a jet-induced starburst ('Minkowski's Object') in the nearby FR-I type radio galaxy NGC 541. We conclude that jets can induce star formation in moderately dense (10 cm{sup -3}), warm (10{sup 4} K) gas; that this may be more common in the dense environments of forming, active galaxies; and that this may provide a mechanism for 'positive' feedback from AGN in the galaxy formation process.

  17. Small Fast Spectrum Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler; Stanley K. Borowski

    2012-07-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program requires high performance propulsion systems to support a variety of robotic and crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. The recent NASA Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 Study re-examined mission, payload, and transportation system requirements for a human Mars landing mission in the post-2030 timeframe. Nuclear thermal propulsion was again identified as the preferred in-space transportation system. A common nuclear thermal propulsion stage with three 25,000-lbf thrust engines was used for all primary mission maneuvers. Moderately lower thrust engines may also have important roles. In particular, lower thrust engine designs demonstrating the critical technologies that are directly extensible to other thrust levels are attractive from a ground testing perspective. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted from 1955-1973 under the Rover/NERVA Program. Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. Reactors and engines employing graphite based fuels were designed, built and ground tested. A number of fast spectrum reactor and engine designs employing refractory metal alloy fuel types were proposed and designed, but none were built. The Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) was the last engine design studied by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the program. At the time, this engine was a state-of-the-art graphite based fuel design incorporating lessons learned from the very successful technology development program. The SNRE was a nominal 16,000-lbf thrust engine originally intended for unmanned applications with relatively short engine

  18. Experimental evidence for collisional shock formation via two obliquely merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, Elizabeth C. Adams, Colin S.; University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 ; Moser, Auna L.; Hsu, Scott C. Dunn, John P.; Miguel Holgado, A.; Gilmore, Mark A.

    2014-05-15

    We report spatially resolved measurements of the oblique merging of two supersonic laboratory plasma jets. The jets are formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns using injected argon, and have electron density ?10{sup 14}?cm{sup ?3}, electron temperature ?1.4?eV, ionization fraction near unity, and velocity ?40?km/s just prior to merging. The jet merging produces a few-cm-thick stagnation layer, as observed in both fast-framing camera images and multi-chord interferometer data, consistent with collisional shock formation [E. C. Merritt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 085003 (2013)].

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report | Department of Energy 09 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2009_propulsion_materials.pdf (20.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Magnetic Material for PM Motors Permanent Magnet Development for Automotive Traction Motors Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials

  20. WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WORKSHOP REPORT:Light-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials

  1. Plasma jet ignition device

    DOEpatents

    McIlwain, Michael E.; Grant, Jonathan F.; Golenko, Zsolt; Wittstein, Alan D.

    1985-01-15

    An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

  2. Laboratories | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Our laboratories are available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating energy technologies. We have experienced lab technicians, scientists and engineers ready to design and run tests for you. Some labs are available for conducting your own research. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Accelerated Exposure Testing Laboratory Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced

  3. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  4. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and works in an office building. U.S. naval nuclear propulsion plants use a pressurized-water reactor design that has two basic systems: the primary system and the secondary...

  5. PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PROTOSTELLAR JETS ENCLOSED BY LOW-VELOCITY OUTFLOWS A protostellar jet and outflow...

  6. HybriDrive Propulsion System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    HybriDrive Propulsion System HybriDrive Propulsion System Presentation at DOE & DOT Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop, Washington DC, June 7, 2010 buswksp10_mancini.pdf (735.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Zero Emission Cargo Transport II Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Zero Emission Cargo Transport II: San Pedro Bay Ports Hybrid & Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Project

  7. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Materials Technology actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program by developing advanced materials that enable development of higher efficiency powertrains for ground transportation. Propulsion Materials works closely with the other disciplines within the VT Program to identify the materials properties essential for the development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light duty powertrains.

  8. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this

  9. Beamed Energy Propulsion: Research Status And Needs--Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Birkan, Mitat

    2008-04-28

    One promising solution to the operationally responsive space is the application of remote electromagnetic energy to propel a launch vehicle into orbit. With beamed energy propulsion, one can leave the power source stationary on the ground or space, and direct heat propellant on the spacecraft with a beam from a fixed station. This permits the spacecraft to leave its power source at home, saving significant amounts of mass, greatly improving performance. This concept, which removes the mass penalty of carrying the propulsion energy source on board the vehicle, was first proposed by Arthur Kantrowitz in 1972; he invoked an extremely powerful ground based laser. The same year Michael Minovich suggested a conceptually similar 'in-space' laser rocket system utilizing a remote laser power station. In the late 1980's, Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funded continuous, double pulse laser and microwave propulsion while Strategic Defense Initiative Office (SDIO) funded ablative laser rocket propulsion. Currently AFOSR has been funding the concept initiated by Leik Myrabo, repetitively pulsed laser propulsion, which has been universally perceived, arguably, to be the closest for mid-term applications. This 2-part paper examines the investment strategies in beamed energy propulsion and technical challenges to be covers Part 2 covers the present research status and needs.

  10. DECELERATING RELATIVISTIC TWO-COMPONENT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R. E-mail: Rony.Keppens@wis.kuleuven.b

    2009-11-10

    Transverse stratification is a common intrinsic feature of astrophysical jets. There is growing evidence that jets in radio galaxies consist of a fast low-density outflow at the jet axis, surrounded by a slower, denser, extended jet. The inner and outer jet components then have a different origin and launching mechanism, making their effective inertia, magnetization, associated energy flux, and angular momentum content different as well. Their interface will develop differential rotation, where disruptions may occur. Here we investigate the stability of rotating, two-component relativistic outflows typical for jets in radio galaxies. For this purpose, we parametrically explore the long-term evolution of a transverse cross section of radially stratified jets numerically, extending our previous study where a single, purely hydrodynamic evolution was considered. We include cases with poloidally magnetized jet components, covering hydro and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models. With grid-adaptive relativistic MHD simulations, augmented with approximate linear stability analysis, we revisit the interaction between the two jet components. We study the influence of dynamically important poloidal magnetic fields, with varying contributions of the inner component jet to the total kinetic energy flux of the jet, on their non-linear azimuthal stability. We demonstrate that two-component jets with high kinetic energy flux and inner jet effective inertia which is higher than the outer jet effective inertia are subject to the development of a relativistically enhanced, rotation-induced Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability. This instability plays a major role in decelerating the inner jet and the overall jet decollimation. This novel deceleration scenario can partly explain the radio source dichotomy, relating it directly to the efficiency of the central engine in launching the inner jet component. The FRII/FRI transition could then occur when the relative kinetic energy flux of the

  11. Geoscience Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation and other relatively straight-forward laboratory manipulations. These include buffer preparations, solid sample grinding, solution concentration, filtration, and...

  12. Laboratory Fellows

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    selected as Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows November 16, 2010 Scientific disciplines range from fundamental and applied physics to geology LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, NOVEMBER 16, 2010-Five Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists from diverse fields of research have been named Laboratory Fellows. The five researchers are Brenda Dingus of the Neutron Science and Technology group; William (Bill) Louis of the Subatomic Physics group; John Sarrao, director of Los Alamos's Office of Science

  13. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  14. The Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) ...

  15. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  16. Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop WHEN: Jan 11, 2016 8:30 AM - Jan 13, 2016 5:30 PM WHERE: Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe...

  17. BioJet Corporation | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    93940 Sector: Carbon Product: Monterey-based carbon credit developer and producer of bio-jet fuel derived from jatropha. References: BioJet Corporation1 This article is a...

  18. Printers and Multi-function Devices (Copiers) | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Printers and Multi-function Devices (Copiers) The Ames Laboratory has standardized printer models and multi-functioning devices that meet sustainability requirements. The following devices are recommended for purchase. Printers: HP LaserJet PRO M402dn - Black/White HP LaserJet PRO M452dn Color *both printers meet EPEAT and Energy Star requirements Multi-Functional Devices (MFDs): Canon Imagerunner Imagerunners come in many different configurations and speed varies by model. Contact the

  19. Jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-Nian; Gyulassy, M.

    1990-09-01

    Several aspects of hard and semihard QCD jets in relativistic heavy ion collisions are discussed, including multiproduction of minijets and the interaction of a jet with dense nuclear matter. The reduction of jet quenching effect in deconfined phase of nuclear matter is speculated to provide a signature of the formation of quark gluon plasma. HIJING Monte Carlo program which can simulate events of jets production and quenching in heavy ion collisions is briefly described. 35 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Inclusive jet production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Norniella, Olga; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2006-08-01

    Preliminary results on inclusive jet production in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV based on 1 fb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data are presented. Measurements are preformed using different jet algorithms in a wide range of jet transverse momentum and jet rapidity. The measured cross sections are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations

  1. Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuel - Progress & Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Jul'16 Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuel - Progress & Challenges DOE Bioenergy 2016, Breakout Session 1-D: Launching Renewable Aviation Fuels Walter E. Washington Convention Center Washington DC Wed, 13Jul'16 CAAFI - Public/Private Partnership A reflection of the 23+B gpy US Jet "market pull" www.caafi.org An aviation industry coalition established to facilitate and promote the introduction of sustainable alternative jet fuel (SAJF) Goal is development of non-petroleum, drop-in, jet

  2. Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuel - Scene Setting discussion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Sep'16 Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuel - Scene Setting discussion DOE / EERE / BETO SAJF Workshop: Macon Marriott City Center Macon, GA 14-15Sep'16 Steve Csonka, Executive Director of CAAFI 19 September 2016 2 SAJF Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuel a.k.a. aviation biofuel, biojet, alternative aviation fuel Alternative: Creating synthetic jet fuel by starting with a different set of hydrocarbons than petroleum ... a synthetic comprised of molecules essentially identical to petroleum- based jet

  3. A survey of processes for producing hydrogen fuel from different sources for automotive-propulsion fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F.

    1996-03-01

    Seven common fuels are compared for their utility as hydrogen sources for proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells used in automotive propulsion. Methanol, natural gas, gasoline, diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, ethanol, and hydrogen are the fuels considered. Except for the steam reforming of methanol and using pure hydrogen, all processes for generating hydrogen from these fuels require temperatures over 1000 K at some point. With the same two exceptions, all processes require water-gas shift reactors of significant size. All processes require low-sulfur or zero-sulfur fuels, and this may add cost to some of them. Fuels produced by steam reforming contain {approximately}70-80% hydrogen, those by partial oxidation {approximately}35-45%. The lower percentages may adversely affect cell performance. Theoretical input energies do not differ markedly among the various processes for generating hydrogen from organic-chemical fuels. Pure hydrogen has severe distribution and storage problems. As a result, the steam reforming of methanol is the leading candidate process for on-board generation of hydrogen for automotive propulsion. If methanol unavailability or a high price demands an alternative process, steam reforming appears preferable to partial oxidation for this purpose.

  4. Nuclear powered Mars cargo transport mission utilizing advanced ion propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Galecki, D.L.; Patterson, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear-powered ion propulsion technology was combined with detailed trajectory analysis to determine propulsion system and trajectory options for an unmanned cargo mission to Mars in support of manned Mars missions. A total of 96 mission scenarios were identified by combining two power levels, two propellants, four values of specific impulse per propellant, three starting altitudes, and two starting velocities. Sixty of these scenarios were selected for a detailed trajectory analysis; a complete propulsion system study was then conducted for 20 of these trajectories. Trip times ranged from 344 days for a xenon propulsion system operating at 300 kW total power and starting from lunar orbit with escape velocity, to 770 days for an argon propulsion system operating at 300 kW total power and starting from nuclear start orbit with circular velocity. Trip times for the 3 MW cases studied ranged from 356 to 413 days. Payload masses ranged from 5700 to 12,300 kg for the 300 kW power level, and from 72,200 to 81,500 kg for the 3 MW power level.

  5. Reliability comparison of various nuclear propulsion configurations for Mars mission

    SciTech Connect

    Segna, D.R.; Dagle, J.E.; Lyon, W.F. III

    1992-01-01

    Currently, trade-offs are being made among the various propulsion systems being considered for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions. It is necessary to investigate the reliability aspects as well as the efficiency, mass savings, and experience characteristics of the various configurations. Reliability is a very important factor for the SEI missions because of the long duration and because problems will be fixed onboard. The propulsion options that were reviewed consist of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) and various configurations of each system. There were four configurations developed for comparison with the NTP as baselined in the Synthesis (1991): (1) NEP, (2) hybrid NEP/NTP, (3) hybrid with power beaming, and (4) NTP upper stage on the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV). The comparisons were based more or less on a qualitative review of complexity, stress levels and operations for each of the four configurations. Each configuration included a pressurized NEP and an NTP ascent stage propulsion system for the Mars mission.

  6. Numerical Investigation of Laser Propulsion for Transport in Water Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Han Bing; Li Beibei; Zhang Hongchao; Chen Jun; Shen Zhonghua; Lu Jian; Ni Xiaowu

    2010-10-08

    Problems that cumber the development of the laser propulsion in atmosphere and vacuum are discussed. Based on the theory of interaction between high-intensity laser and materials, as air and water, it is proved that transport in water environment can be impulsed by laser. The process of laser propulsion in water is investigated theoretically and numerically. It shows that not only the laser induced plasma shock wave, but also the laser induced bubble oscillation shock waves and the pressure induced by the collapsing bubble can be used. Many experimental results show that the theory and the numerical results are valid. The numerical result of the contribution of every propulsion source is given in percentage. And the maximum momentum coupling coefficient Cm is given. Laser propulsion in water environment can be applied in many fields. For example, it can provide highly controllable forces of the order of micro-Newton ({mu}N) in microsystems, such as the MEMS (Micro-electromechanical Systems). It can be used as minimally invasive surgery tools of high temporal and spatial resolution. It can be used as the propulsion source in marine survey and exploitation.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sale, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energys Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  8. Australian Science and Technology with Relevance to Beamed Energy Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, H. David Jr

    2008-04-28

    Although Australia has no Beamed Energy Propulsion programs at the present time, it is accomplishing significant scientific and technological activity that is of potential relevance to Beamed Energy Propulsion (BEP). These activities include: continual upgrading and enhancement of the Woomera Test Facility, Which is ideal for development and test of high power laser or microwave systems and the flight vehicles they would propel; collaborative development and test, with the US and UK of hypersonic missiles that embody many features needed by beam-propelled flight vehicles; hypersonic air breathing propulsion systems that embody inlet-engine-nozzle features needed for beam-riding agility by air breathing craft; and research on specially conditioned EM fields that could reduce beamed energy lost during atmospheric propagation.

  9. Tanker under retrofit for arctic service gets new propulsion design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-26

    The world's largest azimuthing propulsion drive will be installed on an oil tanker under retrofit for arctic service by a Finnish shipyard. And plans call for the drive's installation on four 135,000 cu m LNG carriers. The 11.4-mw (15,275 hp) Azipod azimuthing electric propulsion drive is being installed on Nemarc's 16,000 dwt arctic tanker M/T Uikku. The major difference between the Azipod system and traditional Z-type thrusters is that the Azipod's propulsion motor is an electric ac synchronous motor located inside the azimuthing unit. The motor drives a fixed-pitch propeller and is speed-controlled (0--100%) by a cycloconverter. The rotatable Azipod drive enables full power thrust in any desired direction.

  10. Tutorial on nuclear thermal propulsion safety for Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1992-01-01

    Safety is the prime design requirement for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). It must be built in at the initiation of the design process. An understanding of safety concerns is fundamental to the development of nuclear rockets for manned missions to Mars and many other applications that will be enabled or greatly enhanced by the use of nuclear propulsion. To provide an understanding of the basic issues, a tutorial has been prepared. This tutorial covers a range of topics including safety requirements and approaches to meet these requirements, risk and safety analysis methodology, NERVA reliability and safety approach, and life cycle risk assessments.

  11. Engine cycle design considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Collins, J.T. )

    1993-01-20

    A top-level study was performed which addresses nuclear thermal propulsion system engine cycle options and their applicability to support future Space Exploration Initiative manned lunar and Mars missions. Technical and development issues associated with expander, gas generator, and bleed cycle near-term, solid core nuclear thermal propulsion engines are identified and examined. In addition to performance and weight the influence of the engine cycle type on key design selection parameters such as design complexity, reliability, development time, and cost are discussed. Representative engine designs are presented and compared. Their applicability and performance impact on typical near-term lunar and Mars missions are shown.

  12. Tutorial on nuclear thermal propulsion safety for Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1992-08-01

    Safety is the prime design requirement for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). It must be built in at the initiation of the design process. An understanding of safety concerns is fundamental to the development of nuclear rockets for manned missions to Mars and many other applications that will be enabled or greatly enhanced by the use of nuclear propulsion. To provide an understanding of the basic issues, a tutorial has been prepared. This tutorial covers a range of topics including safety requirements and approaches to meet these requirements, risk and safety analysis methodology, NERVA reliability and safety approach, and life cycle risk assessments.

  13. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    SciTech Connect

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-10-16

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests.

  14. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2000-06-19

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  15. COLLOQUIUM: EXTERNAL PROPULSION AND THE FUTURE OF SPACE ACCESS | Princeton

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab June 24, 2015, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: EXTERNAL PROPULSION AND THE FUTURE OF SPACE ACCESS Dr. Dmitriy Tseliakhovich Escape Dynamics, Inc. At Escape Dynamics we are working on the next generation propulsion technologies with the goal of developing electromagnetically-powered engines operating at 10x the efficiency of chemical rockets. In this talk I will describe results of Escape Dynamics' R&D efforts and outline our vision for the future

  16. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiplemore » p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.« less

  17. Laboratory Directors

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Siegfried S. Hecker (1985-1997) Donald M. Kerr (1979-1985) Harold M. Agnew (1970-1979) Norris Bradbury (1945-1970) J. Robert Oppenheimer (1943-1945) Laboratory Directors Harold M. ...

  18. NASA/DOE/DOD nuclear propulsion technology planning: Summary of FY 1991 interagency panel results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.S.; Wickenheiser, T.J.; Doherty, M.P.; Marshall, A.; Bhattacharryya, S.K.; Warren, J.

    1992-01-01

    Interagency (NASA/DOE/DOD) technical panels worked in 1991 to evaluate critical nuclear propulsion issues, compare nuclear propulsion concepts for a manned Mars mission on a consistent basis, and to continue planning a technology development project for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Panels were formed to address mission analysis, nuclear facilities, safety policy, nuclear fuels and materials, nuclear electric propulsion technology, and nuclear thermal propulsion technology. A summary of the results and recommendations of the panels is presented.

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report | Department of Energy Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report This report describes the progress made during 2013 on the research and development projects funded by the Propulsion Materials subprogram in the Vehicle Technologies Office. Past year's reports are listed on the Annual Progress Reports page. 2013_Progress_Report_for_Propulsion_Materials.pdf (10.88 MB) More Documents &

  20. Measurement of the inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Voutilainen, Mikko Antero

    2008-07-01

    This thesis studies the high-energy collisions of protons and antiprotons. The data used in the measurement were collected during 2004-2005 with the D0 detector at the Tevatron Collider of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and correspond to 0.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. High energy hadron collisions usually produce collimated sprays of particles called jets. The energy of the jets is measured using a liquid Argon-Uranium calorimeter and the production angle is determined with the help of silicon microstrip and scintillating fiber trackers. The inclusive jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions is measured as a function of jet transverse momentum pT in six bins of jet rapidity at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The measurement covers jet transerve momenta from 50 GeV up to 600 GeV and jet rapidities up to |y| = 2.4. The data are collected using a set of seven single jet triggers. Event and jet cuts are applied to remove non-physical backgrounds and cosmic-ray interactions. The data are corrected for jet energy calibration, cut and trigger efficiencies and finite jet pT resolution. The corrections are determined from data and the methods are tested with Monte Carlo simulation. The main experimental challenges in the measurement are the calibration of jet energies and the determination of the jet pT resolution. New methods are developed for the jet energy calibration that take into account physical differences between the {gamma}+jet and dijet calibration samples arising from quark and gluon jet differences. The uncertainty correlations are studied and provided as a set of uncertainty sources. The production of particle jets in hadron collisions is described by the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). When the transverse jet momentum is large, the contributions from long-distance physics processes are small and the production rates of jets can be predicted by perturbative QCD. The

  1. Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for April 1995 through September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the DOE, NASA, and DOD advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a 5-year program plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. During the course of the Propulsion System Materials Program, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. To this end, the direction of the Propulsion System Materials Program is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported to include near-term (5--10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  2. Advanced hybrid nuclear propulsion Mars mission performance enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Noffsinger, K.E.; Segna, D.R.

    1992-02-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), can effectively deliver the same mass to Mars using much less propellant, consequently requiring less mass delivered to Earth orbit. The lower thrust of NEP requires a spiral trajectory near planetary bodies, which significantly increases the travel time. Although the total travel time is long, the portion of the flight time spent during interplanetary transfer is shorter, because the vehicle is thrusting for much longer periods of time. This has led to the supposition that NEP, although very attractive for cargo missions, is not suitable for piloted missions to Mars. However, with the application of a hybrid approach to propulsion, the benefits of NEP can be utilized while drastically reducing the overall travel time required. Development of a dual-mode system, which utilizes high-thrust NTP to propel the spacecraft from the planetary gravitational influence and low-thrust NEP to accelerate in interplanetary space, eliminates the spiral trajectory and results in a much faster transit time than could be obtained by either NEP or NTP alone. This results in a mission profile with a lower initial mass in low Earth orbit. In addition, the propulsion system would have the capability to provide electrical power for mission applications.

  3. Mars mission performance enhancement with hybrid nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Noffsinger, K.E.; Segna, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear electric propulsion (NEP), compared with chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP), can effectively deliver the same mass to Mars using much less propellant, consequently requiring less mass delivered to Earth orbit. The lower thrust of NEP requires a spiral trajectory near planetary bodies, which significantly increases the travel time. Although the total travel time is long, the portion of the flight time spent during interplanetary transfer is shorter, because the vehicle is thrusting for much longer periods of time. This has led to the supposition that NEP, although very attractive for cargo missions, is not suitable for piloted missions to Mars. However, with the application of a hybrid application of a hybrid approach to propulsion, the benefits of NEP can be utilized while drastically reducing the overall travel time required. Development of a dual-mode system, which utilizes high-thrust NTP to propel the spacecraft from the planetary gravitational influence and low-thrust NEP to accelerate in interplanetary space, eliminates the spiral trajectory and results in a much faster transit time than could be obtained by either NEP or NTP alone. This results in a mission profile with a lower initial mass in low Earth orbit. In addition, the propulsion system would have the capability to provide electrical power for mission applications.

  4. Advanced Thermally Stable Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    A. Boehman; C. Song; H. H. Schobert; M. M. Coleman; P. G. Hatcher; S. Eser

    1998-01-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components: 1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; 2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles during thermal stressing; 3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; 4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and 5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics from coal.

  5. NesteRenewable Jet Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Neste Renewable Jet Fuel DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop Macon, Georgia 14 September, 2016 Safe Harbor Statement 2 The following information contains, or may be deemed to contain, "forward-looking statements". These statements relate to future events or our future financial performance, including, but not limited to, strategic plans, potential growth, planned operational changes, expected capital expenditures, future cash sources and requirements,

  6. Jet pump for oil wells

    SciTech Connect

    Binks, R. H.; Christ, F. C.

    1985-03-12

    A fluid operated pump system which includes power fluid supply means comprising either the annulus between well casing and production tubing, or a secondary tubing, and a production tubing, set in a well, the production tubing having a housing at the lower end with which the power fluid supply means communicates. A pump unit, including a fluid operated jet pump, is movable downwardly through the production tubing into the housing to a fixed location and maintained at the fixed location by the forces of gravity and friction. The pump is operable in the housing by operating fluid under pressure supplied through the power fluid supply means to pump fluid from the well into the production tubing. A cavity is provided at the lower end of the pump unit between two balanced seals. The cavity communicates with the power fluid supply means and with the fluid operated jet pump. Power fluid introduced into the cavity causes no net force to be exerted on the pump unit. When pumping action takes place, produced fluids are taken from a lower pressure area below the pump unit and boosted to a higher pressure area above the pump unit by the fluid operated jet pump, resulting in a net downward force on the pump unit to cause the pump unit to be restrained against its fixed location without the need of latch means.

  7. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Howard A.

    2006-04-25

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  8. Space nuclear power, propulsion, and related technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Marshall

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is one of the nation's largest research and development (R&D) facilities, with headquarters at Albuquerque, New Mexico; a laboratory at Livermore, California; and a test range near Tonopah, Nevada. Smaller testing facilities are also operated at other locations. Established in 1945, Sandia was operated by the University of California until 1949, when, at the request of President Truman, Sandia Corporation was formed as a subsidiary of Bell Lab's Western Electric Company to operate Sandia as a service to the U.S. Government without profit or fee. Sandia is currently operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by AT&T Technologies, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AT&T. Sandia's responsibility is national security programs in defense and energy with primary emphasis on nuclear weapon research and development (R&D). However, Sandia also supports a wide variety of projects ranging from basic materials research to the design of specialized parachutes. Assets, owned by DOE and valued at more than $1.2 billion, include about 600 major buildings containing about 372,000 square meters (m2) (4 million square feet [ft2]) of floor space, located on land totalling approximately 1460 square kilometers (km2) (562 square miles [mi]). Sandia employs about 8500 people, the majority in Albuquerque, with about 1000 in Livermore. Approximately 60% of Sandia's employees are in technical and scientific positions, and the remainder are in crafts, skilled labor, and administrative positions. As a multiprogram national laboratory, Sandia has much to offer both industrial and government customers in pursuing space nuclear technologies. The purpose of this brochure is to provide the reader with a brief summary of Sandia's technical capabilities, test facilities, and example programs that relate to military and civilian objectives in space. Sandia is interested in forming partnerships with industry and government organizations, and has already

  9. National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing Challenge draws more than 200 students to Los Alamos National Laboratory April 16, 2015 NOTE TO EDITORS: Media are welcome to attend the awards ceremony from 9 a.m. to noon a.m., April 21 at the Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive, Los Alamos. Student teams from around New Mexico showcase year-long research projects April 20-21 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 16, 2015-More than 200 New Mexico students and their teachers are at Los Alamos National Laboratory April 20-21 for the 25th

  10. National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Community invited to learn about emerging technologies July 6, 2016 DisrupTech showcases innovation from Los Alamos National Laboratory LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 6, 2016-New technologies emerging from Los Alamos National Laboratory that address everything from fusion energy to medical testing will be on display for members of the community, investors and business leaders at the DisrupTech showcase, Thursday, July 14, starting at 1:00 p.m. at the Los Alamos Golf Course Event Center. "We call it

  11. Plasma phenomenology in astrophysical systems: Radio-sources and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Montani, Giovanni; Petitta, Jacopo

    2014-06-15

    We review the plasma phenomenology in the astrophysical sources which show appreciable radio emissions, namely Radio-Jets from Pulsars, Microquasars, Quasars, and Radio-Active Galaxies. A description of their basic features is presented, then we discuss in some details the links between their morphology and the mechanisms that lead to the different radio-emissions, investigating especially the role played by the plasma configurations surrounding compact objects (Neutron Stars, Black Holes). For the sake of completeness, we briefly mention observational techniques and detectors, whose structure set them apart from other astrophysical instruments. The fundamental ideas concerning angular momentum transport across plasma accretion diskstogether with the disk-source-jet coupling problemare discussed, by stressing their successes and their shortcomings. An alternative scenario is then inferred, based on a parallelism between astrophysical and laboratory plasma configurations, where small-scale structures can be found. We will focus our attention on the morphology of the radio-jets, on their coupling with the accretion disks and on the possible triggering phenomena, viewed as profiles of plasma instabilities.

  12. Jet measurements by ALICE at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Sultanov, Rishat; Collaboration: ALICE Collaboration

    2015-12-15

    Jets are collimated sprays of particles originating from fragmentation of high energy partons produced in a hard collision. They are an important diagnostic tool in studies of the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). The modification of the jet fragmentation pattern and its structure is a signature for the influence of hot and dense matter on the parton fragmentation process. Jet measurements in proton-proton collisions provide a baseline for similar measurements in heavy-ion collisions, while studies in proton-nucleus system allow to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. Here we present jet studies in different colliding systems (p–p, p–Pb, Pb–Pb) performed by the ALICE collaboration at LHC energies. Results on jet spectra, cross sections, nuclear modification factors, jet structure and other kinematic observables will be presented.

  13. Alternative Jet Fuels Research & Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Jet Fuels Research & Development Alternative Jet Fuels Research & Development Breakout Session 1D: Launching Renewable Aviation Fuels Alternative Jet Fuels Research & Development Nate Brown, Alternative Fuels Project Manager, Federal Aviation Administration brown_bioenergy_2016.pdf (1.54 MB) More Documents & Publications Sustainable Alternative Jet Fuels An Update on FAA Alternative Jet Fuel Efforts Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop Presentations

  14. Nonlinear compressions in merging plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Wu, L.; Brockington, S.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2013-03-15

    We investigate the dynamics of merging supersonic plasma jets using an analytic model. The merging structures exhibit supersonic, nonlinear compressions which may steepen into full shocks. We estimate the distance necessary to form such shocks and the resulting jump conditions. These theoretical models are compared to experimental observations and simulated dynamics. We also use those models to extrapolate behavior of the jet-merging compressions in a Plasma Jet Magneto-Inertial Fusion reactor.

  15. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of Automatic Transmission Fluid Jets with Implications for Electric Machine Thermal Management: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, Kevin; Moreno, Gilberto

    2015-09-29

    Thermal management for electric machines (motors/ generators) is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. Cooling of the electric machine(s) in some electric vehicle traction drive applications is accomplished by impinging automatic transmission fluid (ATF) jets onto the machine's copper windings. In this study, we provide the results of experiments characterizing the thermal performance of ATF jets on surfaces representative of windings, using Ford's Mercon LV ATF. Experiments were carried out at various ATF temperatures and jet velocities to quantify the influence of these parameters on heat transfer coefficients. Fluid temperatures were varied from 50 degrees C to 90 degrees C to encompass potential operating temperatures within an automotive transaxle environment. The jet nozzle velocities were varied from 0.5 to 10 m/s. The experimental ATF heat transfer coefficient results provided in this report are a useful resource for understanding factors that influence the performance of ATF-based cooling systems for electric machines.

  16. PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF STANDARD AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-10-10

    The X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode mission revealed the occurrence, in polar coronal holes, of much more numerous jets than previously indicated by the Yohkoh/Soft X-ray Telescope. These plasma ejections can be of two types, depending on whether they fit the standard reconnection scenario for coronal jets or if they include a blowout-like eruption. In this work, we analyze two jets, one standard and one blowout, that have been observed by the Hinode and STEREO experiments. We aim to infer differences in the physical parameters that correspond to the different morphologies of the events. To this end, we adopt spectroscopic techniques and determine the profiles of the plasma temperature, density, and outflow speed versus time and position along the jets. The blowout jet has a higher outflow speed, a marginally higher temperature, and is rooted in a stronger magnetic field region than the standard event. Our data provide evidence for recursively occurring reconnection episodes within both the standard and the blowout jet, pointing either to bursty reconnection or to reconnection occurring at different locations over the jet lifetimes. We make a crude estimate of the energy budget of the two jets and show how energy is partitioned among different forms. Also, we show that the magnetic energy that feeds the blowout jet is a factor of 10 higher than the magnetic energy that fuels the standard event.

  17. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  18. continuously jet-stirred tank reactor

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    continuously jet-stirred tank reactor - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home ... Predictive Simulation of Engines Transportation Energy Consortiums Engine Combustion ...

  19. Increasing jet entrainment, mixing and spreading

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.

    1994-08-16

    A free jet of air is disturbed at a frequency that substantially matches natural turbulences in the free jet to increase the entrainment, mixing, and spreading of air by the free jet, for example in a room or other enclosure. The disturbances are created by pulsing the flow of air that creates the free jet at the desired frequency. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 11 figs.

  20. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Micro Jets - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, Adrienne

    2015-08-25

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for this type of interaction, capable of producing the highest proton energies possible with today’s laser technologies. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis and investigate new, potentially more efficient mechanisms of ion acceleration, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we acheived a pure proton beam with an indiciation of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the

  1. Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts: Connections to GeV/TeV Jets

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts: Connections to GeV/TeV Jets Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optical Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts: Connections to GeV/TeV Jets Authors: Vestrand, W. Thomas [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-08-21 OSTI Identifier: 1091318 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-26624 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference:

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory | NISAC

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACLos Alamos National Laboratory

  3. Development of NERVA reactor for space nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.R.; Pierce, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The general technology development and demonstration of a Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA), a joint AEC-NASA program, was undertaken successfully in the 1960's and terminated in 1971 for lack of a specific mission. Detailed flight engine specifications were defined and several candidate designs which would satisfy these specifications were completed just prior to termination of these efforts. However, the technology interest continued and efforts were extended during the early 1970's to consider space power applications including a manned Mars mission and dual mode (propulsion power and electrical power) operation. Subsequent efforts have continued in developing electric power applications. Light-weight solid core reactor nuclear power sources have been conceptually studied based upon this technology. This paper provides a short summary of the technology that evolved in this very complex and frequently changing program with some specific references to the Mars mission propulsion application as it evolved from the NERVA development program.

  4. Power feature required for PEFC powered electric propulsion ship

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Isao; Oka, Masaru

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC system for ship propulsion, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quote}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The aspect treated here concerns an analysis of the load-following performance required and estimated of a PEFC system to power the envisaged ship. The analysis proved that difficulty should be expected of the fuel supply circuit in following with adequate rapidity the sharp changes of load on fuel cell under certain conditions. Further integrated experiments and simulation exercises are currently in progress to further analyze the response characteristics of the fuel supply circuit-particularly of the methanol reformer and gas reservoir-to determine the best measure to be adopted for overcoming the expected difficulty.

  5. Assessment of Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Facility and Capability Needs

    SciTech Connect

    James Werner

    2014-07-01

    The development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system rests heavily upon being able to fabricate and demonstrate the performance of a high temperature nuclear fuel as well as demonstrating an integrated system prior to launch. A number of studies have been performed in the past which identified the facilities needed and the capabilities available to meet the needs and requirements identified at that time. Since that time, many facilities and capabilities within the Department of Energy have been removed or decommissioned. This paper provides a brief overview of the anticipated facility needs and identifies some promising concepts to be considered which could support the development of a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Detailed trade studies will need to be performed to support the decision making process.

  6. Laser induced extraplanar propulsion for three-dimensional microfabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, A. J.; Pique, A.

    2011-03-28

    The laser induced extraplanar propulsion process is presented for the creation of controllable three-dimensional deformation of on-substrate components. It is demonstrated that the process is compatible with transparent substrates and ductile materials and is highly controllable in terms of the desired deformation via the adjustment of incident laser energy density. Copper films with thicknesses varying from 0.1-1 {mu}m are deformed over bending angles ranging from 0 deg. - 180 deg. A 355 nm laser at fluences ranging from 10-40 mJ/cm{sup 2} is used in conjunction with an indium-tin-oxide propulsion layer to demonstrate the process. Characterization is performed via electron and laser confocal microscopy.

  7. Nuclear electric propulsion for future NASA space science missions

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Chen-wan L.

    1993-07-20

    This study has been made to assess the needs, potential benefits and the applicability of early (circa year 2000) Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology in conducting NASA science missions. The study goals are: to obtain the performance characteristics of near term NEP technologies; to measure the performance potential of NEP for important OSSA missions; to compare NEP performance with that of conventional chemical propulsion; to identify key NEP system requirements; to clarify and depict the degree of importance NEP might have in advancing NASA space science goals; and to disseminate the results in a format useful to both NEP users and technology developers. This is a mission performance study and precludes investigations of multitudes of new mission operation and systems design issues attendant in a NEP flight.

  8. Vehicle configuration options using nuclear propulsion for Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Emrich, W.J. Jr. )

    1993-01-20

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) provides an attractive means of providing the propulsive force needed to accomplish a wide array of space missions. With its factor of two or more advantage in Isp over chemical engines, nuclear propulsion provides the opportunity to accomplish space missions which are impractical by other means. This paper focuses on the use of a nuclear thermal rocket to accomplish a variety of space missions with emphasis on the manned Mars mission. The particle bed reactor (PBR) type nuclear engine was chosen as the baseline engine used to conduct the present study because of its perceived versatility over other nuclear propulsion systems in conducting a wide variety of tasks. This study baselines a particle bed reactor engine with an engine thrust-to-weight ratio ([similar to]11.5) and a specific impulse of [similar to]950 s. It is shown that a PBR engine of this type will offer distinct advantages over the larger and heavier NERVA type nuclear engines.

  9. Full fuel-cycle comparison of forklift propulsion systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L. L.; Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-11-05

    Hydrogen has received considerable attention as an alternative to fossil fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigates the technical and economic feasibility of promising new technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. A recent report for DOE identified three near-term markets for fuel cells: (1) Emergency power for state and local emergency response agencies, (2) Forklifts in warehousing and distribution centers, and (3) Airport ground support equipment markets. This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Industry data and the Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources, back to the primary feedstocks for fuel production. Also considered are other environmental concerns at work locations. The benefits derived from using fuel-cell propulsion are determined by the sources of electricity and hydrogen. In particular, fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen made from the reforming of natural gas had lower impacts than those using hydrogen from electrolysis.

  10. Performance testing of the AC propulsion ELX electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, W.E.; MacDowall, R.D.; Burke, A.F.

    1994-06-01

    Performance testing of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle is described. Test data are presented and analyzed. The ELX vehicle is the first of a series of electric vehicles of interest to the California Air Resources Board. The test series is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the US Department of energy and the California Air Resources Board. The tests which were conducted showed that the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle has exceptional acceleration and range performance. when the vehicle`s battery was fully charged, the vehicle can accelerate from 0 to 96 km/h in about 10 seconds. Energy consumption and range tests using consecutive FUDS and HWFET Driving cycles (the all-electric cycle) indicate that the energy economy of the AC Propulsion ELX electric vehicle with regenerative braking is 97 W{center_dot}h/km, with a range of 153 km (95 miles). Computer simulations performed using the SIMPLEV Program indicate that the vehicle would have a range of 327 km (203 miles) on the all-electric cycle if the lead acid batteries were replaced with NiMH batteries having an energy density of 67 W{center_dot}h/kg. Comparisons of FUDS test data with and without regenerative braking indicated that regenerative braking reduced the energy consumption of the ELX vehicle by approximately 25%.

  11. PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU Hardware...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU Hardware. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PDF Study of Round Turbulent Condensing Jet using GPU ...

  12. Fragmentation, underlying event and jet shapes at the Tevatron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Fragmentation, underlying event and jet shapes at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fragmentation, underlying event and jet shapes at the Tevatron...

  13. Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities You are ...

  14. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. A .gamma.-mode, resonant-cavity plasma discharge that can be operated at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature using 13.56 MHz rf power is described. Unlike plasma torches, the discharge produces a gas-phase effluent no hotter than 250.degree. C. at an applied power of about 300 W, and shows distinct non-thermal characteristics. In the simplest design, two concentric cylindrical electrodes are employed to generate a plasma in the annular region therebetween. A "jet" of long-lived metastable and reactive species that are capable of rapidly cleaning or etching metals and other materials is generated which extends up to 8 in. beyond the open end of the electrodes. Films and coatings may also be removed by these species. Arcing is prevented in the apparatus by using gas mixtures containing He, which limits ionization, by using high flow velocities, and by properly shaping the rf-powered electrode. Because of the atmospheric pressure operation, no ions survive for a sufficiently long distance beyond the active plasma discharge to bombard a workpiece, unlike low-pressure plasma sources and conventional plasma processing methods.

  15. Laboratory Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Laboratory Applications What are contaminants normally found in hydrogen from fueling nozzle? JP Hsu SmartChemistry.com Particulates are most common found in Hydrogen - 96% hydrogen fuel contains particulates in 108 Particulate Samplings. Typical Particulate filter - 0.035mg/kg SmartChemistry.com H 2 Station X Particulate Sample Particulate Concentration at 700 Bar: 2.0 mg/kg Particulate filter after sampling, in which 4.001mg particulates are found in 2 kilogram hydrogen SmartChemistry.com H 2

  16. REIMR - A Process for Utilizing Liquid Rocket Propulsion-Oriented 'Lessons Learned' to Mitigate Development Risk in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2006-01-20

    This paper is a summary overview of a study conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) during the initial phases of the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) program to evaluate a large number of technical problems associated with the design, development, test, evaluation and operation of several major liquid propellant rocket engine systems (i.e., SSME, Fastrac, J-2, F-1). One of the primary results of this study was the identification of the 'Fundamental Root Causes' that enabled the technical problems to manifest, and practices that can be implemented to prevent them from recurring in future propulsion system development efforts, such as that which is currently envisioned in the field of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP). This paper will discus the Fundamental Root Causes, cite some examples of how the technical problems arose from them, and provide a discussion of how they can be mitigated or avoided in the development of an NTP system.

  17. VLBA AND CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF JETS IN FRI RADIO GALAXIES: CONSTRAINTS ON JET EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; O'Dea, C. P.; Tilak, A.; Baum, S. A.; Haynes, E.; Noel-Storr, J.; Fallon, C.; Christiansen, K.

    2012-07-20

    We present here the results from new Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations at 1.6 and 5 GHz of 19 galaxies of a complete sample of 21 Uppasala General Catalog (UGC) Fanaroff-Riley type I (FRI) radio galaxies. New Chandra data of two sources, viz., UGC 00408 and UGC 08433, are combined with the Chandra archival data of 13 sources. The 5 GHz observations of 10 'core-jet' sources are polarization-sensitive, while the 1.6 GHz observations constitute second-epoch total intensity observations of nine 'core-only' sources. Polarized emission is detected in the jets of seven sources at 5 GHz, but the cores are essentially unpolarized, except in M87. Polarization is detected at the jet edges in several sources, and the inferred magnetic field is primarily aligned with the jet direction. This could be indicative of magnetic field 'shearing' due to jet-medium interaction, or the presence of helical magnetic fields. The jet peak intensity I{sub {nu}} falls with distance d from the core, following the relation, I{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}d{sup a} , where a is typically {approx} - 1.5. Assuming that adiabatic expansion losses are primarily responsible for the jet intensity 'dimming,' two limiting cases are considered: (1) the jet has a constant speed on parsec scales and is expanding gradually such that the jet radius r{proportional_to}d 0{sup .4}; this expansion is, however, unobservable in the laterally unresolved jets at 5 GHz, and (2) the jet is cylindrical and is accelerating on parsec scales. Accelerating parsec-scale jets are consistent with the phenomenon of 'magnetic driving' in Poynting-flux-dominated jets. While slow jet expansion as predicted by case (1) is indeed observed in a few sources from the literature that are resolved laterally, on scales of tens or hundreds of parsecs, case (2) cannot be ruled out in the present data, provided the jets become conical on scales larger than those probed by VLBA. Chandra observations of 15 UGC FRIs detect X-ray jets in

  18. Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories Bettis and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratories DE-NR0000031 Managed and Operated by Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation Updated to Modification 075 dated 10/10/2012 BASIC Contract (Official) Modifications (Official) Funding Mods Available Upon Request Conformed Contract (Unofficial) Basic Contract (9/18/2008) (pdf, 2307KB) NR 001 (12/8/08) (pdf, 7938KB) DE-NR0000031 (Conformed to Mod 075 dated 10/10/2011) (pdf, 12MB) NR 002

  19. Intra-jet shocks in two counter-streaming, weakly collisional plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D. D.; Kugland, N. L.; Park, H.-S.; Plechaty, C.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.

    2012-07-15

    Counterstreaming laser-generated plasma jets can serve as a test-bed for the studies of a variety of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock waves. In the latter problem, the jet's parameters have to be chosen in such a way as to make the collisions between the particles of one jet with the particles of the other jet very rare. This can be achieved by making the jet velocities high and the Coulomb cross-sections correspondingly low. On the other hand, the intra-jet collisions for high-Mach-number jets can still be very frequent, as they are determined by the much lower thermal velocities of the particles of each jet. This paper describes some peculiar properties of intra-jet hydrodynamics in such a setting: the steepening of smooth perturbations and shock formation affected by the presence of the 'stiff' opposite flow; the role of a rapid electron heating in shock formation; ion heating by the intrajet shock. The latter effect can cause rapid ion heating which is consistent with recent counterstreaming jet experiments by Ross et al.[Phys. Plasmas 19, 056501 (2012)].

  20. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  1. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, Donald M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, Larry R.

    1994-01-01

    A propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of FIG. 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the FIG. 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  2. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, D.M.; He, J.; Johnson, L.R.

    1994-01-04

    A propulsion and stabilization system are described comprising a series of coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance, and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension. 8 figures.

  3. Integrated null-flux suspension and multiphase propulsion system for magnetically-levitated vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Rote, D.M.; He, Jianliang; Johnson, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses a propulsion and stabilization system comprising a series of figure 8 coils mounted vertically on the walls of the guideway to provide suspension, lateral guidance and propulsion of a magnetically levitated vehicle. This system further allows for altering the magnetic field effects by changing the relative position of the loops comprising the figure 8 coils either longitudinally and/or vertically with resulting changes in the propulsion, the vertical stability, and the suspension.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report | Department of Energy Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2010 annual progress report focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2010_propulsion_materials.pdf (21.92 MB) More Documents & Publications

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report | Department of Energy Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2011 annual progress report focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2011_propulsion_materials.pdf (21.95 MB) More Documents & Publications

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Report | Department of Energy Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report 2012 annual progress report focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development. 2012_propulsion_materials.pdf (22.34 MB) More Documents & Publications

  7. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Argonne's Analytical Chemistry Laboratory provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs. PDF icon Analytical_Chemistry_Laboratory_fact_sheet

  8. Design of the cryogenic hydrogen release laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Ethan S.; Zimmerman, Mark D.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; Ciotti, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A cooperative research and development agreement was made between Linde, LLC and Sandia to develop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. A three-stage heat exchanger will be used to cool gaseous hydrogen using liquid nitrogen, gaseous helium, and liquid helium. A cryogenic line from the heat exchanger into the lab will allow high-fidelity diagnostics already in place in the lab to be applied to cold hydrogen jets. Data from these experiments will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  9. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Cyrus, Jack D.; Kadlec, Emil G.; Klimas, Paul C.

    1985-01-01

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the ends thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby inducing stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  10. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus, J.D.; Kadlec, E.G.; Klimas, P.C.

    1983-09-15

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the end thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby including stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  11. Jet spoiler arrangement for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Cyrus, J. D.; Kadlec, E. G.; Klimas, P. C.

    1985-03-12

    An air jet spoiler arrangement is provided for a Darrieus-type vertical axis wind-powered turbine. Air is drawn into hollow turbine blades through air inlets at the ends thereof and is ejected in the form of air jets through small holes or openings provided along the lengths of the blades. The air jets create flow separation at the surfaces of the turbine blades, thereby inducing stall conditions and reducing the output power. A feedback control unit senses the power output of the turbine and controls the amount of air drawn into the air inlets accordingly.

  12. THE RHIC HYDROGEN JET LUMINESCENCE MONITOR.

    SciTech Connect

    RUSSO,T.; BELLAVIA, S.; GASSNER, D.; THIEBERGER, P.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; TSANG, T.

    2007-06-25

    A hydrogen jet polarimeter was developed for the RHIC accelerator to improve the process of measuring polarization. Particle beams intersecting with gas molecules can produce light by the process known as luminescence. This light can then be focused, collected, and processed giving important information such as size, position, emittance, motion, and other parameters. The RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter was modified in 2005 with specialized optics, vacuum windows, light transport, and a new camera system making it possible to monitor the luminescence produced by polarized protons intersecting the hydrogen beam. This paper describes the configuration and preliminary measurements taken using the RHIC hydrogen jet polarimeter as a luminescence monitor.

  13. CSP Component Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Component Research and Development CSP Component Research and Development University of California Los Angeles University of California Los Angeles High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids Read more Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP Read more Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jet Propulsion Laboratory Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators Read more HiTek Services HiTek Services Low-Cost Heliostat

  14. LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory Kayla Zimmerman | (650) 926-6281 Lisa Hammon, LCLS Lab Coordinator Welcome to the LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory. This small general use wet...

  15. Heat Transfer Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transfer Laboratory Materials in solids or fluid forms play an important role in a ... Argonne's Heat Transfer Laboratory enables researchers to: Synthesize and prepare heat ...

  16. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

  17. Numerical Simulations of Boiling Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; Troshko, A.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2006-12-01

    This paper explores turbulent boiling jet impingement for cooling power electronic components in hybrid electric vehicles.

  18. Electron dynamics and plasma jet formation in a helium atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge jet

    SciTech Connect

    Algwari, Q. Th.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-09-19

    The excitation dynamics within the main plasma production region and the plasma jets of a kHz atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet operated in helium was investigated. Within the dielectric tube, the plasma ignites as a streamer-type discharge. Plasma jets are emitted from both the powered and grounded electrode end; their dynamics are compared and contrasted. Ignition of these jets are quite different; the jet emitted from the powered electrode is ignited with a slight time delay to plasma ignition inside the dielectric tube, while breakdown of the jet at the grounded electrode end is from charging of the dielectric and is therefore dependent on plasma production and transport within the dielectric tube. Present streamer theories can explain these dynamics.

  19. National Laboratory Impact Initiative

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Laboratory Impact Initiative supports the relationship between the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the national laboratory enterprise.  The national laboratories...

  20. Recapturing NERVA-Derived Fuels for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A L; Hancock, Emily F

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy is working with NASA to examine fuel options for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion applications. Extensive development and testing was performed on graphite-based fuels during the Nuclear Engineer Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) and Rover programs through the early 1970s. This paper explores the possibility of recapturing the technology and the issues associated with using it for the next generation of nuclear thermal rockets. The issues discussed include a comparison of today's testing capabilities, analysis techniques and methods, and knowledge to that of previous development programs and presents a plan to recapture the technology for a flight program.

  1. ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

    2010-09-01

    The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

  2. Jet-images — deep learning edition

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    de Oliveira, Luke; Kagan, Michael; Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel

    2016-07-13

    Building on the notion of a particle physics detector as a camera and the collimated streams of high energy particles, or jets, it measures as an image, we investigate the potential of machine learning techniques based on deep learning architectures to identify highly boosted W bosons. Modern deep learning algorithms trained on jet images can out-perform standard physically-motivated feature driven approaches to jet tagging. We develop techniques for visualizing how these features are learned by the network and what additional information is used to improve performance. Finally, this interplay between physicallymotivated feature driven tools and supervised learning algorithms is generalmore » and can be used to significantly increase the sensitivity to discover new particles and new forces, and gain a deeper understanding of the physics within jets.« less

  3. String model for spinning quark jets

    SciTech Connect

    Artru, X.; Belghobsi, Z.

    2012-06-27

    A string model of quark hadronization, taking the quark spin degree of freedom into account, is proposed. The method for using the model in a Monte-Carlo code for jet generation is given.

  4. Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop Santa Fe Jets and Heavy Flavor Workshop WHEN: Jan 11, 2016 8:30 AM - Jan 13, 2016 5:30 PM WHERE: Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 USA CONTACT: Ivan Vitev CATEGORY: Science TYPE: Conference INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description This workshop will bring together senior researchers, postdoctoral fellows and talented graduate students to discuss the exciting recent developments and future directions in high energy

  5. Gap between jets at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Royon, Christophe

    2013-04-15

    We describe a NLL BFKL calculation implemented in the HERWIG MC of the gap between jets cross section, that represent a test of BFKL dynamics. We compare the predictions with recent measurements at the Tevatron and present predictions for the LHC. We also discuss the interesting process of looking for gap between jets in diffractive events when protons are detected in the ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) detectors.

  6. JET ROTATION DRIVEN BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendt, Christian

    2011-08-10

    In this paper, we present a detailed numerical investigation of the hypothesis that a rotation of astrophysical jets can be caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks in a helical magnetic field. Shock compression of the helical magnetic field results in a toroidal Lorentz force component that will accelerate the jet material in the toroidal direction. This process transforms magnetic angular momentum (magnetic stress) carried along the jet into kinetic angular momentum (rotation). The mechanism proposed here only works in a helical magnetic field configuration. We demonstrate the feasibility of this mechanism by axisymmetric MHD simulations in 1.5 and 2.5 dimensions using the PLUTO code. In our setup, the jet is injected into the ambient gas with zero kinetic angular momentum (no rotation). We apply different dynamical parameters for jet propagation such as the jet internal Alfven Mach number and fast magnetosonic Mach number, the density contrast of the jet to the ambient medium, and the external sonic Mach number of the jet. The mechanism we suggest should work for a variety of jet applications, e.g., protostellar or extragalactic jets, and internal jet shocks (jet knots) or external shocks between the jet and the ambient gas (entrainment). For typical parameter values for protostellar jets, the numerically derived rotation feature looks consistent with the observations, i.e., rotational velocities of 0.1%-1% of the jet bulk velocity.

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; et al

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generatedmore » by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.« less

  8. Study of jet properties at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Mario; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2005-05-01

    The Run II at the Tevatron will define a new level of precision for QCD studies in hadron collisions. Both collider experiments, CDF and D0, expect to collect up to 8 fb{sup -1} of data in this new run period. The increase in instantaneous luminosity, center-of-mass energy (from 1.8 TeV to 2 TeV) and the improved acceptance of the detectors will allow stringent tests of the Standard Model (SM) predictions in extended regions of jet transverse momentum, P{sub T}{sup jet}, and jet rapidity, Y{sup jet}. The hadronic final states in hadron-hadron collisions are characterized by the presence of soft contributions (the so-called underlying event) from initial-state gluon radiation and multiple parton interactions between remnants, in addition to the jets of hadrons originated by the hard interaction. A proper comparison with pQCD predictions at the parton level requires an adequate modeling of these soft contributions which become important at low P{sub T}{sup jet}. In this letter, a review of some of the most important QCD results from Run II is presented.

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.; Ryutov, D.; Hu, S.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Frenje, J.; Casey, D.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Manuel, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Petrasso, R.; Amendt, P.; Park, H.; Remington, B.; Wilks, S.; Betti, R.; Froula, D.; Knauer, J.; Meyerhofer, D.; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Young, R.; Koenig, M.

    2013-12-01

    Monoenergetic-proton radiographs of laser-generated, high-Mach-number plasma jets colliding at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare favorably with results from 2D hydrodynamic simulations of multistream plasma jets, and also with results from an analytic treatment of electron flow and magnetic field advection. In collisions of two noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model’s prediction of a characteristic feature with a narrow structure pointing in one direction and a much thicker one pointing in the opposite direction. Spontaneous magnetic fields, largely azimuthal around the colliding jets and generated by the well-known ∇Te ×∇ne Biermann battery effect near the periphery of the laser spots, are demonstrated to be “frozen in” the plasma (due to high magnetic Reynolds number RM ~5×10⁴) and advected along the jet streamlines of the electron flow. These studies provide novel insight into the interactions and dynamics of colliding plasma jets.

  10. Renewable Energy Laboratory

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Radiation Budget Measurement Networks, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory and Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division *...

  11. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.W.

    1994-05-01

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development.

  12. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Sample Return

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

    2009-07-14

    The need to answer basic questions regarding the origin of the Solar System will motivate robotic sample return missions to destinations like Pluto, its satellite Charon, and objects in the Kuiper belt. To keep the mission duration short enough to be of interest, sample return from objects farther out in the Solar System requires increasingly higher return velocities. A sample return mission involves several complicated steps to reach an object and obtain a sample, but only the interplanetary return phase of the mission is addressed in this paper. Radioisotope electric propulsion is explored in this parametric study as a means to propel small, dedicated return vehicles for transferring kilogram-size samples from deep space to Earth. Return times for both Earth orbital rendezvous and faster, direct atmospheric re-entry trajectories are calculated for objects as far away as 100 AU. Chemical retro-rocket braking at Earth is compared to radioisotope electric propulsion but the limited deceleration capability of chemical rockets forces the return trajectories to be much slower.

  13. PHOTOSPHERIC EMISSION FROM STRATIFIED JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hirotaka; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ono, Masaomi; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Mao, Jirong; Yamada, Shoichi; Pe'er, Asaf; Mizuta, Akira; Harikae, Seiji

    2013-11-01

    We explore photospheric emissions from stratified two-component jets, wherein a highly relativistic spine outflow is surrounded by a wider and less relativistic sheath outflow. Thermal photons are injected in regions of high optical depth and propagated until the photons escape at the photosphere. Because of the presence of shear in velocity (Lorentz factor) at the boundary of the spine and sheath region, a fraction of the injected photons are accelerated using a Fermi-like acceleration mechanism such that a high-energy power-law tail is formed in the resultant spectrum. We show, in particular, that if a velocity shear with a considerable variance in the bulk Lorentz factor is present, the high-energy part of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) photon spectrum can be explained by this photon acceleration mechanism. We also show that the accelerated photons might also account for the origin of the extra-hard power-law component above the bump of the thermal-like peak seen in some peculiar bursts (e.g., GRB 090510, 090902B, 090926A). We demonstrate that time-integrated spectra can also reproduce the low-energy spectrum of GRBs consistently using a multi-temperature effect when time evolution of the outflow is considered. Last, we show that the empirical E{sub p}-L{sub p} relation can be explained by differences in the outflow properties of individual sources.

  14. Electric Drive Dynamic Thermal System Model for Advanced Vehicle Propulsion Technologies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-360

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, K.

    2013-10-01

    Electric drive systems, which include electric machines and power electronics, are a key enabling technology for advanced vehicle propulsion systems that reduce the dependence of the U.S. transportation sector on petroleum. However, to penetrate the market, these electric drive technologies must enable vehicle solutions that are economically viable. The push to make critical electric drivesystems smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective brings respective challenges associated with heat removal and system efficiency. In addition, the wide application of electric drive systems to alternative propulsion technologies ranging from integrated starter generators, to hybrid electric vehicles, to full electric vehicles presents challenges in terms of sizing critical components andthermal management systems over a range of in-use operating conditions. This effort focused on developing a modular modeling methodology to enable multi-scale and multi-physics simulation capabilities leading to generic electric drive system models applicable to alternative vehicle propulsion configurations. The primary benefit for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the abilityto define operating losses with the respective impact on component sizing, temperature, and thermal management at the component, subsystem, and system level. However, the flexible nature of the model also allows other uses related to evaluating the impacts of alternative component designs or control schemes depending on the interests of other parties.

  15. Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power DOE Operations annual site environmental report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, K.S.

    1998-11-23

    This annual report discusses environmental monitoring at two manufacturing and test sites operated in the Los Angeles area by Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power of Boeing North American, Inc. These are identified as Area 4 of the SSFL and the De Soto site. These sites have been used for research and development (R and D), engineering, and testing in a broad range of technical fields primarily in energy research and nuclear reactor technology. The De Soto site had research and development laboratories involved with nuclear research. This work was terminated in 1995 and only D and D activities will have potential for impact on the environment. Since 1956, Area 4 has been used for work with nuclear materials, including fabricating nuclear reactor fuels, testing nuclear reactors, and dissembling used fuel elements. This work ended in 1988 and subsequent efforts have been directed toward decommissioning and decontamination of the former nuclear facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to present information on environmental and effluent monitoring of DOE-sponsored activities to the regulatory agencies responsible for oversight. Information presented here concentrates on Area 4 at SSFL, which is the only area at SSFL where DOE operations were performed.

  16. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S.; Silverstein, C.C.

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  17. THE PROPAGATION OF RELATIVISTIC JETS IN EXTERNAL MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, Omer; Piran, Tsvi; Sari, Re'em; Nakar, Ehud

    2011-10-20

    Relativistic jets are ubiquitous in astrophysical systems that contain compact objects. They transport large amounts of energy to large distances from the source and their interaction with the ambient medium has a crucial effect on the evolution of the system. The propagation of the jet is characterized by the formation of a shocked 'head' at the front of the jet which dissipates the jet's energy and a cocoon that surrounds the jet and potentially collimates it. We present here a self-consistent, analytic model that follows the evolution of the jet and its cocoon, and describes their interaction. We show that the critical parameter that determines the properties of the jet-cocoon system is the dimensionless ratio between the jet's energy density and the rest-mass energy density of the ambient medium. This parameter, together with the jet's injection angle, also determines whether the jet is collimated by the cocoon or not. The model is applicable to relativistic, unmagnetized jets on all scales and may be used to determine the conditions in active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets as well as in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) or microquasars. It shows that AGN and microquasar jets are hydrodynamically collimated due to the interaction with the ambient medium, while GRB jets can be collimated only inside a star and become uncollimated once they break out.

  18. EA-1900: Radiological Work and Storage Building at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (NNPP) intent to prepare an Environmental Assessment for a radiological work and storage building at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. A new facility is needed to streamline radioactive material handling and storage operations, permit demolition of aging facilities, and accommodate efficient maintenance of existing nuclear reactors.

  19. Ames Laboratory Logos | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Logos The Ames Laboratory Logo comes in several formats. EPS files are vector graphics created in Adobe Illustrator and saved with a tiff preview so they will...

  20. Singular behavior of jet substructure observables

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Moult, Ian

    2016-01-20

    Jet substructure observables play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider for identifying the boosted hadronic decay products of electroweak scale resonances. The complete description of these observables requires understanding both the limit in which hard substructure is resolved, as well as the limit of a jet with a single hard core. In this paper we study in detail the perturbative structure of two prominent jet substructure observables, N-subjettiness and the energy correlation functions, as measured on background QCD jets. In particular, we focus on the distinction between the limits in which two-prong structure is resolved or unresolved. Dependingmore » on the choice of subjet axes, we demonstrate that at fixed order, N-subjettiness can manifest myriad behaviors in the unresolved region: smooth tails, end-point singularities, or singularities in the physical region. The energy correlation functions, by contrast, only have non-singular perturbative tails extending to the end point. We discuss the effect of hadronization on the various observables with Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate that the modeling of these effects with non-perturbative shape functions is highly dependent on the N-subjettiness axes definitions. Lastly, our study illustrates those regions of phase space that must be controlled for high-precision jet substructure calculations, and emphasizes how such calculations can be facilitated by designing substructure observables with simple singular structures.« less

  1. Nuclear electric propulsion operational reliability and crew safety study

    SciTech Connect

    Karns, J.J.; Fragola, J.R.; Kahan, L.; Pelaccio, D. )

    1993-01-20

    The central purpose of this analysis is to assess the achievability'' of a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system in a given mission. Achievability'' is a concept introduced to indicate the extent to which a system that meets or achieves its design goals might be implemented using the existing technology base. In the context of this analysis, the objective is to assess the achievability of an NEP system for a manned Mars mission as it pertains to operational reliability and crew safety goals. By varying design parameters, then examining the resulting system achievability, the design and mission risk drivers can be identified. Additionally, conceptual changes in design approach or mission strategy which are likely to improve overall achievability of the NEP system can be examined.

  2. Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. ); Hasegawa, A. ); Santarius, J.F. . Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1991-04-12

    A conceptual design is discussed for a fusion rocket propulsion system based on the magnetic dipole configuration. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Example parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of 1 kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as in an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 21 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Space propulsion by fusion in a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Glass, A.J.; Fowler, T.K. ); Hasegawa, A. ); Santarius, J.F. . Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1991-07-15

    The unique advantages of fusion rocket propulsion systems for distant missions are explored using the magnetic dipole configurations as an example. The dipole is found to have features well suited to space applications. Parameters are presented for a system producing a specific power of kW/kg, capable of interplanetary flights to Mars in 90 days and to Jupiter in a year, and of extra-solar-system flights to 1000 astronomical units (the Tau mission) in 20 years. This is about 10 times better specific power performance than nuclear electric fission systems. Possibilities to further increase the specific power toward 10 kW/kg are discussed, as is an approach to implementing the concept through proof-testing on the moon. 20 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials: Recent Progress and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2001-05-14

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program provides enabling materials technology for the U.S. DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program is based on an industry assessment and the technology roadmap for the OHVT. A five-year program plan was published in 2000. Major efforts in the program are materials for diesel engine fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, and air handling. Additional efforts include diesel engine valve-train materials, structural components, and thermal management. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications. Selected technical issues and planned and ongoing projects as well as brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Computing & Information Sciences People photo Quantum Information Science & Technology Challenge: The Quantum Information Science & Technology Grand Challenge Laboratory Directed ...

  6. Anti-matter propulsion: feasibility, status, and possible enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The possible use of advanced propulsion techniques must be considered if the currently envisioned launch date of the Manned Mars Mission were to be delayed until 2020 or later. Within the next 30 years, technological advances may allow such methods as beaming power to the ship, inertial-confinement fusion, or mass-conversion of anti-protons to become feasible. Of the possible methods, the anti-proton (anti p), reaction offers the highest potential, the greastest problems, and the most fascination. An Isp of 5000 s would allow the currently envisioned ship to fly to Mars in 3 months and would require about one million pounds to be assembled in Earth orbit. Anti-protons are currently being produced in the world in amounts of about 10/sup 14/ particles per year. With sufficient effort, almost a mg/yr (6 x 10/sup 20/) could be produced by the early 2000s. Current experiments plan to decelerate and capture about 10/sup 10/ or greater anti-protons in an electrostatic Penning trap. Such traps may provide a source of low energy anti p's for development of better storage mechanisms suitable for propulsion. Recently, proposals have been investigated which would amplify the average energy released per anti p used. The proposals entail using the anti p's to produce inertial confinement fusion of a capsule or to produce negative muons which can catalyze fusion. By increasing the energy released per anti p, the effective specific cost, $/joule, can be reduced to attractive levels. These two proposals and other areas of research can be investigated now and will help in assessing the feasibility of an anti p engine.

  7. Performance enhancement using power beaming for electric propulsion earth orbital transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.

    1991-08-01

    An electric propulsion Earth orbital transport vehicle (EOTV) can effectively deliver large payloads using much less propellant than chemical transfer methods. By using an EOTV instead of a chemical upper stage, either a smaller launch vehicle can be used for the same satellite mass or larger satellite can be deployed using the same launch vehicle. However, the propellant mass savings from using the higher specific impulse of electric propulsion may not be enough to overcome the disadvantage of the added mass and cost of the electric propulsion power source. Power system limitations have been a major factor delaying the acceptance and use of electric propulsion. This paper outlines the power requirements of electric propulsion technology being developed today, including arcjets, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and ion engines. Power supply characteristics are discussed for nuclear, solar, and power-beaming systems. Operational characteristics are given for each, as are the impacts of the power supply alternative on the overall craft performance. Because of its modular nature, the power-beaming approach is able to meet the power requirements of all three electric propulsion types. Also, commonality of approach allows different electric propulsion approaches to be powered by a single power supply approach. Power beaming exhibits better flexibility and performance than on-board nuclear or solar power systems.

  8. QCD at the Tevatron: Jets and fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    V. Daniel Elvira

    2001-09-27

    At the Fermilab Tevatron energies, ({radical} s=1800 GeV and {radical} s = 630 GeV), jet production is the dominant process. During the period 1992-1996, the D0 and CDF experiments accumulated almost 100 pb{sup -1} of data and performed the most accurate jet production measurements up to this date. These measurements and the NLO-QCD theoretical predictions calculated during the last decade, have improved our understanding of QCD, our knowledge of the proton structure, and pushed the limit to the scale associated with quark compositeness to 2.4-2.7 TeV. In this paper, we present the most recent published and preliminary measurements on jet production and fragmentation by the D0 and CDF collaborations.

  9. Mixing enhancement by use of swirling jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D.K.; Cutler, A.D.

    1993-01-01

    It has been proposed that the mixing of fuel with air in the combustor of scramjet engines might be enhanced by the addition of swirl to the fuel jet prior to injection. This study investigated the effects of swirl on the mixing of a 30 deg wall jet into a Mach 2 flow. Cases with swirl and without swirl were investigated, with both helium and air simulating the fuel. Rayleigh scattering was used to visualize the flow, and seeding the fuel with water allowed it to be traced through the main flow. The results show that the addition of swirl to the fuel jet causes the fuel to mix more rapidly with the main flow, that larger amounts of swirl increase this effect, and that helium spreads better into the main flow than air. 12 refs.

  10. Enabling Green Energy and Propulsion Systems via Direct Noise...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    High-fidelity simulation of exhaust nozzle under installed configuration Umesh Paliath, GE Global Research; Joe Insley, Argonne National Laboratory Enabling Green Energy and ...

  11. Renewable Jet Fuel Is Taking Flight | Department of Energy

    Energy Saver

    Renewable Jet Fuel Is Taking Flight Renewable Jet Fuel Is Taking Flight August 26, 2015 - 3:58pm Addthis Zia Haq Zia Haq Senior Analyst and Defense Production Act Coordinator, ...

  12. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, Scott D.; Farrington, Robert B.

    1997-01-01

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct.

  13. Cascade impactor and jet plate for same

    DOEpatents

    Dahlin, Robert S.; Farthing, William E.; Landham Jr., Edward C.

    2004-02-03

    A sampling system and method for sampling particulate matter from a high-temperature, high-pressure gas stream. A cyclone sampler for use at high temperatures and pressures, and having threadless sacrificial connectors is disclosed. Also disclosed is an improved cascade impactor including jet plates with integral spacers, and alignment features provided for aligning the jet plates with their associated collection substrates. An activated bauxite alkali collector is disclosed, and includes an alumina liner. The sampling system can be operated remotely or locally, and can be permanently installed or configured as a portable system.

  14. Enhancement of wall jet transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Claunch, S.D.; Farrington, R.B.

    1997-02-04

    By enhancing the natural instabilities in the boundary layer and in the free shear layer of a wall jet, the boundary is minimized thereby increasing the transport of heat and mass. Enhancing the natural instabilities is accomplished by pulsing the flow of air that creates the wall jet. Such pulsing of the flow of air can be accomplished by sequentially occluding and opening a duct that confines and directs the flow of air, such as by rotating a disk on an axis transverse to the flow of air in the duct. 17 figs.

  15. High pressure water jet mining machine

    DOEpatents

    Barker, Clark R.

    1981-05-05

    A high pressure water jet mining machine for the longwall mining of coal is described. The machine is generally in the shape of a plowshare and is advanced in the direction in which the coal is cut. The machine has mounted thereon a plurality of nozzle modules each containing a high pressure water jet nozzle disposed to oscillate in a particular plane. The nozzle modules are oriented to cut in vertical and horizontal planes on the leading edge of the machine and the coal so cut is cleaved off by the wedge-shaped body.

  16. Jet Engine Cooling | GE Global Research

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthetic Jets Help Keep Avionics Cool at Cruising Altitude Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Synthetic Jets Help Keep Avionics Cool at Cruising Altitude When you think of airplanes, one of the first objects that comes to mind is the combustion engine that allows it to fly high in the sky. And for decades,

  17. Relativistic MHD simulations of poynting flux-driven jets

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyue; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2014-01-20

    Relativistic, magnetized jets are observed to propagate to very large distances in many active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We use three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations to study the propagation of Poynting flux-driven jets in AGNs. These jets are already assumed to be being launched from the vicinity (?10{sup 3} gravitational radii) of supermassive black holes. Jet injections are characterized by a model described in Li et al., and we follow the propagation of these jets to ?parsec scales. We find that these current-carrying jets are always collimated and mildly relativistic. When ?, the ratio of toroidal-to-poloidal magnetic flux injection, is large the jet is subject to nonaxisymmetric current-driven instabilities (CDI) which lead to substantial dissipation and reduced jet speed. However, even with the presence of instabilities, the jet is not disrupted and will continue to propagate to large distances. We suggest that the relatively weak impact by the instability is due to the nature of the instability being convective and the fact that the jet magnetic fields are rapidly evolving on Alfvnic time scales. We present the detailed jet properties and show that far from the jet launching region, a substantial amount of magnetic energy has been transformed into kinetic energy and thermal energy, producing a jet magnetization number ? < 1. In addition, we have also studied the effects of a gas pressure supported 'disk' surrounding the injection region, and qualitatively similar global jet behaviors were observed. We stress that jet collimation, CDIs, and the subsequent energy transitions are intrinsic features of current-carrying jets.

  18. Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Low-Pressure Steam | Department of Energy Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam This tip sheet on steam jet ejectors and thermocompressors provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies. STEAM TIP SHEET #29 Use Steam Jet Ejectors or Thermocompressors to Reduce Venting of Low-Pressure Steam (January 2012)

  19. The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, recovers valuable rare-earth magnetic material from manufacturing waste and creates useful magnets out of it. Ames Laboratory...

  20. mark | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Profile Mark Gordon Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 201 Spedding ... Group Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Chemical Physics TheoreticalComputational Tools ...

  1. National Laboratory's Weapons Program

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security, LLC, began managing the Laboratory. Prior to joining the Laboratory, McMillan served in a variety of research and management positions at Lawrence Livermore...

  2. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility Distributed Energy Research Center Engine Research Facility Heat Transfer Laboratory Tribology Laboratory Transportation Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source...

  3. Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Blood samples are shipped at room temperature to the laboratory. White blood cells, lymphocytes, are cultured under sterile conditions in an...

  4. Measurement of the Three-jet Mass Cross Section in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hubacek, Zdenek

    2010-06-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of the inclusive three-jet cross section in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV measured at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois, USA. The cross section as a function of three-jet invariant mass is provided in three regions of the third jet transverse momentum and three regions of jet rapidities. It utilizes a data sample collected in the so called Run IIa data taking period (2002-2006) corresponding to the integrated luminosity of about 0.7 fb{sup -1}. The results are used to test the next-to-leading order predictions of Quantum chromodynamics computed using the latest parton distribution functions.

  5. Online b-jets tagging at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Casarsa, M.; Ristori, L.; Amerio, S.; Lucchesi, D.; Pagan Griso, S.; Torre, S.T.; Cortiana, G.; /Padua U., Astron. Dept.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a method to identify b-quark jets at trigger level which exploits recently increased CDF trigger system capabilities. b-quark jets identification is of central interest for the CDF high-P{sub T} physics program, and the possibility to select online b-jets enriched samples can extend the physics reaches especially for light Higgs boson searches where the H {yields} b{bar b} decay mode is dominant. Exploiting new trigger primitives provided by two recent trigger upgrades, the Level2 XFT stereo tracking and the improved Level2 cluster-finder, in conjunction with the existing Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT), we design an online trigger algorithm aimed at selecting good purity b-jets samples useful for many physics measurements, the most important being inclusive H {yields} b{bar b} searches. We discuss the performances of the proposed b-tagging algorithm which must guarantee reasonable trigger rates at luminosity greater than 2 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and provide high efficiency on H {yields} b{bar b} events.

  6. HOT ELECTROMAGNETIC OUTFLOWS. II. JET BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2013-08-20

    We consider the interaction between radiation, matter, and a magnetic field in a compact, relativistic jet. The entrained matter accelerates outward as the jet breaks out of a star or other confining medium. In some circumstances, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the magnetization of the jet is greatly reduced by an advected radiation field while the jet is optically thick to scattering. Where magnetic flux surfaces diverge rapidly, a strong outward Lorentz force develops and radiation and matter begin to decouple. The increase in magnetization is coupled to a rapid growth in Lorentz factor. We take two approaches to this problem. The first examines the flow outside the fast magnetosonic critical surface, and calculates the flow speed and the angular distribution of the radiation field over a range of scattering depths. The second considers the flow structure on both sides of the critical surface in the optically thin regime, using a relaxation method. In both approaches, we find how the terminal Lorentz factor and radial profile of the outflow depend on the radiation intensity and optical depth at breakout. The effect of bulk Compton scattering on the radiation spectrum is calculated by a Monte Carlo method, while neglecting the effects of internal dissipation. The peak of the scattered spectrum sits near the seed peak if radiation pressure dominates the acceleration, but is pushed to a higher frequency if the Lorentz force dominates. The unscattered seed radiation can form a distinct, low-frequency component of the spectrum, especially if the magnetic Poynting flux dominates.

  7. COUNTER-ROTATION IN RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cayatte, V.; Sauty, C.; Vlahakis, N.; Tsinganos, K.; Matsakos, T.; Lima, J. J. G.

    2014-06-10

    Young stellar object observations suggest that some jets rotate in the opposite direction with respect to their disk. In a recent study, Sauty et al. showed that this does not contradict the magnetocentrifugal mechanism that is believed to launch such outflows. Motion signatures that are transverse to the jet axis, in two opposite directions, have recently been measured in M87. One possible interpretation of this motion is that of counter-rotating knots. Here, we extend our previous analytical derivation of counter-rotation to relativistic jets, demonstrating that counter-rotation can indeed take place under rather general conditions. We show that both the magnetic field and a non-negligible enthalpy are necessary at the origin of counter-rotating outflows, and that the effect is associated with a transfer of energy flux from the matter to the electromagnetic field. This can be realized in three cases: if a decreasing enthalpy causes an increase of the Poynting flux, if the flow decelerates, or if strong gradients of the magnetic field are present. An illustration of the involved mechanism is given by an example of a relativistic magnetohydrodynamic jet simulation.

  8. Neutrino emission in the jet propagation process

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, D.; Dai, Z. G.

    2014-07-20

    Relativistic jets are universal in long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) models. Before breaking out, they must propagate in the progenitor envelope along with a forward shock and a reverse shock forming at the jet head. Both electrons and protons will be accelerated by the shocks. High-energy neutrinos could be produced by these protons interacting with stellar materials and electron-radiating photons. The jet will probably be collimated, which may have a strong effect on the final neutrino flux. Under the assumption of a power-law stellar-envelope density profile ??r {sup ?} with index ?, we calculate the neutrino emission flux by these shocks for low-luminosity GRBs (LL-GRBs) and ultra-long GRBs (UL-GRBs) in different collimation regimes, using the jet propagation framework developed by Bromberg et al. We find that LL-GRBs and UL-GRBs are capable of producing detectable high-energy neutrinos up to ?PeV, from which the final neutrino spectrum can be obtained. Further, we conclude that a larger ? corresponds to greater neutrino flux at the high-energy end (?PeV) and to higher maximum neutrino energy as well. However, such differences are so small that it is not promising for us to be able to distinguish these in observations, given the energy resolution we have now.

  9. Status of Laboratory Goals | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Status of Laboratory Goals Status of Calendar Year 2016 objectives and targets. Item 1 Recommendation: The EMSSC recommends an Open House be held in the Ames Laboratory Storeroom and Warehouse by April 1, 2016. The Open House will provide Ames Laboratory employees the opportunity to discover what supplies are readily available through the storeroom and showcase the Equipment Pool website. This recommendation will increase awareness of the sustainable purchasing requirements by showcasing these

  10. The Sample Preparation Laboratories | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Patty 1 Sam Webb 2 John Bargar 3 Arizona 4 Chemicals 5 Team Work 6 Bottles 7 Glass 8 Plan Ahead! See the tabs above for Laboratory Access and forms you'll need to complete. Equipment and Chemicals tabs detail resources already available on site. Avoid delays! Hazardous materials use may require a written Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) before you work. Check the Chemicals tab for more information. The Sample Preparation Laboratories The Sample Preparation Laboratories provide wet lab

  11. Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment is available to serve disciplines from biology to material science. All ... To view equipment inventory by laboratory, refer to the following pages: Biology Chemistry ...

  12. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Zeiss Axiovert 200 Optical Microscope Spark Cutter Fully Equipped Metallographic Laboratory Electropolisher Dimpler

  13. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  14. Thermal-hydraulics Analysis of a Radioisotope-powered Mars Hopper Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. O'Brien; Andrew C. Klein; William T. Taitano; Justice Gibson; Brian Myers; Steven D. Howe

    2011-02-01

    Thermal-hydraulics analyses results produced using a combined suite of computational design and analysis codes are presented for the preliminary design of a concept Radioisotope Thermal Rocket (RTR) propulsion system. Modeling of the transient heating and steady state temperatures of the system is presented. Simulation results for propellant blow down during impulsive operation are also presented. The results from this study validate the feasibility of a practical thermally capacitive RTR propulsion system.

  15. Magnetic Propulsion of Intense Lithium Streams in a Tokamak Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid E. Zakharov

    2002-03-13

    The paper gives the theory of magnetic propulsion of liquid lithium streams and their stability in tokamaks. In the approximation of a thin flowing layer the MHD equations are reduced to one integro-differential equation which takes into account the propulsion effect, viscosity and the drag force due to magnetic pumping and other interactions with the magnetic field. A criterion is obtained for the stabilization of the ''sausage'' instability of the streams by centrifugal force.

  16. Polarization and Structure of Relativistic Parsec-Scale AGN Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, M

    2004-06-10

    We consider the polarization properties of optically thin synchrotron radiation emitted by relativistically moving electron-positron jets carrying large-scale helical magnetic fields. In our model, the jet is cylindrical, and the emitting plasma moves parallel to the jet axis with a characteristic Lorentz factor {Lambda}. We draw attention to the strong influence that the bulk relativistic motion of the emitting relativistic particles has on the observed polarization. Our computations predict and explain the following behavior. (1) For jets unresolved in the direction perpendicular to their direction of propagation, the position angle of the electric vector of the linear polarization has a bimodal distribution, being oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the jet. (2) If an ultra-relativistic jet with {Lambda} >> 1 whose axis makes a small angle to the line of sight, {theta} {approx} 1/{Lambda}, experiences a relatively small change in the direction of propagation, velocity or pitch angle of the magnetic fields, the polarization is likely to remain parallel or perpendicular; on the other hand, in some cases, the degree of polarization can exhibit large variations and the polarization position angle can experience abrupt 90{sup o} changes. This change is more likely to occur in jets with flatter spectra. (3) In order for the jet polarization to be oriented along the jet axis, the intrinsic toroidal magnetic field (in the frame of the jet) should be of the order of or stronger than the intrinsic poloidal field; in this case, the highly relativistic motion of the jet implies that, in the observer's frame, the jet is strongly dominated by the toroidal magnetic field B{sub {phi}}/B{sub z} {ge} {Lambda}. (4) The emission-weighted average pitch angle of the intrinsic helical field in the jet must not be too small to produce polarization along the jet axis. In force-free jets with a smooth distribution of emissivities, the emission should be generated in a limited

  17. Accounting Resources | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounting Resources Ames Laboratory Human Resources Forms Ames Laboratory Travel Forms Ames Laboratory Forms (Select Department) ISU Intramural PO Request...

  18. 2008 Annual Merit Review Results Summary - 2. Applied Battery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... This reviewer added that, low temperature electrolytes do exist, as shown by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with the Mars rover batteries. One person was not convinced that -30C ...

  19. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory Award Number:0595-1612 | January 15, 2013 | Ganapathi Thin Film mirror is 40-50% cheaper and 60% lighter than SOA * Project leverages extensive space...

  20. SunShot CSP R&D 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena CA up to 2.3 million Project will design an optimized solar thermal collector using a light-weight structure capable of lowering costs, ...

  1. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    from Jet Propulsion Laboratory Project Leader: Dr. Gani Ganapathi gani.b.ganapathi@jpl.nasa.gov Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper,...

  2. Constraints on cosmology from the cosmic microwave background...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, ...

  3. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The team, led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is working develop a solar collector structure using lightweight materials that cost less and are easier to install. The ease of ...

  4. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their advanced collectors. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  5. ARM - Laboratory Partners

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    OrganizationLaboratory Partners Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of managing and operating the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM Group Links Science Board SISC Charter Data Archive Data Management Facility Data Quality Program Engineering Support External Data Center Laboratory Partners Nine DOE national laboratories share the responsibility of managing and operating the ARM Climate Research Facility. This unique partnership supports the DOE mission to

  6. Diesel fueled ship propulsion fuel cell demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Kumm, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper describes the work underway to adapt a former US Navy diesel electric drive ship as a 2.4 Megawatt fuel cell powered, US Coast Guard operated, demonstrator. The Project will design the new configuration, and then remove the four 600 kW diesel electric generators and auxiliaries. It will design, build and install fourteen or more nominal 180 kW diesel fueled molten carbonate internal reforming direct fuel cells (DFCs). The USCG cutter VINDICATOR has been chosen. The adaptation will be carried out at the USCG shipyard at Curtis Bay, MD. A multi-agency (state and federal) cooperative project is now underway. The USCG prime contractor, AEL, is performing the work under a Phase III Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award. This follows their successful completion of Phases I and II under contract to the US Naval Sea Systems (NAVSEA) from 1989 through 1993 which successfully demonstrated the feasibility of diesel fueled DFCs. The demonstrated marine propulsion of a USCG cutter will lead to commercial, naval ship and submarine applications as well as on-land applications such as diesel fueled locomotives.

  7. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-06-15

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  8. Evaluation of pulse power devices in electric vehicle propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, A.F. ); Dowgiallo, E.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The application of pulse power devices in electric vehicle propulsion systems to load level the main energy storage battery has been studied. Both high energy density capacitors (ultracapacitors) and high power density, bipolar batteries are considered. Computer simulations of vehicle operation with hybrid (two power source) powertrains indicated the energy storage capacities of the pulse power devices required to load level the main battery are 300 to 500 Wh for the capacitors and 5 to 10 Ah for the bipolar batteries can be reduced from 79 W/kg to about 40 W/kg depending on the vehicle gradeability (speed, percent grade, and length of grade) desired. Evaluation of the status of the technology for the pulse power devices indicated that for both devices, improvements in technology are needed before the devices can be used in EV applications. In the case of the ultracapacitor, the energy density of present devices are 1 to 2 Wh/kg. A minimum energy density of about 5 Wh/kg is needed for electric vehicle applications. Progress in increasing the energy density of ultracapacitors has been rapid in recent years and the prospects for meeting the 5 Wh/kg requirement for EVs appear to be good. For bipolar batteries, a minimum power density of 500 W/kg is needed and the internal resistance must be reduced by about a factor of ten from that found in present designs.

  9. Study of t$\\bar{t}$ production in tau jets channel at CDFII using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, Silvia

    2005-12-01

    CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) is a particle detector located at Fermi National Laboratories, near Chicago. it allows to study decay products of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. During its first period of data taking (RunI), CDF observed for the first time the top quark (1995). The current period of data taking (RunII) is devoted to precise measurements of top properties and to search for new physics. This thesis work is about the top decay channel named τ + jets. A t$\\bar{t}$ pair decays in two W bosons and two b quarks. In a τ + jets event, one out of the two W decays into two jets of hadrons, while the other produces a τ lepton and a neutrino; the τ decays semileptonically in one or more charged and neutral pions while b quarks hadronize producing two jets of particles. Thus the final state of a τ + jets event has this specific signature: five jets, one τ-like, i.e. narrow and with low track multiplicity, two from b quarks, two from a W boson and a large amount of missing energy from two τ neutrinos. They search for this signal in 311 pb-1 of data collected with TOP{_}MULTIJET trigger. They use neural networks to separate signal from background and on the selected sample they perform a t$\\bar{t}$ production cross section measurement. The thesis is structured as follows: in Chapter 1 they outline the physics of top and τ, concentrating on their discovery, production mechanisms and current physics results involving them. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the experimental setup: the accelerator complex first and CDF detector then. The trigger system is described in Chapter 3, while Chapter 4 shows how particles are reconstructed exploiting information from different CDF subdetectors. With Chapter 5 they begin to present their analysis: we use a feed forward neural network based on a minimization algorithm developed in Trento University, called Reactive Taboo Search (RTS), especially designed to rapidly

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Ion Beam Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ion Beam Lab Technology Deployment Centers Ion Beam Lab The Accelerators Ion Beam Analysis Ion Beam Modification Radiation Effects Microscopy In Situ Ion Irradiation Microscopy Video Gallery Publications Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Explosive Components Facility Materials Science and Engineering Center Pulsed Power and Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

  12. Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars September 4, 2012 - 3:29pm Addthis Curiosity, left, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in late November 2011. Shown here is the flight hardware that was being assembled prior to shipment to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for the launch. | Photo Credit Dr. Robert C. Nelson Curiosity, left, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  13. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars September 4, 2012 - 3:29pm Addthis Curiosity, left, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in late November 2011. Shown here is the flight hardware that was being assembled prior to shipment to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for the launch. | Photo Credit Dr. Robert C. Nelson Curiosity, left, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  14. Environmental Management System

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars Environmental Management Scientist Sets His Sights on Mars September 4, 2012 - 3:29pm Addthis Curiosity, left, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, in late November 2011. Shown here is the flight hardware that was being assembled prior to shipment to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for the launch. | Photo Credit Dr. Robert C. Nelson Curiosity, left, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  15. Implications of Upwells as Hydrodynamic Jets in a Pulse Jet Mixed System

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, Leonard F.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2015-08-01

    This report evaluates the physics of the upwell flow in pulse jet mixed systems in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Although the initial downward flow and radial flow from pulse jet mixers (PJMs) has been analyzed in some detail, the upwells have received considerably less attention despite having significant implications for vessel mixing. Do the upwells behave like jets? How do the upwells scale? When will the central upwell breakthrough? What proportion of the vessel is blended by the upwells themselves? Indeed, how the physics of the central upwell is affected by multiple PJMs (e.g., six in the proposed mixing vessels), non-Newtonian rheology, and significant multicomponent solids loadings remain unexplored. The central upwell must satisfy several criteria to be considered a free jet. First, it must travel for several diameters in a nearly constant direction. Second, its velocity must decay with the inverse of elevation. Third, it should have an approximately Gaussian profile. Fourth, the influence of surface or body forces must be negligible. A combination of historical data in a 12.75 ft test vessel, newly analyzed data from the 8 ft test vessel, and conservation of momentum arguments derived specifically for PJM operating conditions demonstrate that the central upwell satisfies these criteria where vigorous breakthrough is achieved. An essential feature of scaling from one vessel to the next is the requirement that the underlying physics does not change adversely. One may have confidence in scaling if (1) correlations and formulas capture the relevant physics; (2) the underlying physics does not change from the conditions under which it was developed to the conditions of interest; (3) all factors relevant to scaling have been incorporated, including flow, material, and geometric considerations; and (4) the uncertainty in the relationships is sufficiently narrow to meet required specifications. Although the central upwell

  16. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  17. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member.

  18. Cryogenic target formation using cold gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-02-26

    A method and apparatus using cold gas jets for producing a substantially uniform layer of cryogenic materials on the inner surface of hollow spherical members having one or more layers, such as inertially imploded targets are disclosed. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on an inner surface of the spherical member. Basically the method involves directing cold gas jets onto a spherical member having one or more layers or shells and containing the cryogenic material, such as a deuterium-tritium (DT) mixture, to freeze the contained material, momentarily heating the spherical member so as to vaporize the contained material, and quickly refreezing the thus vaporized material forming a uniform layer of cryogenic material on an inner surface of the spherical member. 4 figs.

  19. Merging of high speed argon plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Case, A.; Messer, S.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2013-01-15

    Formation of an imploding plasma liner for the plasma liner experiment (PLX) requires individual plasma jets to merge into a quasi-spherical shell of plasma converging on the origin. Understanding dynamics of the merging process requires knowledge of the plasma phenomena involved. We present results from the study of the merging of three plasma jets in three dimensional geometry. The experiments were performed using HyperV Technologies Corp. 1 cm Minirailguns with a preionized argon plasma armature. The vacuum chamber partially reproduces the port geometry of the PLX chamber. Diagnostics include fast imaging, spectroscopy, interferometry, fast pressure probes, B-dot probes, and high speed spatially resolved photodiodes, permitting measurements of plasma density, temperature, velocity, stagnation pressure, magnetic field, and density gradients. These experimental results are compared with simulation results from the LSP 3D hybrid PIC code.

  20. NEW VARIABLE JET MODELS FOR HH 34

    SciTech Connect

    Raga, A. C.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Esquivel, A.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    2012-01-15

    We consider newly derived proper motions of the HH 34 jet to reconstruct the evolution of this outflow. We first extrapolate ballistic trajectories for the knots (starting from their present-day positions and velocities) and find that at {approx}1000 yr in the future most of them will merge to form a larger-mass structure. This mass structure will be formed close to the present-day position of the HH 34S bow shock. We then carry out a fit to the ejection velocity versus time reconstructed from the observed proper motions (assuming that the past motion of the knots was ballistic) and use this fit to compute axisymmetric jet simulations. We find that the intensity maps predicted from these simulations do indeed match reasonably well the [S II] structure of HH 34 observed in Hubble Space Telescope images.

  1. STEADY TWIN-JETS ORIENTATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR FORMATION MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Soker, Noam; Mcley, Liron E-mail: lironmc@tx.technion.ac.il

    2013-08-01

    We compare the structures of the jets of the pre-planetary nebulae (pre-PNe) CRL618 and the young stellar object (YSO) NGC 1333 IRAS 4A2 and propose that in both cases the jets are launched near periastron passages of a highly eccentric binary system. The pre-PN CRL618 has two ''twin-jets'' on each side, where by ''twin-jets'' we refer to a structure where one side is composed of two very close and narrow jets that were launched at the same time. We analyze the position-velocity diagram of NGC 1333 IRAS 4A2, and find that it also has the twin-jet structure. In both systems, the orientation of the two twin-jets does not change with time. By comparing these two seemingly different objects, we speculate that the constant relative direction of the two twin-jets is fixed by the direction of a highly eccentric orbit of a binary star. For example, a double-arm spiral structure in the accretion disk induced by the companion might lead to the launching of the twin-jets. We predict the presence of a low-mass stellar companion in CRL618 that accretes mass and launches the jets, and a substellar (a planet of a brown dwarf) companion to the YSO NGC 1333 IRAS 4A2 that perturbed the accretion disk. In both cases the orbit has a high eccentricity.

  2. Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2014-04-15

    The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

  3. Bioenergy Impacts … Renewable Jet Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Navy are funding the construction of three biorefineries that will be able to produce renewable jet fuel for the commercial aviation industry and the military. FedEx, Southwest Airlines, United Airlines, and Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific Airways signed agreements to purchase biofuel made from sorted landfill waste and woody biomass. Biofuel is becoming an option for commercial and military

  4. Cellulosic Biomass Sugars to Advantaged Jet Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2 May, 2013 Technology Area Review: Biochemical Conversion Randy Cortright PhD Virent, Inc WBS: 2.3.1.8 Goal Statement Project Goal - Integrate Virent's BioForming® Process with NREL's biomass deconstruction technology to efficiently produce cost effective "drop-in" fuels from corn stover with particular focus in maximizing jet fuel yields.  Improve pretreatment strategies for deconstruction of cellulose and hemicellulose while significantly reducing or eliminating costly enzymes

  5. Alternative Jet Fuels Research & Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Presented to: DOE Bioenergy 2016, Breakout 1-D Launching Renewable Aviation Fuels By: Nate Brown Office of Environment & Energy Federal Aviation Administration Date: July 13, 2016 Alternative Jet Fuels Research & Development Federal Aviation Administration 2 FAA E&E Policy Statement Alternative Fuels key contributor to FAA Environmental and Energy Goals: * Carbon neutral growth by 2020 compared to 2005 * Absolute reduction of significant air quality impacts, notwithstanding aviation

  6. An approximation technique for jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Najafi, Mahmoud; Fincher, Donald; Rahni, Taeibi; Javadi, KH.; Massah, H.

    2015-03-10

    The analytical approximate solution of a non-linear jet impingement flow model will be demonstrated. We will show that this is an improvement over the series approximation obtained via the Adomian decomposition method, which is itself, a powerful method for analysing non-linear differential equations. The results of these approximations will be compared to the Runge-Kutta approximation in order to demonstrate their validity.

  7. Photo of the Week: Biomass Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory |

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Scientists and engineers at the Energy Department and its national laboratories are finding new, more efficient ways to convert biomass into biofuels that can take the place of conventional fuels like gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Environmental Science Division, graduate students and researchers use transplanted trees in a number of studies, including those involving biomass conversion to biofuels. In this photo, graduate student Alina

  8. Disruption mitigation using high pressure gas jets

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis G. Whyte

    2007-10-11

    The goal of this research is to establish credible disruption mitigation scenarios based on the technique of massive gas injection. Disruption mitigation seeks to minimize or eliminate damage to internal components that can occur due to the rapid dissipation of thermal and magnetic energy during a tokamak disruption. In particular, the focus of present research is extrapolating mitigation techniques to burning plasma experiments such as ITER, where disruption-caused damage poses a serious threat to the lifetime of internal vessel components. A majority of effort has focused on national and international collaborative research with large tokamaks: DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, JET, and ASDEX Upgrade. The research was oriented towards empirical trials of gas-jet mitigation on several tokamaks, with the goal of developing and applying cohesive models to the data across devices. Disruption mitigation using gas jet injection has proven to be a viable candidate for avoiding or minimizing damage to internal components in burning plasma experiments like ITER. The physics understanding is progress towards a technological design for the required gas injection system in ITER.

  9. Ejector device for direct injection fuel jet

    DOEpatents

    Upatnieks, Ansis

    2006-05-30

    Disclosed is a device for increasing entrainment and mixing in an air/fuel zone of a direct fuel injection system. The device comprises an ejector nozzle in the form of an inverted funnel whose central axis is aligned along the central axis of a fuel injector jet and whose narrow end is placed just above the jet outlet. It is found that effective ejector performance is achieved when the ejector geometry is adjusted such that it comprises a funnel whose interior surface diverges about 7.degree. to about 9.degree. away from the funnel central axis, wherein the funnel inlet diameter is about 2 to about 3 times the diameter of the injected fuel plume as the fuel plume reaches the ejector inlet, and wherein the funnel length equal to about 1 to about 4 times the ejector inlet diameter. Moreover, the ejector is most effectively disposed at a separation distance away from the fuel jet equal to about 1 to about 2 time the ejector inlet diameter.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451 Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 GPS: 100 Stellarator Road Princeton, NJ 08540 www.pppl.gov 2015 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A...

  11. DOE Laboratory Partnerships

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE national laboratories were created to support the various missions of the Department, including energy, national security, science and related environmental activities. The laboratories conduct innovative research and development in literally hundreds of technology areas, some available nowhere else.

  12. Ames Laboratory Emergency Plan | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Emergency Plan Version Number: 14.0 Document Number: Plan 46300.001 Effective Date: 04/2016 File (public): PDF icon Plan 46300.001 Rev14 Emergency Plan

  13. Materials Design Laboratory Concepts | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Laboratory Concepts Northwest view 1 of 3 Northwest view Northwest view 1 of 3 Northwest view Northeast view 2 of 3 Northeast view Southeast view 3 of 3 Southeast view

  14. Ames Laboratory Hot Canyon | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Hot Canyon An error occurred. Try watching this video on www.youtube.com, or enable JavaScript if it is disabled in your browser. This historical film footage,...

  15. Alamos National Laboratory's 2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    $2 million pledged during Los Alamos National Laboratory's 2014 employee giving campaign December 17, 2013 "I Give Because..." theme focuses on unique role Lab plays in local communities LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 17, 2013-Nearly $2 million has been pledged by Los Alamos National Laboratory employees to United Way and other eligible nonprofit programs during the Laboratory's 2014 Employee Giving Campaign. Los Alamos National Security, LLC, which manages and operates the Laboratory for the

  16. Metamaterials | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy » Signature Facilities » Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago Photo of the Met Lab and the Stagg Field Bleachers Photo of the Met Lab and the Stagg Field Bleachers One of the most important branches of the Manhattan Project was the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) in Chicago. Using the name "Metallurgical Laboratory" as cover at the University of Chicago, scientists from the east and west coasts were

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory i Table of Contents Letter from the Division Director 1 Innovation Prize Nominations 2 Innovation Prize Winner 5 About the Feynman Center for Innovation 6 Innovation Assets 7 Strategic Sponsored Work 8 National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 9 Licensing 10 SOLVE 11 Economic Development 12 STAR Cryoelectronics 13 Partnership 14 Verdesian Life Sciences 15 R&D 100 Awards 16 Federal Laboratory Consortium Awards 17 Los Alamos National Laboratory 1 As scientists and

  18. islowing | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    islowing Ames Laboratory Profile Igor Slowing Assoc Scientist Chemical & Biological Sciences 2756 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-1959 Email Address: islowing@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Associate Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Homogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in 3D Controlled Environment Nanorefinery Education: Ph.D., Iowa State University, 2003-2008 Licenciate in Chemistry, San Carlos University, Guatemala, 1988-1995 Professional Appointments: Staff Scientist, Ames Laboratory,

  19. levin | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    levin Ames Laboratory Profile Evgenii Levin Scientist I Division of Materials Science & Engineering 107 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-6093 Email Address: levin@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Novel Materials Preparation & Processing Methodologies Professional Appointments: Scientist I & Adj. Associate Professor, Ames Laboratory U.S. DOE, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, 2010- present Associate Scientist & Lecturer, Ames Laboratory

  20. Management | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Sciences & Engineering Focus: Understanding & Control of Interfacial Processes Web Site Michael Thackeray Michael Thackeray (Deputy Director) Argonne National Laboratory...

  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Tribal Energy Program Review Roger Taylor Manger State, Local & Tribal Integrated Application Group National Renewable Energy Laboratory November 5-8, 2007 Major DOE National Laboratories Brookhaven Brookhaven Pacific Northwest Pacific Northwest Lawrence Berkeley Lawrence Berkeley Lawrence Livermore Lawrence Livermore h h h h h INEL INEL National Renewable National Renewable Energy Laboratory Energy Laboratory Los Alamos Los Alamos Sandia Sandia Argonne Argonne Oak Ridge Oak Ridge Defense

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Laboratories' Foundation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Foundation Capabilties Sandia's ability to deliver on its national security missions is built on a strong foundation, which originated in the early days of the Laboratories' nuclear weapons program. As we think about it today, the foundation with all its component parts drives Sandia to achieve its mission strategies. We invest in our vital resources - people, research, and facilities and tools - to build a unique set of capabilities that enable mission delivery. Capabilities The

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Laboratory We have field and laboratory capabilities to measure electrostatic environment generation, storage, and charge transfer effects. Non-contact electrostatic field surveillance techniques are available to monitor charge generation of conductors or dielectrics, and induction or physical contact charging of wiring or pin voltage for electrical system components. The Sandia severe personnel electrostatic discharge simulator, with a maximum charge voltage of 25

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Laboratories' Strategic Framework

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategic Framework Vision, Mission, and Values Strategic Framework Mission Areas Laboratories Foundation Strategic Objectives and Crosscuts About Strategic Framework strategic framework Sandia continues to be engaged in the significant demands of the nation's nuclear weapons modernization program while conducting a whole range of activities in broader national security. The Laboratories' strategic framework drives strategic decisions about the totality of our work and has positioned our

  5. INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a jet drilling an H I cloud: Shock induced formation of molecular clouds and jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Asahina, Yuta; Ogawa, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Kawashima, Tomohisa; Furukawa, Naoko; Enokiya, Rei; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuo

    2014-07-01

    The formation mechanism of the jet-aligned CO clouds found by NANTEN CO observations is studied by magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations taking into account the cooling of the interstellar medium. Motivated by the association of the CO clouds with the enhancement of H I gas density, we carried out MHD simulations of the propagation of a supersonic jet injected into the dense H I gas. We found that the H I gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by growth of the cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, a cold dense sheath is formed around the interface between the jet and the H I gas. The radial speed of the cold, dense gas in the sheath is a few km s{sup 1} almost independent of the jet speed. Molecular clouds can be formed in this region. Since the dense sheath wrapping the jet reflects waves generated in the cocoon, the jet is strongly perturbed by the vortices of the warm gas in the cocoon, which breaks up the jet and forms a secondary shock in the H I-cavity drilled by the jet. The particle acceleration at the shock can be the origin of radio and X-ray filaments observed near the eastern edge of the W50 nebula surrounding the galactic jet source SS433.

  7. Application of water jet assisted drag bit and pick cutter for the cutting of coal measure rocks. Final technical report. [Tests of combination in different rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ropchan, D.; Wang, F.D.; Wolgamott, J.

    1980-04-01

    A laboratory investigation was made of the effects of high pressure water jets on the cutting forces of drag bit cutters in sedimentary rocks. A hard and soft sandstone, shale and limestone were tested with commercially obtainable conical and plow type drag bits on the EMI linear cutting machine. About 1200 cuts were made at different bit penetration, jet orientation, and water pressure to determine the reduction of cutting forces on the bit from the use of the water jet. Both independent and interactive cutting was used. The greatest reduction in cutting forces were with both of the sandstones; the drag forces were reduced about 30 percent and the normal forces about 60 percent at 5000 psi water pressure with the nozzle behind the bit. The method was less effective in the shale, except at 10,000 psi water pressure the reduction in drag force was about 55 percent. Of the rocks tested, the limestone was least affected by the water jet. The cutting forces for the plow bit showed continuous change with wear so a machined conical bit was used for most of the testing. Tests with the plow bit did show a large reduction in cutting forces by using the water jet with worn bits. An economic analysis of equipping a drag bit tunnel boring machine indicated that the water jet system could reduce costs per foot in sandstone by up to 40 percent.

  8. DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2009 Merit Review Report - Propulsion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... 3.50 3.00 3.00 3.25 Thermoelectric Mechanical Reliability A.A. Wereszczak (Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)) 7-23 3.20 3.20 3.20 3.20 3.20 Thermoelectric Materials by Design, ...

  9. Manned mars mission enhancements using Pratt and Whitney escort combined propulsion and power system

    SciTech Connect

    Joyner, Russell; Feller, Gerald J.

    1999-01-22

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the cost implications to manned Mars missions when a nuclear thermal combined propulsion and power unit is used for main propulsion and mission power. The paper uses a series of mission opportunities during the NASA DRM focus period and looks at how a NTR (Nuclear Thermal Rocket) can be used to increase the Mars mission payload delivery capability and mission flexibility across the entire mission spectrum. In propulsive mode, a nuclear reactor is used to heat hot hydrogen, which is expanded through a converging/diverging nozzle to generate thrust. Heat pickup in the nozzle and the radial beryllium reflectors is used to drive the turbomachinery in the ESCORT expander cycle. In electrical mode, the reactor is used to heat a mixture of helium and xenon to drive a closed-loop Brayton cycle in order to generate electrical energy. A Mars transportation system integrated performance methodology was developed to assess the sensitivity to weight, thrust and impulse to the Mars conjunction class mission requirements. Propellant tanks, propulsion system mass, shielding, and Brayton cycle power conversion unit requirements were included in this evaluation. This paper examines how the design characteristics of the ESCORT derivative propulsion and power system affect the mission payload capability and the earth launch vehicle design requirements. The same reactor design is also used for Mars surface power reactor, delivered as payload by the ESCORT derivative powered Mars transfer stage. Trade curves of mission mass and payload are presented.

  10. Cost comparison modeling between current solder sphere attachment technology and solder jetting technology

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.N.

    1996-10-01

    By predicting the total life-cycle cost of owning and operating production equipment, it becomes possible for processors to make accurate and intelligent decisions regarding major capitol equipment investments as well as determining the most cost effective manufacturing processes and environments. Cost of Ownership (COO) is a decision making technique based on inputting the total costs of acquiring, operating and maintaining production equipment. All quantitative economic and production data can be modeled and processed using COO software programs such as the Cost of Ownership Luminator program TWO COOL{trademark}. This report investigated the Cost of Ownership differences between the current state-of-the-art solder ball attachment process and a prototype solder jetting process developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The prototype jetting process is a novel and unique approach to address the anticipated high rate ball grid array (BGA) production requirements currently forecasted for the next decade. The jetting process, which is both economically and environmentally attractive eliminates the solder sphere fabrication step, the solder flux application step as well as the furnace reflow and post cleaning operations.

  11. The deterministic chaos and random noise in turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Hai-Feng Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2014-06-01

    A turbulent flow is usually treated as a superposition of coherent structure and incoherent turbulence. In this paper, the largest Lyapunov exponent and the random noise in the near field of round jet and plane jet are estimated with our previously proposed method of chaotic time series analysis [T. L. Yao, et al., Chaos 22, 033102 (2012)]. The results show that the largest Lyapunov exponents of the round jet and plane jet are in direct proportion to the reciprocal of the integral time scale of turbulence, which is in accordance with the results of the dimensional analysis, and the proportionality coefficients are equal. In addition, the random noise of the round jet and plane jet has the same linear relation with the Kolmogorov velocity scale of turbulence. As a result, the random noise may well be from the incoherent disturbance in turbulence, and the coherent structure in turbulence may well follow the rule of chaotic motion.

  12. Analysis of ``soft`` recovered shaped charge jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    A shaped charge with an 81 mm diameter, 42{degree} apex angle oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper conical liner was fired into a ``soft`` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 g, of which 184 g was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g., dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work the authors present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet they find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  13. A NUMERICAL MODEL OF STANDARD TO BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Archontis, V.; Hood, A. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report on three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations of the formation of jets produced during the emergence and eruption of solar magnetic fields. The interaction between an emerging and an ambient magnetic field in the solar atmosphere leads to (external) reconnection and the formation of ''standard'' jets with an inverse Y-shaped configuration. Eventually, low-atmosphere (internal) reconnection of sheared fieldlines in the emerging flux region produces an erupting magnetic flux rope and a reconnection jet underneath it. The erupting plasma blows out the ambient field and, moreover, it unwinds as it is ejected into the outer solar atmosphere. The fast emission of the cool material that erupts together with the hot outflows due to external/internal reconnection form a wider ''blowout'' jet. We show the transition from ''standard'' to ''blowout'' jets and report on their 3D structure. The physical plasma properties of the jets are consistent with observational studies.

  14. Towards an understanding of the correlations in jet substructure

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Adams, D.; Arce, A.; Asquith, L.; Backovic, M.; Barillari, T.; Berta, P.; Bertolini, D.; Buckley, A.; Butterworth, J.; Camacho Toro, R.  C.; et al

    2015-09-09

    Over the past decade, a large number of jet substructure observables have been proposed in the literature, and explored at the LHC experiments. Such observables attempt to utilize the internal structure of jets in order to distinguish those initiated by quarks, gluons, or by boosted heavy objects, such as top quarks and W bosons. This report, originating from and motivated by the BOOST2013 workshop, presents original particle-level studies that aim to improve our understanding of the relationships between jet substructure observables, their complementarity, and their dependence on the underlying jet properties, particularly the jet radius and jet transverse momentum. Thismore » is explored in the context of quark/gluon discrimination, boosted W boson tagging and boosted top quark tagging.« less

  15. SIMULATING PROTOSTELLAR JETS SIMULTANEOUSLY AT LAUNCHING AND OBSERVATIONAL SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Jon P.; Clarke, David A. [Institute for Computational Astrophysics, Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2011-02-10

    We present the first 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of protostellar jets that include both the region in which the jet is launched magnetocentrifugally at scale lengths <0.1 AU and where the propagating jet is observed at scale lengths >10{sup 3} AU. These simulations, performed with the new adaptive mesh refinement MHD code AZEuS, reveal interesting relationships between conditions at the disk surface, such as the magnetic field strength, and direct observables such as proper motion, jet rotation, jet radius, and mass flux. By comparing these quantities with observed values, we present direct numerical evidence that the magnetocentrifugal launching mechanism is capable, by itself, of launching realistic protostellar jets.

  16. Reconstructing top quark-antiquark events with one lost jet

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Demina, Regina; Harel, Amnon; Orbaker, Douglas

    2015-04-02

    We present a technique for reconstructing the kinematics of pair-produced top quarks that decay to a charged lepton, a neutrino and four final state quarks in the subset of events where only three jets are reconstructed. We present a figure of merit that allows for a fair comparison of reconstruction algorithms without requiring their calibration. The new reconstruction of events with only three jets is fully competitive with the full reconstruction typically used for four-jet events.

  17. MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2012-09-10

    We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

  18. Reconstructing $t\\bar{t}$ events with one lost jet

    SciTech Connect

    Demina, Regina; Harel, Amnon; Orbaker, Douglas

    2015-04-02

    We present a technique for reconstructing the kinematics of pair-produced top quarks that decay to a charged lepton, a neutrino and four final state quarks in the subset of events where only three jets are reconstructed. We present a figure of merit that allows for a fair comparison of reconstruction algorithms without requiring their calibration. As a result, the new reconstruction of events with only three jets is fully competitive with the full reconstruction typically used for four-jet events.

  19. Reconstructing $$t\\bar{t}$$ events with one lost jet

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Demina, Regina; Harel, Amnon; Orbaker, Douglas

    2015-04-02

    We present a technique for reconstructing the kinematics of pair-produced top quarks that decay to a charged lepton, a neutrino and four final state quarks in the subset of events where only three jets are reconstructed. We present a figure of merit that allows for a fair comparison of reconstruction algorithms without requiring their calibration. As a result, the new reconstruction of events with only three jets is fully competitive with the full reconstruction typically used for four-jet events.

  20. Ames Laboratory Conflict of Interest Policy | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Conflict of Interest Policy The Ames Laboratory has developed a conflict of interest and consulting policy for Laboratory employees. The Policy is more stringent ...

  1. LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE DUE TO INCLEAMENT WEATHER During the winter months, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times...

  2. Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Sales to End Users Sales for Resale...

  3. COLLIMATION AND CONFINEMENT OF MAGNETIC JETS BY EXTERNAL MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Amir; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We study the collimation of a highly magnetized jet by a surrounding cocoon that forms as a result of the interaction of the jet with the external medium. We show that in regions where the jet is well confined by the cocoon, current-driven instabilities should develop over timescales shorter than the expansion time of the jet's head. We speculate that these instabilities would give rise to complete magnetic field destruction, whereby the jet undergoes a transition from high to low sigma above the collimation zone. Using this assumption, we construct a self-consistent model for the evolution of the jet-cocoon system in an ambient medium of arbitrary density profile. We apply the model to jet breakout in long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and show that the jet is highly collimated inside the envelope of the progenitor star and is likely to remain confined well after breakout. We speculate that this strong confinement may provide a channel for magnetic field conversion in GRB outflows, whereby the hot, low-sigma jet section thereby produced is the source of the photospheric emission observed in many bursts.

  4. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  5. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION OF SELF-COLLIMATING RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian; Vaidya, Bhargav; Meliani, Zakaria E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2011-08-10

    The goal of this paper is to derive signatures of synchrotron radiation from state-of-the-art simulation models of collimating relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jets featuring a large-scale helical magnetic field. We perform axisymmetric special relativistic MHD simulations of the jet acceleration region using the PLUTO code. The computational domain extends from the slow-magnetosonic launching surface of the disk up to 6000{sup 2} Schwarzschild radii allowing jets to reach highly relativistic Lorentz factors. The Poynting-dominated disk wind develops into a jet with Lorentz factors of {Gamma} {approx_equal} 8 and is collimated to 1{sup 0}. In addition to the disk jet, we evolve a thermally driven spine jet emanating from a hypothetical black hole corona. Solving the linearly polarized synchrotron radiation transport within the jet, we derive very long baseline interferometry radio and (sub-) millimeter diagnostics such as core shift, polarization structure, intensity maps, spectra, and Faraday rotation measure (RM) directly from the Stokes parameters. We also investigate depolarization and the detectability of a {lambda}{sup 2}-law RM depending on beam resolution and observing frequency. We find non-monotonic intrinsic RM profiles that could be detected at a resolution of 100 Schwarzschild radii. In our collimating jet geometry, the strict bimodality in the polarization direction (as predicted by Pariev et al.) can be circumvented. Due to relativistic aberration, asymmetries in the polarization vectors across the jet can hint at the spin direction of the central engine.

  6. A comparison of nuclear thermal propulsion concepts: Results of a workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.S. )

    1991-01-05

    A Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Workshop, co-sponsored by NASA, DOE and DOD, was held in Cleveland, Ohio on July 10-12, 1990. The workshop was to provide a database of nuclear propulsion concepts and technologies to assist in planning a nuclear propulsion project, identify high priority activities to be initiated early, and to provide cost and schedule estimates for development of concepts to technology readiness level 6-full system verification in a simulated environment. Sixteen concepts were presented to Technology Review Panels (TRP), and discussed. Each concept was compared to a baseline manned Mars mission. A preliminary comparison of ratings made by the TRP's is presented herein for mission benefit, safety, technical risk, and development cost.

  7. The United States Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program - Over 151 Million Miles Safely Steamed on Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-03-01

    NNSA’s third mission pillar is supporting the U.S. Navy’s ability to protect and defend American interests across the globe. The Naval Reactors Program remains at the forefront of technological developments in naval nuclear propulsion and ensures a commanding edge in warfighting capabilities by advancing new technologies and improvements in naval reactor performance and reliability. In 2015, the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program pioneered advances in nuclear reactor and warship design – such as increasing reactor lifetimes, improving submarine operational effectiveness, and reducing propulsion plant crewing. The Naval Reactors Program continued its record of operational excellence by providing the technical expertise required to resolve emergent issues in the Nation’s nuclear-powered fleet, enabling the Fleet to safely steam more than two million miles. Naval Reactors safely maintains, operates, and oversees the reactors on the Navy’s 82 nuclear-powered warships, constituting more than 45 percent of the Navy’s major combatants.

  8. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; McCulloch, W.H.; Sawyer, J.C. Jr.; Bari, R.A.; Brown, N.W.; Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C.; Niederauer, G.F.; Remp, K.; Rice, J.W.; Sholtis, J.A.

    1992-09-01

    An Interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top- level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed.

  9. NSPWG-recommended safety requirements and guidelines for SEI nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.; Lee, J.H.; McCulloch, W.H. ); Sawyer, J.C. Jr. ); Bari, R.A. ); Brown, N.W. ); Cullingford, H.S.; Hardy, A.C. (National Aeronautics and Space Administ

    1992-01-01

    An Interagency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program to facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG developed a top- level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the nuclear propulsion safety program and the development of Safety Functional Requirements. In addition the NSPWG reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. Safety requirements were developed for reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, and safeguards. Guidelines were recommended for risk/reliability, operational safety, flight trajectory and mission abort, space debris and meteoroids, and ground test safety. In this paper the specific requirements and guidelines will be discussed.

  10. Realistic Probability Estimates For Destructive Overpressure Events In Heated Center Wing Tanks Of Commercial Jet Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N; Lambert, H

    2007-02-07

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) identified 17 accidents that may have resulted from fuel tank explosions on commercial aircraft from 1959 to 2001. Seven events involved JP 4 or JP 4/Jet A mixtures that are no longer used for commercial aircraft fuel. The remaining 10 events involved Jet A or Jet A1 fuels that are in current use by the commercial aircraft industry. Four fuel tank explosions occurred in center wing tanks (CWTs) where on-board appliances can potentially transfer heat to the tank. These tanks are designated as ''Heated Center Wing Tanks'' (HCWT). Since 1996, the FAA has significantly increased the rate at which it has mandated airworthiness directives (ADs) directed at elimination of ignition sources. This effort includes the adoption, in 2001, of Special Federal Aviation Regulation 88 of 14 CFR part 21 (SFAR 88 ''Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements''). This paper addresses SFAR 88 effectiveness in reducing HCWT ignition source probability. Our statistical analysis, relating the occurrence of both on-ground and in-flight HCWT explosions to the cumulative flight hours of commercial passenger aircraft containing HCWT's reveals that the best estimate of HCWT explosion rate is 1 explosion in 1.4 x 10{sup 8} flight hours. Based on an analysis of SFAR 88 by Sandia National Laboratories and our independent analysis, SFAR 88 reduces current risk of historical HCWT explosion by at least a factor of 10, thus meeting an FAA risk criteria of 1 accident in billion flight hours. This paper also surveys and analyzes parameters for Jet A fuel ignition in HCWT's. Because of the paucity of in-flight HCWT explosions, we conclude that the intersection of the parameters necessary and sufficient to result in an HCWT explosion with sufficient overpressure to rupture the HCWT is extremely rare.

  11. United States-Russian laboratory-to-laboratory cooperation on protection, control, and accounting for naval nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhoruchkin, V.; Yurasov, N.; Goncharenko, Y.; Mullen, M.; McConnell, D.

    1996-12-31

    In March 1995, the Russian Navy contacted safeguards experts at the Kurchatov Institute (KI) and proposed the initiation of work to enhance nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) at Russian Navy facilities. Because of KI`s successful experience in laboratory-to-laboratory MPC and A cooperation with US Department of Energy Laboratories, the possibility of US participation in the work with the Russian Navy was explored. Several months later, approval was received from the US Government and the Russian Navy to proceed with this work on a laboratory-to-laboratory basis through Kurchatov Institute. As a first step in the cooperation, a planning meeting occurred at KI in September, 1995. Representatives from the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Defense (DOD), the Russian Navy, and KI discussed several areas for near-term cooperative work, including a vulnerability assessment workshop and a planning study to identify and prioritize near-term MPC and A enhancements that might be implemented at Russian facilities which store or handle unirradiated highly enriched uranium fuel for naval propulsion applications. In subsequent meetings, these early proposals have been further refined and extended. This MPC and A cooperation will now include enhanced protection and control features for storage facilities and refueling service ships, computerized accounting systems for naval fuel, methods and equipment for rapid inventories, improved security of fresh fuel during truck transportation, and training. This paper describes the current status and future plans for MPC and A cooperation for naval nuclear materials.

  12. Jet mass and substructure of inclusive jets in root s=7 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aad G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamezyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the potential of jet substructure techniques to identify the hadronic decays of boosted heavy particles. These studies all rely upon the assumption that the internal substructure of jets generated by QCD radiation is well understood. In this article, this assumption is tested on an inclusive sample of jets recorded with the ATLAS detector in 2010, which corresponds to 35 pb{sup -1} of pp collisions delivered by the LHC at {radical}s = 7 TeV. In a subsample of events with single pp collisions, measurements corrected for detector efficiency and resolution are presented with full systematic uncertainties. Jet invariant mass, k{sub t} splitting scales and N-subjettiness variables are presented for anti-k{sub t} R = 1.0 jets and Cambridge-Aachen R = 1.2 jets. Jet invariant-mass spectra for Cambridge-Aachen R = 1.2 jets after a splitting and filtering procedure are also presented. Leading-order parton-shower Monte Carlo predictions for these variables are found to be broadly in agreement with data. The dependence of mean jet mass on additional pp interactions is also explored.

  13. Going green earns Laboratory gold

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Going green earns Laboratory gold Going green earns Laboratory gold The Laboratory's newest facility is its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

  14. Laboratory program helps small businesses

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab helps small businesses Laboratory program helps small businesses The free program, run jointly by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, leverages the laboratories'...

  15. Budget Office | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    that the Laboratory complies with all Department Of Energy cost controls Providing decision-making support to senior Laboratory management Providing support to the Laboratory...

  16. Application of a neptune propulsion concept to a manned mars excursion. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, C.J.

    1993-04-01

    NEPTUNE is a multimegawatt electric propulsion system. It uses a proven compact nuclear thermal rocket, NERVA, in a closed cycle with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator to power a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster. This thesis defines constraints on an externally sourced propulsion system intended to carry out a manned Martian excursion. It assesses NEPTUNE's ability to conform to these constraints. Because an unmodified NEPTUNE system is too large, the thesis develops modifications to the system which reduce its size. The result is a far less proven, but more useful derivative of the unmodified NEPTUNE system.

  17. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial applications as

  18. Searches in photon and jet states

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, A.; /UC, Davis

    2007-06-01

    The authors present recent results from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D0 experiments using data from proton-antiproton collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. New physics may appear in events with high transverse momentum objects, including photons and quark or gluon jets. The results described here are of signature-based searches and model-based searches probing supersymmetry, leptoquarks, 4th generation quarks, and large extra dimensions.

  19. Jet and electromagnetic tomography (JET) of extreme phases of matter in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-08-31

    The Ohio State University (OSU) group contributed to the deliverables of the JET Collaboration three major products: 1. The code package iEBE-VISHNU for modeling the dynamical evolution of the soft medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, from its creation all the way to final freeze-out using a hybrid approach that interfaces a free-streaming partonic pre-equilbrium stage with a (2+1)-dimensional viscous relativistic fluid dynamical stage for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase and the microscopic hadron cascade UrQMD for the hadronic rescattering and freeze-out stage. Except for UrQMD, all dynamical evolution components and interfaces were developed at OSU and tested and implemented in collaboration with the Duke University group. 2. An electromagnetic radiation module for the calculation of thermal photon emission from the QGP and hadron resonance gas stages of a heavy-ion collision, with emission rates that have been corrected for viscous effects in the expanding medium consistent with the bulk evolution. The electromagnetic radiation module was developed under OSU leadership in collaboration with the McGill group and has been integrated in the iEBE-VISHNU code package. 3. An interface between the Monte Carlo jet shower evolution and hadronization codes developed by the Wayne State University (WSU), McGill and Texas A&M groups and the iEBE-VISHNU bulk evolution code, for performing jet quenching and jet shape modification studies in a realistically modeled evolving medium that was tuned to measured soft hadron data. Building on work performed at OSU for the theoretical framework used to describe the interaction of jets with the medium, initial work on the jet shower Monte Carlo was started at OSU and moved to WSU when OSU Visiting Assistant Professor Abhijit Majumder accepted a tenure track faculty position at WSU in September 2011. The jet-hydro interface was developed at OSU and WSU and tested and implemented in collaboration with the McGill, Texas

  20. EFFECT OF INTERACTING RAREFACTION WAVES ON RELATIVISTICALLY HOT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Jin; Shibata, Kazunari; Masada, Youhei

    2012-06-01

    The effect of rarefaction acceleration on the propagation dynamics and structure of relativistically hot jets is studied through relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. We emphasize the nonlinear interaction of rarefaction waves excited at the interface between a cylindrical jet and the surrounding medium. From simplified one-dimensional (1D) models with radial jet structure, we find that a decrease in the relativistic pressure due to the interacting rarefaction waves in the central zone of the jet transiently yields a more powerful boost of the bulk jet than that expected from single rarefaction acceleration. This leads to a cyclic in situ energy conversion between thermal and bulk kinetic energies, which induces radial oscillating motion of the jet. The oscillation timescale is characterized by the initial pressure ratio of the jet to the ambient medium and follows a simple scaling relation, {tau}{sub oscillation}{proportional_to}(P{sub jet,0}/P{sub amb,0}){sup 1/2}. Extended two-dimensional simulations confirm that this radial oscillating motion in the 1D system manifests as modulation of the structure of the jet in a more realistic situation where a relativistically hot jet propagates through an ambient medium. We find that when the ambient medium has a power-law pressure distribution, the size of the reconfinement region along the propagation direction of the jet in the modulation structure {lambda} evolves according to a self-similar relation {lambda}{proportional_to}t{sup {alpha}/2}, where {alpha} is the power-law index of the pressure distribution.

  1. Results from Sandia National Laboratories/Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML).

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Skurdal, Ben; Gaigler, Randy; Basak, L; Root, G; Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Turman, Bobby N.; Floyd, Mendel D.

    2005-05-01

    Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. The EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m/s. To demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10% of the propulsion coils needed for a tactical design. The demonstrator verified the design by launching a 1430 lb weighted sled to a height of 24 ft in mid-December 2004 (Figure 1). This paper provides the general launcher design, specific pulsed power system component details, system operation, and demonstration results.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    purchases nearly $1 billion in goods and services last fiscal year December 6, 2010 Surpasses goals for small business procurements LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 6, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory purchased nearly $1 billion in goods and services in the 2010 fiscal year ending September 30, 2010. The $925 million in purchases was helped in part by funding from the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act the Laboratory received for environmental remediation and basic research.The Laboratory

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Publications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSS Pathfinder Airborne ISR Systems Publications Sandia National Laboratories: Synthetic Aperature Radar (SAR): Publications Reports authored by Sandia National Laboratories 63 results OSTI ID Report No. Type Title Authors Pub. Date Researcher Sponsor 1121978 Full Text Available SAND2013-10619 Technical Report Window taper functions for subaperture processing. Doerry, Armin Walter Dec. 2013 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

  4. Savannah River National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance 'Tin whiskers' suppression method Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a treatment method that slows or prevents the formation of whiskers in lead-free solder. Tin whiskers spontaneously grow from thin films of tin, often found in microelectronic devices in the form of solders and platings. Background This problem was

  5. The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Insider Honors and Awards Frederic Perras awarded Banting Fellowship Frédéric Perras, a post-doctoral researcher at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, has been awarded a Banting Fellowship by the Government of Canada and the National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). Perras joined the Ames Laboratory in 2015 after he was named the Laboratory's first Spedding Fellow, a position created to recognize exceptional research achievements. He conducts research

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Locations Locations Sandia California CINT photo A national and international presence Sandia operates laboratories, testing facilities, and offices in multiple sites around the United States and participates in research collaborations around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located in Livermore, California. Although most of our 9,840 employees work at these two locations,

  7. The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Representatives from 3M's Ames operation toured Ames Laboratory research projects on Sept. 22. U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory and Iowa State University PhD student Colleen Bertoni has been named this year's recipient of the Margaret Butler Fellowship in Computational Science. Read More Summer 2016 SULI student Emily Kozick interned with mentor Donald Sakaguchi in biological sciences. Participants in the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships, Community College

  8. jwang | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    jwang Ames Laboratory Profile Jigang Wang Assoc Prof Division of Materials Science & Engineering B15 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-2964 Email Address: jgwang@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Metamaterials Education: Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, 2005 M.S. Electrical Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, 2002 B.S. Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, P. R. China, 2000 Professional Appointments: Associate Scientist, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State

  9. rshouk | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    rshouk Ames Laboratory Profile Robert Houk Prof Chemical & Biological Sciences B27 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-9462 Email Address: rshouk@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Associate and Professor, Iowa State University Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Chemical Analysis of Nanodomains Education: Postdoctoral Associate, Iowa State University, 1981 Ph.D. Iowa State University, 1980 B.S. Slippery Rock State College, 1974 Professional Appointments: Senior Chemist and Professor of Chemistry, Iowa

  10. sadow | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    sadow Ames Laboratory Profile Aaron Sadow Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2101B Hach Phone Number: 515-294-8069 Email Address: sadow@iastate.edu Scientist, Ames Laboratory and Associate Professor, Iowa State University Website(s): Sadow's Group Page Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Homogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in 3D Controlled Environment Education: Postdoctoral Associate, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), 2003-2005 PhD., University of California, Berkeley,

  11. Mentoring | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentoring Why mentoring? As one of the largest laboratories in the nation for science and engineering research, Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the most prolific and well-renowned scientists and engineers. To maintain an environment that fosters innovative research, we are committed to ensuring the success of our major players on the frontlines of our research-our Postdoctoral Scientists. The Argonne National Laboratory has a long-standing reputation as a place that offers

  12. Laboratory History | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory History The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has a rich history of renewable energy and energy efficiency research and innovation that spans decades. NREL's Roots: The Creation of SERI NREL was designated a national laboratory by President George Bush on September 16, 1991. But the birth of the organization began more than two decades before. Learn about the global politics, energy landscape, and environmental drivers that led to the creation of NREL's predecessor, the Solar

  13. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    8 Annual Review Roger Taylor November 17, 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Major DOE National Laboratories Brookhaven Pacific Northwest Lawrence Berkeley Lawrence Livermore          INEL National Renewable Energy Laboratory Los Alamos Sandia Argonne Oak Ridge   Defense Program Labs  Office of Science Labs  Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Lab  Environmental Management Lab  Fossil Energy Lab NETL 

  14. Sustainability | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability Ames Laboratory is committed to environmental sustainability in all of its operations as outlined in the Laboratory's Site Sustainability Plan. Executive orders, such as Executive Order 13693, "Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade" sets goals for the reduction of the government's environmental footprint. The Laboratory's Environmental Management System Steering Committee (EMSSC) recommends goals and objectives to Executive Council that address the

  15. Education | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Education The MFRC has established a network of Midwest crime laboratories and university-based forensic science programs. This network has two general goals: help universities become better casework, research, and development partners for crime laboratories; and to engage crime laboratories in university efforts. These efforts can better-prepare the next generation of forensic scientists, advance the state-of-the-art in forensic science research, and influence students whose

  16. marit | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Honors & Awards: AAAS Fellow, 2007 Regents Award for Faculty Excellence, 2003 Inventor Incentive Award, Ames Laboratory, 2002 Iowa Regents Faculty Citation Award, 2000...

  17. jwgong | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Profile Jianwu Gong Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering Chemical & Biological Sciences 326 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email...

  18. ackerman | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ackerman Ames Laboratory Profile David Ackerman Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2025 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-1638 Email Address: ackerman...

  19. pmberge | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    pmberge Ames Laboratory Profile Paul Berge Industrial Spec Division of Materials Science & Engineering 110 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5972 Email Address:...

  20. bartine | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    bartine Ames Laboratory Profile Jeffrey Bartine Program Coord III Environmental, Safety, Health, and Assurance G40 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-4743 Email Address: bartine...

  1. Leadership | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    scientific user facility in North America; and the Argonne Accelerator Institute. Harry Weerts Harry Weerts, Associate Laboratory Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering...

  2. mjkramer | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Profile Matthew Kramer Director III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 125 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-0276 Email Address:...

  3. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of Radionuclide Monitoring in the CSRA Savannah River NERP Research ... Upcoming Seminars The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory is a research unit of the ...

  4. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Facilities Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory Cylindrical Boiling Facility ...

  5. vaclav | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    vaclav Ames Laboratory Profile Michael Vaclav Engr IV Facilities Services 158E Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-7891 Email Address: vaclav

  6. valery | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    valery Ames Laboratory Profile Valery Borovikov Postdoc Res Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 205 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4312 Email Address: valery

  7. vbalema | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    vbalema Ames Laboratory Profile Viktor Balema Division of Materials Science & Engineering 255 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-8033 Email Address: vbalema

  8. vdahl | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    vdahl Ames Laboratory Profile Vincent Dahl Mgr Facilities Mnt Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: vdahl

  9. weverett | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    weverett Ames Laboratory Profile William Everett Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 121 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: weverett@iastate.edu

  10. witt | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    witt Ames Laboratory Profile Lynnette Witt Interim Director Human Resources Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-5740 Email Address: witt@ameslab.gov

  11. zrein | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    zrein Ames Laboratory Profile Zachary Reinhart Grad Asst-RA Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: zrein

  12. carter | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    carter Ames Laboratory Profile Steven Carter Engr IV Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-7889 Email Address: carter@ameslab.gov...

  13. cbertoni | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    cbertoni Ames Laboratory Profile Colleen Bertoni Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 201 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: cbertoni...

  14. Workshops | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop Summary June 8-10, 2015 NSRC Workshop on "Big, Deep, and Smart Data Analytics in Materials Imaging" Oak Ridge National Laboratory This workshop brought together ...

  15. ppezzini | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ppezzini Ames Laboratory Profile Paolo Pezzini Postdoc Res Associate Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science Off Campus Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: ppezzini...

  16. dcheng | The Ames Laboratory

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    dcheng Ames Laboratory Profile Di Cheng Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering A311 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-5373 Email Address: dcheng@iastate.edu...

  17. Advanced Materials Laboratory

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    ... Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test ...

  18. boushaba | The Ames Laboratory

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    boushaba Ames Laboratory Profile Khalid Boushaba Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 3208 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: boushaba

  19. liza | The Ames Laboratory

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    liza Ames Laboratory Profile Liza Alexander Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 2242 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-6116 Email Address: liza...

  20. xinyufu | The Ames Laboratory

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    xinyufu Ames Laboratory Profile Xinyu Fu Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2238 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: xinyufu...

  1. bender | The Ames Laboratory

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    bender Ames Laboratory Profile Lee Bendickson Lab Tech III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 3288 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-5682 Email Address: bender...

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory's

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    produced by current operations. LANL and regulatory agencies survey the air, soil, sediment, groundwater, and surface water around the Laboratory to make sure contaminants from...

  3. antropov | The Ames Laboratory

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    in Condensed Matter Physics, Ames Laboratory, 1993-1995 Visiting Scholar, Max Planck Institute, Stuttgart, Germany, 1991-1993 Scientist, Institute of Physics of Metals, ...

  4. dscomito | The Ames Laboratory

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    dscomito Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Comito Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering A524 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-9800 Email Address: dscomito...

  5. dfreppon | The Ames Laboratory

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    dfreppon Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Freppon Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 0712 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-8586 Email Address: dfreppon...

  6. drbohlke | The Ames Laboratory

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    drbohlke Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Bohlke Division of Materials Science & Engineering 115 Spedding Phone Number: 209-761-4100 Email Address: drbohlke...

  7. djbell | The Ames Laboratory

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    djbell Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Bell Grad Asst-RA Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: djbell...

  8. Factsheets | The Ames Laboratory

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    Image Rare Earths Info Card This handy pocket card highlights the rare earth elements on the front and provides information on the back concerning Ames Laboratory's historical ...

  9. dpaulc | The Ames Laboratory

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    dpaulc Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Cole Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 10 Carver Co-Lab Phone Number: 515-294-1235 Email Address: dpaulc...

  10. flanders | The Ames Laboratory

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    flanders Ames Laboratory Profile Duane Flanders Sheet Metal Mech Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: flanders@ameslab.gov

  11. foughtel | The Ames Laboratory

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    foughtel Ames Laboratory Profile Eliscia Fought Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 124 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: foughtel

  12. galvin | The Ames Laboratory

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    galvin Ames Laboratory Profile Glen Galvin Mgr Info Tech I Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-6604 Email Address: galvin

  13. gharper | The Ames Laboratory

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    gharper Ames Laboratory Profile Gregory Harper Sys Control Tech Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: gharper

  14. gillilan | The Ames Laboratory

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    gillilan Ames Laboratory Profile Steven Gilliland Sys Control Tech Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-3078 Email Address: gillilan

  15. goldston | The Ames Laboratory

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    goldston Ames Laboratory Profile Jennifer Goldston Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 213 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4992 Email Address: goldston@iastate.edu

  16. gsbacon | The Ames Laboratory

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    gsbacon Ames Laboratory Profile Graham Bacon Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 129 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: gsbacon

  17. guan | The Ames Laboratory

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    guan Ames Laboratory Profile Yong Guan Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 3219 Coover Phone Number: 515-294-8378 Email Address: guan

  18. haberer | The Ames Laboratory

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    haberer Ames Laboratory Profile Charles Haberer Facil Mechanic II Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3757 Email Address: haberer

  19. hauptman | The Ames Laboratory

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    hauptman Ames Laboratory Profile John Hauptman Associate Facilities Services A411 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-8572 Email Address: hauptman

  20. hcelliott | The Ames Laboratory

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    hcelliott Ames Laboratory Profile Henrietta Elliott Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5446 Email Address: hcelliott

  1. herrman | The Ames Laboratory

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    herrman Ames Laboratory Profile Terrance Herrman Engr V Facilities Services 167 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-7896 Email Address: herrman

  2. jac | The Ames Laboratory

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    jac Ames Laboratory Profile Justin Conrad Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 305 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-4604 Email Address: jac

  3. jbobbitt | The Ames Laboratory

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    jbobbitt Ames Laboratory Profile Jonathan Bobbitt Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 0712 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-4285 Email Address: jbobbitt

  4. jboschen | The Ames Laboratory

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    jboschen Ames Laboratory Profile Jeffery Boschen Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 124 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: jboschen

  5. jbright | The Ames Laboratory

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    jbright Ames Laboratory Profile Jerald Bright Division of Materials Science & Engineering 258 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: jbright@ameslab.gov

  6. jhahn | The Ames Laboratory

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    jhahn Ames Laboratory Profile Jane Hahn Facilities Services 158B Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3756 Email Address: jhahn

  7. jrblaum | The Ames Laboratory

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    jrblaum Ames Laboratory Profile Jacqueline Blaum Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 37 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: jrblaum

  8. kasuni | The Ames Laboratory

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    kasuni Ames Laboratory Profile Walikadage Boteju Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences Critical Materials Institute 2306 Hach Phone Number: 515-294-6342 Email Address: kasuni

  9. kbratlie | The Ames Laboratory

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    kbratlie Ames Laboratory Profile Kaitlin Bratlie Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 2220 Hoover Phone Number: 515-294-7304 Email Address: kbratlie

  10. kgalayda | The Ames Laboratory

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    kgalayda Ames Laboratory Profile Katherine Galayda Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences B5 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-3887 Email Address: kgalayda@iastate.edu

  11. klclark | The Ames Laboratory

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    klclark Ames Laboratory Profile Katie Augustus Program Coord II Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-8753 Email Address: katiea@ameslab.gov

  12. kmbryden | The Ames Laboratory

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    kmbryden Ames Laboratory Profile Kenneth Bryden Prof Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 2274 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: kmbryden

  13. lcademar | The Ames Laboratory

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    lcademar Ames Laboratory Profile Ludovico Cademartiri Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 2240J Hoover Phone Number: 515-294-4549 Email Address: lcademar

  14. lenyeart | The Ames Laboratory

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    lenyeart Ames Laboratory Profile Linda Enyeart Admin Spec II Chemical & Biological Sciences 144A Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-6029 Email Address: lenyeart

  15. long | The Ames Laboratory

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    long Ames Laboratory Profile Catherine Long Supv-Custodial Svc Facilities Services 158G Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: long

  16. lucasr | The Ames Laboratory

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    lucasr Ames Laboratory Profile Lucas Rozendaal Associate Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3757 Email Address: lucasr@iastate.edu

  17. maheedhar | The Ames Laboratory

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    maheedhar Ames Laboratory Profile Maheedhar Gunasekharan Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 327 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: maheedhar@ameslab.gov

  18. mbonilla | The Ames Laboratory

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    mbonilla Ames Laboratory Profile Claudia Bonilla escobar Postdoc Res Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 252 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-2041 Email Address: mbonilla

  19. mdotzler | The Ames Laboratory

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    mdotzler Ames Laboratory Profile Mike Dotzler Facil Mechanic III Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-4346 Email Address: mdotzler

  20. mhend | The Ames Laboratory

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    mhend Ames Laboratory Profile Matthew Henderson Sys Analyst I Chemical & Biological Sciences 327 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-1293 Email Address: mhend@ameslab.gov

  1. mhenely | The Ames Laboratory

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    mhenely Ames Laboratory Profile Michael Henely Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5446 Email Address: mhenely

  2. nbarbee | The Ames Laboratory

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    nbarbee Ames Laboratory Profile Nicole Barbee Lab Assistant-X Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: nbarbee

  3. ndesilva | The Ames Laboratory

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    ndesilva Ames Laboratory Profile Nuwan De silva Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences Critical Materials Institute 236 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: ndesilva

  4. olsenjro | The Ames Laboratory

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    olsenjro Ames Laboratory Profile Jarrett Olsen Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: olsenjro@ameslab.gov

  5. qslin | The Ames Laboratory

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    qslin Ames Laboratory Profile Qisheng Lin Assoc Scientist Division of Materials Science & Engineering 353 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-3513 Email Address: qslin@ameslab.gov

  6. rberrett | The Ames Laboratory

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    rberrett Ames Laboratory Profile Ronald Berrett Sys Control Tech Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: rberrett

  7. rfry | The Ames Laboratory

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    rfry Ames Laboratory Profile Robert Fry Electronics Tech I Facilities Services 258 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4823 Email Address: rfry

  8. rgonzalez | The Ames Laboratory

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    rgonzalez Ames Laboratory Profile Reymundo Gonzalez Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2262 Hach Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: rgonzalez01

  9. rmalmq | The Ames Laboratory

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    rmalmq Ames Laboratory Profile Richard Malmquist Facil Mechanic III Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1228 Email Address: rmalmq

  10. rodgers | The Ames Laboratory

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    rodgers Ames Laboratory Profile Elizabeth Rodgers Program Coord III Office of Sponsored Research Administration Director's Office 305 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-1254 Email Address: rodgers

  11. rofox | The Ames Laboratory

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    rofox Ames Laboratory Profile Rodney Fox Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 3162 Sweeney Phone Number: 515-294-9104 Email Address: rofox@iastate.edu

  12. sarahmb | The Ames Laboratory

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    sarahmb Ames Laboratory Profile Sarah Morris-Benavides Sr Environ Spec Environmental, Safety, Health, and Assurance G40 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-7923 Email Address: sarahmb

  13. sburkhow | The Ames Laboratory

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    sburkhow Ames Laboratory Profile Sadie Burkhow Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 0712 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: sburkhow

  14. schenad | The Ames Laboratory

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    schenad Ames Laboratory Profile Shen Chen Grad Asst-TA/RA Division of Materials Science & Engineering 211 Physics Phone Number: 515-294-9361 Email Address: schenad

  15. seliger | The Ames Laboratory

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    seliger Ames Laboratory Profile Victoria Seliger Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: seliger

  16. sumitc | The Ames Laboratory

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    sumitc Ames Laboratory Profile Sumit Chaudhary Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 2124 Coover Phone Number: 515-294-0606 Email Address: sumitc

  17. takinyi | The Ames Laboratory

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    takinyi Ames Laboratory Profile Tina Akinyi Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: takinyi

  18. tatesin | The Ames Laboratory

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    tatesin Ames Laboratory Profile Tulay Atesin Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2262 Hach Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: tatesin@ameslab.gov

  19. tboell | The Ames Laboratory

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    tboell Ames Laboratory Profile Tyler Boell Lab Assistant-X Division of Materials Science & Engineering 146 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: tboell

  20. tchou | The Ames Laboratory

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    tchou Ames Laboratory Profile Tsung-han Chou Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 132 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-6822 Email Address: tchou