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Sample records for ic middle atlantic

  1. A study of sediment motion and bottom boundary layer dynamics over the Middle Atlantic Bight shelf and upper slope. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchill, James H.; Williams, Albert J.

    2001-02-14

    This report summarizes research on circulation and particle dynamics over the Middle Atlantic Bight shelf and upper slope. It includes an overview of the field experiments conducted in the waters off North Carolina, and gives the principal results from these experiments.

  2. North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...heast",,"Midwest",,"South",,,"West" ,,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West South ...

  3. LIFE IC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Zip: S60 5WG Product: LIFE-IC is a UK national resource centre for the development of all new energy technology innovations. References: LIFE-IC1 This article is a stub. You can...

  4. 2016 IC Virtual Career Fair

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meet the Intelligence Community Online at the IC Virtual Career Fair on Thursday, March 3, 2016 from 2pm to 8pm. To register, please go to www.ICVirtualFair.com.

  5. R&D100: IC ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamlet, Jason; Pierson, Lyndon; Bauer, Todd

    2015-11-19

    Supply chain security to detect, deter, and prevent the counterfeiting of networked and stand-alone integrated circuits (ICs) is critical to cyber security. Sandia National Laboratory researchers have developed IC ID to leverage Physically Unclonable Functions (PUFs) and strong cryptographic authentication to create a unique fingerprint for each integrated circuit. IC ID assures the authenticity of ICs to prevent tampering or malicious substitution.

  6. Institutional computing (IC) information session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Kenneth R; Lally, Bryan R

    2011-01-19

    The LANL Institutional Computing Program (IC) will host an information session about the current state of unclassified Institutional Computing at Los Alamos, exciting plans for the future, and the current call for proposals for science and engineering projects requiring computing. Program representatives will give short presentations and field questions about the call for proposals and future planned machines, and discuss technical support available to existing and future projects. Los Alamos has started making a serious institutional investment in open computing available to our science projects, and that investment is expected to increase even more.

  7. IC Green Energy ICG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Green Energy ICG Jump to: navigation, search Name: IC Green Energy (ICG) Place: Tel-Aviv, Israel Zip: 61204 Product: IC Green Energy (ICG), a member of Israel Corp. Group, is a new...

  8. ORISE: Incident Command System (ICS) Training

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Incident Command System (ICS) Training The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) supports the emergency response community by promoting interagency cooperation and...

  9. Instrumentation and Controls, IC, Accelerator Operations and...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation and Controls, IC About Us AOT Home Teams Beam Diagnostics Controls Software ECAD Electronics Vacuum CONTACTS Group Leader Fred E. Shelley Office Administrator...

  10. PPM Atlantic Renewable Formerly Atlantic Renewable Energy Corp...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    PPM Atlantic Renewable Formerly Atlantic Renewable Energy Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: PPM Atlantic Renewable (Formerly Atlantic Renewable Energy Corp) Place: Virginia...

  11. I&C Modeling in SPAR Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John A. Schroeder

    2012-06-01

    The Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models for the U.S. commercial nuclear power plants currently have very limited instrumentation and control (I&C) modeling [1]. Most of the I&C components in the operating plant SPAR models are related to the reactor protection system. This was identified as a finding during the industry peer review of SPAR models. While the Emergency Safeguard Features (ESF) actuation and control system was incorporated into the Peach Bottom Unit 2 SPAR model in a recent effort [2], various approaches to expend resources for detailed I&C modeling in other SPAR models are investigated.

  12. Microsoft Word - S06401_IC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Photos of T Building Rooms with Special ICs This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls ...

  13. 2015 IC Virtual Career Fair | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2015 IC Virtual Career Fair 2015 IC Virtual Career Fair Instructions for Applicants Please use the following process to submit an application and resume for DOE's 2015 IC Virtual...

  14. Electron Storage Ring Development for ICS Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewen, Roderick

    2015-09-30

    There is an increasing world-wide interest in compact light sources based on Inverse Compton Scattering. Development of these types of light sources includes leveraging the investment in accelerator technology first developed at DOE National Laboratories. Although these types of light sources cannot replace the larger user-supported synchrotron facilities, they offer attractive alternatives for many x-ray science applications. Fundamental research at the SLAC National Laboratory in the 1990’s led to the idea of using laser-electron storage rings as a mechanism to generate x-rays with many properties of the larger synchrotron light facilities. This research led to a commercial spin-off of this technology. The SBIR project goal is to understand and improve the performance of the electron storage ring system of the commercially available Compact Light Source. The knowledge gained from studying a low-energy electron storage ring may also benefit other Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) source development. Better electron storage ring performance is one of the key technologies necessary to extend the utility and breadth of applications of the CLS or related ICS sources. This grant includes a subcontract with SLAC for technical personnel and resources for modeling, feedback development, and related accelerator physics studies.

  15. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements

  16. Atlantic Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    navigation, search Logo: Atlantic Solar Name: Atlantic Solar Place: Cape Town, South Africa Sector: Solar Product: Solar Thermal Technology Year Founded: 1985 Phone Number:...

  17. Prometheus Reactor I&C Software Development Methodology, for Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Hamilton

    2005-07-30

    The purpose of this letter is to submit the Reactor Instrumentation and Control (I&C) software life cycle, development methodology, and programming language selections and rationale for project Prometheus to NR for approval. This letter also provides the draft Reactor I&C Software Development Process Manual and Reactor Module Software Development Plan to NR for information.

  18. Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1981-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1980 totaled 6,747,719,000 bbl or an average rate of 18,436,390,000 bbl/d, down 13.9% from 1979. Increases were in Saudi Arabia and Syria. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, and Turkey. New discoveries were made in Abu Dhabi, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Sharjah, and Oman. New areas were explored in Bahrain, Oman, Syria, and Yemen. 9 figures, 16 tables.

  19. Idaho - IC 61-516 - Priority Designation for Electric Transmission...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Idaho - IC 61-516 - Priority Designation for Electric Transmission Projects Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation:...

  20. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls Doc. No. S08846 June 2012 Page C-1 T Building Rooms with Special ICs In addition to ...

  1. Idaho IC 67-6512 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    12 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Idaho IC 67-6512Legal Abstract This section discusses special use permits,...

  2. Interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) architecture for PV devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Tian, Zhaobing; Mishima, Tetsuya D.; Santos, Michael B.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Klem, John F.

    2015-10-20

    A photovoltaic (PV) device, comprising a PV interband cascade (IC) stage, wherein the IC PV stage comprises an absorption region with a band gap, the absorption region configured to absorb photons, an intraband transport region configured to act as a hole barrier, and an interband tunneling region configured to act as an electron barrier. An IC PV architecture for a photovoltaic device, the IC PV architecture comprising an absorption region, an intraband transport region coupled to the absorption region, and an interband tunneling region coupled to the intraband transport region and to the adjacent absorption region, wherein the absorption region, the intraband transport region, and the interband tunneling region are positioned such that electrons will flow from the absorption region to the intraband transport region to the interband tunneling region.

  3. South Atlantic summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.; Wiese, J.D.

    1983-12-01

    To date, four Federal offshore oil-and-gas leasing actions have occurred in the South Atlantic Region. Two additional South Atlantic lease offerings remain on the July 1982 final 5-year OCS oil-and-gas leasing schedule before June 1987. The South Atlantic Region consists of three major sedimentary basins: the Carolina Trough, the Blake Plateau, and the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Lease Sale 43, the first in the South Atlantic Region, featured blocks for exploration in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. Offshore operators drilled a total of six exploratory wells on blocks leased in Lease Sale 43. All were dry. The 43 leases from Lease Sale 43 have now expired, some blocks were relinquished earlier by their lease-holders. In the recent Lease Sales 56 and RS-2, and in the South Atlantic Lease Offering (July 1983), blocks leased were largely concentrated in the Carolina Trough Basin. Exploration of these blocks may begin anew in early 1984. The blocks are in deep water and will require careful, long-range planning before drilling can commence. As of July 1983, all 66 leases from the above three sales are active. Two plans of exploration have been approved by Minerals Management Service for exploration on blocks leased in Lease Sale 56. The plans are for Russell Area, Blocks 709 and 710, and Manteo Area, Block 510. Blocks 709 and 710 are held by ARCO, and Block 510 is held by Chevron. Based on current plans of exploration, operations will begin in 1984, first by Chevron, and sometime later by ARCO. Operations will be supported by a temporary service base to be established at Morehead City, North Carolina. 6 references, 4 figures.

  4. Instrumentation and control system (ICS). Training alternatives study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    Computer technology today provides tools for producing presentations and training programs that are colorful, effective and comprehensive. For example, the Microsoft package of Word, Excel, Powerpoint, and Visual Basic can be used to produce a multimedia presentation for training WETF ICS operators. This presentation would be segmented into a series of lessons which would lead the prospective operator from a cursory view of facility operations to a detailed knowledge of ICS, process, control room and other systems operations. Using a suitably equipped Personal Computer (PC), a person would be ready for advanced, hands-on experience at the conclusion of such a training sequence.

  5. Atlantic Energy Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Atlantic Energy Solutions Place: Foxboro, Massachusetts Sector: Efficiency, Renewable Energy Product: Atlantic Energy Solutions provides energy auditing for its customers and...

  6. Atlantic Biomass Conversions Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Biomass Conversions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Atlantic Biomass Conversions Inc Place: Frederick, Maryland Sector: Biomass Product: Atlantic Biomass Conversions is...

  7. Middle School Science Bowl

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 February Middle School Science Bowl Middle School Science Bowl WHEN: Feb 28, 2015 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM WHERE: Highland High School 4700 Coal Ave SE, Albuquerque, NM...

  8. The Role Of IC Engines In Future Energy Use | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Of IC Engines In Future Energy Use The Role Of IC Engines In Future Energy Use Reviews future market trends and forecasts, and future engine challenges and research focus PDF icon ...

  9. Idaho IC 67-6508, Planning Duties for Local Land Use | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Idaho IC 67-6508, Planning Duties for Local Land Use Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Idaho IC 67-6508, Planning...

  10. I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife Property of State--Preservation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 36-103 - Wildlife...

  11. EA-193 Energy Atlantic, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EA-193 Energy Atlantic, LLC Order authorizing Energy Atlantic, LLC to export electric energy to Canada. EA-193 Energy Atlantic, LLC (22.85 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  12. ON THE STELLAR CONTENT OF THE STARBURST GALAXY IC10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanna, N.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R.; Stetson, P. B.; Pietrinferni, A.; Cassisi, S.; Monelli, M.; Drozdovsky, I.; Sabbi, E.; Caputo, F.; Castellani, M.; Corsi, C. E.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Pulone, L.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Nonino, M.; Romaniello, M.; Walker, A. R.

    2009-07-10

    We investigate the stellar content of the starburst dwarf galaxy IC10 using accurate and deep optical data collected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The comparison between theory and observations indicates a clear change in age distribution when moving from the center toward the external regions. Moreover, empirical calibrators and evolutionary predictions suggest the presence of a spread in heavy element abundance of the order of one-half dex. The comparison between old and intermediate-age core He-burning models with a well defined overdensity in the color-magnitude diagram indicates the presence of both intermediate-age, red clump stars and of old, red horizontal branch stars.

  13. A revolutionary concept to improve the efficiency of IC antennas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2014-02-12

    The successful design of an Ion Cyclotron (IC) antenna mainly relies on the capability of coupling high power to the plasma (MW), feature that is currently reached by allowing rather high voltages (tens of kV) on the unavoidable unmatched part of the feeding lines. This requirement is often responsible of arcs along the transmission lines and other unwanted phenomena that considerably limit the usage of IC launchers. In this work, we suggest and describe a revolutionary approach based on high impedance surfaces, which allows to increase the antenna radiation efficiency and, hence, to highly reduce the imposed voltages to couple the same level of power to the plasma. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) displaced usually on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts usually embedded inside a dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. In terms of working properties, high impedance surfaces are electrically thin in-phase reflectors, i.e. they present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. While the usual design of a high impedance surface requires the presence of a dielectric layer, some alternative solutions can be realized in vacuum, taking advantage of double layers ofmetallic patches. After an introductory part on the properties of high impedance surfaces, this work documents both their design by means of numerical codes and their implementation on a scaled mock-up.

  14. Longfellow Middle School Wins Virginia Middle School Science...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Wins Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 2014 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl At the end of the day, the team from Longfellow Middle School, Falls Church, won the...

  15. Virginia Middle School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Middle School, Williamsburg Carson Middle School, Herndon Crittenden Middle School, Newport News Edlin School, Reston Floris Elementary School, Herndon Frost Middle ...

  16. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Malba, V.

    1999-08-03

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips is disclosed. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM. 12 figs.

  17. Attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Malba, Vincent

    1999-01-01

    An attachment method for stacked integrated circuit (IC) chips. The method involves connecting stacked chips, such as DRAM memory chips, to each other and/or to a circuit board. Pads on the individual chips are rerouted to form pads on the side of the chip, after which the chips are stacked on top of each other whereby desired interconnections to other chips or a circuit board can be accomplished via the side-located pads. The pads on the side of a chip are connected to metal lines on a flexible plastic tape (flex) by anisotropically conductive adhesive (ACA). Metal lines on the flex are likewise connected to other pads on chips and/or to pads on a circuit board. In the case of a stack of DRAM chips, pads to corresponding address lines on the various chips may be connected to the same metal line on the flex to form an address bus. This method has the advantage of reducing the number of connections required to be made to the circuit board due to bussing; the flex can accommodate dimensional variation in the alignment of chips in the stack; bonding of the ACA is accomplished at low temperature and is otherwise simpler and less expensive than solder bonding; chips can be bonded to the ACA all at once if the sides of the chips are substantially coplanar, as in the case for stacks of identical chips, such as DRAM.

  18. Middle School Science Bowl 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    Middle school students from across Iowa converged on Ames Feb. 24 and 25, 2012 to compete in the Middle School Science Bowl and car competition.

  19. Nutrients in the Atlantic thermocline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawase, M.; Sarmiento, J.L.

    1985-09-20

    A set of maps are presented of nutrient distribution on isopycnal surfaces in the North and tropical Atlantic Ocean main thermocline. The data used in producing these maps are from the Transient Tracers in the Oceans (TTO) North Atlantic Study and Tropical Atlantic Study, an associated German study (Meteor 56/5), two cross-Atlantic sections from cruise 109 of the Atlantis II, and the GEOSECS program. The nutrient distributions reflect primarily the sources at the northern and southern outcrops of the isopycnal surfaces, the in situ regeneration due to decomposition of sinking organic materials, and the interior physical processes as inferred from thermocline models and the distribution of conservative properties such as salinity. However, silica also exhibits behavior that cannot be explained by in situ regeneration. A simple phenomenological model suggests that cross-isopycnal advection and mixing in the equatorial region may play an important role in the nutrient dynamics. These data should prove of great value in constraining models of physical as well as biogeochemical processes. 43 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  20. Atlantic Ethanol Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Ethanol Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Atlantic Ethanol Capital Place: Washington, Washington, DC Product: Biofuel Investor in Caribbean and Central American region....

  1. Atlantic Biodiesel Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Biodiesel Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Atlantic Biodiesel, Inc. Place: Salem, New Hampshire Zip: 30790 Product: Privately-held corporation producing biodiesal in its...

  2. Jersey Atlantic Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown owns majority Developer Jersey American Wind- LLC Energy Purchaser Atlantic County...

  3. Atlantic Wind Solar Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search Name: Atlantic Wind & Solar Inc. Place: Coconut Groove, Florida Zip: 33133 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Florida-based installer of distributed wind and solar systems...

  4. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions October 1, 2013 - ...

  5. 2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference 2015 ACI Mid-Atlantic Regional Home Performance Conference October 20, 2015 9:00AM EDT to October 21...

  6. Atlantic County, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Companies in Atlantic County, New Jersey Bartholomew Heating and Cooling Energy Enterprises South Jersey Industries Energy Generation Facilities in Atlantic County, New Jersey...

  7. Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Convention Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant Facility Atlantic City Convention Center Sector Solar...

  8. IC 67-75 - Local Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    67-75 - Local Land Use Planning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: IC 67-75 - Local Land Use PlanningLegal Published...

  9. I.C. 68-52 - Idaho Administrative Procedure Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: I.C. 68-52 - Idaho Administrative Procedure Act Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not...

  10. IC 42-104 - Appropriation (of Water) Must be for Beneficial Purpose...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    of water must be for beneficial purpose. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1899 Legal Citation I.C. 42-104 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

  11. I.C. 39-44 - Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    44 - Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 39-44 - Idaho Hazardous Waste...

  12. I.C. 67-65 - Local Land Use Planning | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 67-65 - Local Land Use PlanningLegal Abstract This statute outlines the zoning and...

  13. I.C. 47-1605 - Geothermal Resources - Leases--Rental and Royalty...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 47-1605 - Geothermal Resources - Leases--Rental and RoyaltyLegal Abstract This code...

  14. I.C. 42-217 - Proof of Application (of Water) to Beneficial Use...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 42-217 - Proof of Application (of Water) to Beneficial UseLegal Abstract This statute...

  15. I.C. 39-3602 - Water Quality--Definitions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 39-3602 - Water Quality--DefinitionsLegal Abstract This statutory section provides...

  16. I.C. 42-221 - Appropriation of Water Fees | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 42-221 - Appropriation of Water FeesLegal Abstract This statutory section provides for...

  17. I.C. 42-203A - Notice Upon Receipt of Application to Appropriate...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 42-203A - Notice Upon Receipt of Application to AppropriateLegal Abstract This...

  18. I.C. 67-52 - Idaho Administrative Procedure Act | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 67-52 - Idaho Administrative Procedure ActLegal Abstract This statute governs the...

  19. I.C. 67-80 - Regulatory Takings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 67-80 - Regulatory TakingsLegal Abstract This statute outlines the criteria and...

  20. I.C. 62-6 - Procedure Before Commission and in Courts | Open...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 62-6 - Procedure Before Commission and in CourtsLegal Abstract This statute governs...

  1. I.C. 27-503 - Protection of Graves, Permitted Acts -- Notice...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 27-503 - Protection of Graves, Permitted Acts -- NoticeLegal Abstract This statute...

  2. I.C. 39-101 - Idaho Environmental Protection and Health Act ...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 39-101 - Idaho Environmental Protection and Health ActLegal Published NA Year Signed...

  3. I.C. 61-17 - Siting of Certain Electrical Transmission Facilities...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: I.C. 61-17 - Siting of Certain Electrical Transmission FacilitiesLegal Abstract This statute...

  4. Qualification of the First ICS-3000 ION Chromatograph for use at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T; Mahannah, R.

    2011-07-05

    The ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography (IC) system installed in 221-S M-13 has been qualified for use. The qualification was a head to head comparison of the ICS-3000 with the currently used DX-500 IC system. The crosscheck work included standards for instrument calibration and calibration verifications and standards for individual anion analysis, where the standards were traceable back to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In addition the crosscheck work included the analysis of simulated Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt, SRAT Product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples, along with radioactive Sludge Batch 5 material from the SRAT and SME tanks. Based upon the successful qualification of the ICS-3000 in M-13, it is recommended that this task proceed in developing the data to qualify, by a head to head comparison of the two ICS-3000 instruments, a second ICS-3000 to be installed in M-14. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requires the analysis of specific anions at various stages of its processing of high level waste (HLW). The anions of interest to the DWPF are fluoride, formate, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, sulfate, oxalate, and phosphate. The anion analysis is used to evaluate process chemistry including formic acid/nitric acid additions to establish optimum conditions for mercury stripping, reduction-oxidation (REDOX) chemistry for the melter, nitrite destruction, organic acid constituents, etc. The DWPF Laboratory (Lab) has been using Dionex DX-500 ion chromatography (IC) systems since 1998. The vendor informed DWPF in 2006 that the instruments would no longer be supported by service contracts after 2008. DWPF purchased three new ICS-3000 systems in September of 2006. The ICS-3000 instruments are (a) designed to be more stable using an eluent generator to make eluent, (b) require virtually no daily chemical handling by the analysts, (c) require less line breaks in the hood, and (d) generally require less maintenance

  5. PTF 12gzkA rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2013-11-20

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (?0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (?0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ?10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  6. Winds of low-metallicity OB-type stars: HST-COS spectroscopy in IC 1613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Miriam; Najarro, Francisco; Herrero, Artemio; Urbaneja, Miguel Alejandro

    2014-06-10

    We present the first quantitative ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis of resolved OB stars in IC 1613. Because of its alleged very low metallicity (?1/10 Z {sub ?}, from H II regions), studies in this Local Group dwarf galaxy could become a significant step forward from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) toward the extremely metal-poor massive stars of the early universe. We present HST-COS data covering the ?1150-1800 wavelength range with resolution R ? 2500. We find that the targets do exhibit wind features, and these are similar in strength to SMC stars. Wind terminal velocities were derived from the observed P Cygni profiles with the Sobolev plus Exact Integration method. The v {sub ?}-Z relationship has been revisited. The terminal velocity of IC 1613 O stars is clearly lower than Milky Way counterparts, but there is no clear difference between IC 1613 and SMC or LMC analog stars. We find no clear segregation with host galaxy in the terminal velocities of B-supergiants, nor in the v {sub ?}/v {sub esc} ratio of the whole OB star sample in any of the studied galaxies. Finally, we present the first evidence that the Fe-abundance of IC 1613 OB stars is similar to the SMC, which is in agreement with previous results on red supergiants. With the confirmed ?1/10 solar oxygen abundances of B-supergiants, our results indicate that IC 1613's ?/Fe ratio is sub-solar.

  7. SUPER-LUMINOUS TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE: CATCHING A MAGNETAR BY THE TAIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Smith, K.; Chen, T.-W.; Kotak, R.; Nicholl, M.; Valenti, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Botticella, M. T.; Ergon, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; and others

    2013-06-20

    We report extensive observational data for five of the lowest redshift Super-Luminous Type Ic Supernovae (SL-SNe Ic) discovered to date, namely, PTF10hgi, SN2011ke, PTF11rks, SN2011kf, and SN2012il. Photometric imaging of the transients at +50 to +230 days after peak combined with host galaxy subtraction reveals a luminous tail phase for four of these SL-SNe. A high-resolution, optical, and near-infrared spectrum from xshooter provides detection of a broad He I {lambda}10830 emission line in the spectrum (+50 days) of SN2012il, revealing that at least some SL-SNe Ic are not completely helium-free. At first sight, the tail luminosity decline rates that we measure are consistent with the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Co, and would require 1-4 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni to produce the luminosity. These {sup 56}Ni masses cannot be made consistent with the short diffusion times at peak, and indeed are insufficient to power the peak luminosity. We instead favor energy deposition by newborn magnetars as the power source for these objects. A semi-analytical diffusion model with energy input from the spin-down of a magnetar reproduces the extensive light curve data well. The model predictions of ejecta velocities and temperatures which are required are in reasonable agreement with those determined from our observations. We derive magnetar energies of 0.4 {approx}< E(10{sup 51} erg) {approx}< 6.9 and ejecta masses of 2.3 {approx}< M{sub ej}(M{sub Sun }) {approx}< 8.6. The sample of five SL-SNe Ic presented here, combined with SN 2010gx-the best sampled SL-SNe Ic so far-points toward an explosion driven by a magnetar as a viable explanation for all SL-SNe Ic.

  8. Insights Gained for Updating an Analog I&C System to a Digital System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A.; Carte, N.; Hardesty, Duane; Hardin, LeRoy A; Wilson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Licensees at both Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) and Non-Power Reactors (NPRs) are increasing their use of state-of-the-art digital technology in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems because digital systems offer improved reactor control, information processing, and information storage over analog. Digital I&C systems can range from experimental systems for reactor control research (at NPRs), to measurement and display systems, to complete reactor console replacements. Because of the increasing difficulty in finding spare parts for their original analog I&C systems, many licensees have begun or have plans to upgrade, refurbish, or replace their old analog I&C systems with digital systems. The perception is that upgrading to a digital I&C system will solve all of a facility s obsolescence problems. However, licensees need to be aware of several issues associated with upgrading to a digital system including obsolescence of the digital system (hardware and software) because of the short product life cycle and the associated cost to acquire, store, and maintain a long-term supply of spare parts. Configuration management and cyber security are also vitally important for any upgrade. Further, it must be recognized that the introduction of software and microprocessors could create new failure mechanisms, such as software errors and increased susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. In fact, experience has shown that these failure mechanisms may cause the reactor to malfunction in a way not previously considered. Thus, a conversion from analog to digital I&C systems solves some problems while potentially introducing others. Recognition of the additional risks coupled with good design, engineering, review, and testing can identify and minimize these risks.

  9. DIONEX ICS3000 ION CHROMATOGRAPHY SYSTEM INSTALLATION AND INSTRUMENT ASSESSMENT FOR SRNL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedenman, B.; White, T.

    2009-11-16

    Ion Chromatography (IC) is routinely used at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for sample analysis and characterization. Results from IC analysis are valued in corrosion control maintenance and measurement programs, remediation waste process control, soil and ground water measurement, nuclear materials processing, and various other research and development programs. Presented in this report are analytical methods developed on a DIONEX ICS3000 Reagent Free Ion Chromatography (RFIC) system located in AD at SRNL. This IC system contains two independent analysis channels comprising of a mobile phase generator, a pump, stationary phase columns, a suppressor and a conductivity detector. One channel is dedicated to anion analysis using Potassium Hydroxide (KOH) as the mobile phase while a second channel is configured for cation analysis using Methanesulfonic Acid (MSA) as the mobile phase. Both channels share an autosampler and the peak analysis software, Chromeleon{reg_sign} v.6.8. Instrument configuration is modified from the manufacturer for radiological service. Listed within this report are Dionex ICS3000 parameters and results for the analysis of routine anions and cations. Additional method parameters and discussion are presented on the analysis of Acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}) and Iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}). Previous IC analysis instruments at AD have been based upon carbonate/bicarbonate buffer mobile phase chemistry. This report represents a transition to hydroxide as a mobile phase eluent. The hydroxide eluent offers a lower baseline conductivity, which allows for greater sample dilution and/or lower detection limits. Also the hydroxide mobile phase and column set has a significant separation of the phosphate peak from the nitrate and sulfate peaks vs. the carbonate/bicarbonate mobile phase and column set, an advantage for the industrial waste analyzed at SRNL.

  10. Atlantic Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Place: Iowa Phone Number: 712-243-1395 Website: www.a-m-u.net Twitter: @AMUAtlantic Facebook: https:www.facebook.comAtlanticMunicipalUtilities Outage Hotline: 712-243-1395...

  11. Interim Human Factors Guidance for Hybrid and Digital I&C System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.Naser, G.Morris

    2003-08-15

    OAK- B135 To help nuclear power plant operators and suppliers plan, specify, design and implement the modernization of control rooms and other HSI in a way that takes advantage of digital systems and HSI technologies, reflects practical constraints associated with modernizing existing control rooms and I&C systems, and addresses issues associated with hybrid control room HSI.

  12. Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students |...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Minnesota Regions Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle ...

  13. Bohnam Middle School wins Pantex Middle School Science Bowl ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 4:13pm NNSA Blog Teams from 17 area Texas schools competed for a regional title Saturday at the Pantex Middle School Science Bowl at West Texas A&M ...

  14. EIS-0465: Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway Transmission Line Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    5: Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway Transmission Line Project in Maryland and Delaware EIS-0465: Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway Transmission Line Project in Maryland and Delaware March 4, ...

  15. New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas | Department...

    Energy Savers

    New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2009, the New Jersey Clean ...

  16. EERE Success Story-New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas EERE Success Story-New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas November 6, 2013 - 12:45pm Addthis In 2009, the New Jersey ...

  17. Middle Georgia Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Georgia Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Middle Georgia Biofuels Place: East Dublin, Georgia Zip: 31027 Product: Georgia-based biodiesel producer. References: Middle...

  18. The Broad-band X-ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint NuSTAR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Broad-band X-ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint NuSTARSuzaku Observation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Broad-band X-ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint ...

  19. Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project Funded by the Department of Energy, along with a number of partners, the collaborative Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project, led by the Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI), helps improve understanding of species composition and use of the Mid-Atlantic marine environment in order to promote more sustainable offshore wind development. This first-of-its-kind study along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States delivers

  20. MidAtlantic_Corridor_Map091707.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    MidAtlantic_Corridor_Map091707.pdf MidAtlantic_Corridor_Map091707.pdf (1.64 MB) More Documents & Publications DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 FACT SHEET: Designation of National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors,As Authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005

  1. The GeV to TeV view of SNR IC443: predictions for Fermi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrero, Ana Y. Rodriguez; Torres, Diego F.; Cea Del Pozo, Elsa de

    2009-04-08

    We present a theoretical model that explains the high energy phenomenology of the neighborhood of SNR IC 443, as observed with the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope and the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). We also discuss how the model can be tested with observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope. We interpret MAGIC J0616+225 as delayed TeV emission of cosmic-rays diffusing from IC 443 and interacting with a known cloud located at a distance of about 20 pc in the foreground of the remnant. This scenario naturally explains the displacement between EGRET and MAGIC sources, their fluxes, and their spectra. Finally, we predict how this context can be observed by Fermi.

  2. A transient supergiant X-ray binary in IC 10: An extragalactic SFXT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laycock, Silas; Cappallo, Rigel; Oram, Kathleen; Balchunas, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of a large amplitude (factor of ?100) X-ray transient (IC 10 X-2, CXOU J002020.99+591758.6) in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy IC 10 during our Chandra monitoring project. Based on the X-ray timing and spectral properties, and an optical counterpart observed with Gemini, the system is a high-mass X-ray binary consisting of a luminous blue supergiant and a neutron star. The highest measured luminosity of the source was 1.8 10{sup 37} erg s{sup 1}during an outburst in 2003. Observations before, during, and after a second outburst in 2010 constrain the outburst duration to be less than 3 months (with no lower limit). The X-ray spectrum is a hard power law (? = 0.3) with fitted column density (N{sub H} = 6.3 10{sup 21} atom cm{sup 2}), consistent with the established absorption to sources in IC 10. The optical spectrum shows hydrogen Balmer lines strongly in emission at the correct blueshift (-340 km s{sup 1}) for IC 10. The N III triplet emission feature is seen, accompanied by He II [4686] weakly in emission. Together these features classify the star as a luminous blue supergiant of the OBN subclass, characterized by enhanced nitrogen abundance. Emission lines of He I are seen, at similar strength to H?. A complex of Fe II permitted and forbidden emission lines are seen, as in B[e] stars. The system closely resembles galactic supergiant fast X-ray transients, in terms of its hard spectrum, variability amplitude, and blue supergiant primary.

  3. THE FAST AND FURIOUS DECAY OF THE PECULIAR TYPE Ic SUPERNOVA 2005ek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drout, M. R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Margutti, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Sanders, N. E.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Chakraborti, S.; Challis, P.; Friedman, A.; Hicken, M.; Jensen, C.; Mazzali, P. A.; Parrent, J. T.; Filippenko, A. V.; Li, W.; Cenko, S. B.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Brown, P. J.; and others

    2013-09-01

    We present extensive multi-wavelength observations of the extremely rapidly declining Type Ic supernova (SN Ic), SN 2005ek. Reaching a peak magnitude of M{sub R} = -17.3 and decaying by {approx}3 mag in the first 15 days post-maximum, SN 2005ek is among the fastest Type I supernovae observed to date. The spectra of SN 2005ek closely resemble those of normal SN Ic, but with an accelerated evolution. There is evidence for the onset of nebular features at only nine days post-maximum. Spectroscopic modeling reveals an ejecta mass of {approx}0.3 M{sub Sun} that is dominated by oxygen ({approx}80%), while the pseudo-bolometric light curve is consistent with an explosion powered by {approx}0.03 M{sub Sun} of radioactive {sup 56}Ni. Although previous rapidly evolving events (e.g., SN 1885A, SN 1939B, SN 2002bj, SN 2010X) were hypothesized to be produced by the detonation of a helium shell on a white dwarf, oxygen-dominated ejecta are difficult to reconcile with this proposed mechanism. We find that the properties of SN 2005ek are consistent with either the edge-lit double detonation of a low-mass white dwarf or the iron-core collapse of a massive star, stripped by binary interaction. However, if we assume that the strong spectroscopic similarity of SN 2005ek to other SNe Ic is an indication of a similar progenitor channel, then a white-dwarf progenitor becomes very improbable. SN 2005ek may be one of the lowest mass stripped-envelope core-collapse explosions ever observed. We find that the rate of such rapidly declining Type I events is at least 1%-3% of the normal SN Ia rate.

  4. Depositional patterns of kerogen, Atlantic Margin, North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armentrout, J.M.

    1985-02-01

    Geochemical and biostratigraphic data from offshore wells along the Atlantic margin of North America define a depositional history dominated by coastal-plain and shallow-shelf facies containing degraded and residual continent-derived kerogen. Exceptions to this generalization are 4 depositional facies containing hydrogen-rich amorphous kerogen assemblages. The rocks containing hydrogen-rich amorphous kerogen assemblages are: (1) Upper Jurassic inner-shelf facies probably deposited in algal-rich lagoonlike environments, (2) Lower Cretaceous nonmarine coaly facies, probably deposited in algal-rich swamplike environments, (3) middle Cretaceous abyssal-plain facies probably deposited by turbidity currents that originated on an algal-rich slope, and (4) Miocene outer-shelf to upper-slope facies probably deposited under algal-rich upwelling systems. Correlations of these facies to seismic packages allows for extrapolation of probable organic facies distribution throughout the continental margin. Such modeling of organic facies distributions in conjunction with plate-tectonic and ocean-circulation models permits refinement of strategies for hydrocarbon exploration.

  5. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. ON THE RADIAL EXTENT OF THE DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY IC10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanna, N.; Bono, G.; Buonanno, R.; Stetson, P. B.; Ferraro, I.; Caputo, F.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Bresolin, R.; Cignoni, M.; Matsunaga, N.; Pietrinferni, A.; Romaniello, M.; Storm, J.; Walker, A. R.

    2010-10-20

    We present new deep and accurate space (Advanced Camera for Surveys-Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope) and ground-based (Suprime-Cam at Subaru Telescope, Mega-Cam at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) photometric and astrometric data for the Local Group dwarf irregular IC10. We confirm the significant decrease of the young stellar population when moving from the center toward the outermost regions. We find that the tidal radius of IC10 is significantly larger than previous estimates of r{sub t} {approx_lt} 10'. By using the I, V-I color-magnitude diagram based on the Suprime-Cam data, we detect sizable samples of red giant (RG) stars up to radial distances of 18'-23' from the galactic center. The ratio between observed star counts (Mega-Cam data) across the tip of the RG branch and star counts predicted by Galactic models indicates a star count excess at least at a 3{sigma} level up to 34'-42' from the center. This finding supports the hypothesis that the huge H I cloud covering more than 1{sup 0} across the galaxy is associated with IC10. We also provide new estimates of the total luminosity (L{sub V} {approx} 9 x 10{sup 7} L {sub sun}, M{sub V} {approx} -15.1 mag) that agree with similar estimates available in the literature. If we restrict our study to the regions where rotational velocity measurements are available (r {approx} 13'), we find a mass-to-light ratio ({approx}10 M {sub sun}/L {sub sun}) that is at least one order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. The new estimate should be cautiously treated, since it is based on a minimal fraction of the body of the galaxy.

  7. Security in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, S.F. Jr.; Bruzonsky, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The full range of U.S. security interests in the Middle East is covered in this volume of original contributions from prominent international scholars. Case studies of key countries emphasize the prospects for peaceful political, economic, and cultural change in the region. The Arab-Israeli conflict is examined with particular attention to the ''Palestine problem,'' U.S. policy and diplomacy, and the peace process. Finally, the involvement of the U.S. and the USSR and the policy options open to them are considered. Includes chapters on oil and its role in Middle-East security issues.

  8. Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge April 27, 2016 'Solving the Rubik's Cube 2.0' includes 3D simulation LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 26, 2016-Andy Corliss, Phillip Ionkov and Ming Lo of Aspen Elementary, and Max Corliss of Los Alamos Middle School won first place in the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge for their project, "Solving the Rubik's Cube 2.0," Tuesday at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They created a

  9. Recent Observations of IC443 with the Whipple 10m Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holder, J.; Badran, H.M.; Blaylock, G.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S.M.; Buckley, J.H.; Byrum, K.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Celik, O.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Calle Perez, I. de la; Daniel, M.K.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, D.J.; Fegan, S.J.; Finley, J.P.; Fortson, L.F.

    2005-02-21

    We present here the results of recent observations made with the Whipple 10m imaging Cherenkov telescope of the region of the supernova remnant IC443. No evidence for gamma-ray emission was found, and we obtain an upper limit above 500 GeV (99.9% confidence) of 0.6 x 10-7 ph m-2 s-1 (0.11 Crab) at the location of the recently identified X-ray plerion nebula and 0.8 x 10-7 ph m-2 s-1 (0.14 Crab) at the site of the OH maser at the densest part of the molecular cloud.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ANL IC3P Research Focus on Diagnostic Studies at BNL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by 3M at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ANL IC3P research focus on diagnostic...

  11. DISK EVOLUTION IN OB ASSOCIATIONS: DEEP SPITZER/IRAC OBSERVATIONS OF IC 1795

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roccatagliata, Veronica; Bouwman, Jeroen; Henning, Thomas; Gennaro, Mario; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Feigelson, Eric; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Lawson, Warrick A.

    2011-06-01

    We present a deep Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) survey of the OB association IC 1795 carried out to investigate the evolution of protoplanetary disks in regions of massive star formation. Combining Spitzer/IRAC data with Chandra/Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observations, we find 289 cluster members. An additional 340 sources with an infrared excess, but without X-ray counterpart, are classified as cluster member candidates. Both surveys are complete down to stellar masses of about 1 M{sub sun}. We present pre-main-sequence isochrones computed for the first time in the Spitzer/IRAC colors. The age of the cluster, determined via the location of the Class III sources in the [3.6]-[4.5]/[3.6] color-magnitude diagram, is in the range of 3-5 Myr. As theoretically expected, we do not find any systematic variation in the spatial distribution of disks within 0.6 pc of either O-type star in the association. However, the disk fraction in IC 1795 does depend on the stellar mass: sources with masses >2 M{sub sun} have a disk fraction of {approx}20%, while lower mass objects (2-0.8 M{sub sun}) have a disk fraction of {approx}50%. This implies that disks around massive stars have a shorter dissipation timescale.

  12. Infrared tip of the red giant branch and distances to the MAFFEI/IC 342 group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Po-Feng; Tully, R. Brent; Jacobs, Bradley A.; Rizzi, Luca; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from the previously used I-band, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of ∼5% in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously used Advance Camera for Surveys F606W and F814W filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45{sub −0.13}{sup +0.13} Mpc for IC 342, 3.37{sub −0.23}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 1, and 3.52{sub −0.30}{sup +0.32} Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  13. Understanding compact object formation and natal kicks. IV. The case of IC 10 X-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Tsing-Wai; Valsecchi, Francesca; Ansari, Asna; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Fragos, Tassos; McClintock, Jeffrey; Glebbeek, Evert E-mail: francesca@u.northwestern.edu E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: ansari@ldeo.columbia.edu

    2014-08-01

    The extragalactic X-ray binary IC 10 X-1 has attracted attention as it is possibly the host of the most massive stellar-mass black-hole (BH) known to date. Here we consider all available observational constraints and construct its evolutionary history up to the instant just before the formation of the BH. Our analysis accounts for the simplest possible history, which includes three evolutionary phases: binary orbital dynamics at core collapse, common envelope (CE) evolution, and evolution of the BH-helium star binary progenitor of the observed system. We derive the complete set of constraints on the progenitor system at various evolutionary stages. Specifically, right before the core collapse event, we find the mass of the BH immediate progenitor to be ? 31 M{sub ?} (at 95% of confidence, same hereafter). The magnitude of the natal kick imparted to the BH is constrained to be ? 130 km s{sup 1}. Furthermore, we find that the 'enthalpy' formalism recently suggested by Ivanova and Chaichenets is able to explain the existence of IC 10 X-1 without the need to invoke unreasonably high CE efficiencies. With this physically motivated formalism, we find that the CE efficiency required to explain the system is in the range of ? 0.6-1.

  14. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan Southern Africa is the world's largest emitter of biomass-burning (BB) aerosols. Their westward transport over the remote southeast Atlantic Ocean colocates some of the largest atmospheric loadings of absorbing aerosol with the least examined of the Earth's major subtropical

  15. Conneaut Middle School Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Conneaut Middle School Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Conneaut Middle School Wind Turbine Facility Conneaut Middle School Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility...

  16. Oil Study Guide - Middle School | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Middle School Oil Study Guide - Middle School Oil Study Guide - Middle School (271.4 KB) More Documents & Publications Oil Study Guide - High School evaluationegstech2008.pdf A ...

  17. New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural Gas | Department...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... and diesel elsewhere. | Photo courtesy of Clean Energy In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety New Jersey: Atlantic City Jitneys Running on Natural ...

  18. Sandia, the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    the Atlantic Council, and NM Water Resource Research Institute Sponsor Roundtable on Western Water Scarcity - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ...

  19. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to

  20. Advanced Reactor Licensing: Experience with Digital I&C Technology in Evolutionary Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, RT

    2004-09-27

    This report presents the findings from a study of experience with digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology in evolutionary nuclear power plants. In particular, this study evaluated regulatory approaches employed by the international nuclear power community for licensing advanced l&C systems and identified lessons learned. The report (1) gives an overview of the modern l&C technologies employed at numerous evolutionary nuclear power plants, (2) identifies performance experience derived from those applications, (3) discusses regulatory processes employed and issues that have arisen, (4) captures lessons learned from performance and regulatory experience, (5) suggests anticipated issues that may arise from international near-term deployment of reactor concepts, and (6) offers conclusions and recommendations for potential activities to support advanced reactor licensing in the United States.

  1. AmeriFlux US-ICs Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bret-Harte, Syndonia [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Euskirchen, Eugenie [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ICs Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra. Site Description - The Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra (Fen Station) is located near Imnavait Creek in Alaska, north of the Brooks Range in the Kuparuk basin near Lake Toolik and the Toolik Field Station. The Kuparuk River has its headwaters in the Brooks Range and drains through northern Alaska into the Arctic Ocean. Within these headwaters lies the Imnavait basin at an average elevation of 930 m. Water tracks run down the hill in parallel zones with a spacing of approximately 10 m. The Fen Station was deployed at the end of Summer 2007.

  2. Middle East oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The following subjects are covered in this publication: (1) position of preeminence of the Middle East; (2) history of area's oil operations for Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, neutral zone, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman and Egypt; (3) gas operations of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Iraq and United Arab Emirates; (4) changing relationships with producing countries; (5) a new oil pricing environment; (6) refining and other industrial activities; and (7) change and progress. 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Optical observations of the type Ic supernova 2007gr in NGC 1058

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Juncheng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Junzheng; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li, Weidong; Chornock, Ryan; Steele, Thea E-mail: wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-08-01

    We present extensive optical observations of the normal Type Ic supernova (SN) 2007gr, spanning from about one week before maximum light to more than one year thereafter. The optical light and color curves of SN 2007gr are very similar to those of the broad-lined Type Ic SN 2002ap, but the spectra show remarkable differences. The optical spectra of SN 2007gr are characterized by unusually narrow lines, prominent carbon lines, and slow evolution of the line velocity after maximum light. The earliest spectrum (taken at t = –8 days) shows a possible signature of helium (He I λ5876 at a velocity of ∼19,000 km s{sup –1}). Moreover, the larger intensity ratio of the [O I] λ6300 and λ6364 lines inferred from the early nebular spectra implies a lower opacity of the ejecta shortly after the explosion. These results indicate that SN 2007gr perhaps underwent a less energetic explosion of a smaller-mass Wolf-Rayet star (∼8-9 M{sub ☉}) in a binary system, as favored by an analysis of the progenitor environment through pre-explosion and post-explosion Hubble Space Telescope images. In the nebular spectra, asymmetric double-peaked profiles can be seen in the [O I] λ6300 and Mg I] λ4571 lines. We suggest that the two peaks are contributed by the blueshifted and rest-frame components. The similarity in velocity structure and the different evolution of the strength of the two components favor an aspherical explosion with the ejecta distributed in a torus or disk-like geometry, but inside the ejecta the O and Mg have different distributions.

  4. Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Resources National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms,...

  5. The ACS LCID project. X. the star formation history of IC 1613: Revisiting the over-cooling problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Hidalgo, Sebastian L.; Monelli, Matteo; Gallart, Carme; Aparicio, Antonio E-mail: shidalgo@iac.es E-mail: carme@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, Va Lctea s and others

    2014-05-01

    We present an analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of a field near the half-light radius in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 based on deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging. Our observations reach the oldest main sequence turn-off, allowing a time resolution at the oldest ages of ?1 Gyr. Our analysis shows that the SFH of the observed field in IC 1613 is consistent with being constant over the entire lifetime of the galaxy. These observations rule out an early dominant episode of star formation in IC 1613. We compare the SFH of IC 1613 with expectations from cosmological models. Since most of the mass is in place at early times for low-mass halos, a naive expectation is that most of the star formation should have taken place at early times. Models in which star formation follows mass accretion result in too many stars formed early and gas mass fractions that are too low today (the 'over-cooling problem'). The depth of the present photometry of IC 1613 shows that, at a resolution of ?1 Gyr, the star formation rate is consistent with being constant, at even the earliest times, which is difficult to achieve in models where star formation follows mass assembly.

  6. Longfellow Middle School Edges Out Gildersleeve to Win 2011 Virginia Middle

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab Edges Out Gildersleeve to Win 2011 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Longfellow Middle School Edges Out Gildersleeve to Win 2011 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl 1st_place_Longfellow.jpg The team from Longfellow Middle School, Falls Church, won the 2011 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl held March 5 at Jefferson Lab. Pictured, left to right, are Ryan Golant, Kunal Naik, Keaton Lee, Tarun Kamath, Ross Dempsey and Coach James Bradford. Photo:

  7. Natural Gas Study Guide - Middle School | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Middle School Natural Gas Study Guide - Middle School Natural Gas Study Guide - Middle School (246.85 KB) More Documents & Publications Natural Gas Study Guide - High School What is shale gas? Oil Study Guide - Middle

  8. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  9. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  10. Chemistry of western Atlantic precipitation at the mid-Atlantic coast and on Bermuda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, T.M.; Galloway, J.N.; Jickells, T.D.; Knap, A.H.

    1982-12-20

    The major ion composition of western Atlantic precipitation falling at the coast of eastern United States (Lewes, Delaware) and at the Sargasso Sea (Bermuda Island) has been measured by event year round (May 1980 to April 1981) to assess the influence of the ocean on precipitation from storms that leave the North American continent and transit over the western Atlantic. Particular attention is paid to the oceanic influence on the sulfur and nitrogen precursors of acid rains. While sea salt contributes over half (by weight) of the salt in precipitation at the coast and over three quarters at Bermuda, most of the sulfate (90% at the coast and 50% at Bermuda) is in excess to sea salt sodium. Since Bermuda precipitation is still acidified some factor of 8 relative to pure equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide, this strong acidity has been attributed to the long-range transport sulfur and nitrogen precursors in the marine troposphere during which the sulfuric acid component dominates. A sulfur budget for the western Atlantic troposphere shows that of the total amount of sulfur exported from the North American continent (>3.9 TgS/yr) less than 3% (0.1 TgS/yr) is from natural sources, the rest being from anthropogenic emissions. If Bermuda precipitation is taken as typical of wet fallout of sulfur over the western Atlantic, then no more than half (<2 TgS/yr) of North American excess (nonsea salt) sulfur export falls out to the western Atlantic and at least half undergoes potential transoceanic transport as acid rain precursors to the east of Bermuda.

  11. Chemistry of Western Atlantic Precipitation at the Mid-Atlantic Coast and on Bermuda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, T.M.; Galloway, J.N.; Jickells, T.D.; Knap, A.H.

    1982-12-20

    The major ion composition of western Atlantic precipitation falling at the coast of eastern United States (Lewes, Delaware) and at the Sargasso Sea (Bermuda Island) has been measured by event year round (May 1980 to April 1981) to assess the influence of the ocean on precipitation from storms that leave the North American continent and transit over the western Atlantic. Particular attention is paid to the oceanic influence on the sulfur and nitrogen precursors of 'acid rains.' While sea salt contributes over half (by weight) of the salt in precipitation at the coast and over three quarters at Bermuda, most of the sulfate (90% at the coast and 50% at Bermuda) is in excess to sea salt sodium. Since Bermuda precipitation is still acidified some factor of 8 relative to pure equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide, this strong acidity has been attributed to the long-range transport sulfur and nitrogen precursors in the marine troposphere during which the sulfuric acid component dominates. A sulfur budget for the western Atlantic troposphere shows that of the total amount of sulfur exported from the North American continuent (>3.9 TgS/yr) less than 3% (0.1 TgS/yr) is from natural sources, the rest being from anthropogenic emissions. If Bermuda precipitation is taken as typical of wet fallout of sulfur over the western Atlantic, then no more than half (<2 TgS/yr) of north American excess (nonsea salt) sulfur export falls out to the western Atlantic and at least half undergoes potential transoceanic tranport as acid rain precursors to the east of Bermuda.

  12. Cenozoic climates: evidence from the North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Cenozoic biostratigraphy and climatology of the North Atlantic and adjacent land areas reflects the continuing fragmentation of Eurasia and concomitant changes on ocean-continent geometry. A latitudinal (zonal) Mesozoic circulation pattern evolved into a predominantly longitudinal (meridional) pattern during the Cenozoic in which the development of oceanic gateways and barriers gradually decreased the efficiency of poleward heat transfer resulting in the progressive climatic change which has taken place over the past 50 million years. Cenozoic distributional data from the North Atlantic and adjacent land areas will be reviewed from the following fields: a) terrestrial vertebrates and floras: b) marine calcareous microplankton and benthic foraminifera; c) other marine invertebrates. Available data suggests that the present climate in the northern hemisphere has resulted from a gradual, but inexorable, strengthening of latitudinal and vertical temperature gradients punctuated by several brief intervals of accelerated change. The absence of evidence for northern hemisphere polar glaciation prior to the late Neogene does not preclude seasonal cooling near the freezing point in post-Eocene time. Evidence for early Paleogene cold climates is not reflected in the fossil record.

  13. Longfellow Middle School Wins Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    7 | Jefferson Lab Wins Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 Longfellow Middle School Wins Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 2014 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl At the end of the day, the team from Longfellow Middle School, Falls Church, won the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl on March 7. The team of (back row, left to right) Coach Jim Bradford, Fred Zhang and Benjamin Xu, and (front, l. to r.) Christopher Bi, Wenbo Wu and Aaditya Singh pose for a

  14. Progress on the FabrIc for Frontier Experiments project at Fermilab

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Box, Dennis; Boyd, Joseph; Dykstra, Dave; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Herner, Kenneth; Kirby, Michael; Kreymer, Arthur; Levshina, Tanya; Mhashilkar, Parag; Sharma, Neha

    2015-01-01

    The FabrIc for Frontier Experiments (FIFE) project is an ambitious, major-impact initiative within the Fermilab Scientific Computing Division designed to lead the computing model for Fermilab experiments. FIFE is a collaborative effort between experimenters and computing professionals to design and develop integrated computing models for experiments of varying needs and infrastructure. The major focus of the FIFE project is the development, deployment, and integration of Open Science Grid solutions for high throughput computing, data management, database access and collaboration within experiment. To accomplish this goal, FIFE has developed workflows that utilize Open Science Grid sites along with dedicated and commercialmore » cloud resources. The FIFE project has made significant progress integrating into experiment computing operations several services including new job submission services, software and reference data distribution through CVMFS repositories, flexible data transfer client, and access to opportunistic resources on the Open Science Grid. Hence, the progress with current experiments and plans for expansion with additional projects will be discussed. FIFE has taken a leading role in the definition of the computing model for Fermilab experiments, aided in the design of computing for experiments beyond Fermilab, and will continue to define the future direction of high throughput computing for future physics experiments worldwide« less

  15. The H I chronicles of little things BCDs II: The origin of IC 10's H I structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Trisha; Simpson, Caroline E.; Pokhrel, Nau Raj; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Johnson, Megan; Nidever, David L. E-mail: simpsonc@fiu.edu E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com E-mail: dnidever@umich.edu

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we analyze Very Large Array (VLA) telescope and Green Bank Telescope (GBT) atomic hydrogen (H I) data for the LITTLE THINGS (Local Irregulars That Trace Luminosity Extremes, The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey; https://science.nrao.edu/science/surveys/littlethings) blue compact dwarf galaxy IC 10. The VLA data allow us to study the detailed H I kinematics and morphology of IC 10 at high resolution while the GBT data allow us to search the surrounding area at high sensitivity for tenuous H I. IC 10's H I appears highly disturbed in both the VLA and GBT H I maps with a kinematically distinct northern H I extension, a kinematically distinct southern plume, and several spurs in the VLA data that do not follow the general kinematics of the main disk. We discuss three possible origins of its H I structure and kinematics in detail: a current interaction with a nearby companion, an advanced merger, and accretion of intergalactic medium. We find that IC 10 is most likely an advanced merger or a galaxy undergoing accretion.

  16. West KY Regional Middle School Science Bowl

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Deegan Lawrence (far right) from Henderson County North Middle School gives an answer as teammates D.J. Banks (middle) and Alex Chandler look on during DOE’s West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl in Paducah February 6. Henderson North won the competition and will compete in DOE’s National Science Bowl® in Washington, D.C. April 30 through May 4.

  17. Are You Smarter Than a Middle Schooler?

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Test your knowledge of math and science against the middle school finalists in the National Science Bowl with these 10 questions.

  18. Atlantic multi-decadal oscillation covaries with Agulhas leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biastoch, Arne; Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Morrison, Adele K.; van Sebille, Erik; Weijer, Wilbert; Griffies, Stephen M.

    2015-12-10

    The interoceanic transfer of seawater between the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, ‘Agulhas leakage’, forms a choke point for the overturning circulation in the global ocean. Here, by combining output from a series of high-resolution ocean and climate models with in situ and satellite observations, we construct a time series of Agulhas leakage for the period 1870–2014. The time series demonstrates the impact of Southern Hemisphere westerlies on decadal timescales. Agulhas leakage shows a correlation with the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation on multi-decadal timescales; the former leading by 15 years. Lastly, this is relevant for climate in the North Atlantic.

  19. THE EVOLUTION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS SURROUNDING INTERMEDIATE-MASS STARS: IC 1805

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, S. C.; Strom, S. E.; Rebull, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of a study of the intermediate- and high-mass stars in the young, rich star-forming complex IC 1805, based on a combination of optical, near-infrared, and mid-infrared photometry, and classification spectra. These data provide the basis for characterizing the masses and ages for stars more massive than {approx}2 M{sub sun} and enable a study of the frequency and character of circumstellar disks associated with intermediate- and high-mass stars. Optically thick accretion disks among stars with masses 2 < M/M{sub sun} < 4 are rare ({approx}2% of members) and absent among more massive stars. A larger fraction ({approx}10%) of stars with masses 2 < M/M{sub sun} < 4 appear to be surrounded by disks that have evolved from the initial optically thick accretion phase. We identify four classes of such disks. These classes are based on spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of excess emission above photospheric levels: disks that are (1) optically thin based on the magnitude of the observed excess emission from 2 to 24 {mu}m, (2) optically thin in their inner regions (r < 20 AU) and optically thick in their outer regions, (3) exhibit empty inner regions (r < 10 AU) and optically thin emission in their outer regions, and (4) exhibit empty inner regions and optically thick outer regions. We discuss, and assess the merits and liabilities of, proposed explanations for disks exhibiting these SED types and suggest additional observations that would test these proposals.

  20. Atlantic Hurricane Surge Response to Geoengineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, John; Grinsted, Aslak; Guo, Xiaoran; Yu, Xiaoyong; Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Rinke, Annette; Cui, Xuefeng; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Lenton , Andrew; Watanabe, Shingo; Ji, Duoying

    2015-09-29

    Devastating Atlantic hurricanes are relatively rare events. However their intensity and frequency in a warming world may rapidly increase by a factor of 2-7 for each degree of increase in mean global temperature. Geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosol injection cools the tropics relative to the polar regions, including the hurricane main development region in the Atlantic, suggesting that geoengineering may be an effective method of controlling hurricanes. We examine this hypothesis using 8 Earth System Model simulations of climate under the GeoMIP G3 and G4 schemes that use stratospheric aerosols to reduce the radiative forcing under the RCP4.5 scenario. Global mean temperature increases are greatly ameliorated by geoengineering, and tropical temperature increases are at most half of those in RCP4.5, but sulphate injection would have to double between 2020 and 2070 to balance RCP 4.5 to nearly 10 Tg SO2 yr-1, with consequent implications for damage to stratospheric ozone. We project changes in storm frequencies using a temperature-dependent Generalized Extreme Value statistical model calibrated by historical storm surges from 1923 and observed temperatures. The numbers of storm surge events as big as the one that caused the 2005 Katrina hurricane are reduced by about 50% compared with no geoengineering, but this is only marginally statistically significant. However, when sea level rise differences at 2070 between RCP4.5 and geoengineering are factored in to coastal flood risk, we find that expected flood levels are reduced by about 40 cm for 5 year events and perhaps halved for 50 year surges.

  1. Category:Atlantic City, NJ | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Atlantic City NJ Public Service Elec & Gas Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment...

  2. Biodiversity Research Institute Mid-Atlantic Baseline Study Webinar

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carried out by the Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technology Office and other partners, the goal of the Mid-Atlantic Baseline...

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds - Supplemental Measurements Supplemental Measurements Related Campaigns LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds 2016.06.01, Zuidema, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds - Supplemental Measurements 2016.06.01 - 2017.05.31 Lead Scientist : Paquita Zuidema Abstract Supplementary measurements are desired for the LASIC campaign to properly

  4. Things to Consider When Upgrading a Non-Power Reactor to a Digital I&C System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhlheim, Michael David; Hardin, LeRoy A; Hardesty, Duane; Wilson, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Non-Power Reactor (NPR) licensees are increasing their use of state-of-the-art digital technology in instrumentation and control (I&C) systems because digital systems offer improved reactor control, information processing, and information storage. In Generic Letter GL 95-02, the NRC recognized that the design characteristics specific to the new digital electronics could result in failure modes and system malfunctions that either were not considered during the initial plant design or not evaluated in sufficient detail in the safety analysis report. These concerns include potential common mode failures. A conversion from analog to digital I&C systems in NPRs solves some problems while potentially introducing others. Good design, engineering, review, and testing can identify and minimize these risks.

  5. Statistical circuit simulation with measurement-based active device models: Implications for process control and IC manufacturability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Root, D.E.; McGinty, D.; Hughes, B.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a new approach to statistical active circuit design which unifies device parametric-based process control and non-parametric circuit simulation. Predictions of circuit sensitivity to process variation and yield-loss of circuits fabricated in two different GaAs IC processes are described. The simulations make use of measurement-based active device models which are not formulated in terms of conventional parametric statistical variables. The technique is implemented in commercially available simulation software (HP MDS).

  6. Middle School Students | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Students National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Attending the National Finals ...

  7. Middle School Science Bowl | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Bowl Middle School Science Bowl February 25, 2017 Mark your calendars Be a part of the Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University Middle School Science Bowl! Form a team and show you've got what it takes to compete against the best teams in the Midwest. This event is guaranteed to excite and challenge the Midwest's brightest middle school students. The basics - For students in grades 6, 7, and 8 - One-day academic competition - Held on the beautiful Iowa State University campus in Ames, Iowa

  8. Media Advisory: Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Set For March...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Set For March 5 at Jefferson Lab What: The Department of Energy's 2011 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 5,...

  9. Media Advisory: March 7 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Tournament...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    March 7 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Tournament What: The 2009 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 7, 2009. Round-robin competition will run...

  10. East Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space Heating...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name East Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space...

  11. National Science Bowl Update: Middle School Teams from Maryland...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Science Bowl Update: Middle School Teams from Maryland and Indiana to Compete for National Championship on Monday National Science Bowl Update: Middle School Teams from Maryland ...

  12. Energy-dependent evolution in IC10 X-1: hard evidence for an extended corona and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, R.; Steiner, J. F.; Prestwich, A. F.; Stevens, I. R.; Clark, J. S.; Kolb, U. C.

    2014-09-10

    We have analyzed a ∼130 ks XMM-Newton observation of the dynamically confirmed black hole + Wolf-Rayet (BH+WR) X-ray binary (XB) IC10 X-1, covering ∼1 orbital cycle. This system experiences periodic intensity dips every ∼35 hr. We find that energy-independent evolution is rejected at a >5σ level. The spectral and timing evolution of IC10 X-1 are best explained by a compact disk blackbody and an extended Comptonized component, where the thermal component is completely absorbed and the Comptonized component is partially covered during the dip. We consider three possibilities for the absorber: cold material in the outer accretion disk, as is well documented for Galactic neutron star (NS) XBs at high inclination; a stream of stellar wind that is enhanced by traveling through the L1 point; and a spherical wind. We estimated the corona radius (r {sub ADC}) for IC10 X-1 from the dip ingress to be ∼10{sup 6} km, assuming absorption from the outer disk, and found it to be consistent with the relation between r {sub ADC} and 1-30 keV luminosity observed in Galactic NS XBs that spans two orders of magnitude. For the other two scenarios, the corona would be larger. Prior BH mass (M {sub BH}) estimates range over 23-38 M {sub ☉}, depending on the inclination and WR mass. For disk absorption, the inclination, i, is likely to be ∼60-80°, with M {sub BH} ∼ 24-41 M {sub ☉}. Alternatively, the L1-enhanced wind requires i ∼ 80°, suggesting ∼24-33 M {sub ☉}. For a spherical absorber, i ∼ 40°, and M {sub BH} ∼ 50-65 M {sub ☉}.

  13. A fractographic technique for the estimation of initiation fracture toughness J[sub Ic] for ductile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srinivas, M.; Kamat, S.V. ); Rao, P.R. )

    1994-07-01

    A single specimen fractographic technique based on critical stretch zone width measurements is suggested for the estimation of fracture toughness (J[sub Ic]) for highly ductile materials. The salient feature of this technique is that it overcomes the problem of fatigue precracking and is able to predict the fracture toughness of a material using a blunt notch specimen. Fracture toughness tests on commercially pure Armco iron, nickel, and aluminum as well as Al-Mn based austenitic stainless steel and En28 steel were carried out to validate the method.

  14. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds - Cloud Radar at St. Helena Cloud Radar at St. Helena Related Campaigns LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds 2016.06.01, Zuidema, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds - Cloud Radar at St. Helena 2017.08.01 - 2017.10.31 Lead Scientist : Paquita Zuidema Abstract Smoke and clouds over the remote ocean represent a regime of significant

  16. NREL: Workforce Development and Education Programs - Middle School

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle School Learn about fun and exciting middle school programs and competitions that will put student's science and math skills to the test. National Middle School Science Bowl NREL Model Car Competitions Kit and Component Supplier List Printable Version NREL's Workforce Development & Education Programs Home About Workforce Development & Education Programs Grade 4-12 Students Middle School National Middle School Science Bowl NREL Model Car Competitions High School Science

  17. Crystal structure of human dynein light chain Dnlc2A: Structural insights into the interaction with IC74

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Junfeng; Wang Zhanxin; Wang Xinquan; Tang Qun; An Xiaomin; Gui Lulu; Liang Dongcai . E-mail: dcliang@sun5.ibp.ac.cn

    2006-10-27

    The human light chain of the motor protein dynein, Dnlc2A, is also a novel TGF-{beta}-signaling component, which is altered with high frequency in epithelial ovarian cancer. It is an important mediator of dynein and the development of cancer, owing to its ability to bind to the dynein intermediate light chain (DIC) IC74 and to regulate TGF-{beta}-dependent transcriptional events. Here we report the 2.1-A crystal structure of Dnlc2A using single anomalous diffraction. The proteins form a homodimer in solution and interact mainly through the helix {alpha}{sub 2}, strand {beta}{sub 3}, and the loop following this strand in each protein to generate a 10-stranded {beta}-sheet core. The surface of the {beta}-sheet core is mainly positively charged and predicted (by software PPI-Pred) to be the site that interacts with other partners. At the same time, the residues 79-82, 88, and 90 of each molecule formed two holes in the core. Residue 89 of each molecule, which is crucial for the DIC binding function of Dnlc2A, is within the holes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the homodimer is the structural and functional unit maintained by hydrogen bonding interactions and hydrophobic packing, and that the patch of the surface of the {beta}-sheet core is the main area of interaction with other partners. Furthermore, the two holes would be the key sites to interact with IC74.

  18. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic and their onshore impacts. Atlantic summary report, July 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, R.W.; Havran, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Atlantic continues. Hydrocarbon exploration efforts have been and probably will continue to be concentrated on four major sedimentary basins: the Georges Bank Basin, the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau Basin. To date, 46 exploratory wells have been drilled in these areas, most of them in the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area where resource estimates indicate the hydrocarbon potential is the greatest of the three Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Currently, no operators are involved in exploration efforts in the Atlantic. No commercial discoveries have been announced. Since the first and most successful sale of Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf blocks in Lease Sale 40 in August 1976, there have been eight other sales bringing total revenues of almost $3 billion to the Federal Treasury. The current tentative milestone chart for the 5-year offshore leasing schedule calls for four additional lease sales to be held in the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Although no firm plans have been made for the transportation of potential offshore hydrocarbons to onshore processing facilities, it is believed that oil would be transported by tanker or tug-barge system to existing refineries on the Raritan and Delaware Bays. Gas probably would be transported by pipeline to one of several onshore landfalls identifed by Atlantic Coast States and in Federal environmental impact documents. Recent onshore support for Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf exploration came from Davisville, Rhode Island, the only shore support base for the Atlantic that was active during 1984. Three maps are provided in the back pocket of this report for the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas. 29 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

  20. Middle Rio Grande Cooperative Water Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-11-01

    This is computer simulation model built in a commercial modeling product Called Studio Expert, developed by Powersim, Inc. The simulation model is built in a system dynamics environment, allowing the simulation of the interaction among multiple systems that are all changing over time. The model focuses on hydrology, ecology, demography, and economy of the Middle Rio Grande, with Water as the unifying feature.

  1. Task 4 - EMI/RFI Issues Potentially Impacting Electromagnetic Compatibility of I&C Systems (NRCHQ6014D0015)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Ewing, Paul D.

    2015-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) regulations in Part 50, “Domestic Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities,” of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50) state that structures, systems, and components important to safety in a nuclear power plant are to be designed to accommodate the effects of environmental conditions (i.e., remain functional under all postulated service conditions) and that design control measures such as testing are to be used to check the adequacy of design. Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.180 was developed to provide guidance to licensees and applicants on methods acceptable to the NRC staff for complying with the NRC’s regulations on design, installation, and testing practices for addressing the effects of electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference (EMI/RFI) and power surges on safety-related instrumentation and control (I&C) systems. The first revision of RG 1.180 was issued in January 2000 and a second revision was issued in October 2003*. The second revision differed from the first revision in endorsing Military Standard (MIL-STD)-461E and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Standard (Std) 61000 series of EMI/RFI test methods, extending the guidance to cover signal line testing, incorporating frequency ranges where portable communications devices are experiencing increasing use, and relaxing the operating envelopes (test levels) when experience and confirmatory research warranted. It also offered exemptions from specific test criteria based on technical considerations such as plant conditions and the intended location of the safety-related I&C equipment. Since the last revision, new requirements have been identified, associated RGs have been created and updated, and additional industry guidance has been developed. Additionally, the operational environment has changed with the increase in wireless communication technology for both personal (smartphone) and industrial

  2. Media Advisory - The Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Is Set...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Is Set For March 6 at Jefferson Lab What: The 2010 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 6, 2010. Round-robin...

  3. Longfellow Middle School Edges Out Gildersleeve to Win 2011 Virginia...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Edges Out Gildersleeve to Win 2011 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl 1stplaceLongfellow.jpg The team from Longfellow Middle School, Falls Church, won the 2011 Virginia Regional...

  4. Delgado-Aparicio urges middle school students to pursue careers...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Luis Delgado-Aparicio (with a photo of Einstein behind him) speaks to middle school ... Luis Delgado-Aparicio (with a photo of Einstein behind him) speaks to middle school ...

  5. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- Nevada Science Bowl - MIDDLE SCHOOL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bowl NNSANFO Language Options U.S. DOENNSA - Nevada Field Office Nevada Science Bowl - Middle School March 4-5, 2016 Middle School Competition On behalf of the National Nuclear ...

  6. STEM Volunteer Training: Engaging Middle School Students | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    STEM Volunteer Training: Engaging Middle School Students STEM Volunteer Training: Engaging Middle School Students August 13, 2015 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT Register: https:...

  7. Middle School Science Bowl 2003 - News Releases | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle School Science Bowl 2003 June 18, 2003 Golden, CO. - Middle School Science Students to Face Off in Battle of Brains Teams from around the nation to test their science skills ...

  8. EnergySmart Schools Case Study: Northern Guilford Middle School

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-01

    An EnergySmart Schools Case Study on the Northern Guilford Middle School in Greensboro, North Carolina

  9. V.P. Biden Hosts the Middle Class Task Force

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu will join Vice President Biden at the White House as he hosts a Middle Class Task Force event.

  10. Coal Study Guide - Middle School | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Middle School Coal Study Guide - Middle School Coal Study Guide - Middle School (728.75 KB) More Documents & Publications Coal Study Guide for Elementary School Coal Study Guide - High School Guide to Low-Emission Boiler and Combustion Equipment Selection

  11. The post-war Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tempest, P.

    1992-03-09

    The Middle East remains today the global energy fulcrum. One year after the Persian Gulf war, the region is in greater turmoil and political uncertainty than it has known in modern times. The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and subsequent external military intervention forced neighboring states to question the need for a foreign military presence in the future. The rift between the secular revolutionary states in the region led by Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Algeria, and Syria and the traditional monarchy of Saudi Arabia and the emirates of the gulf has widened. Egypt provides, at present, an uncomfortable bridge. The balance of political forces may be shifting. This paper attempts to answer the following questions: Where will we see the new leadership in the Middle East Will it again play a role through the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and determination of the oil price in shaping the structure of global energy supply and demand

  12. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuidema, P; Chiu, C; Fairall, CW; Ghan, SJ; Kollias, P; McFarguhar, GM; Mechem, DB; Romps, DM; Wong, H; Yuter, SE; Alvarado, MJ; DeSzoeke, SP; Feingold, G; Haywood, JM; Lewis, ER; McComiskey, A; Redemann, J; Turner, DD; Wood, R; Zhu, P

    2015-12-01

    Southern Africa is the world’s largest emitter of biomass-burning (BB) aerosols. Their westward transport over the remote southeast Atlantic Ocean colocates some of the largest atmospheric loadings of absorbing aerosol with the least examined of the Earth’s major subtropical stratocumulus decks. Global aerosol model results highlight that the largest positive top-of-atmosphere forcing in the world occurs in the southeast Atlantic, but this region exhibits large differences in magnitude and sign between reputable models, in part because of high variability in the underlying model cloud distributions. Many uncertainties contribute to the highly variable model radiation fields: the aging of shortwave-absorbing aerosol during transport, how much of the aerosol mixes into the cloudy boundary layer, and how the low clouds adjust to smoke-radiation and smoke-cloud interactions. In addition, the ability of the BB aerosol to absorb shortwave radiation is known to vary seasonally as the fuel type on land changes.

  13. STEM: Volunteer Training Engaging Middle School Students

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    STEM: Volunteer Training Engaging Middle School Students August 13, 2015 Erin Twamley Education Project Manager Department of Energy Nimisha Ghosh Roy Network Manager National Girls Collaborative Project Rabiah Mayas, Ph.D. Director of Science and Integrated Strategies Museum of Science and Industry Chicago 2 Agenda You are on mute! Use your webinar bar to fill out poll, send a chat or send in a question. Please tell us via chat if you cannot see or hear. Overview of STEM Training Key Outcomes

  14. Middle Urals` pollution prevention priorities assessment project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, M.; Ott, R.L.; Chukanov, V.

    1995-09-13

    The Middle Urals is an important Russian industrial region. The key industries are also the most environmentally damaging: mining, metallurgical and chemical industries. There are some 600 large-sized and medium-sized enterprises located within the Middle Urals` region. Their annual solid and gaseous chemical releases have led to exceeding some maximum permissible contaminant concentrations by factors of tens and hundreds. The environmental problems of the Middle Urals are of such magnitude, seriousness, and urgency that the limited available resources can be applied only to the problems of the highest priority in the most cost-effective way. By the combined efforts of scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA), Institute of Industrial Ecology (Ekaterinburg, Russia) and Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Snezhinsk, Russia) the project on Environmental Priorities Assessment was initiated in 1993. Because the project will cut across a spectrum of Russian environmental, social, and political issues, it has been established as a genuine Russian effort led by Russian principals. Russian participants are the prime movers and decision-makers, and LLNL participants are advisors. A preliminary project has been completed to gather relevant environmental data and to develop a formal proposal for the full priorities assessment project for submittal to the International Science and Technology Center. The proposed priorities assessment methodology will be described in this paper. The specific objectives of this project are to develop and to implement a methodology to establish Russian priorities for future pollution prevention efforts in a limited geographic region of the Middle Urals (a part of Chelyabinsk and Sverdlovsk Oblasts). This methodology will be developed on two geographic levels: local (town scale) and regional (region scale). Detailed environmental analysis will be performed on a local scale and extrapolated to the regional scale.

  15. A COMPREHENSIVE X-RAY AND MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE COLLIDING GALAXY PAIR NGC2207/IC 2163

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mineo, S.; Rappaport, S.; Levine, A.; Homan, J.; Pooley, D.; Steinhorn, B. E-mail: sar@mit.edu E-mail: jeroen@space.mit.edu E-mail: bsteinho@mit.edu

    2014-12-20

    We present a comprehensive study of the total X-ray emission from the colliding galaxy pair NGC2207/IC 2163, based on Chandra, Spitzer, and GALEX data. We detect 28 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), 7 of which were not detected previously because of X-ray variability. Twelve sources show significant long-term variability, with no correlated spectral changes. Seven sources are transient candidates. One ULX coincides with an extremely blue star cluster (BV = 0.7). We confirm that the global relation between the number and luminosity of ULXs and the integrated star-formation rate (SFR) of the host galaxy also holds on local scales. We investigate the effects of dust extinction and age on the X-ray binary (XRB) population on subgalactic scales. The distributions of N {sub X} and L {sub X} are peaked at L {sub IR}/L {sub NUV} ? 1, which may be associated with an age of ?10Myr for the underlying stellar population. We find that approximately one-third of the XRBs are located in close proximity to young star complexes. The luminosity function of the XRBs is consistent with that typical for high-mass XRBs and appears unaffected by variability. We disentangle and compare the X-ray diffuse spectrum with that of the bright XRBs. The hot interstellar medium dominates the diffuse X-ray emission at E ? 1keV and has a temperature kT=0.28{sub ?0.04}{sup +0.05}keV and intrinsic 0.5-2keV luminosity of 7.910{sup 40} erg s{sup ?1}, a factor of ?2.3 higher than the average thermal luminosity produced per unit SFR in local star-forming galaxies. The total X-ray output of NGC2207/IC 2163 is 1.510{sup 41} erg s{sup ?1}, and the corresponding total integrated SFR is 23.7 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}.

  16. EIS-0465: Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway Transmission Line Project in Maryland

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Delaware | Department of Energy 5: Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway Transmission Line Project in Maryland and Delaware EIS-0465: Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway Transmission Line Project in Maryland and Delaware March 4, 2011 EIS-0465: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Construction of Phase II of the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway Transmission Line Project, in Maryland and Delaware February 4, 2011 EIS-0465: Announcement of Public Scoping Meetings Construction of Phase II of

  17. I&C Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    of services to the office and the general public. These include public information, media relations, congressional, intergovernmental and tribal relations, public...

  18. Nuclear Factor I-C promotes proliferation and differentiation of apical papilla-derived human stem cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zhihua; Jiang, Yong; Niu, Zhongying; Fu, Lei; Luo, Zhirong; Cooper, Paul R.; Smith, Anthony J.; He, Wenxi

    2015-03-15

    The transcription factor Nuclear Factor I-C (NFIC) has been implicated in the regulation of tooth root development, where it may be anticipated to impact on the behavior of stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs) and root odontoblast activity. We hypothesized that NFIC may provide an important target for promoting dentin/root regeneration. In the present study, the effects of NFIC on the proliferation and differentiation of SCAPs were investigated. Over-expression of NFIC increased cell proliferation, mineralization nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in SCAPs. Furthermore, NFIC up-regulated the mRNA levels of odontogenic-related markers, ALP, osteocalcin and collagen type I as well as dentin sialoprotein protein levels. In contrast, knockdown of NFIC by si-RNA inhibited the mineralization capacity of SCAPs and down-regulated the expression of odontogenic-related markers. In conclusion, the results indicated that upregulation of NFIC activity in SCAPs may promote osteo/odontoblastic differentiation of SCAPs. - Highlights: • NFIC promotes the proliferation of SCAPs in vitro. • NFIC promotes osteo/odontogenic differentiation of SCAPs in vitro. • Knockdown of NFIC inhibits odontogenic differentiation in SCAPs.

  19. THE CEPHEID PERIOD-LUMINOSITY RELATION (THE LEAVITT LAW) AT MID-INFRARED WAVELENGTHS. IV. CEPHEIDS IN IC 1613

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Wendy L.; Rigby, Jane; Madore, Barry F.; Persson, S. E.; Sturch, Laura; Mager, Violet E-mail: jrigby@ociw.edu E-mail: persson@ociw.edu E-mail: vmager@ociw.edu

    2009-04-20

    We present mid-infrared period-luminosity relations for Cepheids in the Local Group galaxy IC 1613. Using archival Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) imaging data from Spitzer we were able to measure single-epoch magnitudes for five, 7-50 days, Cepheids at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. When fit to the calibrating relations, measured for the Large Magellanic Cloud Cepheids, the data give apparent distance moduli of 24.29 {+-} 0.07 and 24.28 {+-} 0.07 at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, respectively. A multiwavelength fit to previously published BVRIJHK apparent moduli and the two IRAC moduli gives a true distance modulus of 24.27 {+-} 0.02 mag with E(B - V) = 0.08 mag, and a corresponding metric distance of 715 kpc. Given that these results are based on single-phase observations derived from exposures having total integration times of only 1000 s pixel{sup -1}, we suggest that Cepheids out to about 2 Mpc are accessible to Spitzer with modest integration times during its warm mission. We identify the main limiting factor to this method to be crowding/contamination induced by the ubiquitous population of infrared-bright asymptotic giant branch stars.

  20. Middle East sparking increase in world drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    Global drilling outside the United States appears to have bottomed out last year if official numbers and estimates supplied to World oil prove accurate. The 1990:0090 forecast calls for a 7.8% boost to 22,316 wells (excluding the USSR, Eastern Europe and North Korea), and every region expects to see a net increase. Figures provided by governmental agencies, operating companies and other sources indicate Middle Eastern drilling last year hit a new high for the 1980's with 948 wells. These figures are also given for Western Europe, the Far East, Africa, South America, Canada, Mexico, Costa Rica, and Guatemala.

  1. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future

  2. SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN NGC 1333 AND IC 348

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbrich, Jan; Wolk, Scott J.; Osten, Rachel A.

    2011-07-20

    Young stellar objects (YSOs) and in particular protostars are known to show a variety of high-energy processes. Observations in the X-ray and centimetric radio wavelength ranges are thought to constrain some of these processes, e.g., coronal-type magnetic activity. There is a well-known empirical correlation of radio and X-ray luminosities in active stars, the so-called Guedel-Benz (GB) relation. Previous evidence of whether YSOs are compatible with this relation remains inconclusive for the earliest evolutionary stages. The main difficulty is that due to the extreme variability of these sources, simultaneous observations are essential. Until now, only a few YSOs and only a handful of protostars have been observed simultaneously in the X-ray and radio range. To expand the sample, we have obtained such observations of two young clusters rich in protostars, NGC 1333 and IC 348. While the absolute sensitivity is lower for these regions than for more nearby clusters like CrA, we find that even in deep continuum observations carried out with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA), the radio detection fraction for protostars in these clusters is much lower than the X-ray detection fraction. Very few YSOs are detected in both bands, and we find the radio and X-ray populations among YSOs to be largely distinct. We combine these new results with previous simultaneous Chandra and VLA observations of star-forming regions and find that YSOs with detections in both bands appear to be offset toward higher radio luminosities for given X-ray luminosities when compared with the GB relation, although even in this sensitive data set most sources are too weak for the radio detections to provide information on the emission processes. The considerably improved sensitivity of the Expanded VLA will provide a better census of the YSO radio population as well as better constraints on the emission mechanisms.

  3. EA-1970: Fishermen’s Energy LLC Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore Atlantic City, New Jersey

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is proposing to provide funding to Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm, LLC to construct and operate up to six wind turbine generators, for an offshore wind demonstration project, approximately 2.8 nautical miles off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ. The proposed action includes a cable crossing from the turbines to an on-shore existing substation.

  4. Greeley's Maplewood Middle School Stellar in Solar Car Race

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Greeley's Maplewood Middle School Stellar in Solar Car Race For more information contact: Sarah Holmes Barba, 303-275-3023 email: Sarah Barba Golden, Colo., May. 12, 2001 - Students from Greeley's Maplewood Middle School built the fastest model solar car and won the Junior Solar Sprint at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today. A team from Lyons Middle School won top honors for design. Thirty-seven teams from across Colorado entered the 20-meter race,

  5. Media Advisory - Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Jefferson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Middle School Science Bowl Media Advisory - Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl What: Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 1, 2014. Round robin competition runs from 9 a.m. - noon. The double elimination, semi-final and finalist rounds run from 1:30 - ~ 4 p.m. Awards presentations will be made immediately after the final round. Where: CEBAF Center Auditorium, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, Va.

  6. 2016 Middle School Science Bowl | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 Middle School Science Bowl Check out video highlights of the 2016 Ames Laboratory Regional Middle School Science Bowl, held Feb. 20. Twenty-four teams from across the state competed in the event, with Ames Middle School winning the championship over LeMars and a trip to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Science Bowl, April 28-May 2 in Washington DC

  7. EERE Middle East and African Partnerships and Projects | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Middle East and African Partnerships and Projects EERE Middle East and African Partnerships and Projects The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) engages bilaterally with individual countries in the Middle East and Africa. Bilateral Partnerships Israel EERE collaborates with the Israeli Ministry of Energy and Water Resources (MEW) to conduct jointly-funded research, development, and demonstration projects that aim to successfully commercialize cutting-edge clean

  8. Linkages of Remote Sea Surface Temperatures and Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity Mediated by the African Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hagos, Samson M.

    2015-01-28

    Warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in North Atlantic and Mediterranean (NAMED) can influence tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the tropical East Atlantic by modulating summer convection over western Africa. Analysis of 30 years of observations show that the NAMED SST is linked to a strengthening of the Saharan heat low and enhancement of moisture and moist static energy in the lower atmosphere over West Africa, which favors a northward displacement of the monsoonal front. These processes also lead to a northward shift of the African easterly jet that introduces an anomalous positive vorticity from western Africa to the main development region (50W20E; 10N20N) of Atlantic TC. By modulating multiple processes associated with the African monsoon, this study demonstrates that warm NAMED SST explains 8% of interannual variability of Atlantic TC frequency. Thus NAME SST may provide useful predictability for Atlantic TC activity on seasonal-to-interannual time scale.

  9. Middle School Academic Competition - Double Elimination | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos and Videos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event...

  10. Ames wins 2015 Middle School Science Bowl | The Ames Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    championship round. Complete results from the afternoon can be found HERE. Champion - Ames Middle School Seated (left to right): Brennan Seymour, Andres Cordorba,...

  11. Middle Tennessee E M C | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Tennessee E M C Place: Tennessee Website: www.mtemc.com Twitter: @MidTnElectric Facebook: https:www.facebook.comMiddleTennesseeElectric?refts Outage Hotline:...

  12. Middle School Academic Competition - Double Elimination | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    NSB Home About High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2015 ... School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2015 News Media WDTS Home Contact Information ...

  13. Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Thursday, February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to Strengthen Cooperation on Clean Energy Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Wednesday, February 24 Readout of Energy Secretary Chu's Meetings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

  14. Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Site | Department of Energy Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah Site Heath Middle School Science Students Study Environmental Issue at Paducah Site April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Mentor Jim Erickson of the LATA Kentucky team shows Heath Middle School sixth grader Ian Morgan how to use red cabbage to indicate if a watery solution is acidic, basic, or neutral. Mentor Jim Erickson of the LATA Kentucky team shows Heath Middle School sixth grader Ian Morgan

  15. Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky...

    Energy Savers

    The DOE National Science Bowl challenges students' knowledge in all areas of science, including biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, energy, and math. Middle school ...

  16. Stoller Middle School of Beaverton, Ore., emerges undefeated...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Wash. Shahala Middle School, Vancouver, Wash. Pierce County Home School Club, Milton, Wash. BPA sponsors the science bowl to showcase students' talents in science,...

  17. Middle School Academic Competition - Double Elimination | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos and Videos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2015 Competition Results...

  18. Training Manual for Senior and Middle Level Managers in Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Agency for International Developments (USAID) Energy Small Grants Program developed a training manual in order to build the knowledge base of senior and middle level managers...

  19. Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students |...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals ...

  20. Maryland team wins Virginia/Maryland Regional Middle School Science...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    There are two competitions at the National Middle School Science Bowl - an academic math and science competition and a model fuel-cell car competition. The academic competition...

  1. Middle Tennessee EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation (MTEMC) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offer incentives for residential customers through the eScore Program by:

  2. Honey Creek Middle School Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Competition - News Releases | NREL Honey Creek Middle School Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Competition June 24, 2006 Photo of students from Honey Creek Middle School standing with their trophy from the National Middle School Science Bowl. Students from Honey Creek Middle School traveled from Terre Haute, Ind., to take first place at the National Middle School Science Bowl in Denver, Colo. Five middle school students from Honey Creek Middle School in Terre Haute, Ind.,

  3. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  4. EM participates in local middle school’s career week

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    OREM recently participated in Vine Middle School’s 6th Annual College and Career Week. OREM sends employee representatives to the Knoxville-based middle school every year to educate children about the value of education and the diverse jobs that are possible through the sciences.

  5. Composite refraction-reflection stack sections: Tracing faults in the Atlantic coastal plain sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, D.E.; Coruh, C.; Costain, J.K.

    1993-05-01

    Seismic data from the Atlantic Coastal Plain are reprocessed and composite refraction-reflection stack sections produced to investigate basement faults that penetrate upward into Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments in South Carolina. Reprocessing recovered reflections from within the deep crust to the Moho as well as from within thin veneer (300) of the Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments. One of the major objectives of this paper is to discuss the use of shallow refracted arrivals to construct a composite refraction- reflection stack that allows better imaging of the subsurface at shallow depths.

  6. Multi-model analysis of the Atlantic influence on Southern Amazon rainfall

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Yoon, Jin -Ho

    2015-12-07

    Amazon rainfall is subject to year-to-year fluctuation resulting in drought and flood in various intensities. A major climatic driver of the interannual variation of the Amazon rainfall is El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Also, the Sea Surface Temperature over the Atlantic Ocean is identified as an important climatic driver on the Amazon water cycle. Previously, observational datasets were used to support the Atlantic influence on Amazon rainfall. Furthermore, it is found that multiple global climate models do reproduce the Atlantic-Amazon link robustly. However, there exist differences in rainfall response, which primarily depends on the climatological rainfall amount.

  7. South Atlantic sag basins: new petroleum system components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, S.G. Mohriak, W.U.; Mello, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    Newly discovered pre-salt source rocks, reservoirs and seals need to be included as components to the petroleum systems of both sides of the South Atlantic. These new components lie between the pre-salt rift strata and the Aptian salt layers, forming large, post-rift, thermal subsidence sag basins. These are differentiated from the older rift basins by the lack of syn-rift faulting and a reflector geometry that is parallel to the base salt regional unconformity rather than to the Precambrian basement. These basins are observed in deep water regions overlying areas where both the mantle and the crust have been involved in the extension. This mantle involvement creates post-rift subsiding depocenters in which deposition is continuous while proximal rift-phase troughs with little or no mantle involvement are bypassed and failed to accumulate potential source rocks during anoxic times. These features have been recognized in both West African Kwanza Basin and in the East Brasil Rift systems. The pre-salt source rocks that are in the West African sag basins were deposited in lacustrine brackish to saline water environment and are geochemically distinct from the older, syn-rift fresh to brackish water lakes, as well as from younger, post-salt marine anoxic environments of the drift phase. Geochemical analyses of the source rocks and their oils have shown a developing source rock system evolving from isolated deep rift lakes to shallow saline lakes, and culminating with the infill of the sag basin by large saline lakes to a marginally marine restricted gulf. Sag basin source rocks may be important in the South Atlantic petroleum system by charging deep-water prospects where syn-rift source rocks are overmature and the post-salt sequences are immature.

  8. Monitoring and Mitigation Alternatives for Protection of North Atlantic Right Whales during Offshore Wind Farm Installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Matzner, Shari; Copping, Andrea E.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-01

    Progress report on defining and determining monitoring and mitigation measures for protecting North Atlantic Right Whales from the effects of pile driving and other activities associated with installation of offshore wind farms.

  9. 2014 SAME Mid-Atlantic Regional Joint Engineer Training Symposium (JETS)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) presents its Mid-Atlantic Regional Joint Engineer Training Symposium (JETS) with the topic Navigating the New Normal: Partnerships for the Future.

  10. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region.

  11. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  12. Secretary Bodman Travels to the Middle East | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Middle East Secretary Bodman Travels to the Middle East November 10, 2005 - 2:22pm Addthis Four-nation swing to emphasize domestic energy needs and goals WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman embarked upon a four-nation tour through the Middle East to enhance the United States' relationship with major oil-producing nations, promote economic liberalization and increased foreign investment in the region, and reaffirm U.S. energy policy goals. "Both consumers and producers

  13. Media Advisory: March 7 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Tournament |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab 7 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Tournament Media Advisory: March 7 Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Tournament What: The 2009 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 7, 2009. Round-robin competition will run from 10 a.m. - noon. The double-elimination, semi-final and finalist rounds will run from 1:30 - 5 p.m. Awards will be presented immediately after the final round. Where: CEBAF Center Auditorium at the Thomas Jefferson National

  14. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Smith Middle School...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Smith Middle School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl ... 2010 DOE National Science Bowl Photos - Smith Middle School Print Text Size: A A A ...

  15. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electric Transmission Corridors | Department of Energy Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 11:12am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today announced the Department's designation of two National Interest

  16. DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electric Transmission Corridors | Department of Energy Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors DOE Designates Southwest Area and Mid-Atlantic Area National Interest Electric Transmission Corridors October 2, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin M. Kolevar today announced the Department's designation of two National Interest

  17. Heat flow in the northwest Atlantic (abstract) (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Heat flow in the northwest Atlantic (abstract) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heat flow in the northwest Atlantic (abstract) Authors: Hobart, M.A. [1] ; Herman, B.M. ; Langseth, M.G. ; Sclater, J.G. ; Crowe, J. + Show Author Affiliations (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, NY) Publication Date: 1977-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 5202016 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: EOS, Trans., Am. Geophys. Union; (United States); Journal Volume:

  18. South Atlantic summary report 2. Revision of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, J.L.; Kurz, F.N.; Porter, E.O.

    1982-05-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the South Atlantic Region began in 1960, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. In 1977, a Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) well was drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. In March 1978, the first lease sale, Sale 43, was held, resulting in the leasing of 43 tracts. Approximately a year later, in May 1979, the first exploratory drilling began, and by February 1980, six exploratory wells had been drilled by four companies. Hydrocarbons were not found in any of these wells. Lease Sale 56, the second lease sale in the South Atlantic Region, was held in August 1981. The sale resulted in the leasing of 47 tracts. Most of the leased tracts are in deep water along the Continental Slope off North Carolina. To date, no drilling has occurred on these tracts, but it is likely that two wells will be drilled or will be in the process of being drilled by the end of 1982. Reoffering Sale RS-2 is scheduled for July 1982, and it will include tracts offered in Lease Sale 56 that were not awarded leases. Lease Sale 78 is scheduled to be held in July 1983. The most recent (March 1982) estimates of risked resources for leased lands in the South Atlantic OCS are 27 million barrels of oil and 120 billion cubic feet of gas. To date, onshore impacts resulting from OCS exploration have been minimal, and they were associated with Lease Sale 43 exploratory activities. In June 1981, the South Atlantic Regional Technical Working Group prepared a Regional Transportation Management Plan for the South Atlantic OCS. The plan is principally an integration of regulatory frameworks, policies, and plans that are applicable to pipeline siting from each of the South Atlantic coastal States and Federal agencies with jurisdiction in the area.

  19. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix C, Compendium of Pre-Workshop Answers for Mid-Atlantic Survey & Modeling Efforts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Appendix C: Compendium of Pre-Workshop Answers for Mid-Atlantic Survey & Modeling Efforts July 2013 Appendix C: Compendium of Pre-Workshop Answers 1 Mid-Atlantic Survey & Modeling Efforts Prepared by Participants in Advance of: Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication 1 These responses were provided by workshop participants in advance of the workshop. This appendix records the verbatim responses of participants. 56

  20. Record 18 teams prepare for Virginia Regional Middle School Science...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    MEDIA ADVISORY: News Media invited to cover the March 10 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl at Jefferson Lab; Record turnout with bright young minds from 18 teams vying...

  1. Record 18 teams prepare for Virginia Regional Middle School Science...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy's Jefferson Lab, in Newport News, Va., hosts the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl on Saturday, March 10, with a record 18 teams competing. This is the...

  2. Middle School Science Bowl Registration | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    one team. A team is made up of 4-5 middle school students. All teams should have a coach mentoring and managing the team. Teams are selected on a first come first serve basis....

  3. Middle Georgia El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    El Member Corp Place: Georgia Phone Number: 1-800-342-0144 Website: www.mgemc.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comMiddleGeorgiaEMC Outage Hotline: 229-268-2671; 800-342-0144...

  4. Teachers and JLab scientists help middle-school science instructors...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    scientists help middle-school science instructors prepare to teach physics in the 21st century By John Anderson, II, JLab Public Affairs intern August 11, 2003 As part of Jefferson...

  5. Middle School Energy and Nuclear Science Curriculum Now Available

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A new middle school science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum called The Harnessed Atom is now available on the Office of Nuclear Energy website. This new curriculum offers...

  6. Tucson and Colorado Springs Middle Schools Win Science Bowl Hydrogen...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucson and Colorado Springs Middle Schools Win Science Bowl Hydrogen Fuel Cell Model Car ... captured top place in the open class model car competitions on the first day of the ...

  7. Massachusetts Middle School Goes Local for PV Solar Energy System...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New 26 kW solar energy system to be part of curriculum at Norton Middle School. | Photo courtesy of Norton Public Schools New 26 kW solar energy system to be part of curriculum at ...

  8. Middle Schoolers Face-Off in Model Car Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forty-four teams entered the middle school Lithium-Ion Battery Powered Model Car Competition, and two teams distinguished themselves, one for speed and the other for design.

  9. EECBG Success Story: Massachusetts Middle School Goes Local for...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    When the school buses pull up to Norton Middle School this year, students will see more than just their friends and teachers, they'll get a view of new - 126 solar panels on the ...

  10. EECBG Success Story: Massachusetts Middle School Goes Local for...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New 26 kW solar energy system to be part of curriculum at Norton Middle School. | Photo courtesy of Norton Public Schools. New 26 kW solar energy system to be part of curriculum at...

  11. Space Coast Science Education Alliance Science Bowl for Middle School

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Students | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Space Coast Science Education Alliance Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC

  12. Media Advisory: March 1 Middle School Science Bowl Tournament | Jefferson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab 1 Middle School Science Bowl Tournament Media Advisory What: Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 1, 2008. Round robin competition runs from 10 a.m. - noon. The double elimination, semi-final and finalist rounds run from 1:30 - 5 p.m. Awards presentations will be made immediately after the final round. Where: CEBAF Center Auditorium, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA Details: Twenty teams, representing

  13. Local Middle School Receives School-to-Career Grant

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle School Receives School-to-Career Grant For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., December 24, 1997 - Deer Creek Middle School in Littleton received a $10,000 grant from the Jefferson County School-to-Career Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) assisted the school in writing the grant as an extension of NREL's National Teacher Enhancement Program. The money will be used to help students explore career opportunities

  14. Digital I&C systems in nuclear power plants. Risk-screening of environmental stressors and a comparison of hardware unavailability with an existing analog system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, M.; Vesely, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this report, we present a screening study to identify environmental stressors for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in a nuclear power plant (NPP) which can be potentially risk-significant, and compare the hardware unavailability of such a system with that of its existing analog counterpart. The stressors evaluated are temperature, humidity, vibration, radiation, electro-magnetic interference (EMI), and smoke. The results of risk-screening for an example plant, subject to some bounding assumptions and based on relative changes in plant risk (core damage frequency impacts of the stressors), indicate that humidity, EMI from lightning, and smoke can be potentially risk-significant. Risk from other sources of EMI could not be evaluated for a lack of data. Risk from temperature appears to be insignificant as that from the assumed levels of vibrations. A comparison of the hardware unavailability of the existing analog Safety Injection Actuation System (SIAS) in the example plant with that of an assumed digital upgrade of the system indicates that system unavailability may be more sensitive to the level of redundancy in elements of the digital system than to the environmental and operational variations involved. The findings of this study can be used to focus activities relating to the regulatory basis for digital I&C upgrades in NPPs, including identification of dominant stressors, data-gathering, equipment qualification, and requirements to limit the effects of environmental stressors. 30 refs., 8 figs., 26 tabs.

  15. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Africa and Middle East Project Plan 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, Jeremy D.

    2012-02-01

    GTRI Africa and Middle East Project Plan submitted for school project to American Graduate University.

  16. Los Alamos Middle School team wins regional MathCounts competition

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Middle School team wins Regional MathCounts competition Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:November 2, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Los Alamos Middle School wins regional MathCounts event Competes against 60 other middle schools for the title. March 1, 2013 Los Alamos Middle School won the regional MathCounts competition. Los Alamos Middle School won the regional MathCounts competition. Contacts Editor

  17. Intravenous and standard immune serum globulin preparations interfere with uptake of /sup 125/I-C3 onto sensitized erythrocytes and inhibit hemolytic complement activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, M.; Rosenkranz, P.; Brown, C.Y.

    1985-02-01

    Antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes were used as a model to determine the effects of therapeutic immune serum globulin (ISG) preparations on the ability of this particulate activator to fix C3 and initiate hemolysis. Both standard and intravenous forms of ISG inhibit uptake of /sup 125/I-C3, presumably by competing for the deposition of ''nascent'' C3b molecules onto the erythrocytes. Both forms of ISG also inhibit hemolytic activity of whole serum or purified complement components. The inhibition appears to be a specific property of IgG itself, since similar inhibition was not caused by equivalent concentrations of human serum albumin, and was not affected by the buffer in which the ISG was dissolved. Interference with C3 uptake onto antibody-sensitized platelets and/or inhibition of hemolytic complement activity could contribute to the efficacy of high dose intravenous ISG in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  18. Implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center(FRMAC) - Emergency Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-04-01

    Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-5 requires all federal departments and agencies to adopt a National Incident Management System (NIMS)/Incident Command System (ICS) and use it in their individual domestic incident management and emergency prevention, preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation programs and activities, as well as in support of those actions taken to assist state and local entities. This system provides a consistent nationwide template to enable federal, state, local, and tribal governments, private-sector, and nongovernmental organizations to work together effectively and efficiently to prepare for, prevent, respond to, and recover from domestic incidents, regardless of cause, size, or complexity, including acts of catastrophic terrorism. This document identifies the operational concepts of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center's (FRMAC) implementation of the NIMS/ICS response structure under the National Response Plan (NRP). The construct identified here defines the basic response template to be tailored to the incident-specific response requirements. FRMAC's mission to facilitate interagency environmental data management, monitoring, sampling, analysis, and assessment and link this information to the planning and decision staff clearly places the FRMAC in the Planning Section. FRMAC is not a mitigating resource for radiological contamination but is present to conduct radiological impact assessment for public dose avoidance. Field monitoring is a fact-finding mission to support this effort directly. Decisions based on the assessed data will drive public protection and operational requirements. This organizational structure under NIMS is focused by the mission responsibilities and interface requirements following the premise to provide emergency responders with a flexible yet standardized structure for incident response activities. The coordination responsibilities outlined in the NRP are based on the NIMS/ICS

  19. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  20. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Greeley's Maplewood Middle School Stellar in Solar Car Race

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Greeley's Maplewood Middle School Stellar in Solar Car Race Media may contact: George Douglas, 303-275-4096 email: George Douglas Golden, Colo., May. 13, 2000 - Students from Greeley's Maplewood Middle School built the fastest model solar car and won the Junior Solar Sprint at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) today. A team from Monarch K-8 School in Louisville won top honors for design. Forty-one teams from across Colorado entered the 20-meter race,

  2. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1987-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1986 totaled 4,493,973,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,312,254 BOPD), up 22.3% from the revised 1985 total of 3,673,729,000 bbl. Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, and Oman had significant increased; Iran was the only Middle East country with a significant decrease. New fields went on production in Oman and Yemen Arab Republic, and significant discoveries were reported in Iraq, Yemen Arab Republic, Oman, and Syria. However, exploration was generally down in most countries. Exploration and production operations continued to be affected by war in Iraq and Iran. 8 figures, 7 tables.

  3. Nysmith School Wins Virginia Middle School Science Bowl | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nysmith School Wins Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Nysmith School for the Gifted, Herndon, finished in first place at the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl. Nysmith will now represent Virginia at the National Science Bowl® (NSB) finals to be held in Washington, D.C., April 28-May 2. Team members (front row, left to right) Ajit Kadeveru, Vaibhav Sharma, and Kaien Yang, and (back row, l.-r.) Anusha Allamsetty and Ishaan Sharma are pictured with their team trophy and Beau Tyler,

  4. Middle School Science Bowl Registration | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle School Science Bowl Registration Regional champions of the Academic Science Bowl win a trip to Washington, D.C.! We encourage all eligible participants to apply to the National Science Bowl. All applicants must be enrolled for the current school year in grades sixth, seventh, or eighth at the team's school. Each school is only allowed to submit one team. A team is made up of 4-5 middle school students. All teams should have a coach mentoring and managing the team. Teams are selected on a

  5. NETL Researcher Honored with 2014 FLC Mid-Atlantic Regional STEM...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    high school and middle school students throughout West Virginia, putting the pursuit of STEM careers within the reach of students. Dr. Gerdes is a researcher at NETL, studying...

  6. BETO-Funded Technology Produces Jet Fuel for Virgin Atlantic | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy BETO-Funded Technology Produces Jet Fuel for Virgin Atlantic BETO-Funded Technology Produces Jet Fuel for Virgin Atlantic September 27, 2016 - 11:36am Addthis Alcohol-to-jet production units at LanzaTech Freedom Pines Biorefinery in Soperton, Georgia. Alcohol-to-jet production units at LanzaTech Freedom Pines Biorefinery in Soperton, Georgia. LanzaTech recently announced a significant milestone-producing 1,500 gallons of renewable jet fuel from industrial waste gases. LanzaTech

  7. Wind Turbine Wake-Redirection Control at the Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churchfield, M.; Fleming, P.; Bulder, B.; White, S.

    2015-05-06

    In this paper, we will present our work towards designing a control strategy to mitigate wind turbine wake effects by redirecting the wakes, specifically applied to the Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW), proposed for deployment off the shore of Atlantic City, New Jersey. As wind turbines extract energy from the air, they create low-speed wakes that extend behind them. Full wake recovery Full wake recovery to the undisturbed wind speed takes a significant distance. In a wind energy plant the wakes of upstream turbines may travel downstream to the next row of turbines, effectively subjecting them to lower wind speeds, meaning these waked turbines will produce less power.

  8. Advection of sulfur dioxide over the western Atlantic Ocean during CITE 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, D.C.; Bandy, A.R.; Beltz, N.; Driedger, A.R. III; Ferek, R. ||

    1993-12-01

    During the NASA Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation 3 sulfur intercomparison over the western Atlantic Ocean, five techniques for the determination of sulfur dioxide were evaluated. The response times of the techniques varied from 3 to 30 min. Based on the ensemble of measurements reported, it was clear that advection of SO2 from the North American continent occurred in the boundary layer (altitude less than 1 km) with only one exception. The vertical distribution of SO2 above the boundary layer for the northern and southern Atlantic Ocean was remarkably similar duing this experiment.

  9. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1982-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1981 totaled 5,741,096,000 bbl, or an average rate of 15,729,030 BOPD, down 14.9% from 1980. Increases were in Oman, Dubai, and Turkey. Significant decreases occurred in Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were made in Oman, Saudi Arabia, and Abu Dhabi.

  10. Cooperative monitoring workshop: Focus on the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Vannoni, M.; Biringer, K.; Dobranich, P.

    1995-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation hosted a workshop on the application of cooperative monitoring to the Middle East. The workshop, held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, from July 17 through 21, 1994, was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the US Department of State. The meeting, which focused on use of technical monitoring tools and sharing of collected information to facilitate regional agreements, included participants from five regional countries as well as from American universities, the US government, and US National Laboratories. Some attendees previously participated in meetings of the Arms Control and Regional Security working group of the Middle East Multilateral Peace Talks. The workshop combined presentations, demonstrations and hands-on experimentation with monitoring hardware and software. An exercise was conducted to evaluate and recommend cooperative monitoring options for a model agreement between two hypothetical countries. Historical precedents were reviewed and the role of environmental and natural resource conflicts explored. These activities were supplemented by roundtable discussions covering Middle East security issues, the relationship of ``national means`` to cooperative monitoring, and cooperative monitoring of ballistic missiles in the Middle East.

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North...

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North...

  13. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook

    Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North...

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North...

  15. Interannual Modulation of Subtropical Atlantic Boreal Summer Dust Variability by ENSO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFlorio, Mike; Goodwin, Ian D.; Cayan, Dan; Miller, Arthur J.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pierce, David; Russell, Lynn M.; Singh, Balwinder

    2016-01-01

    Dust variability in the climate system has been studied for several decades, yet there remains an incomplete understanding of the dynamical mechanisms controlling interannual and decadal variations in dust transport. The sparseness of multi-year observational datasets has limited our understanding of the relationship between climate variations and atmospheric dust. We use available observations and a century-length fully coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulation to show that the El Niño- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) exerts a control on North African dust transport during boreal summer. In CESM, this relationship is stronger over the dusty tropical North Atlantic than near Barbados, one of the few sites having a multi-decadal observed record. During strong La Niña summers in CESM, a statistically significant increase in lower tropospheric easterly wind is associated with an increase in North African dust transport over the Atlantic. Barbados dust and Pacific SST variability are only weakly correlated in both observations and CESM, suggesting that other processes are controlling the crossbasin variability of dust. We also use our CESM simulation to show that the relationship between downstream North African dust transport and ENSO fluctuates on multidecadal timescales and may be modulated by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Our findings indicate that existing observations of dust over the tropical North Atlantic are not extensive enough to completely describe the variability of dust and dust transport, and demonstrate the importance of global models to supplement and interpret observational records.

  16. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes Offshore Regions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Environmental consulting and engineering firm Stantec is observing patterns in offshore bat activity and species composition in the Gulf of Maine, Great Lakes, and Mid-Atlantic coastal states regions to inform efforts to mitigate potential impacts associated with offshore wind energy development in these regions.

  17. STEM Middle School Mentoring Cafés Take it on the Road | Department...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    STEM Middle School Mentoring Cafs Take it on the Road STEM Middle School Mentoring Cafs Take it on the Road November 12, 2015 - 3:00pm Addthis STEM Mentoring Cafes - sponsored ...

  18. D.C. Middle and High School Students Get a Chance to Experience...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    D.C. Middle and High School Students Get a Chance to Experience the Regional Science Bowl Competition Setting D.C. Middle and High School Students Get a Chance to Experience the ...

  19. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Will James Middle School...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    The Will James Middle School team competes in the Solar Car Challenge at the National Science Bowl in Washington, DC. Will James Middle School won the Best Design Document award. ...

  20. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Will James Middle School...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Will James Middle School Team as they compete in the Solar Car Challenge at the National Science Bowl for middle school students in Washington DC. Left to right: Evan Quarles, ...

  1. 2011 Annual IC Assessment Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    June 2014 LMS/MND/S11616 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MND/S11616 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Institutional Controls at the Mound, Ohio, Site Miamisburg, Ohio June 2014 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Sitewide Institutional Controls, Mound Site June 2014 Doc. No. S11616 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  2. LES Modeling for IC Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Large eddy simulation offers better accuracy and sensitivity to study cyclic variability, mode transition and mixing effects in engine design and operation

  3. GENERAL@ELECTtiIC COMPINY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    We propose to fabricate the pellets in by the Atomic Power Equipment Department, with&&ptable modifications and to bill that Department for fabrication services in a&&&e with the ...

  4. OC_IC_DIGITAL.indd

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    OCIO Leadership OCIO Leadership Michael M. Johnson Chief Information Officer More about Michael M. Johnson Robert G. Green Principal Deputy CIO for Enterprise Information Resources Management More about Robert G. Green Cheryl Peace Principal Deputy CIO for Cyber More about Cheryl Peace Sarah L. Gamage Deputy CIO for Resources Management More about Sarah Gamage Allan Manuel Deputy CIO for Enterprise Policy, Portfolio Management & Governance More about Allan Manuel Renee Forney (Acting) Deputy

  5. 2011 Annual IC Assessment Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of ... of Sitewide Institutional Controls, Mound Site U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  6. Carolina Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    to participate. Competition Location Southwest Middle School 13624 Steele Creek Road Charlotte, North Carolina 28273 Regional Contact Information Regional Coordinator: ...

  7. Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Alabama Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Alabama Regional Middle School

  8. Argonne Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Argonne Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Argonne Regional Middle School

  9. Arizona Middle School Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Arizona Middle School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Arizona Middle School Regional

  10. Arkansas Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Arkansas Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Arkansas Regional Middle

  11. BPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    BPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals BPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl

  12. Carolina Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Carolina Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Carolina Middle School Science Bowl Print Text

  13. Chicago Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Chicago Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Chicago Regional Middle School

  14. Colorado Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Colorado Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Colorado Regional Middle

  15. Georgia Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Georgia Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Georgia Regional Middle School

  16. Indiana Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Indiana Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Indiana Regional Middle School

  17. Iowa Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Iowa Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Iowa Regional Middle School Science Bowl

  18. Kansas Middle School Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Kansas Middle School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Kansas Middle School Regional

  19. Maryland Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Maryland Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Maryland Regional Middle

  20. Missouri Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Missouri Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Missouri Regional Middle

  1. NYC Regional SHPE Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) NYC Regional SHPE Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals NYC Regional SHPE Middle

  2. Nebraska Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Nebraska Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Nebraska Regional Middle

  3. Nevada Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Nevada Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Nevada Regional Middle School

  4. New Jersey Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) New Jersey Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals New Jersey Regional Middle

  5. New Mexico Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) New Mexico Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals New Mexico Regional Middle

  6. Northeast Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Northeast Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Northeast Regional Middle

  7. Oklahoma Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Oklahoma Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Oklahoma Regional Middle

  8. Pantex Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Pantex Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Pantex Regional Middle School

  9. Puerto Rico Middle School Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Puerto Rico Middle School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Puerto Rico Middle

  10. Redding Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Redding Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Redding Regional Middle School

  11. SWPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    SWPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals SWPA Regional Middle School Science Bowl

  12. Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Virginia Regional Middle

  13. Wisconsin Middle School Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Wisconsin Middle School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Wisconsin Middle School

  14. Wyoming Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) Wyoming Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Wyoming Regional Middle School

  15. Teachers and JLab scientists help middle-school science instructors prepare

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    to teach physics in the 21st century | Jefferson Lab and JLab scientists help middle-school science instructors prepare to teach physics in the 21st century Valerie Bicouvaris, Berkeley MIddle School, Williamsburg Valerie Bicouvaris, Berkeley Middle School, Williamsburg, uses magnetism to conduct a "magic" trick during the course section on magnetism. Teachers and JLab scientists help middle-school science instructors prepare to teach physics in the 21st century By John Anderson,

  16. Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 Teams for Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 Teams for Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 Teams for Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., March 2, 2009 - The nation's future scientists, engineers and mathematicians may be found testing their mental skills at the Department of Energy's Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl taking place at Jefferson Lab on Saturday, March 7. Twenty-three teams, representing middle schools from across the region are registered for

  17. Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky Regional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Science Bowl | Department of Energy Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl Henderson County North Middle School wins 2015 DOE West Kentucky Regional Science Bowl February 6, 2015 - 12:08pm Addthis 1st Place Henderson County North Middle School, from left: (Top) Deegan Lawrence, Coach Chris Fifer and D.J. Banks. (Bottom) Luke Payne, Alex Chandler and Nick Cissell (not pictured). 1st Place Henderson County North Middle School, from left: (Top)

  18. SUZAKU VIEW OF THE SWIFT/BAT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. IV. NATURE OF TWO NARROW-LINE RADIO GALAXIES (3C 403 AND IC 5063)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2011-09-01

    We report the results of Suzaku broadband X-ray observations of the two narrow-line radio galaxies, 3C 403 and IC 5063. Combined with the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) spectra averaged for 58 months, we are able to accurately constrain their spectral properties over the 0.5-200 keV band. The spectra of both nuclei are well represented with an absorbed cutoff power law, an absorbed reflection component from cold matter with an iron-K emission line, and an unabsorbed soft component, which gives a firm upper limit for the scattered emission. The reflection strength normalized to the averaged BAT flux is R {identical_to} {Omega}/2{pi} {approx} 0.6 in both targets, implying that their tori have a sufficiently large solid angle to produce the reprocessed emission. A numerical torus model with an opening angle of {approx}50{sup 0} well reproduces the observed spectra. We discuss the possibility that the amount of the normal gas responsible for Thomson scattering is systematically smaller in radio galaxies compared with Seyfert galaxies.

  19. Statistical evaluation of the through-thickness copper variation and the K{sub Ic} and K{sub Ia} curves for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonen, F.A.; Khaleel, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes a statistical evaluation of the through-thickness copper variation for welds in reactor pressure vessels, and reviews the historical basis for the static and arrest fracture toughness (K{sub Ic} and K{sub Ia}) equations used in the VISA-II code. Copper variability in welds is due to fabrication procedures with copper contents being randomly distributed, variable from one location to another through the thickness of the vessel. The VISA-II procedure of sampling the copper content from a statistical distribution for every 6.35- to 12.7-mm (1/4- to 1/2-in.) layer through the thickness was found to be consistent with the statistical observations. However, the parameters of the VISA-II distribution and statistical limits required further investigation. Copper contents at few locations through the thickness were found to exceed the 0.4% upper limit of the VISA-II code. The data also suggest that the mean copper content varies systematically through the thickness. While, the assumption of normality is not clearly supported by the available data, a statistical evaluation based on all the available data results in mean and standard deviations within the VISA-II code limits.

  20. Middle Eastern power systems; Present and future developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Middle Eastern Power systems have evolved independently of each other over many decades. The region covers a wide geographical area of over 4 million square kilometers with an estimated population in 1990 of over 120 million people. This paper discusses the present status and future power system developments in the Middle East with emphasis on the Mashrequ Arab Countries (MAC). MAC consists of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, and the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Interconnections within MAC and possible extensions to Turkey, Europe, and Central Africa are discussed. A common characteristic of the MAC power systems is that they are all operated by government or semi-government bodies. The energy resources in the region are varied. Countries such as Iraq, Egypt, and Syria have significant hydro power resources. On the other hand, the GCC countries and Iraq have abundant fossil fuel reserves.

  1. Sandia California Regional Middle and High School Science Bowl winners |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) California Regional Middle and High School Science Bowl winners Thursday, March 3, 2016 - 2:00pm San Ramon's Dougherty Valley High School won the high school division for the third year in a row. More than 240 students and 48 teams competed in the Sandia California Regional Science Bowls at Las Positas College, in Livermore, California. Hopkins Junior High School (Fremont, California) and Dougherty Valley High School (San Ramon, California)

  2. Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Tuesday, February 23 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Tuesday, February 23 Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Tuesday, February 23 February 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Today, Secretary Chu visited King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, on the Red Sea coast near Jeddah. His host was Saudi Minister of Petroleum and Minerals Ali Al Naimi, who is Chair of the KAUST Board of Trustees. KAUST is an international, graduate-level research university dedicated to science and

  3. Petroleum developments in Middle East countries in 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Mason, J.F.; Hatch, G.C.

    1980-11-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries in 1979 totaled 7,779,619,000 bbl at an average rate of 21,314,024 b/d, up 0.4% from 1978. Principal increases were in Iraq, Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, and Saudi Arabia. Significant new discoveries were made in Saudi Arabia, Oman, and Abu Dhabi. New areas were explored in Oman, Syria, offshore South Yemen, Dubai, and Qatar.

  4. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Hatch, G.C.

    1983-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1982 totaled 4,499,464,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,162,915 BOPD), down 21.5% from 1981. Increases were in Iraq, Iran, and Oman. Significant decreases occurred in Kuwait, Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Abu Dhabi. New discoveries were reported in Oman, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, and Saudi Arabia.

  5. AmeriFlux US-SuM Maui Sugarcane Middle

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anderson, Ray [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, United States Salinity Laboratory, Contaminant Fate and Transport Unit; Wang, Dong [USDA - Agricultural Research Service, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, Water Management Research Unit

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-SuM Maui Sugarcane Middle. Site Description - Continuous, irrigated, sugarcane cultivation for >100 years. Practice is to grow plant sugarcane for 2 years, drydown, burn leaves, harvest cane, and then till and replant very shortly after harvest. Site differs from Sugarcane Windy and Sugarcane Lee/sheltered in soil and meteorology.

  6. Honey Creek Middle School Wins National Science Competition - News Releases

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL Honey Creek Middle School Wins National Science Competition July 13, 2005 Golden, Colo. - Solar concentrators using highly efficient photovoltaic solar cells will reduce the cost of electricity from sunlight to competitive levels soon, attendees were told at a recent international conference on the subject. Herb Hayden of Arizona Public Service (APS) and Robert McConnell and Martha Symko-Davies of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) organized

  7. DOE New Jersey Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab 0, 2015, 9:00am to 3:00pm Science Education Lab-wide DOE New Jersey Regional Middle School Science Bowl Contact Information Website: New Jersey Regional Science Bowl Coordinator(s): Deedee Ortiz-Arias, Science Education Department Program Administraor dortiz@pppl.gov PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor Information, Directions, Security at PPPL As a federal facility, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is operating under heightened security measures because of the events of

  8. OPEC Middle East plans for rising world demand amid uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, I.A.H.

    1996-05-27

    The Middle Eastern members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries must plan for huge increases in oil production capacity yet wonder whether markets for the new output will develop as expected. With worldwide oil consumption rising and non-OPEC output likely to reach its resource limits soon, OPEC member countries face major gains in demand for their crude oil. To meet the demand growth, those with untapped resources will have to invest heavily in production capacity. Most OPEC members with such resources are in the Middle East. But financing the capacity investments remains a challenge. Some OPEC members have opened up to foreign equity participation in production projects, and others may eventually do so as financial pressures grow. That means additions to the opportunities now available to international companies in the Middle East. Uncertainties, however, hamper planning and worry OPEC. Chief among them are taxation and environmental policies of consuming-nation governments. This paper reviews these concerns and provides data on production, pricing, capital investment histories and revenues.

  9. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report, 1 June 1980-1 June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, L P

    1981-02-01

    Research progress is reported in studies of the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight during the spring transition period. Volume I contains preliminary results of GABEX-I. (ACR)

  10. A Reassessment of the Integrated Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Surface Chlorophyll in the Western Subtropical North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltz, Gregory R.; Balaguru, Karthik; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-02-28

    The impact of tropical cyclones on surface chlorophyll concentration is assessed in the western subtropical North Atlantic Ocean during 19982011. Previous studies in this area focused on individual cyclones and gave mixed results regarding the importance of tropical cyclone-induced mixing for changes in surface chlorophyll. Using a more integrated and comprehensive approach that includes quantification of cyclone-induced changes in mixed layer depth, here it is shown that accumulated cyclone energy explains 22% of the interannual variability in seasonally-averaged (JuneNovember) chlorophyll concentration in the western subtropical North Atlantic, after removing the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The variance explained by tropical cyclones is thus about 70% of that explained by the NAO, which has well-known impacts in this region. It is therefore likely that tropical cyclones contribute significantly to interannual variations of primary productivity in the western subtropical North Atlantic during the hurricane season.

  11. Saharan dust as a causal factor of hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols and cloud cover over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Kishcha, Pavel; Da Sliva, Arlindo; Starobinets, Boris; Long, Charles N.; Kalashnikova, Olga; Alpert, Pinhas

    2015-07-09

    Meridional distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30°N – 30°S) was analyzed to assess seasonal variations of meridional AOT asymmetry. Ten-year MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero) data (July 2002 – June 2012) confirms that the Sahara desert emits a significant amount of dust into the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean. Only over the Atlantic Ocean did MERRAero show that desert dust dominates other aerosol species and is responsible for meridional aerosol asymmetry between the tropical North and South Atlantic. Over the 10-year period under consideration, both MISR measurements and MERRAero data showed a pronounced meridional AOTmore » asymmetry. The meridional AOT asymmetry, characterized by the hemispheric ratio (RAOT) of AOT averaged separately over the North and over the South Atlantic, was about 1.7. Seasonally, meridional AOT asymmetry over the Atlantic was the most pronounced between March and July, when dust presence is maximal (RAOT ranged from 2 to 2.4). There was no noticeable meridional aerosol asymmetry in total AOT from September to October. During this period the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to total AOT in the South Atlantic was comparable to the contribution of dust aerosols to total AOT in the North Atlantic. During the same 10-year period, MODIS cloud fraction (CF) data showed that there was no noticeable asymmetry in meridional CF distribution in different seasons (the hemispheric ratio of CF ranged from 1.0 to 1.2). MODIS CF data illustrated significant cloud cover (CF of 0.7 – 0.9) with limited precipitation ability along the Saharan Air Layer.« less

  12. Saharan dust as a causal factor of hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols and cloud cover over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Da Sliva, Arlindo; Starobinets, Boris; Long, Charles N.; Kalashnikova, Olga; Alpert, Pinhas

    2015-07-09

    Meridional distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30°N – 30°S) was analyzed to assess seasonal variations of meridional AOT asymmetry. Ten-year MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero) data (July 2002 – June 2012) confirms that the Sahara desert emits a significant amount of dust into the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean. Only over the Atlantic Ocean did MERRAero show that desert dust dominates other aerosol species and is responsible for meridional aerosol asymmetry between the tropical North and South Atlantic. Over the 10-year period under consideration, both MISR measurements and MERRAero data showed a pronounced meridional AOT asymmetry. The meridional AOT asymmetry, characterized by the hemispheric ratio (RAOT) of AOT averaged separately over the North and over the South Atlantic, was about 1.7. Seasonally, meridional AOT asymmetry over the Atlantic was the most pronounced between March and July, when dust presence is maximal (RAOT ranged from 2 to 2.4). There was no noticeable meridional aerosol asymmetry in total AOT from September to October. During this period the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to total AOT in the South Atlantic was comparable to the contribution of dust aerosols to total AOT in the North Atlantic. During the same 10-year period, MODIS cloud fraction (CF) data showed that there was no noticeable asymmetry in meridional CF distribution in different seasons (the hemispheric ratio of CF ranged from 1.0 to 1.2). MODIS CF data illustrated significant cloud cover (CF of 0.7 – 0.9) with limited precipitation ability along the Saharan Air Layer.

  13. Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Virginia Revised Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2015-031 Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Virginia Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2015-031 Virginia Offshore Wind Technology Advancement Project on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Virginia Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs

  14. Airborne CH2O measurements over the North Atlantic during the 1997 NARE campaign: Instrument comparisons and distributions

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Fried, Alan; Lee, Yin -Nan; Frost, Greg; Wert, Bryan; Henry, Bruce; Drummond, James R.; Hubler, Gerd; Jobson, Tom

    2002-02-27

    Here, formaldehyde measurements from two independent instruments are compared with photochemical box model calculations. The measurements were made on the NOAA P-3 aircraft as part of the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE 1997). After examining the possible reasons for the model-measurement discrepancy, we conclude that there are probably one or more additional unknown sources of CH2O in the North Atlantic troposphere.

  15. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts. South Atlantic summary report update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    An update of the South Atlantic Summary Report 2, this report provides current information about Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil- and gas-related activities and their onshore impacts for the period June 1982 to February, 1983. The geographical area covered by the report extends from north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral, Florida. The information is designed to assist in planning for the onshore effects associated with offshore oil and gas development. It covers lease and transportation strategies and the nature and location of onshore facilities. An appendix summarizes related state and federal studies. 11 references, 2 tables.

  16. Lower to middle Miocene isotope ( sup 87 Sr/ sup 86 Sr,. delta. sup 18 O,. delta. sup 13 C) standard sections, DSDP site 608

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, K.G.; Feigenson, M.D. ); Wright, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Isotopes changes ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 13}C) have been correlated to the geologic time scale primarily by biostratigraphy. Biostratigraphic correlations suffer from problems of diachrony and taxonomy. Magnetostratigraphy provides a facies-independent correlation tool, but there are few Tertiary sections with unambiguous magnetostratigraphy. The authors previously developed an isotope standard for the Oligocene at the only location with a pristine magnetochronology, Site 522. They extend this approach to Site 608 in the northeastern North Atlantic, which contains a relatively straightforward Miocene magnetochronology. They establish Miocene oxygen isotope Chronozones MI1 through MI6 at Sites 522 and 608, which are directly tied to the geomagnetic polarity time scale (GPTS). The integration of stable isotopes, Sr isotopes, biostratigraphy, and magnetostratigraphy at site 608 provides a standard section with which other Sr isotope and oxygen isotope records can be correlated. For example, using oxygen isotopes to correlate, the Sr isotope record from Site 608 compares well with previously published records from Sites 516 and 590. The firm ties of the Oligocene to middle Miocene isotope records with the GPTS allows them to establish the nature of the change in Sr isotopes between 38 and 8 Ma. There were moderately high rates of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr change during the Oligocene ({approximately}0.000030/m.y.), yielding stratigraphic resolution of {plus minus}1.0 m.y. The rate of change of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr increased during the early Miocene. They estimate that the rate of change between 23 and 15 Ma was greater than 0.000060/m.y. Given their ability to reproduce Sr isotope measurements ({plus minus}0.000020 to {plus minus}0.000030), temporal resolution is better than {plus minus}0.5 my. for the early to early middle Oliocene.

  17. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  18. The influence of cut off lows on sulfate burdens over the North Atlantic during April, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovitz, C.M.; Miller, M.A.; Schwartz, S.E.; Kwon, O.U.

    2001-01-14

    The authors have presented examples from a modeling study of the development of sulfur burdens over North America, the North Atlantic Ocean and Europe during April, 1987 using observation-derived meteorological data to represent the actual conditions for this period, focusing on the influence of cut-off lows on SO{sub 2} and sulfate column burdens over the North Atlantic Ocean. The analysis demonstrates that these systems can serve either as sources or sinks of sulfate, and that the major factor governing their resulting effect is the position during its formative stages relative to (a) sources of moisture, and (b) sulfur emissions, which regulates the availability of sulfur, cloud liquid water for sulfur oxidation, and the amount of precipitation for sulfate removal produced in the later stages of the life cycle.

  19. Atlantic Coastal Experiment VI: R/V KNORR cruise, 23 August--11 September 1980, data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of estuaries on the ecosystem of the Mid-Atlantic Bight was undertaken. Data were collected from excursions into the Hudson, Delaware and Chesapeake estuaries, three across-shelf and one along-shelf transects, and two time series stations. In all, 139 stations were occupied and 164 XBT soundings were taken. In addition to standard hydrographic measurements, nutrient , chlorophyll, particulate carbon and nitrogen, 14C, 15N, DNA, particle size, FTD, phytoplankton and zooplankton analyses were made.

  20. Middle East fuel supply & gas exports for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, G.K.; Newendorp, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Middle East countries that border on, or are near, the Persian Gulf hold over 65% of the world`s estimated proven crude oil reserves and 32% of the world`s estimated proven natural gas reserves. In fact, approximately 5% of the world`s total proven gas reserves are located in Qatar`s offshore North Field. This large natural gas/condensate field is currently under development to supply three LNG export projects, as well as a sub-sea pipeline proposal to export gas to Pakistan. The Middle East will continue to be a major source of crude oil and oil products to world petroleum markets, including fuel for existing and future base load, intermediate cycling and peaking electric generation plants. In addition, as the Persian Gulf countries turn their attention to exploiting their natural gas resources, the fast-growing need for electricity in the Asia-Pacific and east Africa areas offers a potential market for both pipeline and LNG export opportunities to fuel high efficiency, gas-fired combustion turbine power plants. Mr. Mitchell`s portion of this paper will discuss the background, status and timing of several Middle Eastern gas export projects that have been proposed. These large gas export projects are difficult and costly to develop and finance. Consequently, any IPP developers that are considering gas-fired projects which require Mid-East LNG as a fuel source, should understand the numerous sources and timing to securing project debt, loan terms and conditions, and, restrictions/credit rating issues associated with securing financing for these gas export projects. Mr. Newendorp`s section of the paper will cover the financing aspects of these projects, providing IPP developers with additional considerations in selecting the primary fuel supply for an Asian-Pacific or east African electric generation project.

  1. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.

    1986-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1985 totaled 3,837,580,000 bbl (an average rate of 10,513,917 BOPD), down 2.2% from the revised 1984 total of 3,924,034,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Dubai, Oman, and Syria had significant increases; Kuwait, Kuwait-Saudi Arabia Divided Neutral Zone, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar had significant decreases. New fields went on production in Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Oman, and Syria. In North Yemen, the first ever oil production in that country was nearing the start-up stage at year end. 9 figures, 9 tables.

  2. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed. 4 figures, 9 tables.

  3. Oil and gas developments in Middle East in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Lyle, J.H.

    1985-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1984 totaled 4,088,853,000 bbl (an average rate of 11,144,407 BOPD), down less than 1.0% from the revised total of 4,112,116,000 bbl produced in 1983. Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, and Oman had significant increases; Iran and Dubai had significant decreases. Jordan produced oil, although a minor amount, for the first time ever, and new production facilities were in the planning stage in Syria, North Yemen, and Oman, which will bring new fields on stream when completed.

  4. 2016 Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Middle School Science Bowl View larger image 16 PR 0219 271 View larger image 16 PR 0220 090 View larger image MSSci Bowl Winner William Annin 1 F View larger image Princeton Charter 264 View larger image Princeton Charter 278 View larger image Princeton Charter Witherspoon 229 View larger image Second Place Princeton Charter 313 View larger image Third Place Witherspoon 312 View larger image William Annin 261 View larger image 16 PR 0219 037 View larger image 16 PR 0219 072 View larger image 16

  5. NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    2, 2013, 8:00am Science Education Lab-wide Event NJ Regional Middle School Science Bowl Teams of students are invited to participate in the Department of Energy's National Science Bowl Competition. Each year PPPL hosts the New Jersey Regional Science Bowl which decides which teams from the local area can continue onto the national competition in Washington, D.C. The Science Bowl is a double elimination contest with oral question and answer rounds in the fields of chemistry, biology, physics,

  6. Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Hood River, Oregon The Hood River Middle School Music and Science Building is includes music and science classroom, music practice rooms, teacher offices, a greenhouse, an adjacent recycling and storage building, and outdoor spaces including an amphitheater and garden. The building is integrated with the school's progressive sustainability and permaculture curriculum. Students can track and create experiments using data from the buildings net zero energy system and rainwater harvesting system, and learn about the building's innovative and integrated use of materials and systems. 07/08/2015 - 10:06

  7. Oil and gas development in Middle East in 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemer, D.O.; Gohrbandt, K.H.A.; Phillips, C.B.

    1988-10-01

    Petroleum production in Middle East countries during 1987 totaled an estimated 4,500,500,000 bbl (an average rate of 12,330,137 b/d), up slightly from the revised 1986 total of 4,478,972,000 bbl. Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic had significant increases; Kuwait and Saudi Arabia had significant decreases. Production was established for the first time in People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. New fields went on production in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, and Syria, and significant oil discoveries were reported in Iraq, Oman, People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, Syria, and Yemen Arab Republic. The level of exploration increased in 1987 with new concessions awarded in some countries, drilling and seismic activities on the increase, new regions in mature areas explored for the first time, and significant reserve additions reported in new and old permits. The Iraq-Iran war still had a negative impact in some regions of the Middle East, particularly in and around the Gulf. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Photo of the Week: Students from Roosevelt Middle School win Argonne's 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regional Science Bowl | Department of Energy Students from Roosevelt Middle School win Argonne's 2013 Regional Science Bowl Photo of the Week: Students from Roosevelt Middle School win Argonne's 2013 Regional Science Bowl February 25, 2013 - 11:49am Addthis Each year, the National Science Bowl brings together thousands of middle and high school students from across the country to compete in a range of science disciplines, including biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, astronomy and

  9. Big Sky Regional Middle School Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Big Sky Regional Middle School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Big Sky

  10. Cal State LA Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Cal State LA Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Cal State LA

  11. California South/West Bay Area Regional Middle School Science Bowl

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    California South/West Bay Area Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals California

  12. Central Coast Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Central Coast Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Central Coast

  13. Connecticut Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Connecticut Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Connecticut

  14. East Tennessee Middle School Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) East Tennessee Middle School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals East Tennessee

  15. Eastern Idaho Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Eastern Idaho Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Eastern Idaho

  16. Long Island Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Long Island Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Long Island

  17. Middle School Academic Competition - Double Elimination | U.S. DOE Office

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    of Science (SC) Academic Competition - Double Elimination National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions National Finals Attending the National Finals 2016 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2016 Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department

  18. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Academic Competition - Round Robin National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions National Finals Attending the National Finals 2016 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2016 Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy

  19. Middle School Electric Car Competition | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Electric Car Competition National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions National Finals Attending the National Finals 2016 Competition Results Middle School Round Robin Middle School Double Elimination Middle School Electric Car High School Round Robin High School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2016 Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building

  20. Middle School Sample Questions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Middle School Sample Questions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Sample Questions Print Text Size:

  1. Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Office of Science (SC) Minnesota Regional Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School

  2. Mississippi Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Mississippi Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Mississippi

  3. New York State Capital District Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    DOE Office of Science (SC) New York State Capital District Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle

  4. SHPE-Fresno Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) SHPE-Fresno Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals SHPE-Fresno

  5. San Antonio Area Middle School Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) San Antonio Area Middle School Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals San Antonio

  6. Sandia/Las Positas Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Sandia/Las Positas Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Sandia/Las

  7. Washington, DC Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Washington, DC Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Washington, DC

  8. West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals West Kentucky

  9. West Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) West Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals West Virginia

  10. Western Idaho Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Western Idaho Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Western Idaho

  11. Western New York Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Science (SC) Western New York Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us Middle School Regionals Western New

  12. Princeton High School and Grover Middle School Win Top Prizes at Regional

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Bowls | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton High School and Grover Middle School Win Top Prizes at Regional Science Bowls Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Hosts Competitions February 27, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Thomas Grover Middle School took home the top prize Feb. 24 during the middle school Science Bowl® competition at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). Grover team members (from left) are Coach Rae

  13. Clinton Middle School wins CNS-sponsored Dream It. Do It. competition |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Y-12 National Security Complex Clinton Middle School wins ... Clinton Middle School wins CNS-sponsored Dream It. Do It. competition Posted: May 12, 2016 - 5:12pm Clinton Middle School wins the inaugural Dream It. Do It. Competition May 2016. Front row (left to right): Janet Hawkins, Paige Cooper, Sierra Patrick, Anthony Burkett Hundley and Kristin Waldschlager of CNS. Back row (left to right): Anderson County Chamber President Rick Meredith, Jack Spangler, Jonathan Lewis, Kelly Myers and

  14. Middle School Electric Car Competition | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    NSB Home About High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2015 ... School Double Elimination Top Teams for 2015 News Media WDTS Home Contact Information ...

  15. Middle School Electric Car Competition | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Electric Car Competition National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Science ... Middle School Electric Car Competition Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Final ...

  16. Forum on Enhancing the Delivery of Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Households: Discussion Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-09-20

    Summarizes discussions and recommendations from a forum for practitioners and policymakers aiming to strengthen residential energy efficiency program design and delivery for middle income households.

  17. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Roosevelt Middle School...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Roosevelt Middle School National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  18. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - 2010 Middle School...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    2010 Middle School Teams National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past ...

  19. Jefferson Lab Hosts Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 Jefferson Lab Hosts Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 26, 2014 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, March 1, to compete in the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl. Teams from 16 middle schools are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl® - sponsored and managed by the U.S.

  20. Summary of the Mid-Atlantic conference on small-scale hydropower in the Mid-Atlantic states: resolution of the barriers impeding its development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The workshop was conducted to bring together interested persons to examine and discuss the major problems associated with small-scale hydroelectric dam development in the Mid-Atlantic region. The conference opened with an introductory panel which outlined the objectives and the materials available to conference participants. Two of the workshops discussed problems and policy responses raised by state and Federal regulation. The other two workshops concerned economic issues confronting small-scale hydro development and the operation and usefulness of the systems dynamics model under development by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. Various Federal and state programs designed to stimulate small-scale hydro development were discussed. A plenary session completed the workshops.

  1. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis Report for Richland Middle School

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bing

    2003-12-18

    Richland Middle School is a single story, 90,000 square feet new school located in Richland, WA. The design team proposed four HVAC system options to serve the building. The proposed HVAC systems are listed as following: (1) 4-pipe fan coil units served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boilers, (2) Ground-source closed water loop heat pumps with water loop heat pumps with boiler and cooling tower, and (3) VAV system served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boiler. This analysis estimates the annual energy consumptions and costs of each system option, in order to provide the design team with a reasonable basis for determining which system is most life-cycle cost effective. eQuest (version 3.37), a computer-based energy simulation program that uses the DOE-2 simulation engine, was used to estimate the annual energy costs.

  2. Middle East: Iran isn't missed much

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-15

    A concerted effort to further develop productive capacity is evident in most Middle Eastern Countries, through exploration, field development, and secondary recovery. Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Abu Dhabi all plan expanded petroleum industry programs in 1980. Oil production in Saudi Arabia through the first one-half of 1980 averaged 9.5 million bpd, and the Saudis are proceeding with the large-scale associated gas utilization and industrialization program. Iraq's near-term interest is in development of the Majnoon Discovery. Abu Dhabi is continuing efforts to complete development of a giant offshore field and finalize an onshore/offshore associated gas utilization facility. Only Iran and Kuwait are expected to be relatively inactive in petroleum programs during the remainder of 1980. Individual country reports are presented for Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Iran, Kuwait, the Divided Neutral Zone, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain, Syria, Turkey, Israel, Jordan, South Yemen, and Yemen Arab Republic.

  3. A Doppler lidar for measuring winds in the middle atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanin, M.L.; Garnier, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Porteneuve, J. )

    1989-11-01

    The possibility of measuring winds in the middle atmosphere with a Doppler lidar has just been demonstrated. It is aimed at studying the wave-mean flow interaction, when used is association with the Rayleigh lidar providing density and temperature profiles and their fluctuations. The new Doppler lidar relies on the Rayleigh scattering from air molecules is designed to cover the height range 25-60 km, a region where radars cannot operate. The Doppler shift to the backscattered echo is measured by inter-comparing the signal detected through each of the two high-resolution, narrow band-pass Fabry-Perot interferometers tuned on either side of the emitted laser line.

  4. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  5. Support of Publication Costs, Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Special Issue of Deep Sea Research II Journal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amy Honchar

    2012-11-12

    The contribution of funds from DOE supported publication costs of a special issue of Deep Sea Research arising from presentations at the First U.S. Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) Meeting held 4-6 May, 2009 to review the US implementation plan and its coordination with other monitoring activities. The special issue includes a total of 16 papers, including publications from three DOE-supported investigators (ie Sevellec, F., and A.V. Fedorov; Hu et. al., and Wan et. al.,). The special issue addresses DOE interests in understanding and simulation/modeling of abrupt climate change.

  6. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn; Smith, Courtney; Gilman, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  7. Modulation of extremes in the Atlantic region by modes of climate variability/change: A mechanistic coupled regional model study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2015-01-09

    During the course of this project, we have accomplished the following: 1) Explored the parameter space of component models to minimize regional model bias 2) Assessed the impact of air-sea interaction on hurricanes, focusing in particular on the role of the oceanic barrier layer 3) Contributed to the activities of the U.S. CLIVAR Hurricane Working Group 4) Assessed the impact of lateral and lower boundary conditions on extreme flooding events in the U.S. Midwest in regional model simulations 5) Analyzed the concurrent impact of El Nio-Southern Oscillation and Atlantic Meridional Mode on Atlantic Hurricane activity using observations and regional model simulations

  8. LLNL Middle East and North Africa research database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, D; Hauk, T; Moore, R M; O'Boyle, J; Ruppert, S

    1999-07-23

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Research and Development (CTBT R and D) program has made significant progress populating a comprehensive seismic research database (RDB) for seismic events and derived research products in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Our original ME/NA study region has enlarged and is now defined as an area including the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Southwest Asia, the Former Soviet Union and the Scandinavian/Arctic region. The LLNL RDB will facilitate calibration of all International Monitoring System (IMS) stations (primary and auxiliary) or their surrogates (if not yet installed) as well as a variety of gamma stations. The RDB provides not only a coherent framework in which to store and organize large volumes of collected seismic waveforms and associated event parameter information, but also provides an efficient data processing/research environment for deriving location and discrimination correction sur faces and capabilities. In order to accommodate large volumes of data from many sources with diverse formats the RDB is designed to be flexible and extensible in addition to maintaining detailed quality control information and associated metadata. Station parameters, instrument responses, phase pick information, and event bulletins were compiled and made available through the RDB. For seismic events in the MENA region occurring between 1976 and 1999, we have systematically assembled, quality checked and organized event waveforms; continuous seismic data from 1990 to present are archived for many stations. Currently, over 11,400 seismic events and 1.2 million waveforms are maintained in the RDB and made readily available to researchers. In addition to open sources of seismic data, we have established collaborative relationships with several ME/NA countries that have yielded additional ground truth and broadband waveform data essential for regional calibration and capability

  9. Seismic stratigraphy of Long Island platform, United States Atlantic Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jowett, R.A.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1987-09-01

    Approximately 2000 km of single- and multichannel seismic reflection profiles collected over the Long Island platform on the US Atlantic continental margin show that the basement beneath the platform was rifted prior to the separation of Africa from North America and that it subsided after the separation. Postrift sediment thicknesses range from less than 1 km in the northwest part of the platform to several kilometers in the southeast, near the Atlantis and Nantucket rift basins. Flanking the platform are the Georges Bank basin to the east and Baltimore Canyon Trough to the south, where sedimentary rocks are 10-15 km thick. Nine major unconformities have been delineated in analysis of the seismic profiles. The most conspicuous unconformities are correlated with the end of rifting and the upper surfaces of the Bathonian, Tithonian, Albian, Turonian-Coniacian, Maestrichtian, upper Eocene, mid-Oligocene, and mid-Miocene sections. Ages are determined by tracing reflectors and unconformities to the COST (Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test), AMCOR (Atlantic Margin Coring Project), and coastal wells. Several of these unconformities coincide with pronounced fluctuations in the Vail curve of relative sea level.

  10. Clay mineralogy of Lower Cretaceous deep-sea fan sediments, western North Atlantic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    The Lower Cretaceous of the eastern North American continent was a time of extensive deltaic progradation. The effects of deltaic deposition on sedimentation in the western North Atlantic were unknown until May 1982, when, at Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 603 off Cape Hatteras, over 260 m of micaceous, muddy turbidites were recovered that correlate with deltaic progradation on eastern North America. The results of clay mineral studies from onshore and offshore equivalents indicate that during the Cretaceous, some sorting of clay minerals by transport processes occurred. Kaolinite tends to accumulate in continental environments, illite in transitional to marine environments, and smectite in deep sea sediments as pelagic clay. In the sediments from the western North Atlantic, illite tended to be more abundant in thick bedded sandy muds, whereas kaolinite tended to be more abundant in thin bedded muddy sands. Although the occurrence of illite and kaolinite in pelagic sediments indicates a general increased terrigenous influence, the results of this study indicate that these two clays behave independently in these sediments. The presence of large amounts of kaolinite at certain levels in these sediments corresponds to phases of maximum deep-sea fan development, and so indicates a more direct input of continental material, with less sorting of sediments by continental and shelf processes (pericontinental fractionation) prior to redeposition.

  11. Enhancing Middle East climate change monitoring and indexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sensoy, S.; Peterson, T.C.; Zhang, X.

    2007-08-15

    Extreme climate events can have significant impacts on both natural and human systems, and therefore it is important to know if and how climate extremes are changing. Analysis of extremes requires long-term daily station data and, unfortunately, there are many regions in the world where these data are not internationally exchanged. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report (Folland et al. 2001) relied heavily on the multinational analysis of Frich et al (2002). However, Frich et al. had no results from all of Central and South America, and most of Africa and southern Asia, including the Middle East. To remedy this situation for the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, the joint World Meteorological Organization Commission for Climatology/World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) project on Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) Expert Team on Climate Change Detection, Monitoring, and Indices (Zwiers et al. 2003) internationally coordinated a series of five regional climate change workshops and a set of indices for analyses of extremes. Two workshops covered the Americas, one in Brazil and one in Guatemala. One workshop addressed southern Africa. A workshop in India involved south and central Asia, while the workshop for the Middle East sought to address the region from Turkey to Iran and from Georgia to the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula. The key to a successful workshop is a collaborative approach between outside experts and regional participants. The participants here broght long-term daily precipitation and maximum and minimum temperature data, station history information, an understanding of their country's climate, and a willingness to analyze thse data under the tutelage of outside experts. The outside experts brought knowledge of the crucial data and climate change issues, presentations to explain these issues, and user-friendly software to aid the analyses. Xuebin Zhang of Environment Canada wrote the workshop

  12. National Science Bowl Update: Middle School Teams from Maryland and Indiana to Compete for National Championship on Monday

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The field of middle school finalists in the Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl has narrowed once more, and now only two middle school teams remain in the competition.

  13. Kinetic and reactor models for HDT of middle distillates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotta, R.M.; Filho, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of middle distillates over a commercial Ni-Mo/y-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been studied under wide operating conditions just as 340 to 380{degrees}C and 38 to 98 atm. A Power Law model was presented to each one of those reactions. The parameters of kinetic equations were estimated solving the ordinary differential equations by the 4 order Runge-Kutta-Gill algorithm and Marquardt method for searching of set of kinetic parameters (kinetic constants as well as the orders of reactions). An adiabatic diesel hydrotreating trickle-bed reactor packed with the same catalyst was simulated numerically in order to check up the behavior of this specific reaction system. One dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model was used in this work. For each feed, the mass and energy balance equations were integrated along the length of the catalytic bed using the 4th Runge-Kutta-Gill method. The performance of two industrial reactors was checked. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Middle-Late Permian mass extinction on land

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Retallack, G.J.; Metzger, C.A.; Greaver, T.; Jahren, A.H.; Smith, R.M.H.; Sheldon, N.D.

    2006-11-15

    The end-Permian mass extinction has been envisaged as the nadir of biodiversity decline due to increasing volcanic gas emissions over some 9 million years. We propose a different tempo and mechanism of extinction because we recognize two separate but geologically abrupt mass extinctions on land, one terminating the Middle Permian (Guadalupian) at 260.4 Ma and a later one ending the Permian Period at 251 Ma. Our evidence comes from new paleobotanical, paleopedological, and carbon isotopic studies of Portal Mountain, Antarctica, and comparable studies in the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Extinctions have long been apparent among marine invertebrates at both the end of the Guadalupian and end of the Permian, which were also times of warm-wet greenhouse climatic transients, marked soil erosion, transition from high- to low-sinuosity and braided streams, soil stagnation in wetlands, and profound negative carbon isotope anomalies. Both mass extinctions may have resulted from catastrophic methane outbursts to the atmosphere from coal intruded by feeder dikes to flood basalts, such as the end-Guadalupian Emeishan Basalt and end-Permian Siberian Traps.

  15. Appendix C of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the third appendix to the report, the compendium of pre-workshop answers.

  16. Appendix E of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fifth appendix to the report, the bibliography of references.

  17. Appendix A of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the first appendix to the report, the workshop agenda.

  18. Smith Middle School Takes First Place at Science Bowl Hydrogen Fuel Cell

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Car Competition - News Releases | NREL Smith Middle School Takes First Place at Science Bowl Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car Competition National "Battle of the Brains" continues June 25 with academic face off June 24, 2005 Golden, Colo. - Smith Middle School from Chapel Hill, N.C., captured top place in the model hydrogen fuel cell competition on the first day of the National Middle School Science Bowl. St. Andrew's Episcopal School, from Amarillo, Texas, took second and Robert Frost

  19. Halls Middle School students get a taste of science at Y-12 | Y-12 National

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex Halls Middle School ... Halls Middle School students get a taste of science at Y-12 Posted: May 21, 2013 - 12:40pm Engineering, science and history experts give Halls Middle School students a taste of science past and present at Y-12. During a visit to the Y-12 National Security Complex on May 20, eighth graders Miller Sullivan, center, and Tyler Young, right, learn what happens to a banana when it is submerged in liquid nitrogen. Darryl Smith, left, was one of four

  20. Fourteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    | Jefferson Lab Fourteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 Fourteen Teams to Compete in Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., March 3, 2015 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on March 7, to compete in the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl. Teams from 14 schools are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl® -

  1. Media Advisory - The Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Is Set For March 6

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    at Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab The Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Is Set For March 6 at Jefferson Lab Media Advisory - The Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Is Set For March 6 at Jefferson Lab What: The 2010 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 6, 2010. Round-robin competition will run from 10 a.m. - noon. The double-elimination, semi-final and finalist rounds will run from 1:30 to approximately 4 p.m. Awards will be presented immediately after the

  2. Media Advisory: Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Set For March 5 at

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab Advisory: Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Set For March 5 at Jefferson Lab Media Advisory: Virginia Middle School Science Bowl Set For March 5 at Jefferson Lab What: The Department of Energy's 2011 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl When: Saturday, March 5, 2011. Round-robin competition will run from 9 a.m. - noon. The double-elimination, semi-final and finalist rounds will run from 1 p.m. to approximately 4 p.m. Awards will be presented

  3. Latitudinal survey of middle atmospheric water vapor revealed by shipboard microwave spectroscopy. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrader, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    Water vapor is one of the most important greenhouse gases and is an important tracer of atmospheric motions in the middle atmosphere. It also plays an important role in the chemistry of the middle atmosphere and through its photodissociation by solar radiation, it is the major source of hydrogen escaping to space. Ground-based microwave measurements conducted in the 1980s have provided a fair understanding of the seasonal variation of mesospheric water vapor in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes, but the global distribution of water vapor in the middle atmosphere is only beginning to be revealed by space-based measurements.

  4. African Homo erectus: Old radiometric ages and young Oldowan assemblages in the middle Awash Valley, Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, J.D.; White, T.D.; Selassie, Y.H. ); Heinzelin, J. de ); Schick, K.D. ); Hart, W.K. ); WoldeGabriel, G. ); Walter, R.C. ); Suwa, G. ); Asfaw, B. )

    1994-06-24

    Fossils and artifacts recovered from the middle Awash Valley of Ethiopia's Afar depression sample the Middle Pleistocene transition from Homo erectus to Homo sapiens. Ar/Ar ages, biostratigraphy, and tephrachronology from this area indicate that the Pleistocene Bodo hominid cranium and newer specimens are approximately 0.6 million years old. Only Oldowan chopper and flake assemblages are present in the lower stratigraphic units but Acheulean bifacial artifacts are consistently prevalent and widespread in directly overlying deposits. This technological transition is related to a shift in sedimentary regime, supporting the hypothesis that Middle Pleistocene Oldowan assemblages represent a behavioral facies of the Acheulean industrial complex.

  5. U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Bodman Completes Middle East Trip U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip November 20, 2005 - 2:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman concluded his four-nation swing through the Middle East this weekend, by attending the inauguration of the New Permanent Headquarter Office Building of the International Energy Forum (IEF) Secretariat and participating in a number of bilateral meetings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. "This trip allowed me

  6. Apatite fission track evidence for post-Early Cretaceous erosional unroofing of Middle Pennsylvanian sandstones from the southern Appalachian Basin in Kentucky and Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettcher, S.S.; Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission track ages and mean etchable track lengths for 7 samples of Middle Pennsylvanian (Breathitt Formation) depositional age from the southern Appalachian Basin of KY and VA suggest that 3--4 km of erosional unroofing has occurred since the Early Cretaceous. The samples were collected over a 1,600 km[sup 2] area at the northern end of the Pine Mountain Overthrust southeast of Pikeville, KY. This new data set overlaps 8 published apatite fission track ages and 3 mean etchable lengths from the Cumberland Plateau and Valley and Ridge areas of WV. Because all of the apatite fission track ages are significantly younger than the depositional age, maximum burial temperatures in the area exceeded 125 C, such that fission tracks that formed in the detrital apatite prior to deposition have been totally annealed. Furthermore, mean etchable track lengths show considerable length reduction from initial values revealing that the samples resided in the zone of partial annealing on the order of 100 Ma following attainment of maximum temperatures. The burial history for these samples began with deposition and rapid burial of synorogenic sediments in front of the westward advancing Alleghenian deformation front. The fission track data are compatible with the hypothesis that maximum temperatures were attained during the Late Paleozoic as tectonically driven synorogenic fluids penetrated the foreland basin deposits. Slow erosional unroofing (< 15 m/Ma for a thermal gradient of 30 C/km) has occurred since the onset of Triassic-Jurassic rifting along the atlantic continental margin and continued into the Cenozoic.

  7. Design of 3D eye-safe middle range vibrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polulyakh, Valeriy; Poutivski, Iouri

    2014-05-27

    Laser Doppler Vibrometer and Range Meter (3D-MRV) is designed for middle range distances [1100 meters]. 3D-MRV combines more than one laser in one device for a simultaneous real time measuring the distance and movement of the targets. The first laser has a short pulse (t?30psec) and low energy (E?200nJ) for distance measurement and the second one is a CW (continuous wave) single frequency laser for the velocity measurement with output power (P?30mW). Both lasers perform on the eye-safe wavelength 1.5 ?m. 3D-MRV uses the same mono-static optical transmitting and receiving channel for both lasers including an output telescope and a scanning angular system. 3D-MRV has an optical polarization switch to combine linear polarized laser beams from two lasers into one optical channel. The laser beams from both lasers by turns illuminate the target and the scattered laser radiation is collected by the telescope on a photo detector. The electrical signal from photo detector is used for measuring the distance to the target and its movement. For distance measurement the time of flight method is employed. For targets movement the optical heterodyne method is employed. The received CW laser radiation is mixed on a photo detector with the frequency-shifted laser radiation that is taken from CW laser and passed through an acousto-optic cell. The electrical signal from a photo detector on the difference frequency and phase has information about movement of the scattered targets. 3D-MVR may be used for the real time picturing of vibration of the extensive targets like bridges or aircrafts.

  8. Efficient Multifamily Homes in a Hot Humid Climate by Atlantic Housing Partners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaser, Dave; Martin, Eric

    2013-04-01

    With assistance from the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and its Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Atlantic Housing Partners (AHP) has implemented a high performance, systems engineered package of measures. This report demonstrates how the initiative achieves Building America (BA) goals of 30%-50% energy savings. Specifically, the goals are documented as being achieved in the new construction multifamily housing sector in the hot humid climate. Results from energy modeling of the high performance package are presented. The role of utility allowance calculations, used as part of the low-income housing tax credit process, to value those energy savings is discussed, as is customer satisfaction with heat pump water heaters.

  9. Efficient Multifamily Homes in a Hot-Humid Climate by Atlantic Housing Partners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chasar, D.; Martin, E.

    2013-04-01

    With assistance from the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) and its Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Atlantic Housing Partners (AHP) has implemented a high performance, systems engineered package of measures. This report demonstrates how the initiative achieves Building America (BA) goals of 30%-50% energy savings. Specifically, the goals are documented as being achieved in the new construction multifamily housing sector in the hot humid climate. Results from energy modeling of the high performance package are presented. The role of utility allowance calculations, used as part of the low-income housing tax credit process, to value those energy savings is discussed, as is customer satisfaction with heat pump water heaters.

  10. Hydrocarbon gases (free and sorbed) in waters and sediments of the mid-Atlantic ridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudarikov, S.M.; Levshunova, S.P.

    1996-10-01

    Waters and sediments were sampled during the 10-th cruise of the R/V {open_quotes}Geolog Fersman{close_quotes} at several sites of the Mid-Atlantic rift zone. Extensive geochemical analyses including degasing of waters and sediments, luminescence-bituminological analyses, organic-carbon (OC) and C{sub 1}-C{sub 9} fraction content determining have been carried out. According to the microbiological investigations the 65% of the methane are thermogenic and 35% - bacterial. Correlation between bitumen and metals observed in waters may be explained by the formation of metal-organic complexes. Sediments from the Snake Pit field show high contents of bitumen (0.005%) and of C{sub 1}-C{sub 9} hydrocarbons. The process of hydrocarbons generation in ocean rift zones is treated as a result of the interaction between the OC and inorganic fluids containing hydrogen. We thank the Russian Fundamental Science Foundation for financial support.

  11. Causes of Ocean Surface temperature Changes in Atlantic andPacific Topical Cyclogenesis Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santer, B.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.; Gleckler, P.J.; Bonfils, C.; Wehner, M.F.; AchutaRao, K.; Barnett, T.P.; Boyle, J.S.; Bruggemann, W.; Fiorino, M.; Gillett, N.; Hansen, J.E.; Jones, P.D.; Klein, S.A.; Meehl,G.A.; Raper, S.C.B.; Reynolds, R.W.; Stott, P.A.; Taylor, K.E.; Washington, W.M.

    2006-01-31

    Previous research has identified links between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and hurricane intensity. We use climate models to study the possible causes of SST changes in Atlantic and Pacific tropical cyclogenesis regions. The observed SST increases in these regions range from 0.32 to 0.67 C over the 20th century. The 22 climate models examined here suggest that century-timescale SST changes of this magnitude cannot be explained solely by unforced variability of the climate system, even under conservative assumptions regarding the magnitude of this variability. Model simulations that include external forcing by combined anthropogenic and natural factors are generally capable of replicating observed SST changes in both tropical cyclogenesis regions.

  12. Secretary Bodman to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International Energy Cooperation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman next week will embark on a five-nation tour through the Middle East to enhance the United States' relationship with oil-producing nations,...

  13. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Looking for the latest information on the Double Elimination tournament? Click here Jefferson Division Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total Points 1. Alfonza W. Davis Middle School 0 0 0 0 ...

  14. EECBG Success Story: Massachusetts Middle School Goes Local for PV Solar Energy System

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    When the school buses pull up to Norton Middle School this year, students will see more than just their friends and teachers, they'll get a view of new - 126 solar panels on the school's roof. Learn more.

  15. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Falcon Cove Middle...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Falcon Cove Middle School students from Weston, FL tour the National Mall in Washington, DC as they participate in the National Science Bowl. ...

  16. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 26, 2011-Los Alamos Middle School...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    April 26, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 26, 2011-Los Alamos Middle School student Cole Kendrick won the top prize in the 21st New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge hosted by Los ...

  17. Secretary Bodman to Travel to the Middle East to Advance International...

    Energy Savers

    WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman next week will embark on a five-nation tour through the Middle East to enhance the United States' relationship with oil-p...

  18. Standard's Guide to Learning Middle School Hands-On Science Elective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Guide to Learning Middle School Hands-On Science Elective Class Student: Grade: Date: Math B Proficiency Levels PP P A Collect, organize, analyze, and graph (e.g., line plots,...

  19. Delgado-Aparicio urges middle school students to pursue careers in science

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and join the quest for fusion energy | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Delgado-Aparicio urges middle school students to pursue careers in science and join the quest for fusion energy By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe June 16, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicist Luis Delgado-Aparicio (with a photo of Einstein behind him) speaks to middle school students at the Hispanics Inspiring Students' Performance and Achievement (HISPA) Conference at Princeton University. (Photo by Elle

  20. University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Regional Middle School Science Bowl |

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email

  1. Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Aspen Elementary, Los Alamos Middle School students take top award in 26th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Andy Corliss, Phillip Ionkov and Ming Lo of Aspen Elementary, and Max Corliss of Los Alamos Middle School won first place in the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge. April 27, 2016 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop

  2. Record 18 teams prepare for Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl on

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    March 10 at Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab MEDIA ADVISORY: News Media invited to cover the March 10 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl at Jefferson Lab; Record turnout with bright young minds from 18 teams vying for top spot in academic competition The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Va., is hosting the 2007 Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl on Saturday, March 10. Eighteen teams - twice the number of teams that competed in 2006 - will participate

  3. D.C. Middle and High School Students Get a Chance to Experience the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Regional Science Bowl Competition Setting | Department of Energy D.C. Middle and High School Students Get a Chance to Experience the Regional Science Bowl Competition Setting D.C. Middle and High School Students Get a Chance to Experience the Regional Science Bowl Competition Setting March 26, 2014 - 1:07pm Addthis Annie Whatley Annie Whatley Deputy Director, Office of Minority Education and Community Development Have you ever heard of the Washington, D.C. regional science bowl competition?

  4. DOE opens lab equipment acquisition program to high schools and middle

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    schools | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information opens lab equipment acquisition program to high schools and middle schools Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2009 U.S. high schools and middle schools are now eligible to participate in the Department of Energy Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) program. For 32 years this program has enabled institutions of higher education to acquire hundreds of millions of dollars in high quality surplus laboratory

  5. Jefferson Lab Hosts 20 Teams for Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 25, 2008 - Tomorrow's scientists, engineers and mathematicians may be found testing their mental skills at the Department of Energy's Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl taking place at Jefferson Lab on Saturday, March 1. Twenty teams, representing high schools from across the region are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl® tournament - sponsored by the U.S. Department

  6. EIS-0465: Pepco Holdings, Inc. Mid-Atlantic Power Path (MAPP) Project, Prince George's, Calvert, and Wicomico Counties, Maryland, and Sussex County, Delaware

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pepco Holdings, Inc., cancelled its proposed Phase II of the Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway transmission line project and DOE cancelled preparation of an EIS on the potential environmental impacts of a proposed federal loan guarantee for the project.

  7. Comparison of Cenozoic Faulting at the Savannah River Site to Fault Characteristics of the Atlantic Coast Fault Province: Implications for Fault Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cumbest, R.J.

    2000-11-14

    This study compares the faulting observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity with the faults of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province and concludes that both sets of faults exhibit the same general characteristics and are closely associated. Based on the strength of this association it is concluded that the faults observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity are in fact part of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province. Inclusion in this group means that the historical precedent established by decades of previous studies on the seismic hazard potential for the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province is relevant to faulting at the Savannah River Site. That is, since these faults are genetically related the conclusion of ''not capable'' reached in past evaluations applies.In addition, this study establishes a set of criteria by which individual faults may be evaluated in order to assess their inclusion in the Atlantic Coast Fault Province and the related association of the ''not capable'' conclusion.

  8. Airborne CH2O measurements over the North Atlantic during the 1997 NARE campaign: Instrument comparisons and distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fried, Alan; Lee, Yin -Nan; Frost, Greg; Wert, Bryan; Henry, Bruce; Drummond, James R.; Hubler, Gerd; Jobson, Tom

    2002-02-27

    Here, formaldehyde measurements from two independent instruments are compared with photochemical box model calculations. The measurements were made on the NOAA P-3 aircraft as part of the 1997 North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE 1997). After examining the possible reasons for the model-measurement discrepancy, we conclude that there are probably one or more additional unknown sources of CH2O in the North Atlantic troposphere.

  9. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    July 24-25, 2012 July 2013 Final Report Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication July 24 - 25, 2012 Silver Spring, Maryland Workshop and report sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office Publication Date: July 2013 Jocelyn Brown-Saracino 1 , Courtney Smith 2 , and Patrick Gilman 3 New West Technologies 1 Wind and Water Power

  10. Heavy metals in the near-surface aerosol over the Atlantic Ocean from 60 degree south to 54 degree north

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voelkening, J.; Heumann, K.G. )

    1990-11-20

    The particulate heavy metal concentrations of Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Tl, and Pb were determined in the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean from 60{degree}S to 54{degree}N with the definitive method of isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Fe was used as a reference element for the influence of crustal material calculating the corresponding enrichment factors EF(Fe) for the other metal traces. Tl showed the lowest abundance of all heavy metals with concentrations of less than 20 pg m{sup {minus}3} for all samples except those from the area around the English Channel. The concentration ranges for the other elements were Cr = <0.08-9 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Fe = <2.6-7,500 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Ni = <0.05-10 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Cu = <0.02-20 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Zn = <0.09-450 ng m{sup {minus}3}, Cd = <0.003-3.5 ng m{sup {minus}3}, and Pb = <0.05-200 ng m{sup {minus}3}. The lowest element concentrations were usually measured in the remote areas of the South Atlantic, whereas the highest ones were detected around the English Channel. Due to high Fe concentrations, a substantial influence of crustal material was observed in the atmosphere southeast of the South American continent, in the South Atlantic area of the southeast trades, and over the North Atlantic west of North Africa. EF(Fe) values for the most part less than 10 for Cr and Ni and less than 50 for Cu indicate that the influence of crustal material for these metals is much higher than for Zn, Cd, and Pb where EF(Fe) values between 500 and 5,000 had often been determined. This is due to anthropogenic and biological influences.

  11. Anomalous mid-twentieth century atmospheric circulation change over the South Atlantic compared to the last 6000 years

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Turney, Chris S. M.; Jones, Richard T.; Lister, David; Jones, Phil; Williams, Alan N.; Hogg, Alan; Thomas, Zoe A.; Compo, Gilbert P.; Yin, Xungang; Fogwill, Christopher J.; et al

    2016-06-09

    Determining the timing and impact of anthropogenic climate change in data-sparse regions is a considerable challenge. Arguably, nowhere is this more difficult than the Antarctic Peninsula and the subantarctic South Atlantic where observational records are relatively short but where high rates of warming have been experienced since records began. Here we interrogate recently developed monthly-resolved observational datasets from the Falkland Islands and South Georgia, and extend the records back using climate-sensitive peat growth over the past 6000 years. Investigating the subantarctic climate data with ERA-Interim and Twentieth Century Reanalysis, we find that a stepped increase in precipitation across the 1940smore » is related to a change in synoptic atmospheric circulation: a westward migration of quasi-permanent positive pressure anomalies in the South Atlantic has brought the subantarctic islands under the increased influence of meridional airflow associated with the Amundsen Sea Low. Analysis of three comprehensively multi-dated (using 14C and 137Cs) peat sequences across the two islands demonstrates unprecedented growth rates since the mid-twentieth century relative to the last 6000 years. Comparison to observational and reconstructed sea surface temperatures suggests this change is linked to a warming tropical Pacific Ocean. Lastly, our results imply 'modern' South Atlantic atmospheric circulation has not been under this configuration for millennia.« less

  12. Teleconnections of the Southern Oscillation in the tropical Atlantic sector in the OSU coupled upper ocean-atomosphere GCM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hameed, S.; Meinster, A. ); Sperber, K.R. )

    1993-03-01

    The Oregon State University coupled upper ocean-atmosphere GCM has been shown to qualitatively simulate the Southern Oscillation. A composite analysis of the warm and cold events simulated in this 23-year integration has been performed. During the low phase of the Southern Oscillation, when warm anomalies occur in the eastern Pacific, the model simulates for the Atlantic region during March-May (1) a deficit of precipitation over the tropical South American continent, (2) Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico sea level pressure and sea surface temperature are in phase with the eastern Pacific anomalies, while those east of the Nordeste region are out of phase, and (3) northeast trade winds are anomalously weak and southwest trade winds are anomalously strong (as inferred from surface current anomalies). The anomalies in the oceanic processes are induced by perturbations in the atmospheric circulation over the Atlantic and are coupled to changes in the Walker circulation. During the high phase of the simulated Southern Oscillation, conditions in the atmosphere and ocean are essentially the reverse of the low phase. The model produces a response in the South American region during the opposing phases of the Southern Oscillation that is in general agreement with observations. The interannual variation of Nordeste rainfall is shown to be dominated by a few band-limited frequencies. These frequencies are found in the SST series of those regions of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans where strong correlations with Nordeste precipitation exist.

  13. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Geologic hazards on the Atlantic continental margin of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although 46 exploratory holes have failed to reveal commercial hydrocarbon accumulations on the US Atlantic margin, about twice that number were drilled on the contiguous Canadian margin before large reserves were discovered. Thus, despite the initial results, exploration on the US margin will probably continue and additional information will be needed to augment the extensive environmental data base acquired over the past 10 years. The extent, timing, causes, and importance of sediment instability of the Continental Slopes of Georges Bank, Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough--where future exploration will take place--remain controversial. Many question remain to be answered regarding such phenomena as creep on the upper slope, mass wasting in canyons and gullies, and slumping associated with faults and salt diapirs. Along the southeastern margin, the distribution of cavernous porosity below the shelf is only broadly known. Caverns pose a potential threat to drilling operations ranging from collapse of rigs to circulation loss and sheared drill strings. In deeper waters of the Continental Slope (700-2000 m), clathrates or frozen gas hydrates are common. The potential hazard of blow-outs from gas trapped beneath this layer are unknown. Additional information is needed to assess the bottom stresses imposed by tidal, storm, and geostrophically-driven currents on offshore rigs and structures, particularly in such areas as Georges Bank, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau.

  15. Vertical responses of Atlantic croaker to gas supersaturation and temperature change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamberlain, G.W.; Neill, W.H.; Romanowsky, P.A.; Strawn, K.

    1980-11-01

    Vertical responses of juvenile Atlantic croakers (Micropogon undulatus) to acute supersaturation of nitrogen and oxygen and to changing temperature were observed in a 2.5-m-tall test cylinder supplied with flowing estuarine water. Supersaturation of nitrogen caused an initial upward movement of fish, although a compensatory downward response seemed to occur after 2 to 4 hours of exposure. Supersaturation of oxygen resulted in an almost immediate downward movement of fish. Abrupt upward displacement of fish followed water-temperature changes, especially increases. Similarities between the behavior of croakers in these experiments and the behavior of other physoclists after swim-bladder volume manipulation suggested that gas supersaturation caused the swim bladders of our fish to inflate, resulting first in upward drift and then in downward swimming to restore neutral buoyancy. A nonlinear response model incorporating this hypothesis accounted for 62% of the variation (over all experiments) in mean vertical displacement of the croakers. Supersaturation-induced inflation of the swim bladder may provide physoclistous fishes a direct mechanism for avoiding gas bubble disease by stimulating the fish to descend to a depth at which no gas has a relative saturation value greater than 100%.

  16. Students Sharpen Science and Math Skills at Middle School Science Bowl -

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Students Sharpen Science and Math Skills at Middle School Science Bowl March 8, 2004 Golden, Colo. - The buzzer has sounded, the clock is ticking and all eyes are on you-what is the vitamin deficiency that causes Rickets? If you answered "Vitamin D" in 10 seconds or less, you're ready to join students from across Colorado participating in the first annual Middle School Science Bowl on March 13 at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden. This academic competition

  17. A View from the Middle for Chemical Reactions | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    (SC) A View from the Middle for Chemical Reactions Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 10.01.14 A View from the Middle for Chemical

  18. Record 18 teams prepare for Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl on

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    March 10 at Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab Newport News, Va. -- The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab, in Newport News, Va., hosts the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl on Saturday, March 10, with a record 18 teams competing. This is the largest turnout we've had for the Middle School Science Bowl in the four years we have hosted it at Jefferson Lab, according to Jan Tyler, JLab's Science Education program manager and Science Bowl coordinator. "The Science Bowl is an

  19. Secretary Chu Announces Middle and High School Finalists Set to Compete in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the 2012 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. | Department of Energy Middle and High School Finalists Set to Compete in the 2012 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. Secretary Chu Announces Middle and High School Finalists Set to Compete in the 2012 National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. April 12, 2012 - 2:12pm Addthis Washington D.C. - Demonstrating the Obama Administration's commitment to improving the participation and performance of America's students in science, technology,

  20. 50 middle-schoolers are wowed by science at PPPL's My Brother's Keeper

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    program | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 50 middle-schoolers are wowed by science at PPPL's My Brother's Keeper program May 17, 2016 By: Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 8, 2016 Fifty seventh- and eighth-graders from John Witherspoon Middle School in Princeton came to PPPL for a half day on March 4 to become scientists - doing a variety of hands-on science activities, from building a motor to sampling ice cream frozen with liquid nitrogen in a cryogenics demonstration, to watching cool plasma

  1. The Physics of the Middle: Keji Lai | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    The Physics of the Middle: Keji Lai News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 05.09.16 The Physics of the Middle: Keji Lai PECASE recipient develops new ways to study physics at the mesoscale. Print Text

  2. Blue Ic&and~ Illbole D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    terminated as of th&Ottday ofDeoanber , 19@. f,ccording to our records, our flnanoal okigatlon to you IE 87.696.40i. , 1 Dated at Ctiicago,'Illinoi,e, this gx day of Deoember...

  3. Microsoft Word - S06401_IC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S06401 June 2010 Page B-2 U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2010 Doc. ...

  4. Microsoft Word - S06401_IC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... LM, at the Phase IB Empty Salt Storage Shed ............36 U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of ...

  5. Microsoft Word - S06401_IC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Facilities, Underground Storage Tank, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Cleanups This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the ...

  6. IC-Compatible Technologies for Optical MEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krygowski, T.W.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1999-04-30

    Optical Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (Optical MEMS) Technology holds the promise of one-day producing highly integrated optical systems on a common, monolithic substrate. The choice of fabrication technology used to manufacture Optical MEMS will play a pivotal role in the size, functionality and ultimately the cost of optical Microsystems. By leveraging the technology base developed for silicon integrated circuits, large batches of routers, emitters, detectors and amplifiers will soon be fabricated for literally pennies per part. In this article we review the current status of technologies used for Optical MEMS, as well as fabrication technologies of the future, emphasizing manufacturable surface micromachining approaches to producing reliable, low-cost devices for optical communications applications.

  7. Microsoft Word - S06401_IC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    in Physical Inspection Walkaround on April 13, 2010: Brian Nickel, OEPA Jeff Smith, OEPA Tim Fischer, EPA Joe Crombie, ODH Art Kleinrath, LM Paul Lucas, EM Frank Bullock, ...

  8. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for junior high/middle school science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Some basic topics on the subject of solar energy are outlined in the form of a teaching manual. The manual is geared toward junior high or middle school science students. Topics include solar collectors, solar water heating, solar radiation, insulation, heat storage, and desalination. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate the solar energy topics are provided. (BCS)

  9. Calloway Middle School Honored at DOE National Science Bowl, Lone Oak Competes Among High Schools

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, KY – Calloway County Middle School won the Civility Award and was named one of the top six battery-powered model car design teams at the Department of Energy’s National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C.

  10. Gas projects surge in the Middle East as governments seek new revenue sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.D.

    1997-02-24

    The rapid development of natural gas and condensate reserves in the Middle East results from a simple motivation: the desire of governments to earn revenues. For the past decade, Middle East governments have run budget deficits, which they funded by drawing down foreign assets and issuing debt. Now in the process of structural economic reform, they have begun to use an under-utilized resource--natural gas, of which Middle East governments own about one third of the world`s reserves. Governments receive revenues from several sources in natural gas developments, which makes the projects very attractive. Revenue comes from the sale of the natural gas in the domestic market and, if exported, the international market; the sale of associated condensates; the additional exports of crude oil or refined products if natural gas is substituted for refined products in domestic markets; the increased sale of crude oil if natural gas is injected into reservoirs to maintain pressure; and the sale of petrochemicals where natural gas is used as feedstock. Large projects under way in the Middle East highlight the consequences of multiple revenue sources and interlinked costs of natural gas and condensate development. Other countries in the region are undertaking similar projects, so examples cited represent only a portion of what is occurring. The paper describes Abu Dhabi, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Iran.

  11. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    ... Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Total Points 1. Mahtomedi Middle School 2 0 2 0 0 0 4 2. Edward Hurley Elementary School 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 3. Treasure Valley Math & Science Center 2 2 2 2 2 2 12 4. ...

  12. Middle School Academic Competition - Round Robin | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    ... Mulhall-Orlando School 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4. Hunter College High School 2 0 2 0 2 2 2 10 5. ... Next Generation School 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6. Robert H. Sperreng Middle School 0 2 2 2 2 0 2 ...

  13. The Radiative Role of Free Tropospheric Aerosols and Marine Clouds over the Central North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoleni, Claudio; Kumar, Sumit; Wright, Kendra; Kramer, Louisa; Mazzoleni, Lynn; Owen, Robert; Helmig, Detlev

    2014-12-09

    The scientific scope of the project was to exploit the unique location of the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO) located in the summit caldera of the Pico Volcano in Pico Island in the Azores, for atmospheric studies. The observatory, located at 2225m a.s.l., typically samples free tropospheric aerosols laying above the marine low-level clouds and long-range transported from North America. The broad purpose of this research was to provide the scientific community with a better understanding of fundamental physical processes governing the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing and climate; with the ultimate goal of improving our abilities to understand past climate and to predict future changes through numerical models. The project was 'exploratory' in nature, with the plan to demonstrate the feasibility of deploying for the first time, an extensive aerosol research package at PMO. One of the primary activities was to test the deployment of these instruments at the site, to collect data during the 2012 summer season, and to further develop the infrastructure and the knowledge for performing novel research at PMO in follow-up longer-term aerosol-cloud studies. In the future, PMO could provide an elevated research outpost to support the renewed DOE effort in the Azores that was intensified in 2013 with the opening of the new sea-level ARM-DOE Eastern North Atlantic permanent facility at Graciosa Island. During the project period, extensive new data sets were collected for the planned 2012 season. Thanks to other synergistic activities and opportunities, data collection was then successfully extended to 2013 and 2014. Highlights of the scientific findings during this project include: a) biomass burning contribute significantly to the aerosol loading in the North Atlantic free troposphere; however, long-range transported black carbon concentrations decreased substantially in the last decade. b) Single black carbon particles – analyzed off-line at the electron

  14. Carbon cycling in western equatorial atlantic sediments: Insights from carbon isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNichol, A.P.; McCorkle, D.C.; Martin, W.R.; Berry, J.N.

    1995-12-01

    Sediments from a site on the Ceara Rise in the western equatorial Atlantic Ocean (5{degrees} 17N, 44{degrees}8W) were collected in March 1994 to study the carbon cycle of ocean sediments. Sediments were collected in 3270 m of water, above the calcite saturation horizon ({triangle}CO{sub 3}{sup 2} {approx} 20). Relatively large volumes (20-30 ml) of pore water were extracted from 1-2 cm interval sections of the surface 10 cm of the sediments using both whole core squeezing and centrifugation techniques. The whole core squeezer permits the in-situ or shipboard extraction of large volumes of pore water without sectioning sediment cores. We analyzed the pore water dissolved inorganic carbon ({Sigma}CO{sub 2}) to yield high resolution profiles of concentration, {gamma}{sup 13}C, and {triangle}{sup 14}C at this site. The bottom water values we measured are about 10 {per_thousand} lower than that measured at a nearby site during the GEOSECS Program in 1974. Pore water {gamma}{sup 13}C decreases regularly from a value of 0.75 {per_thousand} in the bottom water to -0.8 {per_thousand} at 11 cm and {triangle}{sup 14}C decreases regularly from -109 {per_thousand} in the bottom water to -180 at 10 cm. The stable isotope results indicate the addition of carbon to the pore water from both the dissolution of CaCO{sub 3} and the oxidation of organic matter. Pore water radiocarbon results indicate that at least one of these carbon sources is quite old. We will use results from isotopic analyses of the sediment organic matter and CaCO{sub 3} to constrain the sediment carbon budget and discuss the implications for oceanic carbon modelling,

  15. Sediment transport time measured with U-Series isotopes: Resultsfrom ODP North Atlantic Drill Site 984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Kate; Christensen, John N.; McManus,Jerry

    2006-06-05

    High precision uranium isotope measurements of marineclastic sediments are used to measure the transport and storage time ofsediment from source to site of deposition. The approach is demonstratedon fine-grained, late Pleistocene deep-sea sediments from Ocean DrillingProgram Site 984A on the Bjorn Drift in the North Atlantic. The sedimentsare siliciclastic with up to 30 percent carbonate, and dated by sigma 18Oof benthic foraminifera. Nd and Sr isotopes indicate that provenance hasoscillated between a proximal source during the last three interglacialperiods volcanic rocks from Iceland and a distal continental sourceduring glacial periods. An unexpected finding is that the 234U/238Uratios of the silicate portion of the sediment, isolated by leaching withhydrochloric acid, are significantly less than the secular equilibriumvalue and show large and systematic variations that are correlated withglacial cycles and sediment provenance. The 234U depletions are inferredto be due to alpha-recoil loss of234Th, and are used to calculate"comminution ages" of the sediment -- the time elapsed between thegeneration of the small (<_ 50 mu-m) sediment grains in the sourceareas by comminution of bedrock, and the time of deposition on theseafloor. Transport times, the difference between comminution ages anddepositional ages, vary from less than 10 ky to about 300 to 400 ky forthe Site 984A sediments. Long transport times may reflect prior storagein soils, on continental shelves, or elsewhere on the seafloor. Transporttime may also be a measure of bottom current strength. During the mostrecent interglacial periods the detritus from distal continental sourcesis diluted with sediment from Iceland that is rapidly transported to thesite of deposition. The comminution age approach could be used to dateQuaternary non-marine sediments, soils, and atmospheric dust, and may beenhanced by concomitant measurement of 226Ra/230Th, 230Th/234U, andcosmogenic nuclides.

  16. Evidence for a winter sink of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide in the northeast Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulshoefer, V.S.; Uher, G.; Andreae, M.O. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    Atmospheric and dissolved carbonyl sulfide (COS) concentrations were measured on 473 samples during three cruises into the northeast Atlantic Ocean. The cruises took place in April/May 1992, January 1994, and September 1994, covering three seasons. In January 1994, persistent undersaturation of COS in seawater with respect to the atmosphere was observed. This is the first data set to show a strong and persistent undersaturation with the mean saturation ratio (SR) being 46% and the standard deviation 13%. In April 1992. the seawater was slightly supersaturated, with a SR of 126{plus_minus}58%. Only in September 1994, strong supersaturation of 214{plus_minus}86% was observed. The measured air concentrations were relatively uniform, averaging 410{plus_minus}67 pptv in January 1994, 466{plus_minus}42 pptv in April 1992, and 396{plus_minus}18 pptv in September 1994. Sea-to-air fluxes of COS were estimated using three different exchange models. We obtained moderate to low COS emissions in September (19 to 33 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) and April/May (5 to 10 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), in contrast to a significant flux from the atmosphere into the ocean in January (-76 to -31 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}). The strong seasonal variation of COS emissions with the possibility of reversed fluxes into the ocean during winter must be considered in future oceanic source estimates. The possible effect of an open ocean winter sink on global marine emissions of COS could be a reduction by some 10-15%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Design and development of a probe-based multiplexed multi-species absorption spectroscopy sensor for characterizing transient gas-parameter distributions in the intake systems of I.C. engines

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Jatana, Gurneesh; Geckler, Sam; Koeberlein, David; Partridge, William

    2016-09-01

    We designed and developed a 4-probe multiplexed multi-species absorption spectroscopy sensor system for gas property measurements on the intake side of commercial multi-cylinder internal-combustion (I.C.) engines; the resulting cycle- and cylinder-resolved concentration, temperature and pressure measurements are applicable for assessing spatial and temporal variations in the recirculated exhaust gas (EGR) distribution at various locations along the intake gas path, which in turn is relevant to assessing cylinder charge uniformity, control strategies, and CFD models. Furthermore, the diagnostic is based on absorption spectroscopy and includes an H2O absorption system (utilizing a 1.39 m distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser) for measuring gasmore » temperature, pressure, and H2O concentration, and a CO2 absorption system (utilizing a 2.7 m DFB laser) for measuring CO2 concentration. The various lasers, optical components and detectors were housed in an instrument box, and the 1.39- m and 2.7- m lasers were guided to and from the engine-mounted probes via optical fibers and hollow waveguides, respectively. The 5kHz measurement bandwidth allows for near-crank angle resolved measurements, with a resolution of 1.2 crank angle degrees at 1000 RPM. Our use of compact stainless steel measurement probes enables simultaneous multi-point measurements at various locations on the engine with minimal changes to the base engine hardware; in addition to resolving large-scale spatial variations via simultaneous multi-probe measurements, local spatial gradients can be resolved by translating individual probes. Along with details of various sensor design features and performance, we also demonstrate validation of the spectral parameters of the associated CO2 absorption transitions using both a multi-pass heated cell and the sensor probes.« less

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","New England","Middle...

  19. Carbon 14 measurements in surface water CO{sub 2} from the Atlantic, India, and Pacific Oceans, 1965--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nydal, R.; Brenkert, A.L.; Boden, T.A.

    1998-03-01

    In the 1960s, thermonuclear bomb tests released significant pulses of radioactive carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) into the atmosphere. These major perturbations allowed scientists to study the dynamics of the global carbon cycle by calculating rates of isotope exchange between the atmosphere and ocean waters. A total of 950 ocean surface water observations were made from 1965 through 1994. The measurements were taken at 30 stations in the Atlantic Ocean, 14 stations in the Indian Ocean, and 38 stations in the Pacific Ocean. Thirty-two of the 950 samples were taken in the Atlantic Ocean during the R/V Andenes research cruise. {sup 14}C was measured in 871 of the 950 samples, and those measurements have been corrected ({Delta}{sup 14}C) for isotopic fractionation and radioactive decay. The {Delta}{sup 14}C values range between {minus}113.3 and 280.9 per mille and have a mean value of 101.3 per mille. The highest yearly mean (146.5 per mille) was calculated for 1969, the lowest yearly mean value was calculated for 1990 (67.9 per mille) illustrating a decrease over time. This decrease was to be expected as a result of the ban on atmospheric thermonuclear tests and the slow mixing of the ocean surface waters with the deeper layers.

  20. The role of Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in the global mean temperature variability

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Chylek, Petr; Klett, James D.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Hengartner, Nicolas

    2016-02-20

    We simulated the global mean 1900–2015 warming by 42 Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) climate models varies between 0.58 and 1.70 °C. The observed warming according to the NASA GISS temperature analysis is 0.95 °C with a 1200 km smoothing radius, or 0.86 °C with a 250 km smoothing radius. The projection of the future 2015–2100 global warming under a moderate increase of anthropogenic radiative forcing (RCP4.5 scenario) by individual models is between 0.7 and 2.3 °C. The CMIP5 climate models agree that the future climate will be warmer; however, there is little consensus as to how largemore » the warming will be (reflected by an uncertainty of over a factor of three). Moreover, a parsimonious statistical regression model with just three explanatory variables [anthropogenic radiative forcing due to greenhouse gases and aerosols (GHGA), solar variability, and the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) index] accounts for over 95 % of the observed 1900–2015 temperature variance. This statistical regression model reproduces very accurately the past warming (0.96 °C compared to the observed 0.95 °C) and projects the future 2015–2100 warming to be around 0.95 °C (with the IPCC 2013 suggested RCP4.5 radiative forcing and an assumed cyclic AMO behavior). The AMO contribution to the 1970–2005 warming was between 0.13 and 0.20 °C (depending on which AMO index is used) compared to the GHGA contribution of 0.49–0.58 °C. During the twenty-first century AMO cycle the AMO contribution is projected to remain the same (0.13–0.20 °C), while the GHGA contribution is expected to decrease to 0.21–0.25 °C due to the levelling off of the GHGA radiative forcing that is assumed according to the RCP4.5 scenario. Therefore, the anthropogenic contribution and natural variability are expected to contribute about equally to the anticipated global warming during the second half of the twenty-first century for the RCP4.5 trajectory.« less

  1. Middle School Electric Car Competition | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Electric Car Competition National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Science Bowl Coordinators Alumni Historical Information - National Finals National Science Bowl Logos Regional Competitions National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us 2013 Competition Results Middle School

  2. Middle School Electric Car Competition | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Electric Car Competition National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Science Bowl Coordinators Alumni Historical Information - National Finals National Science Bowl Logos Regional Competitions National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 E: Email Us 2014 Competition Results Middle School

  3. Past Middle School National Science Bowl Winners (2002 - 2015) | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Office of Science (SC) Middle School National Science Bowl Winners (2002 - 2015) National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Science Bowl Coordinators Alumni Historical Information - National Finals National Science Bowl Logos Regional Competitions National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC

  4. Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Joseph W.; Homicz, Gregory F.; Bergman, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

  5. Students and Parents at Carver Middle School Explore STEM with Jefferson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab (Newport News Public Schools TV Media Center,This Just In program) | Jefferson Lab Students and Parents at Carver Middle School Explore STEM with Jefferson Lab (Newport News Public Schools TV Media Center,This Just In program) External Link: http://nnpstv.com/mediacenter/video/1326/This-Just-In-110-Week-of-April-2-2012 By jlab_admin on Mon, 2012-04-02

  6. U.S. Attorney's Office Middle District of Florida FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Middle District of Florida FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, September 11, 2015 Scientists Sentenced To Prison For Defrauding The Small Business Innovation Research Program Tampa, Florida - U.S. District Judge Virginia Hernandez Covington has sentenced Mahmoud Aldissi (a/k/a Matt) and Anastassia Bogomolova (a/k/a Anastasia) for conspiracy to commit wire fraud, wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, and falsification of records. Aldissi was sentenced to 15 years in federal prison and Bogomolova was

  7. Appendix D of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fourth appendix to the report, the presentations from the workshop.

  8. Appendix B of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the second appendix to the report, the workshop participants.

  9. South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study. Volume I: an investigation of live bottom habitats south of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The major objectives of this study were to (1) characterize benthic and nektonic communities associated with representative live bottom habitats on the continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight, and (2) evaluate factors which might influence these communities, particularly the potential for impact by offshore oil and gas activities. The study areas include nine live bottom areas located off South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

  10. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  11. Island based radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud parameters during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frisch, A.S.; Fairall, C.W.; Snider, J.B.; Lenshow, D.H.; Mayer, S.D.

    1996-04-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, simultaneous measurements were made with a vertically pointing cloud sensing radar and a microwave radiometer. The radar measurements are used to estimate stratus cloud drizzle and turbulence parameters. In addition, with the microwave radiometer measurements of reflectivity, we estimated the profiles of cloud liquid water and effective radius. We used radar data for computation of vertical profiles of various drizzle parameters such as droplet concentration, modal radius, and spread. A sample of these results is shown in Figure 1. In addition, in non-drizzle clouds, with the radar and radiometer we can estimate the verticle profiles of stratus cloud parameters such as liquid water concentration and effective radius. This is accomplished by assuming a droplet distribution with droplet number concentration and width constant with height.

  12. Petroleum potential of lower and middle Paleozoic rocks in Nebraska portion of Mid-Continent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, M.P. )

    1989-08-01

    Central North America during the Paleozoic was characterized by northern (Williston) and southern (Anadarko) depositional regimes separated by a stable Transcontinental arch. Nebraska lies on the southern flank of this arch and contains the northern zero edges of the lower and middle Paleozoic rocks of the southern regime. Most of these rocks are secondary dolomites with zones of excellent intercrystalline porosity. The Reagan-LaMotte Sandstones and the overlying Arbuckle dolomites are overlapped by Middle Ordovician rocks toward the Transcontinental arch. Rocks equivalent to the Simpson consist of a basal sand (St. Peter) and overlying interbedded gray-green shales and dolomitic limestones. An uppermost shale facies is present in the Upper Ordovician (Viola-Maquoketa) eastward and southward across Nebraska. The dolomite facies extends northward into the Williston basin. The Silurian dolomites, originally more widely deposited, are overlapped by Devonian dolomites in southeastern Nebraska. Upper Devonian rocks exhibit a regional facies change from carbonate to green-gray shale to black shale southeastward across the Mid-Continent. Mississippian carbonates overlap the Devonian westward and northward across the Transcontinental arch. Pennsylvanian uplift and erosion were widespread, producing numerous stratigraphic traps. Sands related to the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity produce along the Cambridge arch. Arbuckle, Simpson, Viola, and Hunton production is present in the Forest City basin and along the Central Kansas uplift. Although source rocks are scarce and the maturation is marginal, current theories of long-distance oil migration encourage exploration in the extensive lower and middle Paleozoic reservoirs in this portion of the Mid-Continent.

  13. 50 middle-schoolers are wowed by science at PPPL's My Brother's Keeper

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    program | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 50 middle-schoolers are wowed by science at PPPL's My Brother's Keeper program By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 8, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Students use a compass to map the magnetic field lines of the electromagnet they created during a workshop at the My Brother's Keeper event at PPPL March 4. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) (Photo by Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Students use a

  14. Middle Schoolers Dream Big with Their Solar- and Battery-Powered Cars | PV

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    | NREL Middle Schoolers Dream Big with Their Solar- and Battery-Powered Cars May 27, 2016 A group of young students kneel at a starting line with model solar cars. Racers get set for the start of a heat at the annual Junior Solar Sprint and Lithium Ion Battery Car competitions May 14, held inside the Dakota Ridge High School gym in Littleton, Colorado. Photo by Dennis Schroeder Dreams can travel a long way-longer than the 20 meters of black neoprene racetrack used in the annual Junior Solar

  15. 50 middle-schoolers are wowed by science at PPPL's My Brother's Keeper

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    program | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 50 middle-schoolers are wowed by science at PPPL's My Brother's Keeper program By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 8, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Students use a compass to map the magnetic field lines of the electromagnet they created during a workshop at PPPL's My Brother's Keeper event March 4. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Students use a compass to map the magnetic field lines of the electromagnet they

  16. West Windsor-Plainsboro South High School & William Annin Middle School win

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Virginia N.J. Regional Science Bowl at PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    West Windsor-Plainsboro South High School & William Annin Middle School win N.J. Regional Science Bowl at PPPL Top science whizzes will go to national contest in Washington, D.C. By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February 23, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The West Windsor-Plainsboro South High School team buzzes in an answer as they compete against Millburn High School in Round 12 of the New Jersey

  17. Super-giant oil fields and future prospects in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, L.; Johnston, D.

    1995-06-01

    Upper Jurassic carbonates, Lower Cretaceous sands, Lower Cretaceous carbonates and Tertiary carbonates of the Middle East contain more than 50% of the worlds oil. Our area of interest covers SE Turkey and Syria in the north to the borders of Yemen and Oman in the south, and from the Red Sea across Saudi Arabia, the Emirates and the Arabian/Persian Gulf to Iran in the East. There are over 80 fields in this region with over 1 billion barrels of recoverable reserves. Yet only around 30,000 wells have been drilled in this territory. Regional structure and stratigraphy are discussed within the context of three major plays in the region as well as a new play in the Permo-Carboniferous. Numerous opportunities are available and countries such as Iraq and Iran may one day open their doors more to the industry than is presently the case. The dramatic petroleum geology of the region will stamp its influence on the nature of business and opportunities for years to come. While fiscal systems here already offer some of the toughest terms in the world, future deals in the more prolific areas will be even tougher. But, the economies of Middle Eastern scale will provide some of the great mega-opportunities of future international exploration.

  18. SESAME, A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einfeld, D.; Hasnain, S.S.; Sayers, Z.; Schopper, H.; Winick, H.; Al-Dmour, E.

    2004-05-12

    Developed under the auspices of UNESCO, SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be a major international research centre in the Middle East and Mediterranean region. On 6th of January 2003, the official foundation of SESAME took place. The facility is located in Allan, Jordan, 30 km North-West of Amman. As of August 2003 the Founding Members are Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine, Turkey and United Arabic Emirates, representing a population of over 300 million. SESAME will be a 2.5 GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 24.6 nm.rad, circumference {approx}125m). About 40% of the circumference is available for insertion devices (average length 2.75m) in 13 straight sections. Beam lines are up to 36m. The site and a building are provided by Jordan. Construction started in August 2003. The scientific program will start with up to 6 beam lines: MAD Protein Crystallography, SAXS and WAXS for polymers and proteins, Powder Diffraction for material science, UV/VUV/SXR Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Photoabsorption Spectroscopy, IR Spectroscopy, and EXAFS.

  19. Need for refining capacity creates opportunities for producers in Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.S.S. )

    1994-07-11

    Oil industry interest in refining has revived in the past few years in response to rising oil consumption. The trend creates opportunities, for countries in the Middle East, which do not own refining assets nearly in proportion to their crude oil reserved. By closing this gap between reserves and refining capacity, the countries can ease some of the instability now characteristic of the oil market. Some major oil producing countries have begun to move downstream. During the 1980s, Venezuela, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Libya, and other members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries acquired refining assets through direct total purchase or joint ventures. Nevertheless, the oil industry remains largely unintegrated, with the Middle East holding two thirds of worldwide oil reserves but only a small share downstream. As worldwide refining capacity swings from a period of surplus toward one in which the need for new capacity will be built. The paper discusses background of the situation, shrinking surplus, investment requirements, sources of capital, and shipping concerns.

  20. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a “regional” science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school — grades 6 through 8 — students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach — although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and

  1. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 4 January - 21 March 1994)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, Alex

    2005-06-30

    This documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), and pH at hydrographic stations during the R/V Maurice Ewing cruise in the South Atlantic Ocean on the A17 WOCE section. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), this cruise was also a part of the French WOCE program consisting of three expeditions (CITHER 1, 2, and 3) focused on the South Atlantic Ocean. The A17 section was occupied during the CITHER 2 expedition, which began in Montevideo, Uruguay, on January 4, 1994 and finished in Cayenne, French Guyana, on March 21, 1994. During this period the ship stopped in Salvador de Bahia and Recife, Brazil, to take on supplies and exchange personnel. Upon completion of the cruise the ship transited to Fort de France, Martinique. Instructions for accessing the data are provided.

  2. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Mid-Atlantic and their onshore impacts: a summary report, November 1979. Update 3, August 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    At the present, there are no operators drilling in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The prime targets for future exploration will be in areas of 3000 to 6000 feet (914 to 1829 m) depth of water, seaward of previously leased tracts. No commercial discoveries have been found during the 4-year drilling history of the area. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the Mid-Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Little development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with upcoming Lease Sale 59. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of future exploration efforts. After Lease Sale 59, the next sale is Lease Sale 76, which is tentatively scheduled for March 1983.

  3. Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) AMF Deployment Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington CAP-MBL Proposal Team AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate

  4. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix E, Bibliography of References Provided by Participants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    E: Bibliography of References Provided by Participants July 2013 Appendix E: Bibliography of References Provided by Participants Reports on Activities in the Mid-Atlantic New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (prepared by Geo-Marine, Inc.). 2010. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Baseline Studies Final Report. http://www.nj.gov/dep/dsr/ocean-wind/report.htm. Northeast Fisheries Science Center. 2011. Preliminary summer 2010 regional abundance estimate of loggerhead

  5. South Atlantic OCS area living marine resources study. Volume II: an investigation of live bottom habitats north of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The major objectives of this study were to (1) characterize benthic and nektonic communities associated with representative live bottom habitats on the continental shelf of the South Atlantic Bight, and (2) evaluate factors which might influence these communities, particularly the potential for impact by offshore oil and gas activities. The report describes three study sites at the edge of the continental shelf in a 55-100m depth zone, near Cape Fear, North Carolina.

  6. Outmigration of landlocked Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts and effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small scale hydroelectric facility. [Salmo salar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nettles, D.C.; Gloss, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Modes of downstream passage (penstock, spillway, diversion chute) by Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts were monitored using radio telemetry to assess the effectiveness of an angled trash rack/fish bypass structure at a small hydroelectric dam on the Boquet River, New York. Telemetry of 170 Atlantic salmon smolts and visual observations of stocked smolts were used to determine aspects of Atlantic salmon outmigration behavior. Smolts initiated mass migrations after river temperatures reached or exceeded 10/sup 0/C. Many radio-tagged smolts interrupted movements upon reaching ponded waters and/or the dam. River flow did not (P > .05) affect the frequency of migratory movements, passages, or rate of movement. Migrations were of approximately 30 days duration. Passages at the dam occurred primarily at night (61%) with diurnal passages (17%) and crepuscular passages (17%) of secondary importance. Timing of 5% of the passages was undetermined. All passages which occurred when angled trash racks were in place were through the bypass or over the spillway. Six (6) passages occurred when trash racks perpendicular to the penstock were in place: 3 of these were penstock passages. The angled trash rack and bypass structure served to reduce entrainment.

  7. Abrupt Climate Change and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation: sensitivity and non-linear response to Arctic/sub-Arctic freshwater pulses. Collaborative research. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    This project investigated possible mechanisms by which melt-water pulses can induce abrupt change in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) magnitude. AMOC magnitude is an important ingredient in present day climate. Previous studies have hypothesized abrupt reduction in AMOC magnitude in response to influxes of glacial melt water into the North Atlantic. Notable fresh-water influxes are associated with the terminus of the last ice age. During this period large volumes of melt water accumulated behind retreating ice sheets and subsequently drained rapidly when the ice weakened sufficiently. Rapid draining of glacial lakes into the North Atlantic is a possible origin of a number of paleo-record abrupt climate shifts. These include the Younger-Dryas cooling event and the 8,200 year cooling event. The studies undertaken focused on whether the mechanistic sequence by which glacial melt-water impacts AMOC, which then impacts Northern Hemisphere global mean surface temperature, is dynamically plausible. The work has implications for better understanding past climate stability. The work also has relevance for today’s environment, in which high-latitude ice melting in Greenland appears to be driving fresh water outflows at an accelerating pace.

  8. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulkue, Dincer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-19

    SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) will be the Middle East's first international research center. It is a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the region with founding members Bahrain, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, Palestine Authority, and Turkey. Iran is in the process of finalizing its formal membership. Other countries (Cyprus, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates) are also expected to join. The permanent Council of member states has full responsibility for the project. Members provide the annual operating budget. Observer countries are Germany, Greece, Italy, Kuwait, Portugal, Russian Federation, Sweden, the UK, and the US. SESAME is being developed under the umbrella of UNESCO. Jordan was selected as the building site. SESAME will offer excellent opportunities for training of Middle East scientists and attract those working abroad to consider returning. SESAME will be a 2.5GeV 3rd Generation light source (emittance 26nm-rad, circumference {approx}133m), providing excellent performance for structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, surface and interface science, microelectromechanical devices, x-ray imaging, archaeological microanalysis, and materials characterization. It will cover a broad spectral range from the infrared to hard x-rays and will have 12 straight sections for insertion devices (average length 2.75m). The injector will be the BESSY I 0.8 GeV booster synchrotron which has been given as a gift from Germany. Four committees advise the Council and assist in developing the technical design, beam lines, user community, and scientific Program. The SESAME building, now in construction with funds and a site provided by Jordan, is scheduled for completion in late 2006 after which the BESSY I injector will be installed. First stored beam in the new 2.5 GeV ring is planned for 2009 with six initial beamlines planned. Some beamlines will be built by member

  9. Assessing middle school students` understanding of science relationships and processes: Year 2 - instrument validation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schau, C.; Mattern, N.; Weber, R.; Minnick, K.

    1997-01-01

    Our overall purpose for this multi-year project was to develop an alternative assessment format measuring rural middle school students understanding of science concepts and processes and the interrelationships among them. This kind of understanding is called structural knowledge. We had 3 major interrelated goals: (1) Synthesize the existing literature and critically evaluate the actual and potential use of measures of structural knowledge in science education. (2) Develop a structural knowledge alternative assessment format. (3) Examine the validity of our structural knowledge format. We accomplished the first two goals during year 1. The structural knowledge assessment we identified and developed further was a select-and-fill-in concept map format. The goal for our year 2 work was to begin to validate this assessment approach. This final report summarizes our year 2 work.

  10. Science and Technology to Advance Regional Security in the Middle East and Central Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, A F B; Richardson, J H; Ragaini, R C; Knapp, R B; Rosenberg, N D; Smith, D K; Ball, D Y

    2002-10-09

    This paper is concerned with the promotion and advancement of regional security in the Middle East and Central Asia through the development of bilateral and multilateral cooperation on targeted scientific and technical projects. It is widely recognized that increasing tensions and instability in many parts of the world emphasize--or reemphasize--a need to seek and promote regional security in these areas. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), a national security research facility operated for the US Department of Energy, we are pursuing an effort to use science and technology as a ''low risk'' means of engagement in regions of strategic importance to the United States. In particular, we are developing collaborations and cooperative projects among (and between) national laboratory scientists in the US and our various counterparts in the countries of interest.

  11. Environmental impacts of the satellite power system (SPS) on the middle atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none, none

    1980-10-01

    The heavy-lift launch vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in constructing satellite power systems (SPS) would deposit various contaminants in the middle atmosphere, contaminants that could conceivably have adverse effects on climate and upper air structure. These contaminants consist of the major constituents of water vapor, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide, and the minor constituents of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide in the rocket effluent, as well as nitric oxide formed during reentry. To assess the magnitudes of the effects, we have constructed new models or modified existing models. They are: one- and two-dimensional photochemical models, a plume model, a noctilucent cloud and contrail model, a reentry model, and a model of the lower ionosphere, all of which are described in detail in the report. Using a scenario of 400 launches per year for 10 years, we have performed assessments and arrived at the following conclusions which are given.

  12. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixner, Tom; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen; Brooks, Paul; Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  13. The Potential Uses of Commercial Satellite Imagery in the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vannoni, M.G.

    1999-06-08

    It became clear during the workshop that the applicability of commercial satellite imagery to the verification of future regional arms control agreements is limited at this time. Non-traditional security topics such as environmental protection, natural resource management, and the development of infrastructure offer the more promising applications for commercial satellite imagery in the short-term. Many problems and opportunities in these topics are regional, or at least multilateral, in nature. A further advantage is that, unlike arms control and nonproliferation applications, cooperative use of imagery in these topics can be done independently of the formal Middle East Peace Process. The value of commercial satellite imagery to regional arms control and nonproliferation, however, will increase during the next three years as new, more capable satellite systems are launched. Aerial imagery, such as that used in the Open Skies Treaty, can also make significant contributions to both traditional and non-traditional security applications but has the disadvantage of requiring access to national airspace and potentially higher cost. There was general consensus that commercial satellite imagery is under-utilized in the Middle East and resources for remote sensing, both human and institutional, are limited. This relative scarcity, however, provides a natural motivation for collaboration in non-traditional security topics. Collaborations between scientists, businesses, universities, and non-governmental organizations can work at the grass-roots level and yield contributions to confidence building as well as scientific and economic results. Joint analysis projects would benefit the region as well as establish precedents for cooperation.

  14. Biomarker responses in cyprinids of the middle stretch of the River Po, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigano, L.; Arillo, A.; Melodia, F.; Arlati, P.; Monti, C.

    1998-03-01

    Fish belonging to three species of cyprinids, that is, barbel (Barbus plebejus), chub (Leuciscus cephalus), and Italian nase (Chondrostoma soeetta), were collected from two sites of the River Po, located upstream and downstream from the confluence of one of its middle-reach polluted tributaries, the River Lambro. The two groups of individuals caught for each species were analyzed and compared for several microsomal and cytosolic biochemical markers. The enzymatic activities assayed in fish liver included ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), aminopyrine-N-demethylase (APDM), uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, the contents of reduced glutathione and nonprotein thiols were measured. Despite some differences among species, all microsomal activities (EROD, APDM, UDPGT) were found to be significantly induced in fish living downstream the River Lambro. With the exception of a higher GST enzyme activity of barbel from the downstream reach, no significant modification was evident in any of the tested cytosolic biomarkers. Results showed that barbel and nase better discriminated the two reaches of the River Po. In general, the alterations observed in feral fish are consistent with the results found in previous studies conducted with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under both laboratory and field conditions in the same middle reach of the River Po. All of the data indicate that the downstream tract of the main river is exposed to the load of pollutants transported by the River Lambro, including known inducers such as polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The latter were analyzed in sediments sampled at the two sites of fish collection, and the downstream sediment showed the highest concentrations of PAHs, although their levels are comparable to those present in moderately polluted locations. Regardless of the site of exposure

  15. Tectonics, eustasy, and sequence stratigraphy - The Middle Pennsylvanian-Wolfcampian of the Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarg, J.F. )

    1992-04-01

    The depositional patterns of sedimentary rocks are controlled by the interaction of tectonics, eustasy, and sediment supply. Tectonics and eustasy combine to cause relative changes of sea level that control the accommodation space for sediments. Sediment supply controls how much of the accommodation space is filled. Tectonics has the greatest effect on accommodation. Long-term basin fill histories are interpreted as first-order tectonic events. Second-order tectonic events are initiated by increase in the rate of subsidence that progressively decay and may culminate in a period of uplift or structural growth. Three second-order tectonic events characterize the middle-late Paleozoic history of the Permian basin. These events occur over tens of millions of years and are (1) Givetian-Meramecian, (2) Chesterian-Desmoinesian, and (3) Missourian-Guadalupian. Sediment response to these tectonic events include initial backstepping carbonate platform deposition, followed by deepening and starvation of the basin areas resulting in black shale deposition. Eustasy controls the rate of relative sea level change and is the major controlling factor on the timing of stratigraphic discontinuities. The discontinuities bound sequences and subdivide them into systems tracts. The Middle Pennsylvanian-Wolfcampian of the Permian basin can be subdivided into 19-21 third-order sequences (1-5-m.y. duration) and include six Desmoinesian, four Missourian, five to six Virgilian, and four to five Wolfcampian cycles. The cyclothems of the mid-continent represent higher order depositional sequences that stack in an orderly fashion to comprise the systems tracts of the third-order sequences.

  16. Comparison of hydrocarbon production trends in Middle and Upper members of Minnelusa formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reel, C.L.; Horne, J.C.; Kelly, A.O.

    1985-05-01

    The main reservoir rocks in the upper and middle members of the Minnelusa Formation consist of wind blown dunal sands in the area surrounding the Lusk embayment. Changes in the local depositional setting, tectonic framework, and eustatic sea level controlled the distribution and reservior quality of these sandstones. The middle member exhibits two production trends. Age-equivalent Tensleep rocks deposited along the western margin of the embayment produce from sandstones accumulated in a sand sea paleoenvironment. Structure is atnececessary for trapping owing to permeability continuity. Along the eastern margin of the embayment, production comes from isolated accumulations of sandstone deposited as dunes on broad coastal sabkhas. Fields in these sandstones define a linear trend due to the coast-parallel alignment of these dunes. Production from the upper member defines four major trends. Upper member sandstones in the southern part of the basin, similar to Leo reservoirs, produce from sediments deposited as coast-parallel dunes in a northwest-southeast alignment. In the northern portion of the basin, production is from sandstones deposited in broad, flat eolian sand seas. Because of the permeability continuity of these sandstones, structural closure is necessary for trapping hydrocarbons. Upper member production has been influenced by the unconformity developed at the top of the Minnelusa. Movement along the Rosebud arch resulted in a southwest-northeast production trend apparent in each sandstone unit reflecting their northwestward erosional limits. The last, and most apparent, production trend, results from the Opeche Shale infilling of northwest-southeast-oriented stream valleys. Most production to date has been from sandstones following this alignment juxta-posed downdip of these impermeable shales.

  17. Role of Low Frequency Sea Surface Temperature Modes with a Changing Climate in Modulating Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRow, Timothy

    2014-08-03

    The SSTs used in our study come from the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) (Gent et al 2011) and from the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis (CanESM2) (Chylek et al20ll) climate models from the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) (Taylor et al2012). We've examined the tropical cyclones using both the historical simulation that employs volcanic and aerosol forcing as well as the representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5). In addition, we've compared the present day North Atlantic tropical cyclone metrics from a previous study (LaRow, 2013) to these climate change experiments. The experimental setup is shown in Table 1. We considered the CMIP5 experiment number '3.2 historical' (Taylor et al,201l), which provides simulations of the recent past (1850-2005). The second set of CMIP5 SSTs is the RCp4.5 experiment where the radiative forcing stabilizes at 45W m-2 after 2100 (experiment number 4.1 in Taylor etal2}ll).

  18. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts: a summary report, July 1980. Update 1, February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1981-02-01

    Lease Sale 43, in the Southeast Georgia Embayment, was the first lease sale to be held in the South Atlantic. Two additional sales are scheduled between now and 1985: Sale 56 is scheduled for August 1981 and Sale 78, for January 1984. All leases from Sale 43 remain active, but no drilling has taken place since the last of six dry holes was plugged and abandoned. There are no additional plans for drilling on Sale 43 leases in the immediate future. Future exploration may shift away from previous Sale 43 leased tracts to deep-water areas after Sale 56. One hundred thirty of the 286 proposed Sale 56 tracts are in deep-water. The geologic conditions in the deep-water areas are more favorable for hydrocarbon accumulation than those under shallower waters. Structures that may provide trapping mechanisms have been shown to exist in the area. Because leases in deep-water areas take longer and are more costly to explore and develop than those in areas of shallower water, industry consensus is that longer primary lease terms may be required and some delays in acquiring rigs may be experienced. The Sale 43 area appears to be a region of relatively low hydrocarbon-bearing potential. However, the Bureau of Land Management's Intergovernmental Planning Program is preparing the necessary Regional Transportation Management Plan for the entire South Atlantic OCS Region. Nearly all the support facilities associated with Sale 43 have been removed or converted to other uses. Temporary support facilities are likely to be reactivated only if Sale 56 results in further exploration of the South Atlantic OCS.

  19. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication: Appendix A, Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    A: Workshop Agenda July 2013 Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data: Workshop to Establish Coordination & Communication Dates: July 24-25 Location: NOAA's Silver Spring headquarters: NOAA Science Center 1301 East-West Hwy, Silver Spring, MD 20910 July 24 - Science Center 8:00-8:30 - Arrival and check-in (please allow half an hour to go through security and sign- in) 8:30-8:45 - Welcome and Introductions 8:45-9:00 - Meeting Scope and Objectives

  20. Silurian shale origin for light oil, condensate, and gas in Algeria and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zumberge, J.E. ); Macko, S. ) Engel, M. )

    1996-01-01

    Two of the largest gas fields in the world, Hasi R'Mel, Algeria and North Dome, Qatar, also contain substantial condensate and light oil reserves. Gas to source rock geochemical correlation is difficult due to the paucity of molecular parameters in the former although stable isotope composition is invaluable. However, by correlating source rocks with light oils and condensates associated with gas production using traditional geochemical parameters such as biomarkers and isotopes, a better understanding of the origin of the gas is achieved. Much of the crude oil in the Ghadames/Illizi Basins of Algeria has long been thought to have been generated from Silurian shales. New light oil discoveries in Saudi Arabia have also been shown to originate in basal euxinic Silurian shales. Key sterane and terpane biomarkers as well as the stable carbon isotopic compositions of the C15+ saturate and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions allow for the typing of Silurian-sourced, thermally mature light oils in Algeria and the Middle East. Even though biomarkers are often absent due to advanced thermal maturity, condensates can be correlated to the light oils using (1) carbon isotopes of the residual heavy hydrocarbon fractions, (2) light hydrocarbon distributions (e.g., C7 composition), and (3) compound specific carbon isotopic composition of the light hydrocarbons. The carbon isotopes of the C2-C4 gas components ran then be compared to the associated condensate and light oil isotopic composition.

  1. Silurian shale origin for light oil, condensate, and gas in Algeria and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zumberge, J.E.; Macko, S. Engel, M.

    1996-12-31

    Two of the largest gas fields in the world, Hasi R`Mel, Algeria and North Dome, Qatar, also contain substantial condensate and light oil reserves. Gas to source rock geochemical correlation is difficult due to the paucity of molecular parameters in the former although stable isotope composition is invaluable. However, by correlating source rocks with light oils and condensates associated with gas production using traditional geochemical parameters such as biomarkers and isotopes, a better understanding of the origin of the gas is achieved. Much of the crude oil in the Ghadames/Illizi Basins of Algeria has long been thought to have been generated from Silurian shales. New light oil discoveries in Saudi Arabia have also been shown to originate in basal euxinic Silurian shales. Key sterane and terpane biomarkers as well as the stable carbon isotopic compositions of the C15+ saturate and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions allow for the typing of Silurian-sourced, thermally mature light oils in Algeria and the Middle East. Even though biomarkers are often absent due to advanced thermal maturity, condensates can be correlated to the light oils using (1) carbon isotopes of the residual heavy hydrocarbon fractions, (2) light hydrocarbon distributions (e.g., C7 composition), and (3) compound specific carbon isotopic composition of the light hydrocarbons. The carbon isotopes of the C2-C4 gas components ran then be compared to the associated condensate and light oil isotopic composition.

  2. Controls on aggradation and incision in the NE Negev, Israel, since the middle Pleistocene

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Matmon, A.; Elfasi, S.; Hidy, A. J.; Geller, Y.; Porat, N.; Team, ASTER

    2016-02-23

    Here, we investigated the mid-Pleistocene to recent aggradation-incision pattern of two drainage systems (Nahal Peres and Nahal Tahmas) in the hyperarid north eastern Negev desert, southern Israel. Although these drainage systems drain into the tectonically active Dead Sea basin, lake level fluctuations cannot account for the aggradation-incision pattern as bedrock knickpoints disconnect the investigated parts of these drainage systems from base level influence. We applied geomorphic mapping, soil stratigraphy, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and cosmogenic (in situ 10Be) exposure dating to reconstruct cycles of aggradation and incision of alluvial terraces and to study their temporal association with regional periods ofmore » humidity and aridity and global glacial-interglacial cycles. The spatial and temporal relationships between the alluvial units suggest changes in the drainage system behavior since the middle Pleistocene, and show a pattern in which prolonged periods of sediment aggradation alternated with short periods of rapid and intense degradation through erosion and incision into sediment and bedrock. We obtain ages for several Pleistocene-Holocene periods of incision: ~ 1.1 Ma, ~ 300 ka, ~ 120 ka, ~ 20 ka, ~ 12 ka and ~ 2 ka. Although broadly synchronous, the Nahal Peres and Nahal Tahmas systems exhibit temporal differences in aggradation and incision.« less

  3. Extending the flood record on the Middle Gila River with Holocene stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckleberry, G. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-04-01

    Historical changes in flood frequency and magnitude are correlated to changes in channel geometry for the Middle Gila River (MGR) in south-central Arizona. The author has attempted to reconstruct the frequency of large floods on the MGR for the last 1,000 years by looking at the stratigraphic record with the purpose of modeling channel changes during a period of significant local cultural change, i.e., the Hohokam-Pima cultural transition. After distinguishing and mapping geological surfaces in the eastern part of the Gila River Indian Community. The author placed a series of backhoe trenches on late Holocene MGR terraces. He interprets lithological discontinuities within overbank deposits as boundaries separating temporally discrete floods. Detrital charcoal from within the stratigraphy was submitted to the National Science Foundation-University of Arizona AMS facility for radiocarbon analysis. The stratigraphic record indicates that a minimum of four large floods have occurred on the MGR since A.D. 1300. Three of these floods may correspond to large historical floods in 1833, 1868, and 1905. If so, then it appears that MGR flood frequency increased after A.D. 1800. There is no evidence for increased flood frequency and channel transformations during the cultural decline of the Hohokam in the 15th century.

  4. Calibration of Regional Seismic Stations in the Middle East with Shots in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toksoz, M N; Kuleli, S; Gurbuz, C; Kalafat, D; Nekler, T; Zor, K; Yilmazer, M; Ogutcu, Z; Schultz, C A; Harris, D B

    2003-07-21

    The objective of this project is to calibrate regional travel-times and propagation characteristics of seismic waves in Turkey and surrounding areas in the Middle East in order to enhance detection and location capabilities in the region. Important data for the project will be obtained by large calibration shots in central and eastern Turkey. The first, a two-ton shot, was fired in boreholes near Keskin in central Anatolia on 23 November 2002. The explosives were placed in 14 holes, each 80 m deep, arranged in concentric circular arrays. Ninety temporary seismic stations were deployed within a 300 km radius around the shot. The permanent stations of the Turkish National Seismic Network provided a good azimuthal coverage as well as three radial traverses. Most stations within a radius of 200 km recorded the shot. Travel-time data have been analyzed to obtain a detailed crustal model under the shot and along the profiles. The model gives a 35 km thick crust, characterized by two layers with velocities of 5.0 and 6.4 km/s. The P{sub n} velocity was found to be 7.8 km/s. The crustal thickness decreases to the north where the profile crosses the North Anatolian fault. There is a slight increase in crustal velocities, but no change in crustal thickness to the west. Data analysis effort is continuing to refine the regional velocity models and to obtain station corrections.

  5. Integrative curriculum reform, domain dependent knowing, and teachers` epistemological theories: Implications for middle-level teaching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, R.R.

    1998-12-01

    Integrative curriculum as both a theoretical construct and a practical reality, and as a theme-based, problem-centered, democratic way of schooling, is becoming more widely considered as a feasible alternative to traditional middle-level curricula. Importantly for teaching and learning, domain dependence requires teachers to view one area of knowledge as fully interdependent with other areas of knowledge during the learning process. This requires teachers to adopt personal epistemological theories that reflect integrative, domain dependent knowing. This study explored what happened when teachers from highly traditional domain independent school settings encountered an ambitious college-level curriculum project that was designed to help the teachers understand the potential that integrative, domain dependent teaching holds for precollege settings. This study asked: What influence does an integrative, domain dependent curriculum project have on teachers` domain independent, epistemological theories for teaching and learning? Finding an answer to this question is essential if we, as an educational community, are to understand how integrative curriculum theory is transformed by teachers into systemic curriculum reform. The results suggest that the integrative curriculum project that teachers participated in did not explicitly alter their classroom practices in a wholesale manner. Personal epistemological theories of teachers collectively precluded teachers from making any wholesale changes in their individual classroom teaching. However, teachers became aware of integrative curriculum as an alternative, and they expressed interest in infusing integrative practices into their classrooms as opportunities arise.

  6. An example of mixing-zone dolomite, Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, Floridan aquifer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cander, H.S. )

    1994-07-01

    A late-formed dolomite cement in a core of the Middle Eocene Avon Park Formation, peninsular Florida, provides an example of dolomite cement from a mixing zone and illustrates how dolomite textural alteration and stabilization can occur at earth-surface conditions. The Avon Park Formation is a pervasively dolomitized peritidal platform carbonate 400 m thick in the Florida aquifer system. Typical Avon Park dolomite is inclusion-rich, fine-grained (< 40 mm), noncathodoluminescent, highly porous (average, 20%), and formed during the Eocene by normal to hypersaline seawater ([delta][sup 18]O = + 3.7[per thousand] PDB; [delta][sup 13]C = + 2.0[per thousand]; [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr = 0.70778; Sr = 167 ppm). In a 20 m interval in a core from southwest Florida, inclusion-free, cathodoluminescent dolomite overgrows the early-formed noncathodoluminescent marine dolomite. The cathodoluminescent dolomite cement profoundly alters the texture of Avon Park dolomite from typical Cenozoic-like porous, poorly crystalline dolomite to hard, dense, low-porosity, highly crystalline Paleozoic-like dolomite. The dolomite cement is not a replacement of limestone but an overgrowth of early-formed marine dolomite and pore-occluding cement. This study demonstrates that: (1) dolomite precipitated from a 75% seawater mixing-zone fluid that was both calcite saturated and sulfate-rich, and (2) dramatic textural maturation and stabilization in dolomite can occur in the near surface environment, without elevated temperature and burial conditions.

  7. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Intra-Host Populations Are Characterized by Numerous High Frequency Variants

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Borucki, Monica K.; Lao, Victoria; Hwang, Mona; Gardner, Shea; Adney, Danielle; Munster, Vincent; Bowen, Richard; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-20

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging human pathogen related to SARS virus. In vitro studies indicate this virus may have a broad host range suggesting an increased pandemic potential. Genetic and epidemiological evidence indicate camels serve as a reservoir for MERS virus but the mechanism of cross species transmission is unclear and many questions remain regarding the susceptibility of humans to infection. Deep sequencing data was obtained from the nasal samples of three camels that had been experimentally infected with a human MERS-CoV isolate. A majority of the genome was covered and average coverage was greater thanmore » 12,000x depth. Although only 5 mutations were detected in the consensus sequences, 473 intrahost single nucleotide variants were identified. Lastly, many of these variants were present at high frequencies and could potentially influence viral phenotype and the sensitivity of detection assays that target these regions for primer or probe binding.« less

  8. Semidirect Dynamical and Radiative Impact of North African Dust Transport on Lower Tropospheric Clouds over the Subtropical North Atlantic in CESM 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFlorio, Mike; Ghan, Steven J.; Singh, Balwinder; Miller, Arthur J.; Cayan, Dan; Russell, Lynn M.; Somerville, Richard C.

    2014-07-16

    This study uses a century length pre-industrial climate simulation by the Community Earth System Model (CESM 1.0) to explore statistical relationships between dust, clouds and atmospheric circulation, and to suggest a dynamical, rather than microphysical, mechanism linking subtropical North Atlantic lower tropospheric cloud cover with North African dust transport. The length of the run allows us to account for interannual variability of dust emissions and transport downstream of North Africa in the model. CESM’s mean climatology and probability distribution of aerosol optical depth in this region agrees well with available AERONET observations. In addition, CESM shows strong seasonal cycles of dust burden and lower tropospheric cloud fraction, with maximum values occurring during boreal summer, when a strong correlation between these two variables exists downstream of North Africa over the subtropical North Atlantic. Calculations of Estimated Inversion Strength (EIS) and composites of EIS on high and low downstream North Africa dust months during boreal summer reveal that dust is likely increasing inversion strength over this region due to both solar absorption and reflection. We find no evidence for a microphysical link between dust and lower tropospheric clouds in this region. These results yield new insight over an extensive period of time into the complex relationship between North African dust and lower tropospheric clouds over the open ocean, which has previously been hindered by spatiotemporal constraints of observations. Our findings lay a framework for future analyses using sub-monthly data over regions with different underlying dynamics.

  9. Early diagenesis of germanium in sediments of the Antarctic South Atlantic: In search of the missing Ge sink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, S.L.; Froelich, P.N.; Jahnke, R.A.

    2000-04-01

    Pore water and solid-phase geochemistry profiles were obtained from several cores between 41{degree}S and 53{degree}S in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Pore water nitrate, manganese, and iron profiles delineate standard redox zones in these sediments, and help characterize those with classic vs. burn-down behaviors. Pore water Si and Ge profiles demonstrate that Ge released during opal dissolution is removed pervasively throughout the uppermost interval of silicate release, and also downwards into the suboxic zone by as yet unidentified precipitation mechanisms. These results indicate that early diagenesis of Ge is uncoupled from that of opal. Solid-phase extractions (Fe, Mn, U, Mo, Ge, Cu, Ni, Co, V, and Cd) in a few cores suggest that anthigenic Ge removal in the suboxic zone is not associated with peaks in authigenic Mn cycling (MnO{sub 2} and related metals) but rather with processes deeper in the sediments, perhaps Fe or U diagenesis. Below the interval of Ge removal, pre water Ge increases linearly with depth by over two orders of magnitude, indicating a deep (below recovery) source of large magnitude. The fraction of opal-derived Ge precipitated authigenically in these sediments ranges from {approximately}1 to 96% and correlates strongly with the detrital fraction as well as the detrital to opal ratio, both of which generally decrease from north to south. The Ge sink observed in these sediments would need to be globally representative to account for the entire missing Ge sink in today's oceanic Ge balance, which seems unlikely. Benthic fluxes of Ge and Si estimated from these pore water profiles and from measurements in three benthic flux chamber experiments at high carbon-rain continental margin sites demonstrate that the Ge/Si rate released from the seafloor in locations with high benthic silicate and carbon fluxes is congruent with Holocene opal dissolution (Ge/Si {approximately} 0.7 x 10{sup {minus}6}). In contrast, Ge/Si flux ratios in areas

  10. Crisis Prevention Centers as confidence building measures: Suggestions for the Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pregenzer, A.L.

    1995-05-01

    Relationships between countries generally exist somewhere in the grey area between war and peace. Crisis prevention activities are important in this area, and should have two goals: stabilizing tense situations that could push countries toward war, and supporting or reinforcing efforts to move countries toward peace. A Crisis Prevention Center (CPC) should facilitate efforts to achieve these goals. Its functions can be grouped into three broad, interrelated categories: establishing and facilitating communication among participating countries; supporting negotiations and consensus-building on regional security issues; and supporting implementation of agreed confidence and security building measures. Technology will play a critical role in a CPC. Technology is required for establishing communication systems to ensure the timely flow of information between countries and to provide the means for organizing and analyzing this information. Technically-based cooperative monitoring can provide an objective source of information on mutually agreed issues, thereby supporting the implementation of confidence building measures and treaties. Technology can be a neutral subject of interaction and collaboration between technical communities from different countries, thereby providing an important channel for improving relationships. Potential first steps for a CPC in the Middle Ease could include establishing communication channels and a dedicated communications center in each country, together with an agreement to use the system as a ``Hot Line` in bilateral and multilateral-lateral emergency situations. Bilateral cooperative monitoring centers could be established to assist with implementation of agreements. A centrally located CPC could serve as a regional communications hub, coordinating a number of functions aimed at stabilizing regional tensions and supporting confidence building activities. Specific recommendations for confidence building activities are discussed.

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Table 1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by Census Division, Selected Years, 1949-2011 Year New England Middle Atlantic East North Central West North Central South Atlantic East South...

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of a gecko and the phylogeneticposition of the Middle Eastern teratoscincus keyserlingii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macey, J. Robert; Fong, Jonathan J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Shafiei,Soheila; Ananjeva, Natalia B.; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-04-22

    Sqamate reptiles are traditionally divided into six groups: Iguania, Anguimorpha, Scincomorpha, Gekkota (these four are lizards), Serpentes (snakes), and Amphisbaenia (the so-called worm lizards). Currently there are complete mitochondrial genomes from two representatives of the Iguania (Janke et al., 2001; Kumazawa, 2004), three from the Anguimorpha (Kumazawa, 2004; Kumazawa and Endo, 2004), two from the Scincomorpha (Kumazawa and Nishida, 1999; Kumazawa, 2004), two from Serpentes (Kumazawa et al., 1998; Kumazawa, 2004) and 12 from Amphisbaenia (Macey et al., 2004). The only traditional group of Squamata from which a complete mitochondrial genome has not been sequenced is the Gekkota. Here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Teratoscincus keyserlingii, a Middle Eastern representative of the Gekkota. The gekkonid lizard genus Teratoscincus is distributed throughout the deserts of central and southwest Asia as shown in figure 1, with five species currently recognized (Macey et al. 1997a, 1999b). Included in this figure are the positions of mountain ranges discussed in the text; see also figure 1 in Macey et al. (1999b). Two species, T. bedriagai and T. microlepis, are restricted to Southwest Asia south of the Kopet Dagh and Hindu Kush in Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan (Anderson, 1999). Two species are found in the deserts of western China and Mongolia, with T. przewalskii occurring in the Taklimakan and lowland Gobi deserts, and T. roborowskii restricted to the Turpan Depression. The fifth species, T. scincus, is sometimes considered to be restricted to the Caspian Basin in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzistan, Tadjikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Alternatively, Teratoscincus populations in Southwest Asia, primarily on the Iranian Plateau, situated directly north of the Arabian Plate, are sometimes considered to be a subspecies of T. scincus or, otherwise, to constitute a sixth species, T. keyserlingii. Macey et al. (1999b) assessed the phylogenetic

  13. North Atlantic Science Objective

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Energy | Department of Energy North American Energy Ministers Establish a Working Group on Climate Change and Energy North American Energy Ministers Establish a Working Group on Climate Change and Energy May 25, 2015 - 2:25pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov Merida, Mexico - The Honorable Greg Rickford, Canada's Minister of Natural Resources; Pedro Joaquin Coldwell, Mexico's Secretary of Energy; and Ernest J. Moniz, U.S. Secretary of Energy, today announced

  14. Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior

  15. Two-Stroke Uniflow Turbo-Compound IC Engine

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    An evaluation study of a turbo-compounded concept engine consisting of a two-stroke, uniflow, four cylinder air cooled flat-four engine has been completed The concept includes a high pressure ratio supercharger compressor that is powered by an exhaust driven turbine. Downstream of the high pressure turbine is a low pressure power turbine that is geared to the engine crankshaft. The engine cylinders have 360 degree circumferential intake ports with swirl vanes, located at the bottom of the piston stroke. A large single exhaust valve is at the top of the cylinder. The fuel is injected downstream directly into the swirling airflow near the top of the piston stroke. The fuel is ignited by a high energy sparkplug. This engine offers very low fuel consumption in a compact, light weight package, with fuel flexibility.

  16. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........7 6.2.3 EPA-Identified Issues to be Addressed in the ... Management Consolidated Business Center EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ES ...

  17. Idaho IC 61-119, Electrical Corporation Definition | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    61-119 provided in the Application and Definitions of the Public Utilities Law, amended 1917. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1917 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - CASL IC member Overviews.pptx

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting ALOFT Hotel, Greenville, SC April 12-13, 2016 CASL-U-2016-1092-000 2 2 Meeting Objectives Exchange of information about CASL's research and activities to: 1. Provide an opportunity for engagement between industry stakeholders and CASL researchers. 2. Present and seek feedback on the progress on CASL's R&D activities and plans. 3. Discuss CASL and industry priorities to ensure that they are aligned. 4. Identify strategic collaborations between industry and CASL Focus Areas. Industry

  19. Coast Intelligen 150-IC with ECS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    Jump to: navigation, search Manufacturer Coast Intelligen Technology Type Internal Combustion Engine Engine Type Synchronous Generator Power Output 150 kW0.15 MW 150,000 W...

  20. Photo-Spectrometer Realized In A Standard Cmos Ic Process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Michael L.; Ericson, M. Nance; Dress, William B.; Jellison, Gerald E.; Sitter, Jr., David N.; Wintenberg, Alan L.

    1999-10-12

    A spectrometer, comprises: a semiconductor having a silicon substrate, the substrate having integrally formed thereon a plurality of layers forming photo diodes, each of the photo diodes having an independent spectral response to an input spectra within a spectral range of the semiconductor and each of the photo diodes formed only from at least one of the plurality of layers of the semiconductor above the substrate; and, a signal processing circuit for modifying signals from the photo diodes with respective weights, the weighted signals being representative of a specific spectral response. The photo diodes have different junction depths and different polycrystalline silicon and oxide coverings. The signal processing circuit applies the respective weights and sums the weighted signals. In a corresponding method, a spectrometer is manufactured by manipulating only the standard masks, materials and fabrication steps of standard semiconductor processing, and integrating the spectrometer with a signal processing circuit.

  1. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site-Wide Institutional Controls Applied to the Former DOE Mound Site Property June 2011 LMS/MND/S07757 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MND/S07757 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls Applied to the Former DOE Mound Site Property June 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. No. S07757 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  2. Microsoft Word - S10173_2013_Annual_IC.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Institutional Controls at the Mound Site Miamisburg, Ohio June 2013 LMS/MND/S10173 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MND/S10173 Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Institutional Controls at the Mound Site Miamisburg, Ohio June 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Sitewide Institutional Controls, Mound Site June 2013 Doc. No. S10173 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  3. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    No. S07757 Page A-1 Scope: Entire Mound Site Preliminary inspections performed on: April 5 and 7, 2011 Physical Inspection Walk around on: April 12, 2011 Review led by: Art ...

  4. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    No. S08846 Page A-1 Scope: Entire Mound Site, Miamisburg, Ohio Preliminary inspections performed on: March 13 and 26, April 5 Physical inspection walkdown with Regulators on: April ...

  5. Heating performances of a IC in-blanket ring array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosia, G.; Ragona, R.

    2015-12-10

    An important limiting factor to the use of ICRF as candidate heating method in a commercial reactor is due to the evanescence of the fast wave in vacuum and in most of the SOL layer, imposing proximity of the launching structure to the plasma boundary and causing, at the highest power level, high RF standing and DC rectified voltages at the plasma periphery, with frequent voltage breakdowns and enhanced local wall loading. In a previous work [1] the concept for an Ion Cyclotron Heating & Current Drive array (and using a different wave guide technology, a Lower Hybrid array) based on the use of periodic ring structure, integrated in the reactor blanket first wall and operating at high input power and low power density, was introduced. Based on the above concept, the heating performance of such array operating on a commercial fusion reactor is estimated.

  6. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Listings and Photos of Monitoring Wells and Seeps This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional ...

  7. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MDC Property This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2012 Doc. No. S08846 Page ...

  8. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Listings and Photos of Monitoring Wells and Seeps This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional ...

  9. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S07757 June 2011 Page B-2 U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2011 Doc. ...

  10. I.C. engines still key player in rail traction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, P.; Johnson, P.

    1994-07-01

    Still an important player in locomotive applications, internal combustion engines (diesel locomotives) are an obvious choice for hauling most freight, for shunting applications, and for passenger lines that are not economic to electrify. Today, research and testing continue to take place on natural gas-fueled locomotives, with a net result expected to benefit the railroads through reducing operational costs, while meeting new emissions regulations. 8 figs.

  11. Microsoft Word - S08846_2012_Annual_IC report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Photos of T Building Red Concrete Cracks This page intentionally left blank U.S. ... No. S08846 Page E-1 E1. 2012 Photos of Red Concrete Cracks The following photographs in ...

  12. Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. deer10schock.pdf (2.44 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste

  13. UNIDO ICS Portal for Technology Transfer | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Information (Open El) [EERE & EIA]

    ex.php?titleUNIDOICSPortalforTechnologyTransfer&oldid329335" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other...

  14. Light Element Production in Type Ic Supernovae (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this kind of explosions, 6Li is produced by a fusion ... Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, ... evolution of galaxies 2005: New horizon of nuclear ...

  15. Microsoft Word - S07757_2011 Mound IC Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional ... the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. ...

  16. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel remain below seasonally typical levels in the Northeast, a region that includes New England and the Middle Atlantic states. Stocks of distillate fuel, including both...

  17. Microsoft Word - Instructions for Sample Monthly Report Forms...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    : U.S. Geographic Areas and Census Regions Census Region 1: Northeast Area Division I: New England Division 2: Middle Atlantic Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode...

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Annual Energy Outlook

    to BENTEK Energy Services, LLC. The largest ... Industrial demand fell about 2 percent on the week. Despite ... the New England, Middle Atlantic, and Mountain Census ...

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    ... 48 States, the Middle Atlantic and East North Central ... in October 2008. Industrial and commercial ... conditions and high demand for transportation services. ...

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... According to data from BENTEK Energy Services LLC, overall ... Industrial consumption is up 2.4 percent for the week. ... North Central and Middle Atlantic Census divisions, which ...