National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hydrogen storage systems

  1. Hydrogen Storage System Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    System Challenges Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles October 29 th , 2015 Mike Veenstra Ford Research & Advanced Engineering Production fuel cell vehicles are being produced or planned by every major automotive OEM Toyota Honda Hyundai (credit: SA / ANL) Customer Expectations Driving Range Refueling Time Cargo Space Vehicle Weight Durability Cost Safety 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0 Gasoline Hydrogen (700 bar) Natural

  2. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  3. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the

  4. Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Systems Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Presentation by Stephen Lasher on cost analysis of hydrogen storage systems. wkshp_storage_lasher.pdf (1.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board Systems Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

  5. Designing Microporus Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alan C. Cooper

    2012-05-02

    An efficient, cost-effective hydrogen storage system is a key enabling technology for the widespread introduction of hydrogen fuel cells to the domestic marketplace. Air Products, an industry leader in hydrogen energy products and systems, recognized this need and responded to the DOE 'Grand Challenge' solicitation (DOE Solicitation DE-PS36-03GO93013) under Category 1 as an industry partner and steering committee member with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their proposal for a center-of-excellence on Carbon-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials. This center was later renamed the Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE). Our proposal, entitled 'Designing Microporous Carbons for Hydrogen Storage Systems,' envisioned a highly synergistic 5-year program with NREL and other national laboratory and university partners.

  6. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  7. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar Access the recording and download ...

  8. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

  9. Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda Agenda for the second day of the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011. compressed_hydrogen2011_day2_agenda.pdf (15.08 KB) More Documents & Publications Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary

  10. Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    27/2011 eere.energy.gov H 2 and FC Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Renaissance Hotel, Washington, DC August 11-12, 2011 Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage Ned T. Stetson, Ph.D. Team Lead, Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Dept. of Energy 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 9/27/2011 eere.energy.gov * Reduction in greenhouse gas emissions? - Not much impact * Reduction in dependency on petroleum? - Not much impact * Development of vendor

  11. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting: Summary Report, March 29, 2005 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Meeting: Summary Report, March 29, 2005 Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting: Summary Report, March 29, 2005 This report highlights DOE's systems analysis work related to hydrogen storage materials and process development, with a focus on models of on-board and off-board hydrogen storage systems. ssawg_mtg.pdf (110.16 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis

  12. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for ...

  13. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting: Summary Report, March...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    systems analysis work related to hydrogen storage materials and process development, with a focus on models of on-board and off-board hydrogen storage systems. ssawgmtg.pdf ...

  14. Energy Department Awards $7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy 7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems Energy Department Awards $7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems May 19, 2014 - 12:30pm Addthis The Energy Department today announced $7 million for six projects to develop lightweight, compact, and inexpensive advanced hydrogen storage systems that will enable longer driving ranges and help make fuel cell systems competitive for different platforms and sizes of vehicles. These advances in hydrogen storage will be

  15. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    DOEpatents

    Pez, Guido Peter; Cooper, Alan Charles; Scott, Aaron Raymond

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  16. Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 This document provides a summary of the Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group meeting in December 2006 in Washington, D.C. ssawg_minutes_1206.pdf (211.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report

  17. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Summary of June 11, 2008, biannual meeting of the Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group. ssawg_summary_report_0608.pdf (52.38 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

  18. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy The objective of these biannual Working Group meetings is to bring together the DOE research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes. ssawg_summary_report.pdf (266.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006

  19. Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage Small Fuel Cell Systems with Hydrogen Storage Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011. mfg2011_iii_stetson.pdf (882.27 KB) More Documents & Publications Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells: National Academy of Sciences March 2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Program - DOD-DOE Workshop: Shipboard APUs Overview Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Overview

  20. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Automotive Applications | Department of Energy Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Technical report describing the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) assessment of the performance and cost of organic liquid based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications. The on-board system performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume

  1. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne DC Offices L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC December 4, 2007 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory and Kristin Deason Sentech, Inc. January 16, 2008 SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting December 4, 2007 Argonne DC Offices, L'Enfant Plaza, Washington, DC Meeting Objectives This meeting was one of a continuing series of biannual meetings of the Hydrogen Storage Systems

  2. Systems Engineering of Chemical Hydrogen Storage, Pressure Vessel and Balance of Plant for Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done with cryo-sorbent based and chemical-based hydrogen storage materials. Balance of plant components were developed, proof-of-concept testing performed, system costs estimated, and transient models validated as part of this work.

  3. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The objective of these biannual Working Group meetings is to bring together the DOE research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes. PDF ...

  4. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office February 25, 2016 Presenter: Brian James - Strategic Analysis, Inc. DOE Host: Grace Ordaz- Technology Manager, Hydrogen Storage Program 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Question and Answer * Please type your questions into the question box 2 Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell

  5. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting: Summary Report, March 29, 2005

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting 955 L'Enfant Plaza North, SW, Suite 6000 Washington, DC 20024-2168 March 29, 2005 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory June 20, 2005 SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Meeting March 29, 2005 955 L'Enfant Plaza, North, SW, Suite 6000 Washington, DC 20024-2168 Meeting Objectives The objective of this meeting was to familiarize the DOE research community involved in hydrogen storage materials and process

  6. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Held in Conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Crystal Gateway Marriott, Arlington, VA June 11, 2008 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory and Elvin Yzugullu Sentech, Inc. July 18, 2008 SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting June 11, 2008 Crystal Gateway Marriott, Arlington, VA Meeting Objectives This meeting was one of a continuing series of biannual meetings of the Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working

  7. Borazine-boron nitride hybrid hydrogen storage system

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K. [Knoxville, TN; Simonson, J. Michael [Knoxville, TN; Maya, Leon [Knoxville, TN; Paine, Robert T. [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-22

    A hybrid hydrogen storage composition includes a first phase and a second phase adsorbed on the first phase, the first phase including BN for storing hydrogen by physisorption and the second phase including a borazane-borazine system for storing hydrogen in combined form as a hydride.

  8. Hydrogen Storage

    Publication and Product Library

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  9. Proceedings of the DOE chemical energy storage and hydrogen energy systems contracts review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    Sessions were held on electrolysis-based hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen production, hydrogen storage systems, hydrogen storage materials, end-use applications and system studies, chemical heat pump/chemical energy storage systems, systems studies and assessment, thermochemical hydrogen production cycles, advanced production concepts, and containment materials. (LHK)

  10. Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-10-15

    This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

  11. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. ...

  12. Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This document provides a summary of the Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group meeting in December 2006 in Washington, D.C. PDF icon ssawgminutes1206.pdf More Documents ...

  13. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" held on February 25, 2016.

  14. Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well as the technical challenges and research goals for storing hydrogen on board a vehicle.

  15. Hydrogen Storage and Supply for Vehicular Fuel Systems - Energy Innovation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Find More Like This Return to Search Hydrogen Storage and Supply for Vehicular Fuel Systems Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Cryotank for storage of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel by J. Raymond Smith - Accelerating Innovation Webinar Presentation (11,941 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Various alternative-fuel systems have been proposed for passenger vehicles and

  16. Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... Forecast: System Cost (kWH) I L L U S T R A T I V E 12 SLJB012306D0268 ... Fuel Economy (mpgge) H 2 Storage Requirement (kg H 2 ) Fuel Price (eq gal) O&M Cost (mi) ...

  17. DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Storage Systems for Material Handling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Equipment | Department of Energy Material Handling Equipment DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Storage Systems for Material Handling Equipment This table summarizes hydrogen storage technical performance targets for material handling equipment. These targets were developed with input to DOE through extensive communications with various stakeholders, industry developers, and end users, including through a 2012 request for information and workshops, as well as additional national lab

  18. DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Storage Systems for Portable Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Equipment | Department of Energy Portable Power Equipment DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Storage Systems for Portable Power Equipment These tables summarize hydrogen storage technical performance targets for portable power applications. These targets were developed with input to DOE through extensive communications with various stakeholders, industry developers, and end users, including through a 2012 request for information and workshops, as well as additional national lab assessments.

  19. Hydrogen storage and supply system - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    36,324 Site Map Printable Version Share this resource About Search Categories (15) Advanced Materials Biomass and Biofuels Building Energy Efficiency Electricity Transmission Energy Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal Industrial Technologies Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Startup America Vehicles and Fuels Wind Energy Partners (27) Visual Patent Search Success Stories Find More Like This Return to Search Hydrogen storage and supply system United

  20. Analyses of Compressed Hydrogen On-Board Storage Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Compressed Hydrogen On-Board Storage Systems Analyses of Compressed Hydrogen On-Board Storage Systems Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011. compressed_hydrogen2011_3_rosenfeld.pdf (701.48 KB) More Documents & Publications Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board

  1. Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board Systems | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board Systems Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board Systems Presentation by Stephen Lasher of TIAX for Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007. deliv_analysis_lasher.pdf (844.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen

  2. Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    William Clinkscales, Structural Composites, Inc (invited) NASA Perspectives on cryogenic H 2 storage David Chato, NASA-Glenn 12:30 Lunch (1 hour) 1:30 Review of morning ...

  3. Parameter study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale prototype hydrogen storage system as part of a Work For Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed using the complex metal hydride sodium alanate. For the current work, we have continued our evaluation of the GM Demonstration System to provide learning to DOE's hydrogen storage programs, specifically the new Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. Baseline refueling data during testing for GM was taken over a narrow range of optimized parameter values. Further testing was conducted over a broader range. Parameters considered included hydrogen pressure and coolant flow rate. This data confirmed the choice of design pressure of the Demonstration System, but indicated that the system was over-designed for cooling. Baseline hydrogen delivery data was insufficient to map out delivery rate as a function of temperature and capacity for the full-scale system. A more rigorous matrix of tests was performed to better define delivery capabilities. These studies were compared with 1-D and 2-D coupled multi-physics modeling results. The relative merits of these models are discussed along with opportunities for improved efficiency or reduced mass and volume.

  4. Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Applications | Department of Energy Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation Applications Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation Applications Background paper prepared for the 2005 Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D workshop. mfg_wkshp_storage.pdf (1.03 MB) More Documents & Publications Status & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage US DRIVE Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

  5. Technoeconomic analysis of renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.; Kadam, K.

    1996-10-01

    Technical and economic feasibility studies of different degrees of completeness and detail have been performed on several projects being funded by the Department of Energy`s Hydrogen Program. Work this year focused on projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, although analyses of projects at other institutions are underway or planned. Highly detailed analyses were completed on a fiber optic hydrogen leak detector and a process to produce hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis followed by steam reforming of the pyrolysis oil. Less detailed economic assessments of solar and biologically-based hydrogen production processes have been performed and focused on the steps that need to be taken to improve the competitive position of these technologies. Sensitivity analyses were conducted on all analyses to reveal the degree to which the cost results are affected by market changes and technological advances. For hydrogen storage by carbon nanotubes, a survey of the competing storage technologies was made in order to set a baseline for cost goals. A determination of the likelihood of commercialization was made for nearly all systems examined. Hydrogen from biomass via pyrolysis and steam reforming was found to have significant economic potential if a coproduct option could be co-commercialized. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production may have economic potential, but only if low-cost cells can be modified to split water and to avoid surface oxidation. The use of bacteria to convert the carbon monoxide in biomass syngas to hydrogen was found to be slightly more expensive than the high end of currently commercial hydrogen, although there are significant opportunities to reduce costs. Finally, the cost of installing a fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detection system in passenger vehicles was found to be very low and competitive with alternative sensor systems.

  6. Anisotropic storage medium development in a full-scale, sodium alanate-based, hydrogen storage system

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Scott W.; Johnson, Terry A.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Bilheux, Hassina Z.

    2016-06-11

    Deuterium desorption in an automotive-scale hydrogen storage tube was studied in-situ using neutron diffraction. Gradients in the concentration of the various alanate phases were observed along the length of the tube but no significant radial anisotropy was present. In addition, neutron radiography and computed tomography showed large scale cracks and density fluctuations, confirming the presence of these structures in an undisturbed storage system. These results demonstrate that large scale storage structures are not uniform even after many absorption/desorption cycles and that movement of gaseous hydrogen cannot be properly modeled by a simple porous bed model. In addition, the evidence indicatesmore » that there is slow transformation of species at one end of the tube indicating loss of catalyst functionality. These observations explain the unusually fast movement of hydrogen in a full scale system and shows that loss of capacity is not occurring uniformly in this type of hydrogen-storage system.« less

  7. Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage Hydrogen Storage The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) is developing onboard automotive hydrogen storage systems that allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles while meeting cost, safety, and performance requirements. Why Study Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in applications including stationary power, portable power, and transportation. Hydrogen has the highest energy per mass of any

  8. System level permeability modeling of porous hydrogen storage materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Voskuilen, Tyler

    2010-01-01

    A permeability model for hydrogen transport in a porous material is successfully applied to both laboratory-scale and vehicle-scale sodium alanate hydrogen storage systems. The use of a Knudsen number dependent relationship for permeability of the material in conjunction with a constant area fraction channeling model is shown to accurately predict hydrogen flow through the reactors. Generally applicable model parameters were obtained by numerically fitting experimental measurements from reactors of different sizes and aspect ratios. The degree of channeling was experimentally determined from the measurements and found to be 2.08% of total cross-sectional area. Use of this constant area channeling model and the Knudsen dependent Young & Todd permeability model allows for accurate prediction of the hydrogen uptake performance of full-scale sodium alanate and similar metal hydride systems.

  9. Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportation Applications Background paper prepared for the 2005 Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D workshop. ...

  10. Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Summary Report Prepared by: Fuel Cell Technologies Program Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshops February 14-15, 2011 Crystal City, Virginia Compressed and Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Summary Report 2 Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo- Hydrogen Storage Systems Summary: On February 14-15, 2011, the Systems Integration group of the National

  11. Evaluation of Hydrogen Storage System Characteristics for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M.; Day, K.; Brooker, A.

    2010-05-01

    This poster presentation demonstrates an approach to evaluate trade-offs among hydrogen storage system characteristic across several vehicle configurations and estimates the sensitivity of hydrogen storage system improvements on vehicle viability.

  12. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles This table lists the technical targets ...

  13. Durability study of a vehicle-scale hydrogen storage system.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a vehicle-scale demonstration hydrogen storage system as part of a Work for Others project funded by General Motors. This Demonstration System was developed based on the properties and characteristics of sodium alanates which are complex metal hydrides. The technology resulting from this program was developed to enable heat and mass management during refueling and hydrogen delivery to an automotive system. During this program the Demonstration System was subjected to repeated hydriding and dehydriding cycles to enable comparison of the vehicle-scale system performance to small-scale sample data. This paper describes the experimental results of life-cycle studies of the Demonstration System. Two of the four hydrogen storage modules of the Demonstration System were used for this study. A well-controlled and repeatable sorption cycle was defined for the repeated cycling, which began after the system had already been cycled forty-one times. After the first nine repeated cycles, a significant hydrogen storage capacity loss was observed. It was suspected that the sodium alanates had been affected either morphologically or by contamination. The mechanisms leading to this initial degradation were investigated and results indicated that water and/or air contamination of the hydrogen supply may have lead to oxidation of the hydride and possibly kinetic deactivation. Subsequent cycles showed continued capacity loss indicating that the mechanism of degradation was gradual and transport or kinetically limited. A materials analysis was then conducted using established methods including treatment with carbon dioxide to react with sodium oxides that may have formed. The module tubes were sectioned to examine chemical composition and morphology as a function of axial position. The results will be discussed.

  14. Method and system for hydrogen evolution and storage

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2012-12-11

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen (H.sub.2) employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  15. Method and System for Hydrogen Evolution and Storage

    DOEpatents

    Thorn, David L.; Tumas, William; Hay, P. Jeffrey; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Cameron, Thomas M.

    2008-10-21

    A method and system for storing and evolving hydrogen employ chemical compounds that can be hydrogenated to store hydrogen and dehydrogenated to evolve hydrogen. A catalyst lowers the energy required for storing and evolving hydrogen. The method and system can provide hydrogen for devices that consume hydrogen as fuel.

  16. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  17. Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Argonne National Laboratory DC Offices 955 L'Enfant Plaza, North, SW, Suite 6000 Washington, DC December 12, 2006 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory and Laura Verduzco Sentech, Inc. February 28, 2007 SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting December 12, 2006 955 L'Enfant Plaza, North, SW, Suite 6000, Washington, DC Meeting Objectives This meeting was one of a continuing series of biannual meetings of this Working Group. The

  18. Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage Systems in SAE J2579 and GTR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage Systems in SAE J2579 and GTR Requirements for Cycling Testing and Its Effects on Type 3 and 4 Containers Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage ...

  19. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks with design pressures of 350 bar (5000 ... were estimated for both type III and IV tanks in both single and multi-tank ...

  20. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems – Projected Performance and Cost Parameters

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about the projected performance and cost parameters of on-board hydrogen storage systems.

  1. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Andrew J.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2007-12-04

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  2. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Troy A. Semelsberger Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrogen Storage Summit Jan 27-29, 2015 Denver, CO Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials 2 Objectives 1. Assess chemical hydrogen storage materials that can exceed 700 bar compressed hydrogen tanks 2. Status (state-of-the-art) of chemical hydrogen storage materials 3. Identify key material characteristics 4. Identify obstacles, challenges and risks for the successful deployment of chemical hydrogen materials in a practical on-board hydrogen

  3. Modular Energy Storage System for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Janice Thomas

    2010-05-31

    The objective of the project is to develop technologies, specifically power electronics, energy storage electronics and controls that provide efficient and effective energy management between electrically powered devices in alternative energy vehicles ?? plug-in electric vehicles, hybrid vehicles, range extended vehicles, and hydrogen-based fuel cell vehicles. The in-depth research into the complex interactions between the lower and higher voltage systems from data obtained via modeling, bench testing and instrumented vehicle data will allow an optimum system to be developed from a performance, cost, weight and size perspective. The subsystems are designed for modularity so that they may be used with different propulsion and energy delivery systems. This approach will allow expansion into new alternative energy vehicle markets.

  4. Energy Department Awards $4.6 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy 4.6 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems Energy Department Awards $4.6 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems April 8, 2015 - 2:54pm Addthis The Energy Department today announced up to $4.6 million for four projects to develop advanced hydrogen storage materials that have potential to enable longer driving ranges and help make fuel cell systems competitive for different platforms and sizes of vehicles. Advanced hydrogen storage systems will be critical to the

  5. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report examines performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems compared to the US Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications.

  6. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Publication and Product Library

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Re

  7. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Publication and Product Library

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Programs Multiyear Re

  8. Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Thursday, February 25, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST). Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis of onboard compressed hydrogen storage systems.

  9. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. EST. Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis of onboard compressed hydrogen storage systems.

  10. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Automotive Applications | Department of Energy Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the

  11. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications R. K. Ahluwalia, T. Q. Hua, and J-K Peng Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 M. Kromer, S. Lasher, K. McKenney, K. Law, and J. Sinha TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA 02421 June 21, 2011 Executive Summary In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program's

  12. Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans; , Carl B.

    2012-08-07

    Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

  13. Storage material for hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bernauer, O.; Zlegler, K.

    1984-05-01

    A storage material for hydrogen comprising an alloy with the following composition: Ti(V/sub 1//sub -/ /SUB a/ /sub -/ /SUB b/ Fe /SUB a/ Al /SUB b/) /SUB x/ Cr /SUB y/ Mn/sub 2//sub -/ /SUB x/ /sub -/ /SUB y/, wherein: x = greater than 1, less than 2 y = 0 to approximately 0.2 x + y = not greater than 2 a = 0 to approximately 0.25 b = 0 to approximately 0.33 a + b = not greater than approximately 0.35 (1 - a - b) . x = not less than 1 This storage material for hydrogen can, in the cold state, absorb a maximum of 3.2% by weight of H/sub 2/ and already possesses, at low temperatures, a high reaction speed for the absorption of hydrogen. During the absorption of hydrogen, the storage material exhibits self-heating to high temperatures. Thus, in addition to its use for storing hydrogen, it is also particularly suitable for use in preheating systems for hydride-type storage units of motor vehicles.

  14. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  15. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Thanh; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, Matt; Lasher, Stephen; McKenney, Kurtis; Law, Karen; Sinha, Jayanti

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  16. Hydrogen for Energy Storage Analysis Overview (Presentation)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Hydrogen Storage The Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) is developing onboard automotive hydrogen storage systems that allow for a driving range of more than 300 miles while meeting cost, safety, and performance requirements. Why Study Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen storage is a key enabling technology for the advancement of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in applications including stationary power, portable power, and transportation. Hydrogen has the highest energy per mass of any

  17. DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Storage Systems for Material...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from H2 (net useful energymax system volume)b kWhL (kg H2L system) 1.0 (0.03) 1.7 (0.05) Storage System Cost System cost kWh net (kg H2 stored) 20 (667) 15 (500) ...

  18. Engineering an Adsorbent-Based Hydrogen Storage System: What Have We Learned?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Don Siegel, 1 Bruce Hardy, 2 and the HSECoE Team 1 System Architect-Adsorbent System, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Michigan 2 Savanah River National Laboratory Hydrogen)Storage)Summit,)) Golden,)CO)-)January)27928,)2015) Overview' * For)the)past)5)years)the)HSECoE)has)been)developing) hydrogen)storage)systems)based)on)adsorbent,)metal) hydride,)and)chemical)hydride)media) * As)we)near)the)Center's)conclusion,)we)seek)to)translate)

  19. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Publication and Product Library

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab)

  20. Webinar: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Thursday, February 25, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  1. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Monday, February 14, 2011 - Compressed Hydrogen Storage Purpose: Identify strategies and R&D needs for lowering the cost of high pressure hydrogen storage systems. Meeting scope includes the on-board system including but limited to its design, materials of construction, manufacturing processes and operating specifications. The meeting scope does not include the refueling infrastructure, such as hydrogen dispensing, compression and cooling, nor the vehicle powertrain, such as fuel cell, ICE

  2. Hydrogen Storage Basics

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Developing safe, reliable, compact, and cost-effective hydrogen storage technologies is one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen as a form of energy. To be...

  3. Slurry-Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Semelsberger, Troy; Simmons, Kevin L.; Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2014-05-30

    In this paper, the system designs for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen materials in an 80 kWe fuel cell, light-duty vehicle are described. Ammonia borane and alane are used for these designs to represent the general classes of exothermic and endothermic materials. The designs are then compared to the USDRIVE/DOE developed set of system level targets for on-board storage. While most of the DOE targets are predicted to be achieved based on the modeling, the system gravimetric and volumetric densities were more challenging and became the focus of this work. The resulting system evaluation determined that the slurry is majority of the system mass. Only modest reductions in the system mass can be expected with improvements in the balance of plant components. Most of the gravimetric improvements will require developing materials with higher inherent storage capacity or by increasing the solids loading of the chemical hydrogen storage material in the slurry.

  4. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  5. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  6. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's chemical hydrogen storage R&D is focused on developing low-cost energy-efficient regeneration systems for these irreversible hydrogen storage systems. Significant technical issues remain...

  7. Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage Systems in SAE J2579 and GTR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Requirements for Cycling Testing and Its Effects on Type 3 and 4 Containers | Department of Energy Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage Systems in SAE J2579 and GTR Requirements for Cycling Testing and Its Effects on Type 3 and 4 Containers Test Protocol for Hydrogen Storage Systems in SAE J2579 and GTR Requirements for Cycling Testing and Its Effects on Type 3 and 4 Containers These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010,

  8. Advancement of Systems Designs and Key Engineering Technologies for Materials Based Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    van Hassel, Bart A.

    2015-09-18

    UTRC lead the development of the Simulink Framework model that enables a comparison of different hydrogen storage systems on a common basis. The Simulink Framework model was disseminated on the www.HSECoE.org website that is hosted by NREL. UTRC contributed to a better understanding of the safety aspects of the proposed hydrogen storage systems. UTRC also participated in the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of both the chemical- and the adsorbent-based hydrogen storage system during Phase 2 of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. UTRC designed a hydrogen storage system with a reversible metal hydride material in a compacted form for light-duty vehicles with a 5.6 kg H2 storage capacity, giving it a 300 miles range. It contains a heat exchanger that enables efficient cooling of the metal hydride material during hydrogen absorption in order to meet the 3.3 minute refueling time target. It has been shown through computation that the kinetics of hydrogen absorption of Ti-catalyzed NaAlH4 was ultimately limiting the rate of hydrogen absorption to 85% of the material capacity in 3.3 minutes. An inverse analysis was performed in order to determine the material property requirements in order for a metal hydride based hydrogen storage system to meet the DOE targets. Work on metal hydride storage systems was halted after the Phase 1 to Phase 2 review due to the lack of metal hydride materials with the required material properties. UTRC contributed to the design of a chemical hydrogen storage system by developing an adsorbent for removing the impurity ammonia from the hydrogen gas, by developing a system to meter the transport of Ammonia Borane (AB) powder to a thermolysis reactor, and by developing a gas-liquid-separator (GLS) for the separation of hydrogen gas from AB slurry in silicone oil. Stripping impurities from hydrogen gas is essential for a long life of the fuel cell system on board of a vehicle. Work on solid transport of AB was halted after the

  9. Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's hydrogen storage research and development (R&D) activities are aimed at increasing the gravimetric and volumetric energy density and reducing the cost of hydrogen storage systems for...

  10. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J.

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  11. Chemical/hydrogen energy storage systems. Annual report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The progress made in 1979 in the Chemical/Hydrogen Energy Storage Systems Program is described. The program is managed by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Division of Energy Storage Systems of the Department of Energy. The program consists of research and development activities in the areas of Hydrogen Production, Storage and Materials, End-Use Applications/Systems Studies, and in Chemical Heat Pumps. The report outlines the progress made by key industrial contractors such as General Electric in the development of SPE water electrolyzers; INCO in the studies of surface poisoning (and reactivation) of metal hydrides; and Air Products and Chemicals in the evaluation of hydrogen production at small hydropower sites. The BNL in-house supporting research, as well as that at universities and other national laboratories for which BNL has technical oversight, is also described.

  12. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOEpatents

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  13. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for ...

  14. Energy Department Awards $7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems Energy Department Awards 7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems May 19, 2014 - 1:43pm Addthis The Energy Department today ...

  15. Technical assessment of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T. Q.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J. K.; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J.

    2011-02-09

    The performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems has been assessed and compared to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2010, 2015, and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for compressed hydrogen tanks with design pressures of 350 bar ({approx}5000 psi) and 700 bar ({approx}10,000 psi) capable of storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen. The off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen was determined for hydrogen produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR). The main conclusions of the assessment are that the 350-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet the 2010 and 2015 targets for system gravimetric capacity but will not likely meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, given our base case assumptions. The 700-bar compressed storage system has the potential to meet only the 2010 target for system gravimetric capacity and is not likely to meet any of the system targets for volumetric capacity or cost, despite the fact that its volumetric capacity is much higher than that of the 350-bar system. Both the 350-bar and 700-bar systems come close to meeting the Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency target, but fall short by about 5%. These results are summarized.

  16. Hydrogen Storage Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Challenges Hydrogen Storage Challenges For transportation, the overarching technical challenge for hydrogen storage is how to store the amount of hydrogen required for a conventional driving range (>300 miles) within the vehicular constraints of weight, volume, efficiency, safety, and cost. Durability over the performance lifetime of these systems must also be verified and validated, and acceptable refueling times must be achieved. Requirements for off-board bulk storage are

  17. Panel 1, Towards Sustainable Energy Systems: The Role of Large-Scale Hydrogen Storage in Germany

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hanno Butsch | Head of International Cooperation NOW GmbH National Organization Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Towards sustainable energy systems - The role of large scale hydrogen storage in Germany May 14th, 2014 | Sacramento Political background for the transition to renewable energies 2 * Climate protection: Global responsibility for the next generation. * Energy security: More independency from fossil fuels. * Securing the economy: Creating new markets and jobs through innovations. Three

  18. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  19. POSTPONED: Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar has been postponed until further notice. The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection" on Tuesday, January 26, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

  20. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC

    2010-03-03

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage has been assessed and compared to the DOE 2010, 2015 and ultimate targets for automotive applications. The Gen-3 prototype system of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was modeled to project the performance of a scaled-down 5.6-kg usable hydrogen storage system. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers 1.5 kg/min of liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm (4000 psi). The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) and by central electrolysis using electricity from renewable sources. The main conclusions from the assessment are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity and the 2015 target for system volumetric capacity (see Table I). The system compares favorably with targets for durability and operability although additional work is needed to understand failure modes for combined pressure and temperature cycling. The system may meet the targets for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. The high-volume manufacturing cost is projected to be 2-4 times the current 2010 target of $4/kWh. For the reference conditions considered most applicable, the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production and liquid H{sub 2} delivery scenario is 60%-140% higher than the current target of $2-$3/gge while the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  1. Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications High-Pressure Tube ...

  2. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems ...

  3. Technical assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.; Hua, T.; Peng, J.-K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Sinha, J.; Gardiner, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; TIAX LLC; U.S. DOE

    2010-05-01

    On-board and off-board performance and cost of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage are assessed and compared to the targets for automotive applications. The on-board performance of the system and high-volume manufacturing cost were determined for liquid hydrogen refueling with a single-flow nozzle and a pump that delivers liquid H{sub 2} to the insulated cryogenic tank capable of being pressurized to 272 atm. The off-board performance and cost of delivering liquid hydrogen were determined for two scenarios in which hydrogen is produced by central steam methane reforming (SMR) or by central electrolysis. The main conclusions are that the cryo-compressed storage system has the potential of meeting the ultimate target for system gravimetric capacity, mid-term target for system volumetric capacity, and the target for hydrogen loss during dormancy under certain conditions of minimum daily driving. However, the high-volume manufacturing cost and the fuel cost for the SMR hydrogen production scenario are, respectively, 2-4 and 1.6-2.4 times the current targets, and the well-to-tank efficiency is well short of the 60% target specified for off-board regenerable materials.

  4. Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Workshop Welcome | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Workshop Welcome Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Workshop Welcome Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011. compressed_hydrogen2011_6_stetson.pdf (1.42 MB) More Documents & Publications Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary Report Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen

  5. Systems Modeling of Chemical Hydride Hydrogen Storage Materials for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2011-10-05

    A fixed bed reactor was designed, modeled and simulated for hydrogen storage on-board the vehicle for PEM fuel cell applications. Ammonia Borane (AB) was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to {approx}16% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. The design evaluated consisted of a tank with 8 thermally isolated sections in which H2 flows freely between sections to provide ballast. Heating elements are used to initiate reactions in each section when pressure drops below a specified level in the tank. Reactor models in Excel and COMSOL were developed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept, which was then used to develop systems models in Matlab/Simulink. Experiments and drive cycle simulations showed that the storage system meets thirteen 2010 DOE targets in entirety and the remaining four at greater than 60% of the target.

  6. Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech Team Lead Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 12/13/2011 Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Marni Lenahan December 13, 2011 Database Background * The Hydrogen Storage Materials Database was built to retain information from DOE Hydrogen Storage funded research and make these data more accessible. *

  7. Ultrafine Hydrogen Storage Powders - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Ultrafine Hydrogen Storage Powders Ames Laboratory Contact AMES ...

  8. Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... TIAX Base Case 5,000 psi 10,000 psi System Cost, kWh Assembly & Inspection BOP ... TIAX Base Case 5,000 psi 10,000 psi System Cost, kWh Assembly & Inspection BOP ...

  9. DOE Technical Targets for Hydrogen Storage Systems for Portable...

    Energy Saver

    kWhkg (kg H2kg system) 0.7 (0.02) 0.5 (0.015) 1.3 (0.04) 1.0 (0.03) System Volumetric Capacity Usable energy density from H2 (net useful energymax system volume)c kWhL (kg ...

  10. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J. -K.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, Kurtis; Sinha, J.

    2009-12-01

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy analyses of the technology paired with delivery costs.

  11. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Hydrogen Storage Technical Team is to accelerate research and innovation that will lead to commercially viable hydrogen-storage technologies that meet the U.S. DRIVE Partnership goals.

  12. Status & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Status & Direction for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Presentation prepared by Andy Abele for the DOE Hydrogen Manufacturing R&D Workshop. mfg_wkshp_abele.pdf (1.88 MB) More Documents & Publications High Pressure Hydrogen Tank Manufacturing Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications HYDROGEN TO THE HIGHWAYS

  13. Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of companies world-wide * Basis of Ford Motor Co. designcosting method for the past 20+ ... vinyl ester resin * Used alternate fiber sizing (projected 4% system cost savings) Weight ...

  14. Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda Agenda for the first day of the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011. compressed_hydrogen2011_day1_agenda.pdf (10.98 KB) More Documents & Publications Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshop Agenda Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary

  15. Powertech: Hydrogen Expertise Storage Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Powertech is Chair of: * ISO 15869 draft standard for hydrogen vehicle tanks * ANSICSA HGV2 draft standard for hydrogen vehicle fuel tanks Examples of hydrogen storage (up to 950 ...

  16. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  17. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ANL-10/24 Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Nuclear Engineering Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov. Availability of

  18. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ANL/09-33 Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Nuclear Engineering Division About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439. For information about Argonne and its pioneering science and technology programs, see www.anl.gov.

  19. High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of the Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems David A. Dixon Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL Cast: Myrna Hernandez-Matus, Daniel Grant, Jackson Switzer, Jacob Batson, Ronita Folkes, Minh Nguyen Anthony J. Arduengo & co-workers Maciej Gutowski (PNNL) Robert Ramsay Chair Fund Shelby Hall Funding provided in part by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under the

  20. DOE Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This table lists the technical targets for onboard hydrogen storage for light-duty vehicles in the FCT Program’s Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan.

  1. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S.

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  2. The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) Status of Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland. doe_overview_satyapal.pdf (1.53 MB) More Documents & Publications A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs On-Board Storage Systems Analysis Target Explanation

  3. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Y. F

    2015-01-05

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  4. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwel; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  5. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  6. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  7. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  8. Sorbent Material Property Requirements for On-Board Hydrogen Storage for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Peng, J-K; Hua, T. Q.

    2015-05-25

    Material properties required for on-board hydrogen storage in cryogenic sorbents for use with automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems are discussed. Models are formulated for physical, thermodynamic and transport properties, and for the dynamics of H-2 refueling and discharge from a sorbent bed. A conceptual storage configuration with in-bed heat exchanger tubes, a Type-3 containment vessel, vacuum insulation and requisite balance-of-plant components is developed to determine the peak excess sorption capacity and differential enthalpy of adsorption for 5.5 wt% system gravimetric capacity and 55% well-to-tank (WTT) efficiency. The analysis also determines the bulk density to which the material must be compacted for the storage system to reach 40 g.L-1 volumetric capacity. Thermal transport properties and heat transfer enhancement methods are analyzed to estimate the material thermal conductivity needed to achieve 1.5 kg.min(-1) H-2 refueling rate. Operating temperatures and pressures are determined for 55% WTT efficiency and 95% usable H-2. Needs for further improvements in material properties are analyzed that would allow reduction of storage pressure to 50 bar from 100 bar, elevation of storage temperature to 175-200 K from 150 K, and increase of WTT efficiency to 57.5% or higher.

  9. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Ritter, James A.; Wang, Tao; Ebner, Armin D.; Holland, Charles E.

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  10. Stationary High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage Stationary High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage This presentation by Zhili Feng of Oak Ridge National Laboratory was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013. csd_workshop_7_feng.pdf (914.99 KB) More Documents & Publications 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report Materials for High Pressure Fuel Injection Systems R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage

  11. Powertech: Hydrogen Expertise Storage Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation by Angela Das of Powertech was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013.

  12. Hydrogen storage gets new hope

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen storage gets new hope Hydrogen storage gets new hope A new method for "recycling" hydrogen-containing fuel materials could open the door to economically viable hydrogen-based vehicles. September 1, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos

  13. US DRIVE Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage Technical Team Roadmap US DRIVE Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap The scope of the Hydrogen Storage Tech Team is to review and evaluate the potential, and limitations, of novel approaches, materials, and systems for hydrogen storage onboard light-duty fuel cell vehicles and provide feedback to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Partnership stakeholders. Generate system goals and performance targets, and establish test methods for hydrogen storage systems onboard vehicles.

  14. Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies The current status in terms of weight, volume, and cost of various hydrogen storage technologies is shown below. These values are estimates from storage system developers and the R&D community and will be continuously updated by DOE as new technological advancements take place. This figure shows the current status of several hydrogen storage systems in terms of weight and volume. It illustrates the volumetric and

  15. Hydrogen Storage Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage Fact Sheet Hydrogen Storage Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing hydrogen storage. Hydrogen Storage (955.88 KB) More Documents & Publications US DRIVE Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap Hydrogen & Our Energy Future

  16. Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage - Current Technology Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology Hydrogen storage is a significant challenge for the development and viability of hydrogen-powered vehicles. On-board hydrogen storage in the range of approximately 5-13 kg is required to enable a driving range of greater than 300 miles for the full platform of light-duty automotive vehicles using fuel cell power plants. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Current on-board hydrogen storage approaches involve compressed hydrogen gas

  17. Energy Department Awards $7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems Energy Department Awards 7 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems May 19, 2014 - 12:30pm Addthis The Energy Department today ...

  18. Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Center...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    storage materials in the areas of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Hydrogen ... Storage Materials Center of Excellence - Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption ...

  19. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review Presented at the R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops on February 14 and 15, 2011. compressed_hydrogen2011_8_ahluwalia.pdf (1.1 MB) More Documents & Publications Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications Technical Assessment of Organic

  20. Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage » Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's (FCTO's) applied materials-based hydrogen storage technology research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities focus on developing materials and systems that have the potential to meet U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2020 light-duty vehicle system targets with an overarching goal of meeting ultimate full-fleet, light-duty vehicle system targets. Materials-based

  1. Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen transport and storage technologies

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The future use of hydrogen to generate electricity, heat homes and businesses, and fuel vehicles will require the creation of a distribution infrastructure of safe, and cost-effective transport and storage. Present storage methods are too expensive and will not meet the performance requirements of future applications. Transport technologies will need to be developed based on the production and storage systems that come into use as the hydrogen energy economy evolves. Different applications will require the development of different types of storage technologies. Utility electricity generation and home and office use will have storage fixed in one location--stationary storage--and size and weight will be less important than energy efficiency and costs of the system. Fueling a vehicle, however, will require hydrogen storage in an ``on-board`` system--mobile storage--with weight and size similar to the gasoline tank in today`s vehicle. Researchers are working to develop physical and solid-state storage systems that will meet these diverse future application demands. Physical storage systems and solid-state storage methods (metal hydrides, gas-on-solids adsorption, and glass microspheres) are described.

  2. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage » Materials-Based Storage » Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's (FCTO's) chemical hydrogen storage materials research focuses on improving the volumetric and gravimetric capacity, transient performance, and efficient, cost-effective regeneration of the spent storage material. Technical Overview The category of chemical hydrogen storage materials generally refers to covalently bound hydrogen in either solid or

  3. Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation on the Prediction of Novel Hydrogen Storage Reactions was given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

  4. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis Energy Storage Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydropower, Wave and Tidal ... Return to Search Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof ...

  5. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and NREL-Led Characterization Effort Combinatorial ...

  6. National Hydrogen Storage Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National Hydrogen Storage Project National Hydrogen Storage Project In July 2003, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a "Grand Challenge" to the global scientific community for...

  7. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Donald ... the DoE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems This work has been fully ...

  8. Polyhydride complexes for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.M.

    1995-09-01

    Polyhydride metal complexes are being developed for application in hydrogen storage. Efforts have focused on developing complexes with improved available hydrogen weight percentages. We have explored the possibility that complexes containing aromatic hydrocarbon ligands could store hydrogen at both the metal center and in the ligands. We have synthesized novel indenyl hydride complexes and explored their reactivity with hydrogen. The reversible hydrogenation of [IrH{sub 3}(PPh{sub 3})({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 10}H{sub 7})]{sup +} has been achieved. While attempting to prepare {eta}{sup 6}-tetrahydronaphthalene complexes, we discovered that certain polyhydride complexes catalyze both the hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalene.

  9. Hydrogen storage development

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.

    1998-08-01

    A summary of the hydride development efforts for the current program year (FY98) are presented here. The Mg-Al-Zn alloy system was studied at low Zn levels (2--4 wt%) and midrange Al contents (40--60 wt%). Higher plateau pressures were found with Al and Zn alloying in Mg and, furthermore, it was found that the hydrogen desorption kinetics were significantly improved with small additions of Zn. Results are also shown here for a detailed study of the low temperature properties of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and a comparison made between conventional melt cast alloy and the vapor process material.

  10. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Au, Ming

    2012-02-28

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  11. Panel 4, Hydrogen Energy Storage Policy Considerations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Storage Policy Considerations Hydrogen Storage Workshop Jeffrey Reed Southern California Gas Company May 15, 2014 0 Methane is a Great Storage Medium 1 SoCalGas' storage fields are the largest energy storage resource in the region Goleta Playa Del Rey Honor Rancho Aliso Canyon 2 And There's a Fully Built Delivery System N S E W LINE 235 LINE 335 LEGEND NOT TO SCALE RECIPROCATING COMPRESSOR STATION CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSOR STATION PRESSURE LIMITING STATION STORAGE FIELD 4/00 P AC IF IC GA S

  12. Activated Aluminum Hydride Hydrogen Storage Compositions - Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Startup America Startup America Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Activated Aluminum Hydride Hydrogen Storage Compositions ...

  13. Hydrogen Storage- Basics

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Storing enough hydrogen on-board a vehicle to achieve a driving range of greater than 300 miles is a significant challenge. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times the energy content of...

  14. Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap May Hydrogen Storage Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 This roadmap is a document of the U.S. DRIVE Partnership. U.S. DRIVE (Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, non-binding, and nonlegal partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy; USCAR, representing Chrysler Group LLC, Ford Motor Company, and General Motors; Tesla Motors; five energy companies -BP America, Chevron Corporation, Phillips 66

  15. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  16. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap, November 2005

    Publication and Product Library

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen storage technology for transportation applications.

  17. advanced hydrogen storage materials

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  18. Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2014-3954P Geologic Storage of Hydrogen Anna S. Lord Geologist Geotechnology & Engineering Department & Peter H. Kobos Principal Staff Economist, Ph.D. Earth Systems Department 2 Geologic Storage Why underground storage?

  19. Carbon nanotube materials from hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Bekkedahl, T.A.; Cahill, A.F.

    1995-09-01

    The lack of convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage is a major impediment to wide scale use of hydrogen in the United States energy economy. Improvements in the energy densities of hydrogen storage systems, reductions in cost, and increased compatibility with available and forecasted systems are required before viable hydrogen energy use pathways can be established. Carbon-based hydrogen adsorption materials hold particular promise for meeting and exceeding the U.S. Department of Energy hydrogen storage energy density targets for transportation if concurrent increases in hydrogen storage capacity and carbon density can be achieved. These two goals are normally in conflict for conventional porous materials, but may be reconciled by the design and synthesis of new adsorbent materials with tailored pore size distributions and minimal macroporosity. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to explore new designs for adsorbents because they can be fabricated with small size distributions, and naturally tend to self-assemble by van der Waals forces. This year we report heats of adsorption for hydrogen on nanotube materials that are 2 and 3 times greater than for hydrogen on activated carbon. The hydrogen which is most strongly bound to these materials remains on the carbon surface to temperatures greater than 285 K. These results suggest that nanocapillary forces are active in stabilizing hydrogen on the surfaces of carbon nanotubes, and that optimization of the adsorbent will lead to effective storage at higher temperatures. In this paper we will also report on our activities which are targeted at understanding and optimizing the nucleation and growth of single wall nanotubes. These experiments were made possible by the development of a unique feedback control circuit which stabilized the plasma-arc during a synthesis run.

  20. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland. ht_nist_bendersky.pdf (909.73 KB) More Documents & Publications High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and

  1. Hydrogen Station Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Technical Status and Costs: Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, G.; Boyd, R.; Cornish, J.; Remick, R.

    2014-05-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory commissioned an independent review of hydrogen compression, storage, and dispensing (CSD) for pipeline delivery of hydrogen and forecourt hydrogen production. The panel was asked to address the (1) cost calculation methodology, (2) current cost/technical status, (3) feasibility of achieving the FCTO's 2020 CSD levelized cost targets, and to (4) suggest research areas that will help the FCTO reach its targets. As the panel neared the completion of these tasks, it was also asked to evaluate CSD costs for the delivery of hydrogen by high-pressure tube trailer. This report details these findings.

  2. Energy Dense, Lighweight, Durable, Systems for Storage and Delivery of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Jacky Pruez; Samir Shoukry; Gergis William; Thomas Evans; Hermann Alcazar

    2008-12-31

    The work presented in this report summarizes the current state-of-the-art in on-board storage on compressed gaseous hydrogen as well as the development of analysis tools, methods, and theoretical data for devising high performance design configurations for hydrogen storage. The state-of-the-art in the area of compressed hydrogen storage reveals that the current configuration of the hydrogen storage tank is a seamless cylindrical part with two end domes. The tank is composed of an aluminum liner overwrapped with carbon fibers. Such a configuration was proved to sustain internal pressures up to 350 bars (5,000 psi). Finite-element stress analyses were performed on filament-wound hydrogen storage cylindrical tanks under the effect of internal pressure of 700 bars (10,000 psi). Tank deformations, stress fields, and intensities induced at the tank wall were examined. The results indicated that the aluminum liner can not sustain such a high pressure and initiate the tank failure. Thus, hydrogen tanks ought to be built entirely out of composite materials based on carbon fibers or other innovative composite materials. A spherical hydrogen storage tank was suggested within the scope of this project. A stress reduction was achieved by this change of the tank geometry, which allows for increasing the amount of the stored hydrogen and storage energy density. The finite element modeling of both cylindrical and spherical tank design configurations indicate that the formation of stress concentration zones in the vicinity of the valve inlet as well as the presence of high shear stresses in this area. Therefore, it is highly recommended to tailor the tank wall design to be thicker in this region and tapered to the required thickness in the rest of the tank shell. Innovative layout configurations of multiple tanks for enhanced conformability in limited space have been proposed and theoretically modeled using 3D finite element analysis. Optimum tailoring of fiber orientations and lay

  3. Microcavity hydrogen storage. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, R. J.

    1981-05-01

    In the microcavity storage system, high pressure hydrogen is stored in hollow, glass microspheres, 5 to 150 ..mu..m. This report presents the results of an experimental study to evaluate the performance of commercially available microspheres for this application. Eight grades were evaluated and their characteristics are presented. A substantial fraction of the microsphere beds survived the conditions of storing hydrogen at pressures of 400 atm. establishing that the concept of high pressure hydrogen storage is feasible. Information was gathered on the properties of the survivor microspheres. Processes for their selective recovery are being investigated.

  4. Manufacturing R&D of Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems for Transportati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ... The other two documents cover manufacturing R&D for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems and for systems that produce and distribute hydrogen. This material is intended ...

  5. Nanocrystalline materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, R.; Boily, S.; Zaluski, L.; Zaluska, A.; Tessier, P.; Strom Olsen, J.O.

    1995-11-01

    The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of using nanocrystalline hydrides for hydrogen storage and transportation. The method of fabrication, the microstructure of the alloys and the hydrogen absorption-desorption properties of these new materials are presented. The results are compared with those of conventional hydrides. Nanocrystalline hydrides have numerous advantages compared to conventional metal hydrides. The alloys, before hydrogenation, can be formed directly by mechanically alloying the elemental components. Since the crystal size is already very small, they do not usually decripitate during hydrogen absorption and, therefore, they maintain their structural integrity upon cycling. The numerous grain boundaries help the hydrogen diffusion and enhance the absorption-desorption kinetics. The mechanical alloying technique allows a precise control of the component and sorption properties off the alloys. This paper discusses the properties of two nanocrystalline hydrogen absorbing materials: FeTi and Mg{sub 2}Ni.

  6. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles.

  7. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    Publication and Product Library

    Technical report describing DOE's second assessment report on a third generation (Gen3) system capable of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The re

  8. Alane for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Alane for Hydrogen Storage and Delivery June 2012 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Why Hydrogen? * Oil is a limited resource, generates green house gas and much of the worlds supply ...

  9. Hydrogen for Energy Storage Analysis Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D. M.; Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.

    2010-06-01

    Overview of hydrogen for energy storage analysis presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, May 3-6, 2010, Long Beach, CA.

  10. HGMS: Glasses and Nanocomposites for Hydrogen Storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinska, Kris; Hemmers, Oliver

    2013-02-17

    The primary goal of this project is to fabricate and investigate different glass systems and glass-derived nanocrystalline composite materials. These glass-based, two-phased materials will contain nanocrystals that can attract hydrogen and be of potential interest as hydrogen storage media. The glass materials with intrinsic void spaces that are able to precipitate functional nanocrystals capable to attract hydrogen are of particular interest. Proposed previously, but never practically implemented, one of promising concepts for storing hydrogen are micro-containers built of glass and shaped into hollow microspheres. The project expanded this concept to the exploration of glass-derived nanocrystalline composites as potential hydrogen storage media. It is known that the most desirable materials for hydrogen storage do not interact chemically with hydrogen and possess a high surface area to host substantial amounts of hydrogen. Glasses are built of disordered networks with ample void spaces that make them permeable to hydrogen even at room temperature. Glass-derived nanocrystalline composites (two-phased materials), combination of glasses (networks with ample voids) and functional nanocrystals (capable to attract hydrogen), appear to be promising candidates for hydrogen storage media. Key advantages of glass materials include simplicity of preparation, flexibility of composition, chemical durability, non-toxicity and mechanical strength, as well as low production costs and environmental friendliness. This project encompasses a fundamental research into physics and chemistry of glasses and nanocrystalline composite materials, derived from glass. Studies are aimed to answer questions essential for considering glass-based materials and composites as potential hydrogen storage media. Of particular interest are two-phased materials that combine glasses with intrinsic voids spaces for physisorption of hydrogen and nanocrystals capable of chemisorption. This project does not

  11. The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation...

    Energy Saver

    The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) Status of Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D ...

  12. Hydrogen storage compositions (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Hydrogen storage compositions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen storage compositions Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such...

  13. Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage ...

  14. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  15. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications Technical report describing the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) assessment of ...

  16. Chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Semelsberger, Troy; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage is the sought after hydrogen storage media for automotive applications because of the expected low pressure operation (<20 atm), moderate temperature operation (<200 C), system gravimetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/kg system), and system volumetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/L system). Currently, the primary shortcomings of chemical hydrogen storage are regeneration efficiency, fuel cost and fuel phase (i.e., solid or slurry phase). Understanding the required material properties to meet the DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems is a critical knowledge gap in the hydrogen storage research community. This study presents a set of fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications meeting the 2017 DOE technical targets. Viable material properties were determined using a boiler-plate automotive system design. The fluid phase chemical hydrogen storage media considered in this study were neat liquids, solutions, and non-settling homogeneous slurries. Material properties examined include kinetics, heats of reaction, fuel-cell impurities, gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities, and regeneration efficiency. The material properties, although not exhaustive, are an essential first step in identifying viable chemical hydrogen storage material propertiesdand most important, their implications on system mass, system volume and system performance.

  17. Multi-component hydrogen storage material

    DOEpatents

    Faheem, Syed A.; Lewis, Gregory J.; Sachtler, J.W. Adriaan; Low, John J.; Lesch, David A.; Dosek, Paul M.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Siegel, Donald J.; Sudik, Andrea C.; Yang, Jun

    2010-09-07

    A reversible hydrogen storage composition having an empirical formula of: Li.sub.(x+z)N.sub.xMg.sub.yB.sub.zH.sub.w where 0.4.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.8; 0.2.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.0.6; 0hydrogen storage compared to binary systems such as MgH.sub.2--LiNH.sub.2.

  18. Stationary High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Stationary High-Pressure Hydrogen Storage Zhili Feng Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Gap Analysis for Bulk Storage in Hydrogen Infrastructure Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Pathway * Bulk storage in hydrogen delivery infrastructure * * Needed at central production plants, geologic storage sites, terminals, and refueling sites * Important to provide surge capacity for hourly, daily, and seasonal demand variations Technical challenges

  19. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland. ht_ge_soloveichik.pdf (2.32 MB) More Documents & Publications Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed

  20. Hydrogen Storage Related Links | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Related Links Hydrogen Storage Related Links The following resources provide details about U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded hydrogen storage activities, research plans and roadmaps, models and tools, and additional related links. DOE-Funded Hydrogen Storage Activities Each year, hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program are reviewed for their merit during an Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting. View posters and presentations from the latest

  1. High capacity hydrogen storage nanocomposite materials

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Wellons, Matthew S

    2015-02-03

    A novel hydrogen absorption material is provided comprising a mixture of a lithium hydride with a fullerene. The subsequent reaction product provides for a hydrogen storage material which reversibly stores and releases hydrogen at temperatures of about 270.degree. C.

  2. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Engineering Center of Excellence Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence The collaborative Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) conducts engineering research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities to address the engineering challenges posed by various storage technologies. These efforts include comprehensive system modeling and engineering analyses and assessments of materials-based storage system technologies for detailed comparisons against the

  3. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology A. Kostival, C. Rivkin, W. ... Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology A. Kostival, C. Rivkin, W. ...

  4. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen Storage

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage Storing hydrogen for renewable energy technologies can be challenging, especially for intermittent resources such as solar and wind. Whether for stationary, portable, or transportation applications, cost-effective, high-density energy storage is necessary for enabling the technologies that can change our energy future and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Hydrogen can play an important role in transforming our energy future if hydrogen storage technologies are improved. With

  5. Hydrogen Production and Storage for Fuel Cells: Current Status | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy and Storage for Fuel Cells: Current Status Hydrogen Production and Storage for Fuel Cells: Current Status Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Hydrogen Production and Storage for Fuel Cells, February 2, 2011. infocallfeb11_lipman.pdf (0 B) More Documents & Publications Fuel Cells for Supermarkets: Cleaner Energy with Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Systems Financing Fuel Cells The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

  6. Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Applications | Department of Energy Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications Technical report describing DOE's assessment of storing hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures within a pressure vessel on-board a vehicle. The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well an independent reviews of system cost

  7. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Niemann, Michael U.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Phani, Ayala R.; Kumar, Ashok; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2008-01-01

    Nmore » anomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices.anostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS 2 / MoS 2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc.) and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.« less

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  9. First-Principles Modeling of Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Systems

    SciTech Connect

    J. Karl Johnson

    2011-05-20

    The objective of this project is to complement experimental efforts of MHoCE partners by using state-of-the-art theory and modeling to study the structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials. Specific goals include prediction of the heats of formation and other thermodynamic properties of alloys from first principles methods, identification of new alloys that can be tested experimentally, calculation of surface and energetic properties of nanoparticles, and calculation of kinetics involved with hydrogenation and dehydrogenation processes. Discovery of new metal hydrides with enhanced properties compared with existing materials is a critical need for the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. New materials discovery can be aided by the use of first principles (ab initio) computational modeling in two ways: (1) The properties, including mechanisms, of existing materials can be better elucidated through a combined modeling/experimental approach. (2) The thermodynamic properties of novel materials that have not been made can, in many cases, be quickly screened with ab initio methods. We have used state-of-the-art computational techniques to explore millions of possible reaction conditions consisting of different element spaces, compositions, and temperatures. We have identified potentially promising single- and multi-step reactions that can be explored experimentally.

  10. Panel 3, Necessary Conditions for Hydrogen Energy Storage Projects to Succeed in North America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Necessary Conditions for Hydrogen Energy Storage Projects to Succeed in North America Rob Harvey Director, Energy Storage Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services DOE and Industry Canada, Sacramento, May 14-15, 2014 Hydrogenics is a world leader in water electrolysis products and hydrogen fuel cell power systems 2 Onsite Generation Electrolyzers Industrial Hydrogen Hydrogen Fueling Power Systems Fuel Cell Modules Stand-by Power Mobility Power Energy Storage Power-to-Gas 

  11. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  12. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up

  13. DOE Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700 bar Storage Vessels DOE Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential ...

  14. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage Title: Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage ...

  15. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  16. Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2012-04-16

    Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

  17. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  18. Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Workshop Welcome

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Golden Field Office: Jesse Adams, Jim Alkire, Paul Bakke, Katie Randolph and Kristian Whitehouse The DOE Hydrogen Storage Team The Workshop Team Larry Blair Consultant to DOE Bob ...

  19. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Final Report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride ...

  20. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Document states additional feedback on the worksop received via a request for information issued in ...

  1. Hydrogen storage composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, G.G.; Heung, L.K.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition based on a metal hydride dispersed in an aerogel prepared by a sol-gel process. The starting material for the aerogel is an organometallic compound, including the alkoxysilanes, organometals of the form M(OR){sub X} where R is an organic ligand of the form C{sub n}H{sub 2n+1}, and organometals of the form MO{sub x}Ry where R is an alkyl group, where M is an oxide-forming metal, n, x and y are integers and y is two less than the valence of M. A sol is prepared by combining the starting material, alcohol, water, and an acid. The sol is conditioned to the proper viscosity and a hydride in the form of a fine powder is added. The mixture is polymerized and dried under supercritical conditions. The final product is a composition having a hydride uniformly dispersed throughout an inert, stable and highly porous matrix. It is capable of absorbing up to 30 motes of hydrogen per kilogram at room temperature and pressure, rapidly and reversibly. Hydrogen absorbed by the composition can be readily be recovered by heat or evacuation.

  2. Hydrogen storage composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K; Wicks, George G.

    2003-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition based on a metal hydride dispersed in an aerogel prepared by a sol-gel process. The starting material for the aerogel is an organometallic compound, including the alkoxysilanes, organometals of the form M(OR)x and MOxRy, where R is an alkyl group of the form C.sub.n H.sub.2n+1, M is an oxide-forming metal, n, x, and y are integers, and y is two less than the valence of M. A sol is prepared by combining the starting material, alcohol, water, and an acid. The sol is conditioned to the proper viscosity and a hydride in the form of a fine powder is added. The mixture is polymerized and dried under supercritical conditions. The final product is a composition having a hydride uniformly dispersed throughout an inert, stable and highly porous matrix. It is capable of absorbing up to 30 moles of hydrogen per kilogram at room temperature and pressure, rapidly and reversibly. Hydrogen absorbed by the composition can be readily be recovered by heat or evacuation.

  3. MODELING OF 2LIBH4 PLUS MGH2 HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM ACCIDENT SCENARIOS USING EMPIRICAL AND THEORETICAL THERMODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    James, C; David Tamburello, D; Joshua Gray, J; Kyle Brinkman, K; Bruce Hardy, B; Donald Anton, D

    2009-04-01

    It is important to understand and quantify the potential risk resulting from accidental environmental exposure of condensed phase hydrogen storage materials under differing environmental exposure scenarios. This paper describes a modeling and experimental study with the aim of predicting consequences of the accidental release of 2LiBH{sub 4}+MgH{sub 2} from hydrogen storage systems. The methodology and results developed in this work are directly applicable to any solid hydride material and/or accident scenario using appropriate boundary conditions and empirical data. The ability to predict hydride behavior for hypothesized accident scenarios facilitates an assessment of the of risk associated with the utilization of a particular hydride. To this end, an idealized finite volume model was developed to represent the behavior of dispersed hydride from a breached system. Semiempirical thermodynamic calculations and substantiating calorimetric experiments were performed in order to quantify the energy released, energy release rates and to quantify the reaction products resulting from water and air exposure of a lithium borohydride and magnesium hydride combination. The hydrides, LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}, were studied individually in the as-received form and in the 2:1 'destabilized' mixture. Liquid water hydrolysis reactions were performed in a Calvet calorimeter equipped with a mixing cell using neutral water. Water vapor and oxygen gas phase reactivity measurements were performed at varying relative humidities and temperatures by modifying the calorimeter and utilizing a gas circulating flow cell apparatus. The results of these calorimetric measurements were compared with standardized United Nations (UN) based test results for air and water reactivity and used to develop quantitative kinetic expressions for hydrolysis and air oxidation in these systems. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from these tests were then inputted into a computational fluid dynamics model to

  4. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    A Workshop Convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada Hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board Sheraton Grand Hotel, Sacramento, California, May 14-15, 2014 Workshop Goal: Identify challenges, benefits and opportunities for commercial hydrogen energy storage applications to support grid services, variable electricity generation, and hydrogen vehicles. Workshop Scope: A broad range of services from hydrogen storage systems in the

  5. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also

  6. Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Summary report from the May 17, 2007 Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting ssawg_may_summary.pdf (167.2 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006 Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report Hydrogen Storage Systems

  7. Electron Charged Graphite-based Hydrogen Storage Material

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chinbay Q. Fan R&D Manager Office of Technology and Innovations Phone: 847 768 0812

    2012-03-14

    The electron-charge effects have been demonstrated to enhance hydrogen storage capacity using materials which have inherent hydrogen storage capacities. A charge control agent (CCA) or a charge transfer agent (CTA) was applied to the hydrogen storage material to reduce internal discharge between particles in a Sievert volumetric test device. GTI has tested the device under (1) electrostatic charge mode; (2) ultra-capacitor mode; and (3) metal-hydride mode. GTI has also analyzed the charge distribution on storage materials. The charge control agent and charge transfer agent are needed to prevent internal charge leaks so that the hydrogen atoms can stay on the storage material. GTI has analyzed the hydrogen fueling tank structure, which contains an air or liquid heat exchange framework. The cooling structure is needed for hydrogen fueling/releasing. We found that the cooling structure could be used as electron-charged electrodes, which will exhibit a very uniform charge distribution (because the cooling system needs to remove heat uniformly). Therefore, the electron-charge concept does not have any burden of cost and weight for the hydrogen storage tank system. The energy consumption for the electron-charge enhancement method is quite low or omitted for electrostatic mode and ultra-capacitor mode in comparison of other hydrogen storage methods; however, it could be high for the battery mode.

  8. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, Kevin; Jovanovic, Goran; Paul, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  9. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    approaches for hydrogen storage materials Leonid Bendersky Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory NIST, Gaithersburg MD Contributors: G. Downing, E. Mackey, R. Paul, R. Greenberg (NIST:CSTL); L. Cook, M. Green (NIST:MSEL) R. Cavicchi (NIST:CSTL); I. Takeuchi, H. Oguchi (UMd) Two Main Challenges to Combinatorial Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Materials Design and fabrication of appropriate materials libraries Rapid, quantitative measurements of hydrogenation phenomenon We are attacking both

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Karen; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Han, Vickie; Chan, Michael; Chiang, Helena; Leonard, Jon

    2013-03-11

    The overall objective of this project is to conduct cost analyses and estimate costs for on- and off-board hydrogen storage technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on a consistent, independent basis. This can help guide DOE and stakeholders toward the most-promising research, development and commercialization pathways for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. A specific focus of the project is to estimate hydrogen storage system cost in high-volume production scenarios relative to the DOE target that was in place when this cost analysis was initiated. This report and its results reflect work conducted by TIAX between 2004 and 2012, including recent refinements and updates. The report provides a system-level evaluation of costs and performance for four broad categories of on-board hydrogen storage: (1) reversible on-board metal hydrides (e.g., magnesium hydride, sodium alanate); (2) regenerable off-board chemical hydrogen storage materials(e.g., hydrolysis of sodium borohydride, ammonia borane); (3) high surface area sorbents (e.g., carbon-based materials); and 4) advanced physical storage (e.g., 700-bar compressed, cryo-compressed and liquid hydrogen). Additionally, the off-board efficiency and processing costs of several hydrogen storage systems were evaluated and reported, including: (1) liquid carrier, (2) sodium borohydride, (3) ammonia borane, and (4) magnesium hydride. TIAX applied a bottom-up costing methodology customized to analyze and quantify the processes used in the manufacture of hydrogen storage systems. This methodology, used in conjunction with ® software and other tools, developed costs for all major tank components, balance-of-tank, tank assembly, and system assembly. Based on this methodology, the figure below shows the projected on-board high-volume factory costs of the various analyzed hydrogen storage systems, as designed. Reductions in the key cost drivers may bring hydrogen storage system costs closer to this DOE target

  11. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials Grigorii Soloveichik, John Lemmon, Jun Cui, Yan Gao, Tom Raber, Job Rijssenbeek, Gosia Rubinzstajn, J.C. Zhao 2 Outline Approach: Parallel synthesis accompanied by high throughput screening for a desired property. - Methods * Preparation/parallel synthesis * Analytical techniques * Scale-up - Selected results * Al-Li-Si system * Al-Mg-Ti system * AlH 3 + Si * Mg(BH 4 ) 2 - Summary 3 Down-selection of the combi process High energy 96-well Shaker Production

  12. Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides a summary of feedback from ...

  13. Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Thermodynamic guidelines for the prediction of hydrogen storage reactions and their application to destabilized hydride mixtures Hydrogen Storage & Nanoscale Modeling Group Ford ...

  14. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and...

  15. Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of...

    Energy Saver

    Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence This technical report describes the ...

  16. DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive Applications DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive ...

  17. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) FCTO Projects and the Materials Genome Initiative

  18. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies Download presentation...

  19. Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds and Mixtures

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on the Prediction of New Hydrogen Storage Compounds and Mixtures given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

  20. Hydrogen storage compositions (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen storage compositions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrogen storage compositions You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech...

  1. Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis Research and Development

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's hydrogen storage R&D activities include testing, analysis, and developing recommended best practices. The status of hydrogen storage testing and analysis projects is detailed in the...

  2. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage Title: Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, ...

  3. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies Download presentation ...

  4. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Download presentation slides from the "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets" webinar presented by the U.S. ...

  5. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report ...

  6. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation) High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation)...

  7. High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop Summary of the...

  8. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    challenges, benefits and opportunities for commercial hydrogen energy storage applications to support grid services, variable electricity generation, and hydrogen vehicles. ...

  9. Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Highlights Hydrogen's Potential for Electrical Energy Storage (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in analyzing life-cycle costs for hydrogen storage in comparison with other energy storage technologies. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  10. Energy Storage Systems

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Water Power Natural Energy ...

  11. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage Technical Targets | Department of Energy Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Download presentation slides from the "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets" webinar presented by the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office on June 25, 2013. Hydrogen Storage

  12. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements | Department...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    So on that note, I'm going to turn it over to Ned Stetson. He is the hydrogen storage team lead for the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office in Washington, D.C. ...

  13. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Design | Department of Energy in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf (366.26 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Wind Energy Manufacturing & Supply Chain: A Competitiveness Analysis Final Report DE-EE0005380 - Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage

  14. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  15. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure / 1 02 Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. February 2015 Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services Proceedings of an Expert Workshop Convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, Hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources

  16. Optimization of compression and storage requirements at hydrogen refueling stations.

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Mintz, M.; Kelly, B.; Hooks, M.; Paster, M.

    2008-01-01

    The transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles requires detailed technical and economic analyses of all aspects of hydrogen infrastructure, including refueling stations. The cost of such stations is a major contributor to the delivered cost of hydrogen. Hydrogen refueling stations require not only dispensers to transfer fuel onto a vehicle, but also an array of such ancillary equipment as a cascade charging system, storage vessels, compressors and/or pumps/evaporators. This paper provides detailed information on design requirements for gaseous and liquid hydrogen refueling stations and their associated capital and operating costs, which in turn impact hydrogen selling price at various levels of hydrogen demand. It summarizes an engineering economics approach which captures the effect of variations in station size, seasonal, daily and hourly demand, and alternative dispensing rates and pressures on station cost. Tradeoffs in the capacity of refueling station compressors, storage vessels, and the cascade charging system result in many possible configurations for the station. Total costs can be minimized by optimizing that configuration. Using a methodology to iterate among the costs of compression, storage and cascade charging, it was found that the optimum hourly capacity of the compressor is approximately twice the station's average hourly demand, and the optimum capacity of the cascade charging system is approximately 15% of the station's average daily demand. Further, for an hourly demand profile typical of today's gasoline stations, onsite hydrogen storage equivalent to at least 1/3 of the station's average daily demand is needed to accommodate peak demand.

  17. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Material Handling Equipment

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table summarizes hydrogen storage technical performance targets for material handling equipment.

  18. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Portable Power Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These tables summarize hydrogen storage technical performance targets for portable power applications.

  19. ANL Capabilities for Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydride Center

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  20. Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage- Chemical Hydrides

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Angela D. Lueking; Qixiu Li; John V. Badding; Dania Fonseca; Humerto Gutierrez; Apurba Sakti; Kofi Adu; Michael Schimmel

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  2. Outlook and Challenges for Hydrogen Storage in Nanoporous Materials

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Broom, D. P.; Webb, C. J.; Hurst, Katherine E.; Parilla, Philip A.; Gennett, Thomas; Brown, C. M.; Zacharia, R.; Tylianakis, E.; Klontzas, E.; Froudakis, G. E.; et al

    2016-02-16

    Considerable progress has been made recently in the use of nanoporous materials for hydrogen storage. In our article, the current status of the field and future challenges are discussed, ranging from important open fundamental questions, such as the density and volume of the adsorbed phase and its relationship to overall storage capacity, to the development of new functional materials and complete storage system design. With regard to fundamentals, the use of neutron scattering to study adsorbed H2, suitable adsorption isotherm equations, and the accurate computational modelling and simulation of H2 adsorption are discussed. We cover new materials and they includemore » flexible metal–organic frameworks, core–shell materials, and porous organic cage compounds. The article concludes with a discussion of the experimental investigation of real adsorptive hydrogen storage tanks, the improvement in the thermal conductivity of storage beds, and new storage system concepts and designs.« less

  3. Analysis and optimization of thermal stratification and self-pressurization effects in liquid hydrogen storage systems -- Part 2: Model results and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Gursu, S.; Veziroglu, T.N. . Clean Energy Research Inst.); Sherif, S.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Sheffield, J.W. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics)

    1993-09-01

    Three models capable of predicting the phenomena of thermal stratification and self-pressurization in liquid hydrogen storage systems were presented in Part 1 of this paper. In order to be able to evaluate the performance of the different pressure rise models, the results are compared with experimental data obtained from different tests. The set of experimental data obtained from the Plum Brook B-2 test, in the NASA-Lewis Research Center, represents a very accurately instrumented and closely controlled experimental work performed on the liquid hydrogen storage tank. Another set of data is taken from the experimental study conducted again in the NASA-Lewis Research Center to obtain a correlating parameter which relates the rate of pressure rise to the volume of spherical liquid hydrogen tank. In this paper model results are presented and discussed and general conclusions are reached.

  4. Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems...

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Hydrogen Systems LLC formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC (formerly Texaco Ovonic Hydrogen Systems LLC) Place:...

  5. DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This agenda provides information about the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006. theory_session_agenda.pdf (156.76 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on

  6. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xia; Opalka, Susanne M.; Mosher, Daniel A; Laube, Bruce L; Brown, Ronald J; Vanderspurt, Thomas H; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Ronnebro, Ewa; Boyle, Tim; Cordaro, Joseph

    2010-06-30

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method's potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H2 dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH4)4 stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH4)4 ligand complex in SiO2 aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of Ca

  7. Simultaneous purification and storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Weber, R.; Carlson, E.

    1998-08-01

    Specially coated magnesium particles have been shown to selectively absorb hydrogen from a hydrogen-rich gas stream such as reformate. These coated magnesium particles can store the absorbed hydrogen as required and subsequently deliver pure hydrogen, just as uncoated magnesium particles can. These coated magnesium particles could be used in a device that accepts a steady stream of reformate, as from a methane reformer, stores the selectively absorbed hydrogen indefinitely, and delivers purified hydrogen on demand. Unfortunately, this coating (magnesium nitride) has been shown to degrade over a period of several weeks, so that the magnesium within evidences progressively lower storage capacity. The authors are investigating two other coatings, one of which might be applicable to hydridable metals other than magnesium, to replace magnesium nitride.

  8. Hydrogen Storage and Production Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Abhijit; Biris, A. S.; Mazumder, M. K.; Karabacak, T.; Kannarpady, Ganesh; Sharma, R.

    2011-07-31

    This is the final technical report. This report is a summary of the project. The goal of our project is to improve solar-to-hydrogen generation efficiency of the PhotoElectroChemical (PEC) conversion process by developing photoanodes with high absorption efficiency in the visible region of the solar radiation spectrum and to increase photo-corrosion resistance of the electrode for generating hydrogen from water. To meet this goal, we synthesized nanostructured heterogeneous semiconducting photoanodes with a higher light absorption efficiency compared to that of TiO2 and used a corrosion protective layer of TiO2. While the advantages of photoelectrochemical (PEC) production of hydrogen have not yet been realized, the recent developments show emergence of new nanostructural designs of photoanodes and choices of materials with significant gains in photoconversion efficiency.

  9. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2011-12-13

    Porous polymers, tribenzohexazatriphenylene, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene, poly-tetraphenyl methane and their derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  10. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  11. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  12. Hydrogen Storage in Novel Molecular Materials, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Viktor V. Struzhkin; Wendy L. Mao; Ho-Kwang Mao; Burkhard Militzer; Russell Hemley

    2006-05-31

    This project is conducting fundamental studies of inorganic H2 clathrates (H2O- and CH4- based). Insights gained from these studies could be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets, especially cost, specific energy, energy density, environmental cleanliness, and safety of hydrogen storage. We have synthesized clathrates with very high H2 contents in diamond anvil cells at high pressure and low temperature; clathrate formation and hydrogen release are spontaneous. The hydrogen clathrate structures have been synthesized at 300 MPa and 250 K with hydrogen weight content about 5%. This clathrate structure (sII) is stable at ambient pressure up to 80 K. The major technical issue is to extend the P-T stability field to near ambient P and T. Our approach is to explore H2-CH4-X and H2-H2O-X systems experimentally and theoretically to find additional components X (promoters ) that will stabilize existing large-cage clathrate structures, and to look for new clathrate structures with even larger hydrogen storage capacity. Most of the experimental studies performed by our group and other researchers have been concentrated on X=THF (tetrahydrofurane molecule).

  13. New High Capacity Getter for Vacuum-Insulated Mobile Liquid Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    H. Londer; G. R. Myneni; P. Adderley; G. Bartlok; J. Setina; W. Knapp; D. Schleussner

    2006-05-01

    Current ''Non evaporable getters'' (NEGs), based on the principle of metallic surface sorption of gas molecules, are important tools for the improving the performance of many vacuum systems. High porosity alloys or powder mixtures of Zr, Ti, Al, V, Fe and other metals are the base materials for this type of getters. The continuous development of vacuum technologies has created new challenges for the field of getter materials. The main sorption parameters of the current NEGs, namely, pumping speed and sorption capacity, have reached certain upper limits. Chemically active metals are the basis of a new generation of NEGs. The introduction of these new materials with high sorption capacity at room temperature is a long-awaited development. These new materials enable the new generation of NEGs to reach faster pumping speeds, significantly higher sticking rates and sorption capacities up to 104 times higher during their lifetimes. Our development efforts focus on producing these chemically active metals with controlled insulation or protection. The main structural forms of our new getter materials are spherical powders, granules and porous multi-layers. The full pumping performance can take place at room temperature with activation temperatures ranging from room temperature to 650 C. In one of our first pilot projects, our proprietary getter solution was successfully introduced as a getter pump in a double-wall mobile LH2 tank system. Our getters were shown to have very high sorption capacity of all relevant residual gases, including H2. This new concept opens the opportunity for significant vacuum improvements, especially in the field of H2 pumping which is an important task in many different vacuum applications.

  14. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Todd Ramsden, Kevin Harrison, Darlene Steward November 16, 2009 NREL/PR-560-47432 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL Wind2H2 RD&D Project * The National Renewable Energy Laboratory in partnership with Xcel Energy and

  15. Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides information about the Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials held on May 18, 2006 in Crystal City, Va. theory_session_summary.pdf (206.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media DOE

  16. Hydrogen storage in a combined M.sub.xAlH.sub.6/M'.sub.y(NH.sub.2).sub.z system and methods of making and using the same

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Jun; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2012-04-03

    As a promising clean fuel for vehicles, hydrogen can be used for propulsion, either directly or in fuel cells. Hydrogen storage compositions having high storage capacity, good dehydrogenation kinetics, and hydrogen release and uptake reactions which are reversible are disclosed and described. Generally a hydrogen storage composition of a metal aluminum hexahydride and a metal amide can be used. A combined system (Li.sub.3AIH.sub.6/3LiNH.sub.2) with a very high inherent hydrogen capacity (7.3 wt %) can be carried out at moderate temperatures, and with approximately 95% of that inherent hydrogen storage capacity (7.0%) is reversible over repeated cycling of release and uptake.

  17. Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Systems - Workshop Summary Report | Department of Energy Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary Report Research and Development Strategies for Compressed & Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems - Workshop Summary Report Summary report from the Compressed and Cryo-Hydrogen Storage Systems Workshops held February 14-15, 2011, in Crystal City, Virginia. Report summarizes the discussions that took place in the breakout sessions and

  18. Panel 4, Hydrogen Energy Storage Policy Considerations

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    COASTAL SYSTEM (120 MMCFD) VALLEY SYSTEM (150 MMCFD) RNG Pipeline and Storage Pathways WWTP Biogas Collection Organic Matter Landfill Biogas Collection Gasification 22% Energy Loss ...

  19. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Storage Fact Sheet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Storage Hydrogen Storage Developing safe, reliable, compact, and cost-effective hydrogen storage tech- nologies is one of the most technically challenging barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen as a form of energy. To be competitive with conventional vehicles, hydrogen-powered cars must be able to travel more than 300 mi between flls. This is a challenging goal because hydrogen has physical characteristics that make it

  20. Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpv_zheng1.pdf (986.67 KB) More Documents & Publications R&D of Large Stationary Hydrogen/CNG/HCNG Storage Vessels Forum Agenda: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel

  1. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  2. Hydrogen storage via polyhydride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.M.; Zidan, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    The reversible dehydrogenation of NaAlH{sub 4} is catalyzed in toluene slurries of the NaAlH{sub 4} containing the pincer complex, IrH{sub 4} {l_brace}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}PBu{sup t}{sub 2}){sub 2}{r_brace}. The rates of the pincer complex catalyzed dehydrogenation are about five times greater those previously found for NaAlH{sub 4} that was doped with titanium through a wet chemistry method. Homogenization of NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mole % Ti(OBu{sup n}){sub 4} under an atmosphere of argon produces a novel titanium containing material. TPD measurements show that the dehydrogenation of this material occurs about 30 C lower than that previously found for wet titanium doped NaAlH{sub 4}. In further contrast to wet doped NaAlH{sub 4}, the dehydrogenation kinetics and hydrogen capacity of the novel material are undiminished over several dehydriding/hydriding cycles. Rehydrogenation of the titanium doped material occurs readily at 170 C under 150 atm of hydrogen. TPD measurements show that about 80% of the original hydrogen content (4.2 wt%) can be restored under these conditions.

  3. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

    2008-08-24

    The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

  4. Structural Characterization for Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Structural Characterization for H 2 storage NREL: Steven Christensen, Katherine Hurst, Philip Parilla, Thomas Gennett SLAC/SSRL: Dimosthenis Sokaras, Dennis Nordlund, (Tsu-Chien Wang) 2 Core-level spectroscopy * Core-level spectroscopy: electronic structure via excitation of core electrons o X-ray absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) o X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) o Photoemission Spectroscopy (PES) - XPS / UPS o Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPES) * Applications: o Composition: XPS, XES

  5. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services...

    Energy Saver

    Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Industry ...

  6. High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends | Department of Energy High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas and Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends High-pressure Storage Vessels for Hydrogen, Natural Gas and Hydrogen-Natural Gas Blends These slides were presented at the International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on September 27 - 29, 2010, in Beijing, China. ihfpv_lynch.pdf (4.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Properties, Behavior and Material Compatibility of Hydrogen, Natural Gas

  7. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael A.; Page, Richard A.

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  8. Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report This report is a compilation of information exchanged at a forum on March 14, 2003, in Washington, D.C....

  9. DOE Issues Request for Information on Hydrogen Storage for Onboard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hydrogen Storage for Onboard Vehicle Applications DOE Issues Request for Information on Hydrogen Storage for Onboard Vehicle Applications June 7, 2016 - 3:07pm Addthis The U.S. ...

  10. DOE Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop Attendee List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    FCTO Hydrogen Storage Program Workshop � Title: "Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700 Bar Storage Vessels" Date: Wednesday, August 24th, 2016 Location: USCAR, Southfield, Michigan Last Name First Name Organization Aceves Salvadore LLNL Adams Jesse DOE Alvine Kyle PNNL Carrigan John Luxfer Elgowainy Amgad ANL Feng Zhili ORNL Gangloff John DOE Gotthold David PNNL Haines Kevin Cobham Mission Systems Hipp Pat CTD Houchins Cassidy SA Hua Thanh ANL Iftime Gabriel PARC James

  11. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Approaches | Department of Energy Materials: UOP Approaches High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches Presentation by Adriaan Sachtler from the High Throughput/ Combinatorial Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Materials Meeting sachtler.pdf (479.39 KB) More Documents & Publications Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Agenda from the U.S. Department

  12. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (presentation) | Department of Energy High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland. ht_snl_ronnebro_mcdaniel.pdf (471.77 KB) More Documents & Publications High Througput Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D Workshop

  13. Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Database Demonstration Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration" held on December 13, 2011. Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Webinar Slides (1.46 MB) More Documents & Publications Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within DOE's

  14. Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis workshop. wkshp_storage_agenda.pdf (21.87 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership: Analysis Workshop DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Analysis Workshop Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis Meeting Agenda

  15. Explanations of FreedomCAR/DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary of FreedomCAR Targets and Basis for Targets prepared for the Grand Challenge Hydrogen Storage Solicitation.

  16. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Final Report | Department of Energy Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report Proceedings from the Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop held March 20-21, 2013, at Argonne National Laboratory. 2013_csd_workshop_report.pdf (2.03 MB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop

  17. Thermodynamically Tuned Nanophase Materials for reversible Hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Ping Liu; John J. Vajo

    2010-02-28

    This program was devoted to significantly extending the limits of hydrogen storage technology for practical transportation applications. To meet the hydrogen capacity goals set forth by the DOE, solid-state materials consisting of light elements were developed. Many light element compounds are known that have high capacities. However, most of these materials are thermodynamically too stable, and they release and store hydrogen much too slowly for practical use. In this project we developed new light element chemical systems that have high hydrogen capacities while also having suitable thermodynamic properties. In addition, we developed methods for increasing the rates of hydrogen exchange in these new materials. The program has significantly advanced (1) the application of combined hydride systems for tuning thermodynamic properties and (2) the use of nanoengineering for improving hydrogen exchange. For example, we found that our strategy for thermodynamic tuning allows both entropy and enthalpy to be favorably adjusted. In addition, we demonstrated that using porous supports as scaffolds to confine hydride materials to nanoscale dimensions could improve rates of hydrogen exchange by > 50x. Although a hydrogen storage material meeting the requirements for commercial development was not achieved, this program has provided foundation and direction for future efforts. More broadly, nanoconfinment using scaffolds has application in other energy storage technologies including batteries and supercapacitors. The overall goal of this program was to develop a safe and cost-effective nanostructured light-element hydride material that overcomes the thermodynamic and kinetic barriers to hydrogen reaction and diffusion in current materials and thereby achieve > 6 weight percent hydrogen capacity at temperatures and equilibrium pressures consistent with DOE target values.

  18. Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials DOE Hydrogen Program Assessment of Modeling Needs for Hydrogen Storage This report provides a summary of feedback from co-organizers, speakers and participants of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials, held Thursday, May 18, 2006, Crystal City, VA, in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, May 16-19, 2006. Session co-organizers: Chris Wolverton (Ford), Karl Johnson

  19. Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Individual Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Individual Projects Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Individual Projects Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge individual projects funded for three Centers of Excellence, led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. grand_challenge_projects.pdf (68.62 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence Learning Demonstration Teams Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations

  20. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore » the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  1. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of aLiBH4/CaH2Destabilized System

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a destabilizedLiBH4/CaH2system ball-milled withTiCl3,TiF3, andTiO2additives have been investigated. It is found that the system withTiCl3additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount ofTiCl3is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of theLiBH4/CaH2system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation. The activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25?mol% ofTiCl3are 141, 126, and 110?kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts ofTiCl3are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures.

  2. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of a L i B H 4 / C a H 2 Destabilized System

    DOE PAGES [OSTI]

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Tmore » he hydrogen storage properties of a destabilized LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system ball-milled with TiCl 3 , TiF 3 , and TiO 2 additives have been investigated. It is found that the system with TiCl 3 additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount of TiCl 3 is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of the LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation.he activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25 mol% of TiCl 3 are 141, 126, and 110 kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts of TiCl 3 are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures.« less

  3. Energy Department Announces up to $4 Million for Advanced Hydrogen Storage

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Up to $4 million in fiscal year 2014 funding will be made available for the continued development of advanced hydrogen storage systems and novel materials to provide adequate onboard storage for a wide range of applications including fuel cell ele

  4. Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage and Liquid Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cryocompressed Hydrogen Storage & Liquid Delivery Jacob Leachman, Ph.D. Assistant Professor DOE H 2 Transmission & Delivery Workshop 2/26/2014 H Y P E R H drogen roperties for nergy esearch This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Jacob Leachman * DOE H 2 Transmission & Distribution Workshop * 2/25/2014 H Y P E R Why Cryogenic Hydrogen? * LH 2 tanker trucks delivered 80-90 % of total small merchant H 2 in 2010. 1 * Cryo-H

  5. High Pressure Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes - Energy Innovation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search High Pressure Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Contact LLNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Hydrogen storage for transportation is one of the most important problems faced in implementing a "hydrogen economy". Hydrogen can be produced in many ways, but then must be stored for use by fuel cells. The U.S. Department of Energy's

  6. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Veenstra, Mike; Purewal, Justin; Xu, Chunchuan; Yang, Jun; Blaser, Rachel; Sudik, Andrea; Siegel, Don; Ming, Yang; Liu, Dong'an; Chi, Hang; Gaab, Manuela; Arnold, Lena; Muller, Ulrich

    2015-06-30

    Widespread adoption of hydrogen as a vehicular fuel depends critically on the development of low-cost, on-board hydrogen storage technologies capable of achieving high energy densities and fast kinetics for hydrogen uptake and release. As present-day technologies -- which rely on physical storage methods such as compressed hydrogen -- are incapable of attaining established Department of Energy (DOE) targets, development of materials-based approaches for storing hydrogen have garnered increasing attention. Material-based storage technologies have potential to store hydrogen beyond twice the density of liquid hydrogen. To hasten development of these ‘hydride’ materials, the DOE previously established three centers of excellence for materials storage R&D associated with the key classes of materials: metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen, and adsorbents. While these centers made progress in identifying new storage materials, the challenges associated with the engineering of the system around a candidate storage material are in need of further advancement. In 2009 the DOE established the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence with the objective of developing innovative engineering concepts for materials-based hydrogen storage systems. As a partner in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence, the Ford-UM-BASF team conducted a multi-faceted research program that addresses key engineering challenges associated with the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. First, we developed a novel framework that allowed for a material-based hydrogen storage system to be modeled and operated within a virtual fuel cell vehicle. This effort resulted in the ability to assess dynamic operating parameters and interactions between the storage system and fuel cell power plant, including the evaluation of performance throughout various drive cycles. Second, we engaged in cost modeling of various incarnations of the storage systems. This analysis

  7. Hydrogen Production

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  8. Hydrogen Behavior

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  9. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  10. Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Phase Diamond at High Temperature and Its Release

    SciTech Connect

    Tushar K Ghosh

    2008-10-13

    The objectives of this proposed research were: 91) Separation and storage of hydrogen on nanophase diamonds. It is expected that the produced hydrogen, which will be in a mixture, can be directed to a nanophase diamond system directly, which will not only store the hydrogen, but also separate it from the gas mixture, and (2) release of the stored hydrogen from the nanophase diamond.

  11. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsden, T.; Harrison, K.; Steward, D.

    2009-11-16

    Presentation about NREL's Wind to Hydrogen Project and producing renewable hydrogen for both energy storage and transporation, including the challenges, sustainable pathways, and analysis results.

  12. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5037: Hydrogen Storage Materials- 2004 vs. 2006

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about hydrogen storage materials (2004 vs. 2006).

  13. Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Toward new solid and liquid phase systems for the containment, transport and delivery of hydrogen.Solid and liquid hydrogen carriers for use in hydrogen storage and delivery.

  14. DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Vehicles This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations. View

  15. Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Center of Excellence- Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report contains the executive summaries of the final technical reports from the three Hydrogen Storage Centers of Excellence that operated from 2005 through 2010 to develop advanced hydrogen storage materials in the areas of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Hydrogen Sorbents, and Reversible Metal Hydrides.

  16. Theoretical Studies of Hydrogen Storage Alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-03-22

    Theoretical calculations were carried out to search for lightweight alloys that can be used to reversibly store hydrogen in mobile applications, such as automobiles. Our primary focus was on magnesium based alloys. While MgH{sub 2} is in many respects a promising hydrogen storage material, there are two serious problems which need to be solved in order to make it useful: (i) the binding energy of the hydrogen atoms in the hydride is too large, causing the release temperature to be too high, and (ii) the diffusion of hydrogen through the hydride is so slow that loading of hydrogen into the metal takes much too long. In the first year of the project, we found that the addition of ca. 15% of aluminum decreases the binding energy to the hydrogen to the target value of 0.25 eV which corresponds to release of 1 bar hydrogen gas at 100 degrees C. Also, the addition of ca. 15% of transition metal atoms, such as Ti or V, reduces the formation energy of interstitial H-atoms making the diffusion of H-atoms through the hydride more than ten orders of magnitude faster at room temperature. In the second year of the project, several calculations of alloys of magnesium with various other transition metals were carried out and systematic trends in stability, hydrogen binding energy and diffusivity established. Some calculations of ternary alloys and their hydrides were also carried out, for example of Mg{sub 6}AlTiH{sub 16}. It was found that the binding energy reduction due to the addition of aluminum and increased diffusivity due to the addition of a transition metal are both effective at the same time. This material would in principle work well for hydrogen storage but it is, unfortunately, unstable with respect to phase separation. A search was made for a ternary alloy of this type where both the alloy and the corresponding hydride are stable. Promising results were obtained by including Zn in the alloy.

  17. DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Science (Basic Energy Sciences) and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Fuel Cell Technologies) held a Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006 in Crystal City, Va., in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review. The meeting provided an opportunity for experts in the

  18. Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

    2008-11-30

    We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

  19. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  20. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  1. On-Board Storage Systems Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    On-Board Storage Systems Analysis R. K. Ahluwalia, J-K Peng and T. Q. Hua DOE and FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Delivery and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop Washington, DC 25 January 2006 Work sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies 2 ANL ANL ' ' s Role in H s Role in H 2 2 Storage Systems Development Storage Systems Development Working with DOE contractors and Centers of Excellence

  2. High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Energy Storage Energy Storage Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite Processes to add metal hydrideds to nanocarbon structures to yield high capacity hydrogen storage materials Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology Plot of Number of hydrogen atoms per lithium atom vs the Mol ratio of C<sub>60</sub>:Li.&nbsp; An ratio of 1:6

  3. DOE Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Pathways for Lower Cost 700 bar Storage Vessels | Department of Energy Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700 bar Storage Vessels DOE Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700 bar Storage Vessels The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office hosted the workshop "Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700

  4. Hydrogen Storage Characterization and Optimization Research Team Effort

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    EERE FCTO - Hydrogen Storage: Core Characterization Capabilities and Materials Research Effort FCTO Core Capability Advancement A collaboration and synergistic research effort between: PNNL, LBNL, NIST, NREL To Develop and Enhance Hydrogen Storage Characterization Techniques 2 Hydrogen Program Organization 3 Program organized to address near and long-term technology development Designated Lab core/ enabling capabilities Current Team Structure * NREL: Gennett, Blackburn, Dameron, Hurst, Olsen,

  5. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    Publication and Product Library

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen

  6. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    Publication and Product Library

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOEs hydrogen

  7. Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Centers of Excellence Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence DOE's Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Centers of Excellence and partners, led by NREL, SNL, and LANL grand_challenge_centers.pdf (62.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Individual Projects Final Solar and Wind H2 Report EPAct 812.doc Microsoft Word - H2 National Release 2.doc

  8. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach ...

  9. Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Technical Assessment: Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage for Vehicular Applications October 30, 2006* U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program *Revised June, 2008 Table of Contents Introduction ...................................................................................................................................................................3 Summary and Conclusions

  10. Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Center of Excellence - Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Centers of Excellence Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE Period of Performance: 2005-2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U. S. Department of Energy April 2012 2 3 Primary Authors: Chemical Hydrogen Storage (CHSCoE): Kevin Ott, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrogen Sorption (HSCoE): Lin Simpson, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Metal Hydride

  11. Hydrogen purification system

    DOEpatents

    Golben, Peter Mark

    2010-06-15

    The present invention provides a system to purify hydrogen involving the use of a hydride compressor and catalytic converters combined with a process controller.

  12. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Energy Saver

    Storage Materials R&D On June 26, 2007 the Hydrogen Storage Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a ... Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center ...

  13. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Presentation by Adriaan Sachtler from the High Throughput Combinatorial Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Materials Meeting PDF icon sachtler.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  14. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Download presentation slides from the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies held on August 19, 2014.

  15. Hydrogen storage materials and method of making by dry homogenation

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Craig M.; Zidan, Ragaiy A.

    2002-01-01

    Dry homogenized metal hydrides, in particular aluminum hydride compounds, as a material for reversible hydrogen storage is provided. The reversible hydrogen storage material comprises a dry homogenized material having transition metal catalytic sites on a metal aluminum hydride compound, or mixtures of metal aluminum hydride compounds. A method of making such reversible hydrogen storage materials by dry doping is also provided and comprises the steps of dry homogenizing metal hydrides by mechanical mixing, such as be crushing or ball milling a powder, of a metal aluminum hydride with a transition metal catalyst. In another aspect of the invention, a method of powering a vehicle apparatus with the reversible hydrogen storage material is provided.

  16. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf (366.26 KB) More ...

  17. Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of ...

  18. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Development, and Demonstration Plan and includes a detailed explanation of each target. Target Explanation Document: Onboard Hydrogen Storage for Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles ...

  19. Discovery of novel hydrogen storage materials: an atomic scale...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery of novel hydrogen storage materials: an atomic scale computational approach Home Author: C. Wolverton, D. J. Siegel, A. R. Akbarzadeh, V. Ozolins Year: 2008 Abstract:...

  20. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    First Products First | Department of Energy Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First (685.03 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell

  1. Hydrogen: A Promising Fuel and Energy Storage Solution - Continuum

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Magazine | NREL Hydrogen: A Promising Fuel and Energy Storage Solution Fuel cell electric vehicles fill up at the hydrogen fueling station at the National Wind Technology Center. Photo by Chris Ainscough, NREL Hydrogen: A Promising Fuel and Energy Storage Solution Electrolysis-generated hydrogen may provide a solution to fluctuations in renewable-sourced energy. As electricity from renewable resources such as solar and wind becomes a larger portion of our nation's energy mix, the National

  2. Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conover, David R.

    2013-12-01

    Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

  3. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) and Power-to-Gas Economic Analysis; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, Joshua

    2015-07-30

    This presentation summarizes opportunities for hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas and presents the results of a market analysis performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to quantify the value of energy storage. Hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas systems have the ability to integrate multiple energy sectors including electricity, transportation, and industrial. On account of the flexibility of hydrogen systems, there are a variety of potential system configurations. Each configuration will provide different value to the owner, customers and grid system operator. This presentation provides an economic comparison of hydrogen storage, power-to-gas and conventional storage systems. The total cost is compared to the revenue with participation in a variety of markets to assess the economic competitiveness. It is found that the sale of hydrogen for transportation or industrial use greatly increases competitiveness. Electrolyzers operating as demand response devices (i.e., selling hydrogen and grid services) are economically competitive, while hydrogen storage that inputs electricity and outputs only electricity have an unfavorable business case. Additionally, tighter integration with the grid provides greater revenue (e.g., energy, ancillary service and capacity markets are explored). Lastly, additional hours of storage capacity is not necessarily more competitive in current energy and ancillary service markets and electricity markets will require new mechanisms to appropriately compensate long duration storage devices.

  4. Hydrogen Storage Properties of New Hydrogen-Rich BH3NH3-Metal Hydride (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2, and/or CaH2) Composite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-04-19

    Ammonia borane (AB = NH3BH3) is one of the most attractive materials for chemical hydrogen storage due to its high hydrogen contents of 19.6 wt.%, however, impurity levels of borazine, ammonia and diborane in conjunction with foaming and exothermic hydrogen release calls for finding ways to mitigate the decomposition reactions. In this paper we present a solution by mixing AB with metal hydrides (TiH2, ZrH2, MgH2 and CaH2) which have endothermic hydrogen release in order to control the heat release and impurity levels from AB upon decomposition. The composite materials were prepared by mechanical ball milling, and their H2 release properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The formation of volatile products from decomposition side reactions, such as borazine (N3B3H6) was determined by mass spectrometry (MS). Sieverts type pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) gas-solid reaction instrument was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the combined systems and neat AB. In situ 11B MAS-NMR revealed a destabilized decomposition pathway. We found that by adding specific metal hydrides to AB we can eliminate the impurities and mitigate the heat release.

  5. Recommended Best Practices for Characterizing Engineering Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials: Mechanical Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials: Section 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Recommended Best Practices for Characterizing Engineering Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Mechanical Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Karl J. Gross, H2 Technology Consulting LLC We gratefully acknowledge assistance and financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen Storage Program. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contract No. 147388 Contract Technical Monitor: Dr. Philip Parilla H2 Technology Consulting, LLC

  6. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T.

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  7. Energy storage for hybrid remote power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, W., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Energy storage can be a cost-effective component of hybrid remote power systems. Storage serves the special role of taking advantage of intermittent renewable power sources. Traditionally this role has been played by lead-acid batteries, which have high life-cycle costs and pose special disposal problems. Hydrogen or zinc-air storage technologies can reduce life-cycle costs and environmental impacts. Using projected data for advanced energy storage technologies, LLNL ran an optimization for a hypothetical Arctic community with a reasonable wind resource (average wind speed 8 m/s). These simulations showed the life-cycle annualized cost of the total energy system (electric plus space heating) might be reduced by nearly 40% simply by adding wind power to the diesel system. An additional 20 to 40% of the wind-diesel cost might be saved by adding hydrogen storage or zinc-air fuel cells to the system. Hydrogen produced by electrolysis of water using intermittent, renewable power provides inexpensive long-term energy storage. Conversion back to electricity with fuel cells can be accomplished with available technology. The advantages of a hydrogen electrolysis/fuel cell system include low life-cycle costs for long term storage, no emissions of concern, quiet operation, high reliability with low maintenance, and flexibility to use hydrogen as a direct fuel (heating, transportation). Disadvantages include high capital costs, relatively low electrical turn-around efficiency, and lack of operating experience in utility settings. Zinc-air fuel cells can lower capital and life-cycle costs compared to hydrogen, with most of the same advantages. Like hydrogen systems, zinc-air technology promises a closed system for long-term storage of energy from intermittent sources. The turn around efficiency is expected to exceed 60%, while use of waste heat can potentially increase overall energy efficiency to over 80%.

  8. Panel 2, Geologic Storage of Hydrogen

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    2 Geologic Storage Why underground storage? Stored energy can be used to: (1) meet seasonal ... There are other storage options available currently and in the near future, such ...

  9. Hydrogen Electrochemical Energy Storage Device - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivery Hydrogen Delivery A viable hydrogen infrastructure requires that hydrogen be able to be delivered from where it's produced to the point of end-use, such as a dispenser at a refueling station or stationary power site. Infrastructure includes the pipelines, trucks, storage facilities, compressors, and dispensers involved in the process of delivering fuel. Delivery technology for hydrogen infrastructure is currently available commercially, and several U.S. companies deliver bulk hydrogen

  10. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E.

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  11. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board Hydrogen Storage Technical Targets Donald Anton Savannah River National Laboratory Troy Semelsberger Don Siegel Los Alamos National Laboratory University of Michigan Bruce Hardy Kriston Brooks Savannah River National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Materials Requirements Webinar June 25, 2013 2 Webinar Objective Give guidance to the materials development community as to the important materials characteristic for both adsorbent and

  12. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  13. Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC.

  14. A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs George Thomas and Sunita Satyapal Joint Tech Team Meeting Delivery, Storage and Fuels Pathway Tech Teams May 8-9, 2007 Storage Tech Team Roles & Responsibilities Fuel Industry - Fuel Paul Meier (ConocoPhillips) - Alexei Gabrielov (Shell) - International Activities Joe Kaufman (ConocoPhillips) - Fuel Operating Group Representative - BP Hydrogen Plant Issues Government Sunita Satyapal (DOE) - - George Thomas (SNL) - Automotive Industry -

  15. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) held a Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop on March 20-21, 2013, in Argonne, Illinois. The workshop featured 36 participants representing industry, government, and national laboratories with expertise in the relevant fields. The

  16. Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Industry Canada held a Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop on May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California. The workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to identify challenges, benefits, and

  17. Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures | Department of Energy Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures A presentation demonstrating the development of a set of thermodynamic guidelines aimed at facilitating more-robust screening of candidate storage reactions.

  18. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Publication and Product Library

    This is a reference guide to common methodologies and protocols for measuring critical performance properties of advanced hydrogen storage materials. It helps users to communicate clearly the relevan

  19. Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES...

  20. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  1. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  2. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Phase Transformations in Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ceder, Gerbrand; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this project is to develop and apply computational materials science tools to determine and predict critical properties of hydrogen storage materials. By better understanding the absorption/desorption mechanisms and characterizing their physical properties it is possible to explore and evaluate new directions for hydrogen storage materials. Particular emphasis is on the determination of the structure and thermodynamics of hydrogen storage materials, the investigation of microscopic mechanisms of hydrogen uptake and release in various materials and the role of catalysts in this process. As a team we have decided to focus on a single material, NaAlH{sub 4}, in order to fully be able to study the many aspects of hydrogen storage. We have focused on phase stability, mass transport and size-dependent reaction mechanisms in this material.

  3. Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and NREL-Led Characterization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Effort Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop: HyMARC and NREL-Led Characterization Effort The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted a Hydrogen Storage Lab ...

  4. in-situ chemistry mapping of hydrogen storage materials by neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Payzant, E Andrew; Bowman Jr, Robert C; Johnson, Terry A; Jorgensen, Scott W

    2013-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to nondestructively study the microstructures for two hydrogen storage media systems. In the first case, sodium alanate based hydrogen storage is a vehicle-scale candidate system developed by Sandia/GM. Neutron scattering was used to determine the distribution of phases in the storage media at different hydrogen loading levels, to help understand the absorption/desorption of hydrogen in large-scale systems. This study also included a 3D neutron tomographic study of the microstructure. In the second case, tin-doped lanthanum nickel alloys have been studied at JPL for space-based applications, for which the gradual degradation of the material due to segregation and disproportionation of phases is a known problem. A regenerative process developed to restore the storage properties of these alloys was studied, using in-situ neutron diffraction to relate the microstructure to the thermodynamic simulations.

  5. Material synthesis and hydrogen storage of palladium-rhodium alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, Enrique J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2011-08-01

    Pd and Pd alloys are candidate material systems for Tr or H storage. We have actively engaged in material synthesis and studied the material science of hydrogen storage for Pd-Rh alloys. In collaboration with UC Davis, we successfully developed/optimized a supersonic gas atomization system, including its processing parameters, for Pd-Rh-based alloy powders. This optimized system and processing enable us to produce {le} 50-{mu}m powders with suitable metallurgical properties for H-storage R&D. In addition, we studied hydrogen absorption-desorption pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior using these gas-atomized Pd-Rh alloy powders. The study shows that the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) behavior of Pd-Rh alloys is strongly influenced by its metallurgy. The plateau pressure, slope, and H/metal capacity are highly dependent on alloy composition and its chemical distribution. For the gas-atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh, the absorption plateau pressure is relatively high and consistent. However, the absorption-desorption PCT exhibits a significant hysteresis loop that is not seen from the 30-nm nanopowders produced by chemical precipitation. In addition, we observed that the presence of hydrogen introduces strong lattice strain, plastic deformation, and dislocation networking that lead to material hardening, lattice distortions, and volume expansion. The above observations suggest that the H-induced dislocation networking is responsible for the hysteresis loop seen in the current atomized Pd-10 wt% Rh powders. This conclusion is consistent with the hypothesis suggested by Flanagan and others (Ref 1) that plastic deformation or dislocations control the hysteresis loop.

  6. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials - Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    82 Recommended Best Practices for Characterizing Engineering Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials. V150: February 4, 2013 Recommended Best Practices for Characterizing Engineering Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Karl J. Gross, H2 Technology Consulting LLC Bruce Hardy, of Savannah River National Laboratory We gratefully acknowledge assistance and financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen Storage Program. National

  7. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  8. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-doped graphene: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Desnavi, Sameerah; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped grapheme has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 1.40 eV. Doping by Y makes the system metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 2.11 ?{sub B}. Y decorated graphene can adsorb up to four hydrogen molecules with an average binding energy of 0.415 eV. All the hydrogen atoms are physisorbed with an average desorption temperature of 530.44 K. The Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, which imply a wt% of 6.17, close to the DoE criterion for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system is potential hydrogen storage medium with 100% recycling capability.

  9. High capacity stabilized complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Mohtadi, Rana F; Fewox, Christopher; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2014-11-11

    Complex hydrides based on Al(BH.sub.4).sub.3 are stabilized by the presence of one or more additional metal elements or organic adducts to provide high capacity hydrogen storage material.

  10. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services Workshop...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    Structure 1 02 Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable ...

  11. Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    This report provides information about the Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials held on May 18, 2006 in Crystal City, Va. theorysessionsummary.pdf (206.73 KB) More ...

  12. Storage, generation, and use of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Rolfe, Jonathan L.; Larsen, Christopher A.; Konduri, Ravi K.

    2006-05-30

    A composition comprising a carrier liquid; a dispersant; and a chemical hydride. The composition can be used in a hydrogen generator to generate hydrogen for use, e.g., as a fuel. A regenerator recovers elemental metal from byproducts of the hydrogen generation process.

  13. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  14. Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit Attendee List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Materials-based Hydrogen Storage Summit Jan. 27-28, 2015 FIRST NAME LAST NAME JOB TITLE ORGANIZATION 1 Jesse Adams Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy 2 Rajesh Ahluwalia Senior Engineer and Section Manager Argonne National Laboratory 3 Channing Ahn IPA DOE/Caltech 4 Donald Anton Director Hydrogen Storage Engineering CoE Savannah River National Laboratory 5 David Bobela Research Scientist National Renewable Energy Laboratory 6 Mark Bowden Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National

  15. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (presentation) | Department of Energy Materials (presentation) High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland. ht_symyx_boussie.pdf (1013.19 KB) More Documents & Publications High-Throughput Methodology for Discovery of Metal-Organic Frameworks with a High Binding Energy (New Joint UC-Berkeley/Symyx DoD/DLA Project) (presentation) High

  16. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Proceedings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Structure / 1 02 Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. February 2015 Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services Proceedings of an Expert Workshop Convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, Hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources

  17. Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop | Department of Energy Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop Advanced Composite Materials for Cold and Cryogenic Hydrogen Storage Applications in Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hosted the "Advanced

  18. Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Energy Storage: Experimental analysis and modeling Monterey Gardiner U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office 2 Question and Answer * Please type your question into the question box hydrogenandfuelcells.energy.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Experimental analysis and modeling FCTO Webinar Josh Eichman, PhD

  19. Hydrogen Storage-Relevant Capabilities at Argonne National Laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen Storage-Relevant Capabilities at Argonne National Laboratories Debbie Myers, Di-Jia Liu, Rajesh Ahluwalia, Thanh Hua, and Theodore Krause � Argonne National Laboratory � Hydrogen Storage Lab PI Workshop � Golden, Colorado � November 4-5, 2015 � This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Highlighted cross-cutting capabilities/facilities at ANL * High-throughput (HT) Research Lab - Wide range of HT tools for synthesis, characterization, and

  20. NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Systems Evaluation

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Systems Evaluation Photo of man standing between two vehicles and plugging the vehicle on the right into a charging station. NREL system evaluation has confirmed that extreme climates can have a dramatic impact on batteries and energy storage systems. Graph with numerous plots showing battery capacity and resistance with drive time data spanning a two-year period. An NREL algorithm is being used to extract battery state-of-health information and degradation trends from BMW Mini-E

  1. Sandia Energy Energy Storage Systems

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    feed 0 Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive Hydrogen-Storage Challenge http:energy.sandia.govbay-area-national-labs-team-to-tackle-long-stan...

  2. New insights into designing metallacarborane based room temperature hydrogen storage media

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, Pankaj Lochan; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2013-10-28

    Metallacarboranes are promising towards realizing room temperature hydrogen storage media because of the presence of both transition metal and carbon atoms. In metallacarborane clusters, the transition metal adsorbs hydrogen molecules and carbon can link these clusters to form metal organic framework, which can serve as a complete storage medium. Using first principles density functional calculations, we chalk out the underlying principles of designing an efficient metallacarborane based hydrogen storage media. The storage capacity of hydrogen depends upon the number of available transition metal d-orbitals, number of carbons, and dopant atoms in the cluster. These factors control the amount of charge transfer from metal to the cluster, thereby affecting the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules. This correlation between the charge transfer and storage capacity is general in nature, and can be applied to designing efficient hydrogen storage systems. Following this strategy, a search for the best metallacarborane was carried out in which Sc based monocarborane was found to be the most promising H{sub 2} sorbent material with a 9 wt.% of reversible storage at ambient pressure and temperature.

  3. Hydrogen Energy Storage: Grid and Transportation Services (Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    Proceedings of an expert workshop convened by the U.S. Department of Energy and Industry Canada, and hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Air Resources Board, May 14-15, 2014, in Sacramento, California, to address the topic of hydrogen energy storage (HES). HES systems provide multiple opportunities to increase the resilience and improve the economics of energy sup supply systems underlying the electric grid, gas pipeline systems, and transportation fuels. This is especially the case when considering particular social goals and market drivers, such as reducing carbon emissions, increasing reliability of supply, and reducing consumption of conventional petroleum fuels. This report compiles feedback collected during the workshop, which focused on policy and regulatory issues related to HES systems. Report sections include an introduction to HES pathways, market demand, and the "smart gas" concept; an overview of the workshop structure; and summary results from panel presentations and breakout groups.

  4. DOE Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Physical-Based Hydrogen Storage Workshop: Identifying Potential Pathways for Lower Cost 700 Bar Storage Vessels Wednesday, August 24 th , 2016 USCAR 1000 Town Center Drive, Suite 300 Southfield, Michigan ___________________________________________________________________________________ WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES  Identify and prioritize specific and tangible research and development strategies that have high potential to lower the costs of Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) for 700 bar

  5. Energy storage connection system

    DOEpatents

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  6. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  7. Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems- Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen. Design and operations standards and materials for hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

  8. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13010: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems—Current Performance and Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This record summarizes the current status of the projected capacities and manufacturing costs of Type IV, 350- and 700-bar compressed hydrogen storage systems, storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen, for onboard light-duty automotive applications when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units per year, and presents the current projected performance and cost of these systems against the DOE hydrogen storage system targets.

  9. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    renewable energy such as solar, wind, biomass, geothermal, ... of hydrogen fuel cells with the ultimate goal of ... it shows the document history of that reference and ...

  10. Hydrogen Storage Lab Principal Investigator (PI) Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Lab PI Workshop Wednesday - Thursday, November 4-5, 2015 ESIF Room B308 NREL, Golden, CO Note: Times are Mountain Time Wednesday afternoon 12:00 pm Arrive/check-in at NREL Visitor Entrance 12:30 pm DOE Hydrogen Storage Program Vision 2016 and Beyond - Ned Stetson, U.S. Department of Energy 1:00 pm Hydrogen Material - Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC) - Mark Allendorf, SNL 1:30 pm Hydrogen storage characterization and optimization research team effort - Tom Gennett, NREL 2:00 pm Break (15

  11. Improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Sapru, K.; Ming, L.; Ramachandran, S.

    1995-09-01

    Low cost, high density storage of hydrogen will remove the most serious barrier to large-scale utilization of hydrogen as a non-polluting, zero-emission fuel. An important challenge for the practical use of Mg-based, high capacity hydrogen storage alloys has been the development of a low-cost, bulk production technique. Two difficulties in preparation of Mg-based alloys are the immiscibility of Mg with many transition metals and the relatively high volatility of Mg compared to many transition metals. These factors preclude the use of conventional induction melting techniques for the Mg-based alloy preparation. A mechanical alloying technique, in which Mg immiscibility and volatility do not present a problem, was developed and shows great promise for production of Mg-based alloys. A number of Mg-based alloys were prepared via modified induction melting and mechanical alloying methods. The alloys were tested for gas phase hydrogen storage properties, composition, structure and morphology. The mechanically alloyed samples are multi-component, multi-phase, highly disordered materials in their as-prepared state. These unoptimized alloys have shown reversible H-storage capacity of more than 5 wt.% hydrogen. After 2000 absorption/desorption cycles, the alloys show no decline in storage capacity or desorption kinetics. The alloys have also demonstrated resistance to CH{sub 4} and CO poisoning in preliminary testing. Upon annealing, with an increase in crystallinity, the H-storage capacity decreases, indicating the importance of disorder.

  12. Low-Cost Precursors to Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Suzanne W. Linehan; Arthur A. Chin; Nathan T. Allen; Robert Butterick; Nathan T. Kendall; I. Leo Klawiter; Francis J. Lipiecki; Dean M. Millar; David C. Molzahn; Samuel J. November; Puja Jain; Sara Nadeau; Scott Mancroni

    2010-12-31

    From 2005 to 2010, The Dow Chemical Company (formerly Rohm and Haas Company) was a member of the Department of Energy Center of Excellence on Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which conducted research to identify and develop chemical hydrogen storage materials having the potential to achieve DOE performance targets established for on-board vehicular application. In collaboration with Center co-leads Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and other Center partners, Dow's efforts were directed towards defining and evaluating novel chemistries for producing chemical hydrides and processes for spent fuel regeneration. In Phase 1 of this project, emphasis was placed on sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}), long considered a strong candidate for hydrogen storage because of its high hydrogen storage capacity, well characterized hydrogen release chemistry, safety, and functionality. Various chemical pathways for regenerating NaBH{sub 4} from spent sodium borate solution were investigated, with the objective of meeting the 2010/2015 DOE targets of $2-3/gal gasoline equivalent at the pump ($2-3/kg H{sub 2}) for on-board hydrogen storage systems and an overall 60% energy efficiency. With the September 2007 No-Go decision for NaBH{sub 4} as an on-board hydrogen storage medium, focus was shifted to ammonia borane (AB) for on-board hydrogen storage and delivery. However, NaBH{sub 4} is a key building block to most boron-based fuels, and the ability to produce NaBH{sub 4} in an energy-efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner is critical to the viability of AB, as well as many leading materials under consideration by the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. Therefore, in Phase 2, research continued towards identifying and developing a single low-cost NaBH4 synthetic route for cost-efficient AB first fill, and conducting baseline cost estimates for first fill and regenerated AB using a variety of synthetic routes. This project

  13. solid-state hydrogen storage gaps

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  14. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings, August 14th and 15th, 2002

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A workshop was held to identify on-board storage technical barriers and to explore promising research and development options to overcome them. The specific objectives of the workshop were to review the current status of hydrogen storage technologies, identify the technical challenges that must be overcome to have safe, cost-effective and practical storage systems, identify promising technical approaches to overcome the challenges and prioritize the R&D needs for each of those promising approaches.

  15. Uranium for hydrogen storage applications : a materials science perspective.

    SciTech Connect

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Tewell, Craig R.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-08-01

    Under appropriate conditions, uranium will form a hydride phase when exposed to molecular hydrogen. This makes it quite valuable for a variety of applications within the nuclear industry, particularly as a storage medium for tritium. However, some aspects of the U+H system have been characterized much less extensively than other common metal hydrides (particularly Pd+H), likely due to radiological concerns associated with handling. To assess the present understanding, we review the existing literature database for the uranium hydride system in this report and identify gaps in the existing knowledge. Four major areas are emphasized: {sup 3}He release from uranium tritides, the effects of surface contamination on H uptake, the kinetics of the hydride phase formation, and the thermal desorption properties. Our review of these areas is then used to outline potential avenues of future research.

  16. Hydrogen storage in insulated pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    1998-08-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current analysis and experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

  17. Metal-Containing Organic and Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Satcher, Jr., J H; Baumann, T F; Herberg, J L

    2005-01-10

    This document and the accompanying manuscript summarize the technical accomplishments of our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Hydrogen storage and hydrogen fuel cells are important components of the 2003 Hydrogen Fuel Initiative focused on the reduction of America's dependence on oil. To compete with oil as an energy source, however, one must be able to transport and utilize hydrogen at or above the target set by DOE (6 wt.% H{sub 2}) for the transportation sector. Other than liquid hydrogen, current technology falls well short of this DOE target. As a result, a variety of materials have recently been investigated to address this issue. Carbon nanostructures have received significant attention as hydrogen storage materials due to their low molecular weight, tunable microporosity and high specific surface areas. For example, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) achieved 5 to 10 wt.% H{sub 2} storage using metal-doped carbon nanotubes. That study showed that the intimate mix of metal nanoparticles with graphitic carbon resulted in the unanticipated hydrogen adsorption at near ambient conditions. The focus of our LDRD effort was the investigation of metal-doped carbon aerogels (MDCAs) as hydrogen storage materials. In addition to their low mass densities, continuous porosities and high surface areas, these materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage because MDCAs contain a nanometric mix of metal nanoparticles and graphitic nanostructures. For FY04, our goals were to: (1) prepare a variety of metal-doped CAs (where the metal is cobalt, nickel or iron) at different densities and carbonization temperatures, (2) characterize the microstructure of these materials and (3) initiate hydrogen adsorption/desorption studies to determine H2 storage properties of these materials. Since the start of this effort, we have successfully prepared and characterized Ni- and Co-doped carbon aerogels at different densities and carbonization temperatures. The bulk of this

  18. Activation of erbium films for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Snow, Clark S.; Woicik, Joseph C.

    2011-06-01

    Hydriding of metals can be routinely performed at high temperature in a rich hydrogen atmosphere. Prior to the hydrogen loading process, a thermal activation procedure is required to promote facile hydrogen sorption into the metal. Despite the wide spread utilization of this activation procedure, little is known about the chemical and electronic changes that occur during activation and how this thermal pretreatment leads to increased rates of hydrogen uptake. This study utilized variable kinetic energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to interrogate the changes during in situ thermal annealing of erbium films, with results confirmed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and low energy ion scattering. Activation can be identified by a large increase in photoemission between the valence band edge and the Fermi level and appears to occur over a two stage process. The first stage involves desorption of contaminants and recrystallization of the oxide, initially impeding hydrogen loading. Further heating overcomes the first stage and leads to degradation of the passive surface oxide leading to a bulk film more accessible for hydrogen loading.

  19. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    This is a reference guide to common methodologies and protocols for measuring critical performance properties of advanced hydrogen storage materials. It helps users to communicate clearly the relevant performance properties of new materials as they are discovered and tested.

  20. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Maritime Hydrogen & SF-BREEZE

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  2. A comparative analysis of the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods

    SciTech Connect

    Petitpas, G; Benard, P; Klebanoff, L E; Xiao, J; Aceves, S M

    2014-07-01

    While conventional low-pressure LH₂ dewars have existed for decades, advanced methods of cryogenic hydrogen storage have recently been developed. These advanced methods are cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage, which operate best in the temperature range 30–100 K. We present a comparative analysis of both approaches for cryogenic hydrogen storage, examining how pressure and/or sorbent materials are used to effectively increase onboard H₂ density and dormancy. We start by reviewing some basic aspects of LH₂ properties and conventional means of storing it. From there we describe the cryo-compression and cryo-adsorption hydrogen storage methods, and then explore the relationship between them, clarifying the materials science and physics of the two approaches in trying to solve the same hydrogen storage task (~5–8 kg H₂, typical of light duty vehicles). Assuming that the balance of plant and the available volume for the storage system in the vehicle are identical for both approaches, the comparison focuses on how the respective storage capacities, vessel weight and dormancy vary as a function of temperature, pressure and type of cryo-adsorption material (especially, powder MOF-5 and MIL-101). By performing a comparative analysis, we clarify the science of each approach individually, identify the regimes where the attributes of each can be maximized, elucidate the properties of these systems during refueling, and probe the possible benefits of a combined “hybrid” system with both cryo-adsorption and cryo-compression phenomena operating at the same time. In addition the relationships found between onboard H₂ capacity, pressure vessel and/or sorbent mass and dormancy as a function of rated pressure, type of sorbent material and fueling conditions are useful as general designing guidelines in future engineering efforts using these two hydrogen storage approaches.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and hydrogen storage studies on porous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ruz, Priyanka Banerjee, Seemita; Sudarsan, V.; Pandey, M.

    2015-06-24

    Porous carbon sample has been prepared, using zeolite-Y as template followed by annealing at 800°C, with view to estimate the extent of hydrogen storage by the sample. Based on XRD, {sup 13}C MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopic studies it is confirmed that the porous Carbon sample contains only sp{sup 2} hybridized carbon. The hydrogen sorption isotherms have been recorded for the sample at 273, 223K and 123K and the maximum hydrogen absorption capacity is found to be 1.47wt% at 123K. The interaction energy of hydrogen with the carbon framework was determined to be ∼ 10 kJ mol{sup −1}at lower hydrogen uptake and gradually decreases with increase in hydrogen loading.

  4. HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS DURING STORAGE OF 3013 OXIDE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S.; Askew, N.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-03-14

    As part of a surveillance program intended to ensure the safe storage of plutonium bearing nuclear materials in the Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS), samples of these materials are shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. These samples are in the form of solids or powders which will have absorbed moisture. Potentially flammable hydrogen gas is generated due to radiolysis of the moisture. The samples are shipped for processing after chemical analysis. To preclude the possibility of a hydrogen deflagration or detonation inside the shipping containers, the shipping times are limited to ensure that hydrogen concentration in the vapor space of every layer of confinement is below the lower flammability limit of 4 volume percent (vol%). This study presents an analysis of the rate of hydrogen accumulation due to radiolysis and calculation of allowable shipping times for typical KAMS materials.

  5. Iron-titanium-mischmetal alloys for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary Dale

    1978-01-01

    A method for the preparation of an iron-titanium-mischmetal alloy which is used for the storage of hydrogen. The alloy is prepared by air-melting an iron charge in a clay-graphite crucible, adding titanium and deoxidizing with mischmetal. The resultant alloy contains less than about 0.1% oxygen and exhibits a capability for hydrogen sorption in less than half the time required by vacuum-melted, iron-titanium alloys.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Materials | Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials U.S. Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials An agenda for a four-part, theory-focus session on hydrogen storage materials to identify critical areas, key barriers, and gaps in current theory/modeling approaches for hydrogen storage materials and technologies. theory_focus_session_agenda.pdf (119.47 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen

  7. Development and Validation of a Slurry Model for Chemical Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Pires, Richard P.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2014-07-25

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) is developing models for hydrogen storage systems for fuel cell-based light duty vehicle applications for a variety of promising materials. These transient models simulate the performance of the storage system for comparison to the DOE’s Technical Targets and a set of four drive cycles. The purpose of this research is to describe the models developed for slurry-based chemical hydrogen storage materials. The storage systems of both a representative exothermic system based on ammonia borane and endothermic system based on alane were developed and modeled in Simulink®. Once complete the reactor and radiator components of the model were validated with experimental data. The model was then run using a highway cycle, an aggressive cycle, cold-start cycle and hot drive cycle. The system design was adjusted to meet these drive cycles. A sensitivity analysis was then performed to identify the range of material properties where these DOE targets and drive cycles could be met. Materials with a heat of reaction greater than 11 kJ/mol H2 generated and a slurry hydrogen capacity of greater than 11.4% will meet the on-board efficiency and gravimetric capacity targets, respectively.

  8. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ≥6 wt% and ≥50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the

  9. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials- Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report, written by H2 Technology Consulting, provides an introduction to and overview of the recommended best practices in making measurements of the hydrogen storage properties of materials.

  10. DOE Hydrogen Storage Program Vision 2016 and Beyond

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office DOE Hydrogen Storage Program Vision 2016 and Beyond Lab H 2 PI Meeting Dr. Ned Stetson H 2 Storage Program Manager Fuel Cell Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy November, 2015 Fuel Cell Technologies Office | 2 DOE H 2 Storage Program Contacts http://energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/fuel-cell-technologies-office Ned Stetson - Program Manager 202-586-9995 ned.stetson@ee.doe.gov Grace Ordaz 202-586-8350 grace.ordaz@ee.doe.gov Jesse Adams 720-356-1421

  11. Cold/Cryogenic Composites for Hydrogen Storage Applications in FCEVs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) Cold/Cryogenic Composites for Hydrogen Storage Applications in FCEVs October 29, 2015 Dallas, TX Dr. Ned Stetson H 2 Storage Program Manager Fuel Cell Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office | 2 DOE H 2 Storage Program Contacts http://energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/fuel-cell-technologies-office Ned Stetson - Program Manager 202-586-9995 ned.stetson@ee.doe.gov Grace Ordaz 202-586-8350 grace.ordaz@ee.doe.gov Jesse Adams

  12. Energy Department Awards $4.6 Million to Advance Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    high-capacity silicon-based borohydridegraphene composite hydrogen storage materials ... to develop novel new high-capacity hydrogen sorbents based on high surface area graphene. ...

  13. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  14. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected Performance and Cost Parameters DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage ...

  15. Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Schumacher, Ray F.; Wicks, George G.

    2010-02-23

    A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

  16. Hydrogen Energy Storage and Power-to-Gas: Establishing Criteria for Successful Business Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, Joshua; Melaina, Marc

    2015-10-27

    As the electric sector evolves and increasing amounts of variable generation are installed on the system, there are greater needs for system flexibility, sufficient capacity and greater concern for overgeneration. As a result there is growing interest in exploring the role of energy storage and demand response technologies to support grid needs. Hydrogen is a versatile feedstock that can be used in a variety of applications including chemical and industrial processes, as well as a transportation fuel and heating fuel. Traditionally, hydrogen technologies focus on providing services to a single sector; however, participating in multiple sectors has the potential to provide benefits to each sector and increase the revenue for hydrogen technologies. The goal of this work is to explore promising system configurations for hydrogen systems and the conditions that will make for successful business cases in a renewable, low-carbon future. Current electricity market data, electric and gas infrastructure data and credit and incentive information are used to perform a techno-economic analysis to identify promising criteria and locations for successful hydrogen energy storage and power-to-gas projects. Infrastructure data will be assessed using geographic information system applications. An operation optimization model is used to co-optimizes participation in energy and ancillary service markets as well as the sale of hydrogen. From previous work we recognize the great opportunity that energy storage and power-to-gas but there is a lack of information about the economic favorability of such systems. This work explores criteria for selecting locations and compares the system cost and potential revenue to establish competitiveness for a variety of equipment configurations. Hydrogen technologies offer unique system flexibility that can enable interactions between multiple energy sectors including electric, transport, heating fuel and industrial. Previous research established that

  17. Sub-Nanostructured Non Transition Metal Complex Grids for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Orhan Talu; Dr. Surendra N. Tewari

    2007-10-27

    This project involved growing sub-nanostructured metal grids to increase dynamic hydrogen storage capacity of metal hydride systems. The nano particles of any material have unique properties unlike its bulk form. Nano-structuring metal hydride materials can result in: {sm_bullet}Increased hydrogen molecule dissociation rate, {sm_bullet} Increased hydrogen atom transport rate, {sm_bullet} Decreased decrepitation caused by cycling, {sm_bullet} Increased energy transfer in the metal matrix, {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by physical adsorption, and {sm_bullet} Possible additional contribution by quantum effects The project succeeded in making nano-structured palladium using electrochemical growth in templates including zeolites, mesoporous silica, polycarbonate films and anodized alumina. Other metals were used to fine-tune the synthesis procedures. Palladium was chosen to demonstrate the effects of nano-structuring since its bulk hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics are well known. Reduced project funding was not sufficient for complete characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage application. The project team intends to seek further funding in the future to complete the characterization of these materials for hydrogen storage.

  18. Integrated technical and economic assessments of transport and storage of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Smith, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Transportation will be a major market for hydrogen because of its great size and the value of energy at the wheels of a vehicle in comparison to its heating value. Hydrogen also offers important potential efficiency gains over hydrocarbon fuels. However, hydrogen end-use technologies will not develop without a reliable hydrogen supply infrastructure. By the same token, reliable infrastructures will not develop without end-use demand. Our task is to analyze the costs of various infrastructure options for providing hydrogen, as the number of vehicles serviced increased from very small numbers initially, to moderate numbers in the mid-term and to determine if a smooth transition may be possible. We will determine viable market sizes for transport and storage options by examining the technologies and the capital and operating costs of these systems, as well as related issues such as safety, construction time, etc. The product of our work will be data based scenarios of the likely transitions to hydrogen fuel, beginning with small and progressing to larger numbers of vehicles. We are working closely with the suppliers of relevant technologies to (1) determine realistic component costs, and (2) to assure availability of our analyses to business. Preliminary analyses indicate that the cost of transport and storage is as important as production cost in determining the cost of hydrogen fuel to the consumer, and that home electrolysis and centrally processed liquid hydrogen may provide hydrogen in the initial stages.

  19. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  20. DOE to Invest up to $8.2 Million for Hydrogen Storage Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8.2 Million for Hydrogen Storage Research DOE to Invest up to 8.2 Million for Hydrogen Storage Research April 12, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy ...

  1. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Two of ...

  2. Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Publication and Product Library

    Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

  3. Go No-Go Recommendation for Sodium Borohydride for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2007-11-15

    Independent review panel recommendation for go/no go decision on use of hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen storage.

  4. Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  5. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D On June 26, 2007 the Hydrogen Storage Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a one-day meeting to identify how to better implement high-throughput/combinatorial techniques to benefit challenging research on advanced hydrogen storage materials. Participants represented industry, academia, and National

  6. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    7 UOP LLC. All rights reserved. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches High Throughput/Combinatorial Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Materials Meeting Organized by DOE on June 26, 2007 Adriaan Sachtler High Throughput/Combinatorial Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Materials Meeting Organized by DOE on June 26, 2007 Adriaan Sachtler © 2007 UOP LLC. All rights reserved. 2

  7. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F.; Nakamura, Kenji; Au, Ming; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2012-01-31

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a first material of the formula M(BH.sub.4).sub.X, where M is an alkali metal or an alkali earth metal, providing a second material selected from M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x, a mixture of M(AlH.sub.4).sub.x and MCl.sub.x, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and Al, a mixture of MCl.sub.x and AlH.sub.3, a mixture of MH.sub.x and Al, Al, and AlH.sub.3. The first and second materials are combined at an elevated temperature and at an elevated hydrogen pressure for a time period forming a third material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the first material and a higher hydrogen gravimetric density than the second material.

  8. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation: Assessment of hydrogen storage technologies. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This report documents a portion of the work performed Multi-fuel Reformers for Fuel Cells Used in Transportation. One objective for development is to develop advanced fuel processing systems to reform methanol, ethanol, natural gas, and other hydrocarbons into hydrogen for use in transportation fuel cell systems, while a second objective is to develop better systems for on-board hydrogen storage. This report examines techniques and technology available for storage of pure hydrogen on board a vehicle as pure hydrogen of hydrides. The report focuses separately on near- and far-term technologies, with particular emphasis on the former. Development of lighter, more compact near-term storage systems is recommended to enhance competitiveness and simplify fuel cell design. The far-term storage technologies require substantial applied research in order to become serious contenders.

  9. HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER Creating Energy Independence Since 1975 A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida HT Combinatorial Screening of HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Ali T Ali T - - Raissi Raissi Director, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell R&D Director, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell R&D Division Division High Throughput/Combinatorial Analysis of Hydrogen Storage High

  10. Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Automotive Energy Storage Systems 2015, the ITB Group’s 16th annual technical conference, was held from March 4–5, 2015, in Novi, Michigan.

  11. TEST: DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Light-Duty Vehicles

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This table summarizes technical performance targets for hydrogen storage systems onboard light-duty vehicles. These targets were established through the U.S. DRIVE Partnership, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR), energy companies, and utility companies and organizations.

  12. DOE Issues Request for Information on Hydrogen Storage for Onboard Vehicle Applications

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office has issued a request for information to obtain feedback and input from stakeholders on strategies and potential pathways for cost reduction and performance improvements of composite overwrapped pressure vessel systems for compressed hydrogen storage for onboard vehicle applications.

  13. Analysis of Cost-Effective Off-Board Hydrogen Storage and Refueling Stations

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Barnes; William Liss

    2008-11-14

    This report highlights design and component selection considerations for compressed gas hydrogen fueling stations operating at 5000 psig or 350 bar. The primary focus is on options for compression and storage – in terms of practical equipment options as well as various system configurations and how they influence delivery performance and station economics.

  14. A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et

  15. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2004-09-07

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  16. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  17. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

  18. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets J. Kurtz, C. Ainscough, L. Simpson, and M. Caton Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-52783 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early

  19. On-Board Storage Systems Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    More Documents & Publications Potential Carriers and Approaches for Hydrogen Delivery Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review A Brief Overview of Hydrogen ...

  20. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  1. Hydrogen Risk Assessment Model (HyRAM)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  2. General Motors: Final Report for Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Mei; Chakraborty, Amlan; Hou, Peter; Kaisare, Niklet; Jorgensen, Scott; Kumar, Sudarshan; Li, Changpeng; Ortmann, Jerome; Raju, M.; Vadivelu, S. Kumar

    2015-06-30

    As part of the HSECoE team, the GM team built system models and detailed transport models for on-board hydrogen storage systems using metal hydrides and adsorbent materials. Detailed transport models have been developed for both the metal hydride and adsorbent systems with a focus on optimization of heat exchanger designs with the objective of minimizing the heat exchanger mass. We also performed work in collaboration with our partners on storage media structuring and enhancement studies for the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Since the hydrogen storage materials are generally characterized by low density and low thermal conductivity, we conducted experiments to form pellets and add thermal conductivity enhancers to the storage material, and to improve cycling stability and durability of the metal hydride and adsorbent materials. Refueling of a MOF-5 pellet with cryogenic hydrogen was studied by developing a detailed two-dimensional axisymmetric COMSOL® model of the process. The effects of pellet permeability, thermal conductivity, and thermal conductivity enhancers were investigated. Our key area of focus has been on designing and building a cryo-adsorption vessel for validation of cryo-adsorption models. The 3-L cryogenic tank was used to study the fast fill and discharge dynamics of a cryo-adsorbent storage system, both experimentally and numerically.

  3. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.; Saur, G.; Penev, M.; Ramsden, T.

    2009-11-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage technologies: batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air energy storage (CAES).

  4. Engineering report standard hydrogen monitoring system problems

    SciTech Connect

    Golberg, R.L.

    1996-09-25

    Engineering Report to document moisture problems found during the sampling of the vapors in the dome space for hydrogen in the storage tanks and a recommended solution.

  5. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  6. Process for synthesis of ammonia borane for bulk hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Heldebrant, David J [Richland, WA; Linehan, John C [Richland, WA; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J [Richland, WA; Zheng, Feng [Richland, WA

    2011-03-01

    The present invention discloses new methods for synthesizing ammonia borane (NH.sub.3BH.sub.3, or AB). Ammonium borohydride (NH.sub.4BH.sub.4) is formed from the reaction of borohydride salts and ammonium salts in liquid ammonia. Ammonium borohydride is decomposed in an ether-based solvent that yields AB at a near quantitative yield. The AB product shows promise as a chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications.

  7. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Workshop HIGH THROUGHPUT/COMBINATORIAL SCREENING OF HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS June 26, 2007 Tom Boussie Symyx Technologies Symyx develops and applies proprietary high-throughput research technologies and software to increase R&D efficiency in chemical, energy, electronics, pharmaceutical and academic labs. * Pioneer of High Throughput Research (HTR) for materials science * Founded in 1996; publicly traded since 1999 (SMMX: NASDAQ) * 400 Employees (mainly in Santa Clara, CA) * >$400

  8. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Activities at NREL HTAC Josh Eichman, PhD Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee Meeting 4/21/2015 NREL/PR-5400-64137 2 Outline * Hydrogen and Energy Storage Overview o Hydrogen storage pathways o International Power-to-gas activities * Hydrogen energy storage activities o NREL - DOE storage analysis results (FY14) o NREL - DOE storage analysis tasks (FY15) o Energy Storage Workshop results o Clean Energy Dialogue - US/Canada * Update: INTEGRATE activities * Newly Proposed CARB-DOE

  9. 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    the following areas: New materials or technologies for hydrogen storage; Compressed and liquid hydrogen tank technologies; and Off-board hydrogen storage systems. Category 2 is...

  10. First principles DFT investigation of yttrium-decorated boron-nitride nanotube: Electronic structure and hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Richa Naja; Chakraborty, Brahmananda; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2015-06-24

    The electronic structure and hydrogen storage capability of Yttrium-doped BNNTs has been theoretically investigated using first principles density functional theory (DFT). Yttrium atom prefers the hollow site in the center of the hexagonal ring with a binding energy of 0.8048eV. Decorating by Y makes the system half-metallic and magnetic with a magnetic moment of 1.0µ{sub B}. Y decorated Boron-Nitride (8,0) nanotube can adsorb up to five hydrogen molecules whose average binding energy is computed as 0.5044eV. All the hydrogen molecules are adsorbed with an average desorption temperature of 644.708 K. Taking that the Y atoms can be placed only in alternate hexagons, the implied wt% comes out to be 5.31%, a relatively acceptable value for hydrogen storage materials. Thus, this system can serve as potential hydrogen storage medium.

  11. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  12. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNLs metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800C). A high-temperature tank in PNNLs storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNLs thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  13. Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials Jonathan L. Male Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 26, 2006 US Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Chemical) Hydrogen Storage DOE EERE Chemical Hydrogen Center * Controlling release of hydrogen from NH 3 BH 3 - Regeneration of NH 3 BH 3 - Engineering, experiment and theory - Materials Discovery DOE BES Hydrogen Fuel Initiative * Structure and dynamics (Neutron and NMR) -

  14. Technical Assessment of Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank...

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    The report includes an overview of technical progress to date, including the potential to meet DOE onboard storage targets, as well as independent reviews of system cost and energy ...

  15. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) and Power-to-Gas Economic Analysis (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Power-to-Gas Economic Analysis CHBC Summer Summit Josh Eichman, PhD Downey, California 7/30/2015 NREL/PR-5400-64833 2 Outline * Opportunity for HES / P2G * Markets considered * Market valuation results * Future market expectations * Additional projects 3 Complementary Hydrogen Systems Electric Grid Hydrogen Pipeline Injection Water Water Electrolyzer Reformer Fuel Cell or Turbine Chemical and Industrial Processes Hydrogen Storage Natural Gas Grid Source: (from top left by row), Warren Gretz,

  16. Panel 2, Modeling the Financial and System Benefits of Energy Storage Applications in Distribution Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Modeling the Financial and System Benefits of Energy Storage Applications in Distribution Systems Patrick Balducci, Senior Economist, Pacific NW National Laboratory Hydrogen Energy Storage for Grid and Transportation Services Workshop Sacramento, California May 14, 2014 Valuation challenges 2 Source: Lamontagne, C. 2014. Survey of Models and Tools for the Stationary Energy Storage Industry. Presentation at Infocast Storage Week. Santa Clara, CA. Transmission and Distribution planning Models lack

  17. Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Gray, Joshua; Stowe, Ashley C.; Sivasubramanian, Premkumar

    2012-02-28

    A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a borohydride material of the formula: M(BH.sub.4).sub.x where M is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing an alanate material of the formula: M.sub.1(AlH.sub.4).sub.x where M.sub.1 is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing a halide material of the formula: M.sub.2Hal.sub.x where M.sub.2 is an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal or transition metal and Hal is a halide and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.4; combining the borohydride, alanate and halide materials such that 5 to 50 molar percent from the borohydride material is present forming a reaction product material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the alanate material.

  18. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Saver

    : Poster Session Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3: Poster Session The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking ...

  19. Hydrogen-Bromine Flow Battery: Hydrogen Bromine Flow Batteries for Grid Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    GRIDS Project: LBNL is designing a flow battery for grid storage that relies on a hydrogen-bromine chemistry which could be more efficient, last longer and cost less than today’s lead-acid batteries. Flow batteries are fundamentally different from traditional lead-acid batteries because the chemical reactants that provide their energy are stored in external tanks instead of inside the battery. A flow battery can provide more energy because all that is required to increase its storage capacity is to increase the size of the external tanks. The hydrogen-bromine reactants used by LBNL in its flow battery are inexpensive, long lasting, and provide power quickly. The cost of the design could be well below $100 per kilowatt hour, which would rival conventional grid-scale battery technologies.

  20. New Pathways and Metrics for Enhanced, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Boron-Doped Carbon Nanospaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Peter; Wexler, Carlos; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Lee, Mark W.; Jalistegi, Satish S.

    2014-08-14

    This project, since its start in 2007—entitled “Networks of boron-doped carbon nanopores for low-pressure reversible hydrogen storage” (2007-10) and “New pathways and metrics for enhanced, reversible hydrogen storage in boron-doped carbon nanospaces” (2010-13)—is in support of the DOE's National Hydrogen Storage Project, as part of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program’s comprehensive efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. Hydrogen storage is widely recognized as a critical enabling technology for the successful commercialization and market acceptance of hydrogen powered vehicles. Storing sufficient hydrogen on board a wide range of vehicle platforms, at energy densities comparable to gasoline, without compromising passenger or cargo space, remains an outstanding technical challenge. Of the main three thrust areas in 2007—metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, and sorption-based hydrogen storage—sorption-based storage, i.e., storage of molecular hydrogen by adsorption on high-surface-area materials (carbons, metal-organic frameworks, and other porous organic networks), has emerged as the most promising path toward achieving the 2017 DOE storage targets of 0.055 kg H2/kg system (“5.5 wt%”) and 0.040 kg H2/liter system. The objective of the project is to develop high-surface-area carbon materials that are boron-doped by incorporation of boron into the carbon lattice at the outset, i.e., during the synthesis of the material. The rationale for boron-doping is the prediction that boron atoms in carbon will raise the binding energy of hydro- gen from 4-5 kJ/mol on the undoped surface to 10-14 kJ/mol on a doped surface, and accordingly the hydro- gen storage capacity of the material. The mechanism for the increase in binding energy is electron donation from H2 to electron-deficient B atoms, in the form of sp2 boron-carbon bonds. Our team is proud to have

  1. Community Energy: Analysis of Hydrogen Distributed Energy Systems with Photovoltaics for Load Leveling and Vehicle Refueling

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-10-01

    Energy storage could complement PV electricity generation at the community level. Because PV generation is intermittent, strategies must be implemented to integrate it into the electricity system. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies offer possible PV integration strategies, including the community-level approaches analyzed in this report: (1) using hydrogen production, storage, and reconversion to electricity to level PV generation and grid loads (reconversion scenario); (2) using hydrogen production and storage to capture peak PV generation and refuel hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) (hydrogen fueling scenario); and (3) a comparison scenario using a battery system to store electricity for EV nighttime charging (electric charging scenario).

  2. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ≥ 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ≥ 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space

  3. Materials Dow Select Decisions Made Within DOEs Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report Submitted by: The Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Coordinating Council Authors: Kevin C. Ott, Los Alamos National Laboratory Sue Linehan, Rohm and Haas Company Frank Lipiecki, Rohm and Haas Company Christopher L. Aardahl, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory May 2008 Acknowledgements The

  4. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    (presentation) | Department of Energy High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation) High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation) Meeting Background, Purpose and Agenda presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting held June 26, 2007 in Bethesda, Maryland. ht_doe_stetson.pdf (206.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Agenda from the U.S. Department of Energy's High

  5. 2008 DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy 8 DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials 2008 DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Science (Basic Energy Sciences) and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Fuel Cell Technologies) held a second Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on March 24, 2008 in San Francisco, California, in conjunction with the 2008 Spring Materials Research Society Meeting. The meeting provided

  6. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Storage R&D Core Characterization Capabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) Hydrogen Storage R&D Core Characterization Capabilities An NREL-led National Laboratory Collaboration between NREL, LBNL, PNNL, and NIST NREL CORE CHARACTERIZATION CAPABILITIES The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will offer specialized characterization for hydrogen storage materials through its DOE-FCTO core-capability validation laboratory. We offer PCT analysis of hydrogen storage materials to determine their gravimetric and volumetric

  7. DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Automotive Applications | Department of Energy Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive Applications DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways for Onboard Automotive Applications The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the DOE Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Summit: Defining Pathways to Onboard Automotive Applications on January 27-28, 2015, in Golden, Colorado. The objectives of

  8. Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence This technical report describes the activities carried out, key accomplishments, and recommendations from the DOE's Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence, led by Los Alamos National Laboratory with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory from 2005 through 2010. The center's focus was the development of advanced chemical

  9. Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides a summary of feedback from co-organizers, speakers and participants in the Department of Energy's (DOE) "Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials," held Monday, March 24, 2008 (8:30 am to 5:30 pm), Room Golden Gate C3, San Francisco Marriott Hotel, San Francisco, California.

  10. Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research and Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's research and development on sorbents and carbon-based materials for hydrogen storage targets breakthrough concepts for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents...

  11. Lifecycle Cost and GHG Implications of a Hydrogen Energy Storage Scenario (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D. M.

    2010-05-01

    Overview of life cycle cost and green house gas implications of a hydrogen energy storage scenario presented at the National Hydrogen Association Conference & Expo, Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010

  12. Analysis of Hydrogen and Competing Technologies for Utility-Scale Energy Storage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, D.

    2010-02-11

    Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's analysis of hydrogen energy storage scenarios, including analysis framework, levelized cost comparison of hydrogen and competing technologies, analysis results, and conclusions drawn from the analysis.

  13. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Ritter, James A.; Ebner, Armin D.; Wang, Jun; Holland, Charles E.

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  14. Lifecycle Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Versus Other Technologies for Electrical Energy Storage

    Publication and Product Library

    This report presents the results of an analysis evaluating the economic viability of hydrogen for medium- to large-scale electrical energy storage applications compared with three other storage techno

  15. Hydrogen

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen ...

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Theorty Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    An agenda for a four-part, theory-focus session on hydrogen storage materials to identify critical areas, key barriers, and gaps in current theorymodeling approaches for ...

  17. Go No-Go Decision: Pure, Undoped, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    Publication and Product Library

    This document provides information about the go/no-go decision on pure, undoped single walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.

  18. Webinar: Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled "Increasing Renewable Energy with Hydrogen Storage and Fuel Cell Technologies," originally presented on August 19, 2014.

  19. Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Funding Awarded for Feasibility Study

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Project Seeks to Reduce Port Emissions

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  1. Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting 2007 Hydrogen Program Annual Review Crystal Gateway Marriott, Arlington, VA May 17, 2007 SUMMARY REPORT Compiled by Romesh Kumar Argonne National Laboratory and Elvin Yuzugullu Sentech, Inc. June 28, 2007 SUMMARY REPORT Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting May 17, 2007 Crystal Gateway Marriott, Arlington, VA Meeting Objectives This meeting was one of a continuing series of biannual meetings of this Working Group. The objective of these

  2. Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    "Think Tank" Report Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report This report is a compilation of information exchanged at a forum on March 14, 2003, in Washington, D.C. The forum was assembled for innovative and non-conventional brainstorming on this issue of hydrogen storage technologies. Hydrogen Storage "Think Tank" Report (368.39 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Program Goal-Setting Methodologies Report to Congress FY 2003 Progress Report for Hydrogen,

  3. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Polyhedral Borane Anions and Aluminum-Ammonia-Borane Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Jalisatgi, Satish S.; Safronov, Alexander V.; Lee, Han Beak; Wu, Jianguo

    2010-10-01

    Phase 1. Hydrolysis of borohydride compounds offer the potential for significant hydrogen storage capacity, but most work to date has focused on one particular anion, BH4-, which requires high pH for stability. Other borohydride compounds, in particular polyhedral borane anions offer comparable hydrogen storage capacity without requiring high pH media and their long term thermal and hydrolytic stability coupled with non-toxic nature make them a very attractive alternative to NaBH4. The University of Missouri project provided the overall program focal point for the investigation of catalytic hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions for hydrogen release. Due to their inherent stability, a transition metal catalyst was necessary for the hydrolysis of polyhedral borane anions. Transition metal ions such as cobalt, nickel, palladium and rhodium were investigated for their catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of nido-KB11H14, closo-K2B10H10, and closo-K2B12H12. The rate of hydrolysis follows first-order kinetics with respect to the concentration of the polyhedral borane anion and surface area of the rhodium catalyst. The rate of hydrolysis depends upon a) choice of polyhedral borane anion, c) concentration of polyhedral borane anion, d) surface area of the rhodium catalyst and e) temperature of the reaction. In all cases the yield of hydrogen was 100% which corresponds to ~7 wt% of hydrogen (based on material wt%). Phase 2. The phase 2 of program at the University of Missouri was focused upon developing aluminum ammonia-boranes (Al-AB) as chemical hydrogen storage materials, specifically their synthesis and studies of their dehydrogenation. The ammonia borane molecule (AB) is a demonstrated source of chemically stored hydrogen (19.6 wt%) which meets DOE performance parameters except for its regeneration from spent AB and elemental hydrogen. The presence of an aluminum center bonded to multiple AB residues might combine the efficiency of AB dehydrogenation with an aluminum

  4. Discovery of Novel Complex Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage through Molecular Modeling and Combinatorial Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A; Adriaan Sachtler, J.W. J.; Low, John J; Jensen, Craig M; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Siegel, Don; Harmon, Laurel

    2011-02-14

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, Ford Motor Company, and Striatus, Inc., collaborated with Professor Craig Jensen of the University of Hawaii and Professor Vidvuds Ozolins of University of California, Los Angeles on a multi-year cost-shared program to discover novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. This innovative program combined sophisticated molecular modeling with high throughput combinatorial experiments to maximize the probability of identifying commercially relevant, economical hydrogen storage materials with broad application. A set of tools was developed to pursue the medium throughput (MT) and high throughput (HT) combinatorial exploratory investigation of novel complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage. The assay programs consisted of monitoring hydrogen evolution as a function of temperature. This project also incorporated theoretical methods to help select candidate materials families for testing. The Virtual High Throughput Screening served as a virtual laboratory, calculating structures and their properties. First Principles calculations were applied to various systems to examine hydrogen storage reaction pathways and the associated thermodynamics. The experimental program began with the validation of the MT assay tool with NaAlH4/0.02 mole Ti, the state of the art hydrogen storage system given by decomposition of sodium alanate to sodium hydride, aluminum metal, and hydrogen. Once certified, a combinatorial 21-point study of the NaAlH4 LiAlH4Mg(AlH4)2 phase diagram was investigated with the MT assay. Stability proved to be a problem as many of the materials decomposed during synthesis, altering the expected assay results. This resulted in repeating the entire experiment with a mild milling approach, which only temporarily increased capacity. NaAlH4 was the best performer in both studies and no new mixed alanates were observed, a result consistent with the VHTS. Powder XRD suggested that the reverse reaction, the regeneration of the

  5. Storage & File Systems

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Policies NERSC File Systems Data Transfer Nodes HPSS Data Archive I/O Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing I/O performance on the Lustre file system I/O Formats Science Databases Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix Groups at NERSC Unix File Permissions Application Performance Data & Analytics Job Logs & Statistics Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Home » For

  6. On-Site and Bulk Hydrogen Storage | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Storage options today include insulated liquid tanks and gaseous storage tanks. The four types of common high pressure gaseous storage vessels are shown in the table. Type I ...

  7. DOE Hydrogen Storage Technical Performance Targets for Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    bar (abs) 3 3 Max delivery pressure from storage system bar (abs) 12 12 Shock and Vibration Shock g 40 40 Vibration g 5@10Hz-0.75@200Hz 10@10Hz-1@200Hz ChargingDischarging ...

  8. Webinar February 25: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Eastern Standard Time (EST). Strategic Analysis will present results of its cost analysis of onboard compressed hydrogen storage systems. The hydrogen storage systems analyzed are ...

  9. Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection Webinar January 26: Update to the 700 bar Compressed Hydrogen Storage System Cost Projection ...

  10. hydrogen-fueled transportation systems

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... materials to store hydrogen onboard vehicles, leading to more reliable, economic hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles. "Hydrogen, as a transportation fuel, has great potential to ...

  11. Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems ...

  12. Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review- Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations from the 2008 Energy Storage and Power Electronics peer review.

  13. Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review- International Energy Storage Program Presentations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    International energy storage program presentations from the 2007 Energy Storage Systems (ESS) peer review.

  14. Curvature and ionization-induced reversible hydrogen storage in metalized hexagonal B{sub 36}

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chun-Sheng Wang, Xiangfu; Yan, Xiaohong; Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-21

    The synthesis of quasiplanar boron clusters (B{sub 36}) with a central hexagonal hole provides the first experimental evidence that a single-atomic-layer borophene with hexagonal vacancies is potentially viable [Z. Piazza, H. Hu, W. Li, Y. Zhao, J. Li, and L. S. Wang, Nat. Commun. 5, 3113 (2014)]. However, owing to the hexagonal holes, tunning the electronic and physical properties of B{sub 36} through chemical modifications is not fully understood. Based on (van der Waals corrected-) density functional theory, we show that Li adsorbed on B{sub 36} and B{sub 36}{sup ?} clusters can serve as reversible hydrogen storage media. The present results indicate that the curvature and ionization of substrates can enhance the bond strength of Li due to the energetically favorable B 2p-Li 2p orbitals hybridization. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridization between H-s orbitals and Li-2s2p orbitals contribute to the adsorption of H{sub 2} molecules and the resulting adsorption energy lies between the physisorbed and chemisorbed states. Interestingly, the number of H{sub 2} in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the appearance of the negative differential resistance behavior at different bias voltage regions. Furthermore, the cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials constructed by metalized B{sub 36} clusters do not cause a decrease in the number of adsorbed hydrogen molecules per Li. The system reported here is favorable for the reversible hydrogen adsorption/desorption at ambient conditions.

  15. Solar hydrogen energy system. Annual report, 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N.

    1996-12-31

    The paper reports progress on three tasks. Task A, System comparison of hydrogen with other alternative fuels in terms of EPACT requirements, investigates the feasibility of several alternative fuels, namely, natural gas, methanol, ethanol, hydrogen and electricity, to replace 10% of gasoline by the year 2000. The analysis was divided into two parts: analysis of vehicle technologies and analysis of fuel production, storage and distribution. Task B, Photovoltaic hydrogen production, involves this fuel production method for the future. The process uses hybrid solar collectors to generate dc electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The third task, Hydrogen safety studies, covers two topics: a review of codes, standards, regulations, recommendations, certifications, and pamphlets which address safety of gaseous fuels; and an experimental investigation of hydrogen flame impingement.

  16. Overview of Two Hydrogen Energy Storage Studies: Wind Hydrogen in California and Blending in Natural Gas Pipelines (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of two NREL energy storage studies: Wind Hydrogen in California: Case Study and Blending Hydrogen Into Natural Gas Pipeline Networks: A Review of Key Issues. The presentation summarizes key issues, major model input assumptions, and results.

  17. A Basic, and Slightly Acidic, Solution to Hydrogen Storage | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy A Basic, and Slightly Acidic, Solution to Hydrogen Storage A Basic, and Slightly Acidic, Solution to Hydrogen Storage March 23, 2012 - 2:17pm Addthis Brookhaven researchers Etsuko Fujita, Jonathan Hull, and James Muckerman developed a new catalyst that reversibly converts hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide to a liquid under very mild conditions. Their findings were published in the March 18th issue of Nature Chemistry. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Lab. Brookhaven researchers

  18. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  19. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  20. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    Replacing combustion of carbon-based fuels with alternative energy sources that have minimal environmental impact is one of the grand scientific and technological challenges of the early 21st century. Not only is it critical to capture energy from new, renewable sources, it is also necessary to store the captured energy efficiently and effectively for use at the point of service when and where it is needed, which may not be collocated with the collection site. There are many potential storage media but we focus on the storage of energy in chemical bonds. It is more efficient to store energy on a per weight basis in chemical bonds. This is because it is hard to pack electrons into small volumes with low weight without the use of chemical bonds. The focus of the project was the development of new chemistries to enable DOE to meet its technical objectives for hydrogen storage using chemical hydrogen storage systems. We provided computational chemistry support in terms of thermodynamics, kinetics, and properties prediction in support of the experimental efforts of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage. The goal of the Center is to store energy in chemical bonds involving hydrogen atoms. Once the hydrogen is stored in a set of X-H/Y-H bonds, the hydrogen has to be easily released and the depleted fuel regenerated very efficiently. This differs substantially from our current use of fossil fuel energy sources where the reactant is converted to energy plus CO2 (coal) or CO2 and H2O (gasoline, natural gas), which are released into the atmosphere. In future energy storage scenarios, the spent fuel will be captured and the energy storage medium regenerated. This places substantial additional constraints on the chemistry. The goal of the computational chemistry work was to reduce the time to design new materials and develop materials that meet the 2010 and 2015 DOE objectives in terms of weight percent, volume, release time, and regeneration ability. This

  1. Internationally monitored retrievable storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Hafele, W.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed internationally monitored retrievable storage system (IMRSS) is intended to provide an orderly and secure alternative to continuation of the current individualistic spent-fuel management trends in nuclear-power countries. The IMRSS concept, in its broadest terms, proposes that an international entity undertake the management responsibility for spent fuel after its discharge from power plant cooling ponds. The IMRSS envisages international management of a small number of surface (or near-surface) storage facilities distributed globally (in major nuclear countries and elsewhere) and a transportation system between nuclear plants and the storage facilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) would maintain responsibility for adherence to safeguards criteria. The IMRSS operation would be similar to that of an international bank, with each nation maintaining title to its spent fuel and able to withdraw it for peaceful purposes. The system would provide transparency, accountability, and security. The IMRSS would be a step to establishing an inter- national regime for the prudent management of spent fuel and excess civilian plutonium. The IMRSS concept has been studied in three international workshops. Among the major issues that have been addressed are the global distribution of spent fuel if current trends continue, the need for international criteria and management to ensure public health and nonproliferation, the value of spent-fuel retrievability, the future role of a plutonium resource in the fuel cycle, the operating format of a practical IMRSS, and the integration of an IMRSS with existing geopolitical agreements and arrangements.

  2. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Saver

    2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  3. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  4. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  5. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  6. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  7. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  8. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  9. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  10. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  11. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at ...

  12. Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Safety Systems Animation This animation demonstrates the multiple safety systems in hydrogen-fueled ...

  13. Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Subject: 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 29 ... SORPTION; STORAGE; SURFACE AREA; SYNTHESIS; TARGETS Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  14. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 1 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Morever, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be of major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  15. Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal to Liquids » Hydrogen from Coal Hydrogen from Coal Technicians make adjustments to equipment in the hydrogen membrane testing unit at FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. NETL researchers in the Research Innovation Center are testing different types of materials that might be used to separate hydrogen from other gases. Photo courtesy of NETL. Technicians make adjustments to equipment in the hydrogen membrane testing unit at FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory. NETL

  16. Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Unit to Provide Renewable Power to Honolulu...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Components and Systems Batteries Electric Drive Systems Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Hydrogen Behavior Quantitative Risk Assessment Technical ...

  17. Summary Report from DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials San Francisco, 24 March 2008 In conjunction with the Spring 2008 Materials Research Society Meeting Assessment of Modeling Needs for Hydrogen Storage This report provides a summary of feedback from co-organizers, speakers and participants in the Department of Energy's (DOE) "Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials," held Monday, March 24, 2008 (8:30 am to 5:30 pm), Room Golden Gate C3, San Francisco Marriott Hotel, San

  18. Hydrogen transmission/storage with a metal hydride/organic slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J.; McClaine, A.

    1998-08-01

    Thermo Power Corporation has developed a new approach for the production, transmission, and storage of hydrogen. In this approach, a chemical hydride slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. The slurry protects the hydride from unanticipated contact with moisture in the air and makes the hydride pumpable. At the point of storage and use, a chemical hydride/water reaction is used to produce high-purity hydrogen. An essential feature of this approach is the recovery and recycle of the spent hydride at centralized processing plants, resulting in an overall low cost for hydrogen. This approach has two clear benefits: it greatly improves energy transmission and storage characteristics of hydrogen as a fuel, and it produces the hydrogen carrier efficiently and economically from a low cost carbon source. The preliminary economic analysis of the process indicates that hydrogen can be produced for $3.85 per million Btu based on a carbon cost of $1.42 per million Btu and a plant sized to serve a million cars per day. This compares to current costs of approximately $9.00 per million Btu to produce hydrogen from $3.00 per million Btu natural gas, and $25 per million Btu to produce hydrogen by electrolysis from $0.05 per Kwh electricity. The present standard for production of hydrogen from renewable energy is photovoltaic-electrolysis at $100 to $150 per million Btu.

  19. Evaluating Storage Systems for Lustre

    SciTech Connect

    Oral, H. Sarp

    2015-08-20

    Storage systems are complex, including multiple subsystems and components. Sustained operations with top performance require all these subsystems and components working as expected. Having a detailed performance profile helps establishing a baseline. This baseline can be used for easier identification of possible future problems. A systematic bottom-to-top approach, starting with a detailed performance analysis of disks and moving up across layers and subsystems, provides a quantitative breakdown of each component's capabilities and bottlenecks. Coupling these low-level tests with Lustre-level evaluations will present a better understanding of performance expectations under different I/O workloads.

  20. A Brief Overview of Hydrogen Storage Issues and Needs

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by George Thomas at the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007