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Sample records for housing unit built

  1. High Performance Factory Built Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Performance Factory Built Housing 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Jordan Dentz, jdentz@levypartnership.com ARIES The Levy Partnership, Inc. Project Summary ...

  2. ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Review | Department of Energy ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer Review ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Jordan Dentz, Levy Partnership View the Presentation ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer Review (3.34 MB) More Documents & Publications ARIES lab houses. Photo courtesy of The Levy Partnership, Inc. Integrated Design: A High-Performance Solution

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... central air conditioning equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  4. ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    ARIES: Building America, High Performance Factory Built Housing - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Jordan Dentz, Levy Partnership View the Presentation ARIES: Building America, High ...

  5. The house that handmade greeting cards built: Fundraiser November...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit The house that handmade greeting cards built: Fundraiser November 10 Santa Fe Habitat for Humanity will hold a handmade greeting card class, and all the proceeds...

  6. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... for Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... the use of the heating equipment for a business or farm building as well as another ... ,,"RSEs for Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ...

  9. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied

  10. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Vacant housing units, seasonal units, second homes, military housing, and group quarters are excluded. 2Total square footage includes all basements, finished or conditioned (heated ...

  11. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the Building America expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  12. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment3" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Housing ...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment3" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Housing ...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Main Heating Equipment4" ... 4Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 5Housing ...

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Units" ,,"UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Space ... ,,"RSEs for UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"RSEs for Housing Units " "Space ...

  17. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 5Rented includes households that occupy their primary housing unit without payment of rent. ...

  18. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory-Built Housing

    Energy Saver

    (Wall insulation R-value), or * 0.057 (Wall U-value) Thermal Zone Maps: IECC (2009) and HUD MHCSS (1994) 25 Thermal Impact of Research Whole house performance Research options U...

  19. Total U.S. Housing Units...................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Space Heating Usage Indicators Million U.S. Housing Units Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing ...

  20. Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations and Emission Rates in New Manufactured and Site-Built Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Armin Rudd

    2008-10-30

    This study was conducted with the primary objective of characterizing and comparing the airborne concentrations and the emission rates of total VOCs and selected individual VOCs, including formaldehyde, among a limited number of new manufactured and site-built houses.

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,"5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With

  2. DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island 1 of 16 United Way built this 1,890-square-foot home in Deer Park, Long Island, New York, to the performance criteria of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 16 The United Way home's average projected utility bills will be less than $60 a month thanks to a solar photovoltaic system and a high-performance building envelope.

  3. DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island Addthis 1 of 16 United Way built this 1,890-square-foot home in Deer Park, Long Island, New York, to the performance criteria of the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 16 The United Way home's average projected utility bills will be less than $60 a month thanks to a solar photovoltaic system and a high-performance building

  4. Building America Expert Meeting: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides information about the expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes"

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes"

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)"

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Air

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment"

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Televisions" "Number of

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic

  15. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3 -- Whole-House Prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Rath, P.

    2014-04-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective envelope designs that can be effectively integrated into the plant production process while meeting the thermal requirements of the 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing new envelope technologies. This work is part of a multi-phase effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three methods for building high performance walls. Phase 2 focused on developing viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped narrow the research focus to perfecting a stud wall design with exterior continuous insulation (CI). Phase 3, completed in two stages, continued the design development effort, exploring and evaluating a range or methods for applying CI to factory built homes. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing. During this phase, a home was built with CI, evaluated, and placed in service. The experience of building a mock up wall section with CI and then constructing on line a prototype home resolved important concerns about how to integrate the material into the production process. First steps were taken toward finding least expensive approaches for incorporating CI in standard factory building practices and a preliminary assessment suggested that even at this early stage the technology is attractive when viewed from a life cycle cost perspective.

  16. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3. Whole-House Prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Rath, P.

    2014-04-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective envelope designs that can be effectively integrated into the plant production process while meeting the thermal requirements of the 2012 IECC standards. This work is part of a multiphase effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three methods for building high performance walls. Phase 2 focused on developing viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped narrow the research focus to perfecting a stud wall design with exterior continuous insulation (CI). This report describes Phase 3, which was completed in two stages and continued the design development effort, exploring and evaluating a range or methods for applying CI to factory built homes. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing. During this phase, a home was built with CI, evaluated, and placed in service. The experience of building a mock up wall section with CI and then constructing on line a prototype home resolved important concerns about how to integrate the material into the production process. First steps were taken toward finding least expensive approaches for incorporating CI in standard factory building practices and a preliminary assessment suggested that even at this early stage the technology is attractive when viewed from a life cycle cost perspective.

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Fuels Used for Any

  18. "Table HC3.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Census Region and

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not

  1. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Indoor Lights

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Home

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT"

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Air

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Appliances",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Appliances",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)","Census Region" "Appliances",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,19.2,23.9,38.2,20.9

  8. Technology Solutions Case Study: Stud Walls with Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built Housing

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research — stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  9. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3—Design Development and Prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Kessler, B.; Mullens, M.; Rath, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research — stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  10. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3 -- Design Development and Prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Kessler, B.; Mullens, M.; Rath, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research -- stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  11. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Long Island | Department of Energy United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: United Veterans Beacon House by United Way of Long Island

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking

  13. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Personal

  14. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Personal

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)"

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Space Heating

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Cooling

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Cooling

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Number of Water

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT,

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" "Structural

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" "Structural and Geographic

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT,

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD,

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT,

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC,

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT,

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD,

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE,

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Fuels Used for Any Use"

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,,,"5 or More Members" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Census Region and Division"

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT"

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN,

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD"

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Televisions",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.6,0.4,0.2,0.2,0.2

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD"

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Computers and Other Electronics",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Computers" "Number of Computers"

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Computers and Other

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Computers and Other

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Space

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Space

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Water

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,,,,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Fuels Used for Any Use"

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Total

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" ,,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Census Region and Division"

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,19.9,28.6,21.5 "Rural",25.5,2.8,6,13.4,3.3

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Space Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Air

  15. Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ......................................

  16. DOE Tour of Zero: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing...

    Energy Saver

    Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California DOE Tour of Zero: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake by Mutual Housing California 1 of 14 Mutual Housing built this 62-unit ...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.4,0.7,0.5 1,108.1,19.3,25,40.2,23.6 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,0.5,1.2,0.7 "Number of Tankless Water

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,19.4,17.7,18.3

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Televisions"

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Televisions",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,1,0.3,"Q","Q",0.1

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Televisions" "Total

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Storage

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.9,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.3

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Cooking Appliances"

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Appliances" "Total

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.3,0.5,0.4 1,24.2,4.6,5.4,8.1,6.1 2,37.5,7,8,13.8,8.5 3,26.6,4.5,6.1,10.5,5.3 4,14.2,2.2,3.4,5.7,2.9 "5 or

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,6.7,11.1,4.8 1,46.9,8.7,10.6,17.2,10.3 2,24.3,4.3,5.5,8.7,5.8

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Space Heating

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Air

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Water Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.1

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Number of Household Members" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,7.4,11.5,6.3 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,8.5,13.4,7.6 "3

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Computers and Other Electronics"

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Air Conditioning" "Total

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Household Demographics" "Total

  18. Five Efficient-Living Lessons from Student-Built Houses | Department...

    Energy Saver

    ... Stevens Institute of Technology equipped its Ecohabitat with "Smart Sensors" that compile ... for informed management of the house from the main control panel or any mobile device. ...

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Census

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,6.9,6,4.4,3.2 "New England",5.5,2.2,1.9,0.5,0.9 "Middle

  1. Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. ...

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,8.5,2.7,2.6,4 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,38.6,16.2,20.1,18.4 "Use Cooling

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per

  5. Table HC1.1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Housing Unit Characteristics by" " Total, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace, 2005" ,,,"Total Square Footage" ,"Housing Units",,"Total",,"Heated",,"Cooled" "Housing Unit Characteristics","Millions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent","Billions","Percent" "Total",111.1,100,256.5,100,179.8,100,114.5,100 "Census Region

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Census Region

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  13. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Floorspace

  14. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Living Space Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,2.1,0.6,"Q",0.4 "500 to

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,8.5,2.7,2.6,4 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,38.6,16.2,20.1,18.4 "Use

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than

  1. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Main

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Cooling

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,16.9,6.5,4.6,7.6 "Use a Personal

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC8.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total U.S.",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,46.2,18.8,22.5,22.1

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Number

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Coolling

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,45.5,18.2,21.6,21 "2 or More",3.7,1,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot

  10. "Table HC1.1.3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--" " Single-Family Housing Units and Mobile Homes, 2005" ,,"Single- Family and Mobile Homes (millions)","Average Square Feet per Housing Unit-- Single-Family and Mobile Homes" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Detached",,,"Single-Family Attached",,,"Mobile Homes" "Housing Unit

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC5.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2

  13. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  14. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Indoor Lights

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Floorspace

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8

  20. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Number of

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY | Department of Energy United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with

  2. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Single-Family",78.6,2422,2002,1522,880,727,553 "Census

  3. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Multi-Family",28.1,930,807,535,453,393,261 "Census Region"

  4. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Mobile Homes",6.9,1087,985,746,413,375,283 "Census Region"

  5. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total",113.6,1971,1644,1230,766,639,478 "Census Region"

  6. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS IN TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-04-01

    The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. Based on a previous study 1, 2, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using natural log of percentage relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as predictor variables, and natural log of emission factors as the target variable. The coefficients of both inverse temperature and log relative humidity with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. This study should assist to retrospectively estimate indoor formaldehyde exposures of occupants of temporary housing units (THUs).

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million U.S. Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000

  8. "Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,6.9,4.7,2.2 "Town",19,6,4.2,1.9

  9. "Table HC12.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,9.7,7.3,2.4

  10. "Table HC13.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)"

  11. "Table HC14.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total West" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Mountain","Pacific" "Total",111.1,24.2,7.6,16.6 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,12.8,3.2,9.6 "Town",19,3,1.1,1.9

  12. Table HC1.1.2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace, 2005

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace, 2005 " ,,"Average Square Feet per--" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Housing Unit",,,"Household Member" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Total1","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,2171,1618,1031,845,630,401 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,2334,1664,562,911,649,220

  13. Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built Housing: New York, New York (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Building America Case Study Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built Housing New York, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing Location: New York, NY Partners: Manufactured and modular home building companies The Levy Partnership, Inc., www.levypartnership.com SBRA, www.research-alliance.org AFM Corp., www.afmcorporation.com BASF, www.basf.com Dow Corp., www.dow.com Johns Manville, www.jm.com Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com CertainTeed,

  14. Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441

  15. "Table HC3.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  16. "Table HC3.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  17. "Table HC3.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  18. "Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  19. "Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes"

  20. "Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  1. "Table HC3.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  2. "Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  3. "Table HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  4. "Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  5. "Table HC4.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  6. "Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  7. "Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  8. "Table HC4.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  9. "Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile

  10. "Table HC4.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More

  11. "Table HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More

  12. Table HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 3.0 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 28.7 9.2 6.5 12.1 0.9 7.5 Personal Computers 1

  13. Table 2.7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units, 1950-2009

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... For 2001 data consistent with the 1990 Census, see American Housing Survey for the United States: 2001. 2Includes briquettes (made of pitch and sawdust), coal dust, waste material ...

  14. Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built Housing: New York, New York (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Envelope Research effort will provide factory homebuilders with high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs. In the near term, these technologies will play a central role in meeting stringent energy code requirements. For manufactured homes, the thermal requirements, last updated by statute in 1994, will move up to the more rigorous IECC 2012 levels in 2013, the requirements of which are consistent with site built and modular housing. This places added urgency on identifying envelope technologies that the industry can implement in the short timeframe. The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, impact on first cost is a major consideration in developing the new envelope technologies. This work is part of a four-phase, multi-year effort. Phase 1 identified seven envelope technologies and provided a preliminary assessment of three selected methods for building high performance wall systems. Phase 2 focused on the development of viable product designs, manufacturing strategies, addressing code and structural issues, and cost analysis of the three selected options. An industry advisory committee helped critique and select the most viable solution to move further in the research - stud walls with continuous exterior insulation. Phase 3, the subject of the current report, focused on the design development of the selected wall concept and explored variations on the use of exterior foam insulation. The scope also included material selection, manufacturing and cost analysis, and prototyping and testing.

  15. Measure Guideline. Five Steps to Implement the Public Housing Authority Energy-Efficient Unit Turnover Checklist

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, Christine

    2015-07-09

    Five Steps to Implementing the PHA Energy Efficient Unit Turnover Package (ARIES, 2014) is a guide to prepare for the installation of energy efficient measures during a typical public housing authority unit turnover. While a PHA is cleaning, painting and readying a unit for a new resident, there is an opportunity to incorporate energy efficiency measures to further improve the unit's performance. The measures on the list are simple enough to be implemented by in-house maintenance personnel, inexpensive enough to be folded into operating expenses without needing capital budget, and fast enough to implement without substantially changing the number of days between occupancies, a critical factor for organizations where the demand for dwelling units far outweighs the supply. The following guide lays out a five step plan to implement the EE Unit Turnover Package in your PHA, from an initial Self-Assessment through to Package Implementation.

  16. Earth sheltered housing in the south central United States

    SciTech Connect

    Grondzik, W.T. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater); Grondzik, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed study of identified, occupied earth sheltered residences in the south central United States has been conducted by the Oklahoma State University. Selected results from this investigation of more than 150 residences in the states of Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas are presented, focusing upon the issues of habitability and energy performance of such structures.

  17. Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found

  18. Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast

  19. "Table HC10.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total",111.1,20.6,25.6,40.7,24.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,20.6,"N","N","N" "New

  20. "Table HC15.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,7.1,"N","N","N" "New

  1. High Performance Residential Housing Units at U.S. Coast Guard Base Kodiak: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, R.; Hickey, J.

    2013-10-01

    The United States Coast Guard (USCG) constructs residential housing throughout the country using a basic template that must meet the minimum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver criteria or better for the units. In Kodiak, Alaska, USCG is procuring between 24 and 100 residential multi-family housing units. Priorities for the Kodiak project were to reduce overall energyconsumption by at least 20% over existing units, improve envelope construction, and evaluate space heating options. USCG is challenged with maintaining similar existing units that have complicated residential diesel boilers. Additionally, fuel and material costs are high in Kodiak. While USCG has worked to optimize the performance of the housing units with principles of improved buildingenvelope, the engineers realize there are still opportunities for improvement, especially within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and different envelope measures. USCG staff also desires to balance higher upfront project costs for significantly reduced life-cycle costs of the residential units that have an expected lifetime of 50 or more years. To answer thesequestions, this analysis used the residential modeling tool BEoptE+ to examine potential energy- saving opportunities for the climate. The results suggest criteria for achieving optimized housing performance at the lowest cost. USCG will integrate the criteria into their procurement process. To achieve greater than 50% energy savings, USCG will need to specify full 2x 6 wood stud R-21 insulationwith two 2 inches of exterior foam, R-38 ceiling insulation or even wall insulation in the crawl space, and R-49 fiberglass batts in a the vented attic. The air barrier should be improved to ensure a tight envelope with minimal infiltration to the goal of 2.0 ACH50. With the implementation of an air source heat pump for space heating requirements, the combination of HVAC and envelope savings inthe residential unit can save

  2. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds

  3. Healthy and Affordable Housing: Practical Recommendations for Building, Renovating and Maintaining Housing: Read This Before You Turn Over a Unit

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-06

    This document helps landlords provide safe housing, keeping in mind the issues of asthma, health, ventilation, pests, and chemicals.

  4. Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast

  5. Table HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 0.8 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.5 2.4 2.1 2.8 3.0 8.5 8.8 New

  6. Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel

  7. Table HC4.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 Q Q Q 0.3 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 32.3 8.0 3.3 5.8 14.1 1.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 31.8 8.0 3.2 5.6 13.9 1.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.5 N Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel

  8. Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5

  9. Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0

  10. Table HC2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 71.3 7.4 7.7 16.4 6.8 1.............................................................. 103.3 66.2 7.2 7.4 15.9 6.7 2 or More................................................. 6.2 5.1 Q 0.3 0.5 Q Do Not Use an Oven................................... 1.5 0.7 Q Q 0.4 Q

  11. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation Patchogue, NY DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced

  12. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1992. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented on five parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export and Critical Assembly.

  13. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1993. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: civilian, production, military, export, and critical assembly.

  14. Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (February 11 2016)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives February 11, 2016.

  15. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (March 24, 2015)

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives March 24, 2015

  16. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Community-Scale Energy Modeling - Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    Community-scale energy modeling and testing are useful for determining energy conservation measures that will effectively reduce energy use. To that end, IBACOS analyzed pre-retrofit daily utility data to sort homes by energy consumption, allowing for better targeting of homes for physical audits. Following ASHRAE Guideline 14 normalization procedures, electricity consumption of 1,166 all-electric, production-built homes was modeled. The homes were in two communities: one built in the 1970s and the other in the mid-2000s.

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing

  18. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.

    1992-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  19. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

  20. DOE ZERH Case Study: United Way of Long Island Housing Development Corporation, Patchogue, NY

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning affordable home in the mixed-humid climate that got HERS 40 without PV, -3 with PV, with 2x4 16: on center walls with R-13.5 dense packed cellulose and 1.5” polyiso rigid; basement with 2.5: polyiso on interior; unvented attic with R-48 ocsf under roof deck; ERV tied to wall hung boiler with hydro coil.

  1. Table HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.7 Total ... RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.7 Ownership of Unit ...

  2. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics"

  3. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics"

  4. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics"

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics"

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators"

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    HC7.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics"

  9. EERE Success Story-Performance Improvements for Factory-Built...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    energy use in factory-built housing, as compared to best practice HUD-code construction. ... levels of energy performance: Best practice HUD-code; ENERGY STAR for Manufactured ...

  10. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    1 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of Factory-Built Housing Units (1) Company CMH Manufacturing 20% Champion Enterprises, Inc. 19% Palm Harbor Homes, Inc. 10% Fleetwood Enterprises, Inc. 9% Skyline Corporation 6% Note(s): Source(s): 8,207 376.4 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the factory-built home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey.

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,..."Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to ... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.9,0.8,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.7,2.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.7,10.1,... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,7.2,3.4,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5,3.9,2.9... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  18. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.1,0.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line3" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5.4,5.6,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.9,0.9,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.4,1,2.1... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  2. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Central Air" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Energy ...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... "Routine Service or Maintenance" "Performed on Central Air" ... 3Only includes routine service or maintenance performed in the last year. 4Energy ...

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,40.5,21.2,2.8,3.4,6.7,3.2,5.1,6.9,2.4,4.5,12.4,8.2,4.1 "Water Heating",47.1,27.3,16.1,1.8,1.8,6.2,2.2,4.2,5,1.8,3.1,6.2,4,2.3 "Cooking",71.2,31.7,17.9,2....

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,65.8,28.3,54.6,6.5,3.4,2.2,1.1,5.1,2,13.2,4.7,1.2 "Water Heating",47.1,30.8,16.4,23.9,3.6,1.3,1.1,0.3,3,1,7.7,4.2,1 "Cooking",71.2,48.4,22.8,40.8,5....

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...3,1.3,0.6,0.7,2.9,1,1.5,0.4 "Air Conditioning",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Water Heating",47.1,5.1,1.4,0.5,0.9,3.7,1.2,2.1,0.4 "Cooking",71.2,10.1,3.6,1.4,2.3,6.5,2.3,3.2,1 ...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,22.4,15,4.3,3.1,1.8,5.9,7.4,2.3,3.4,1.7 "Water Heating",47.1,7.6,4.8,0.7,0.8,0.7,2.7,2.8,1,1.4,0.4 "Cooking",71.2,15.4,9.7,1.6,1.9,1.6,4.7...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Air Conditioning",94,14.6,5.7,2.4,0.9,1.4,3.3,2.1,1.2,8.9,6.9,2.1 "Water Heating",47.1,7,2.5,0.9,0.3,0.6,1.6,1.2,0.4,4.5,1.4,3.1 "Cooking",71.2,13.9,5.1,3,1.4,1.6,2...

  9. "Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Heated Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "No Main Space Heating

  10. "Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Cooled Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,49.2,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Have Cooling

  11. Bathtub Row Houses

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bathtub Row Houses Manhattan Project in Los Alamos: Bathtub Row Houses Los Alamos was where efforts of the Manhattan Project came together to discover the science necessary to succeed-inventing the technical processes then producing and testing two nuclear devices. In Los Alamos, the park experience is a partnership among the Department of Energy, the National Park Service, private landowners, and Los Alamos County. Guest Cottage, Los Alamos Ranch School, 1942 6. Historical Museum Built as the

  12. Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols Islip, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Islip Housing Authority Unit Turnover Retrofit Program Location: ...

  13. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and Economy September 11, 2015

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and Economy September 11, 2015

  14. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3?Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    performed using BEopt (Building Energy Optimization), software developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the purpose of selecting among measures based on their...

  15. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    The primary goal of this research is to develop wall designs that meet the thermal requirements based on 2012 IECC standards. Given the affordable nature of manufactured homes, ...

  16. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory-Built Housing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar was conducted on December 14, 2011, by the ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team.

  17. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 1.0 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.3 Q 28.6 Solar ...... Notes: * To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding ...

  18. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 3.4 4.6 2.9 4.0 4.9 1.8 18.8 Solar ......Notes: * To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding ...

  19. Energy House

    Education - Teach & Learn

    Students learn about energy conservation and efficiency by using various materials to insulate a cardboard house.

  20. EERE Success Story-Performance Improvements for Factory-Built Homes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Improvements for Factory-Built Homes EERE Success Story-Performance Improvements for Factory-Built Homes December 22, 2015 - 3:02pm Addthis Highly efficient Building America test house in Russellville, AL. Photo Courtesy: Levy Partnership Highly efficient Building America test house in Russellville, AL. Photo Courtesy: Levy Partnership The ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research team, recently developed and evaluated methods to

  1. In-House Facility for Building Batteries and Performance Behavior...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In-House Facility for Building Batteries and Performance Behavior of SNL-Built 18650 Li... Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 76th Lithium Battery Technical...

  2. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

  3. Built Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01

    The market currently encourages BWT deployment before the technology is ready for full-scale commercialization. To address this issue, industry stakeholders convened a Rooftop and Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the National Wind Technology Center, located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. This report summarizes the workshop.

  4. Education Office Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Office Housing Housing A housing forum and listings for housing in and around Los Alamos. Contact Postdoc Housing Email LANL Students' Association Email LANL postdoc...

  5. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Hydronic Heating Coil Versus Propane Furnace, Rehoboth Beach, Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    In this project involving two homes, the IBACOS team evaluated the performance of the two space conditioning systems and the modeled efficiency of the two tankless domestic hot water systems relative to actual occupant use. Each house was built by Insight Homes and is 1,715-ft2 with a single story, three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems and ductwork located in conditioned crawlspaces. The standard house, which the builder offers as its standard production house, uses an air source heat pump (ASHP) with supplemental propane furnace heating. The Building America test house uses the same ASHP unit with supplemental heat provided by the DHW heater (a combined DHW and hydronic heating system, where the hydronic heating element is in the air handler).

  6. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...llinois",4.8,2186,1911,1451,860,752,571 "Michigan",3.8,1954,1559,962,729,582,359 ...Kerosene",0.4,2093,1774,1155,682,578,376 "Solar",0.2,2313,1861,1337,1145,921,662 "Main ...

  7. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ...,0.5,1030,968,711,524,492,362 "Year of Construction" "Before 1940",5.6,1991,1428,573,826,5... "Major Outside Wall Construction" "Siding (Aluminum, Vinyl, ...

  8. Cutting energy costs in multifamily housing: Practical case studies for the builder and developer

    SciTech Connect

    Whiddon, W.I.

    1986-01-01

    This book is based on an expert evaluation of nine existing and three proposed multifamily housing projects across the US. The existing buildings include three lowrise projects (three to four stories), six midrises (five to seven stories), and three highrise buildings (nine to thirty-nine stories). Two projects were designed and built in the late 1950's, two in the late 1960's, and five late in the ''energy-crisis'' of the 1970's. The existing projects range from municipally subsidized elderly housing, to HUD Section-8 suburban developments, to luxury urban highrise buildings. The three ''future'' buildings, designed by the NAHB research team, were based on trends anticipated in the multifamily industry by IREM and NAHB leaders, over the next five years. The key trends identified were: downsizing of units (by 10 to 20%); increased project size (in number of units), denser developments (more midrise and highrise projects), and increased amenities - all in the context of more affordable housing.

  9. Mechanical ventilation in HUD-code manufactured housing in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Lubliner, M.; Stevens, D.T.; Davis, B.

    1997-12-31

    Electric utilities in the Pacific Northwest have spent more than $100 million to support energy-efficiency improvements in the Housing and Urban Development (HUD) code manufactured housing industry in the Pacific Northwest over the past several years. More than 65,000 manufactured housing units have been built since 1991 that exceed the new HUD standards for both thermal performance and mechanical ventilation that became effective in October 1994. All of these units included mechanical ventilation systems that were designed to meet or exceed the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 62-1989. This paper addresses the ventilation solutions that were developed and compares the comfort and energy considerations of the various strategies that have evolved in the Pacific Northwest and nationally. The use and location of a variety of outside air inlets will be addressed, as will the acceptance by the occupants of the ventilation strategy.

  10. Postdoc Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdocs » Postdoc Housing Postdoc Housing Point your career towards Los Alamos Laboratory: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. CONTACT Postdoc Program Office Email Housing in Los Alamos, nearby communities Disclaimer: Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) provides these listings as a convenience for postdocs who will be working or participating in programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    2 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of Modular/3D Housing Units (1) Company Champion Enterprises, Inc. 27% CMH Manufacturing 14% All American Homes, LLC 10% Palm Harbor Homes, Inc. 10% Excel Homes LLC 7% Note(s): Source(s): 1,200 110.6 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the Modular/3D home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey. In 2007,

  12. Meadowlark House

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Greensburg GreenTown Chain of Eco-Homes Meadowlark House in Greensburg, Kansas.

  13. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home Multifamily Project: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake

    SciTech Connect

    D. Springer and A. German

    2015-09-01

    Building cost effective, high performance homes that provide superior comfort, health, and durability is the goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Zero Energy Ready Homes (ZERH) program. This case study describes the development of a 62-unit multifamily community constructed by nonprofit developer Mutual Housing at the Spring Lake subdivision in Woodland, California. The Spring Lake project is expected to be the first ZERH-certified multifamily project nationwide. Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation worked with Mutual Housing throughout the project. An objective of this project was to gain a highly visible foothold for residential buildings built to the DOE ZERH specification that can be used to encourage participation by other California builders.

  14. Designing and Building Houses that are Solar Ready

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Builders considering adding photovoltaic (PV) systems to new houses after initial construction is completed can save time and money by following new house Solar Ready design guidelines. Solar Ready houses are designed and built with integrated electrical and mechanical features that streamline the integration of PV systems.

  15. SustainablyBuilt | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Building Consultants Website: www.sustainablybuilt.com References: Sustainably Built Web Site1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Sustainably Built...

  16. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Gehl, Anthony C; Christian, Jeffrey E

    2012-01-01

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  17. Open House Archive | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Open House Archive 2014 Open House 2012 Open House 2010 Open House 2007 Open House 2005 Open House 2003 Open House 2001 Open House Back to the main Open House Page

  18. Student Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    In order to create a profile you will need a temporary access password. If you would like to take advantage of this housing resource you can request an access password at: ...

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    5 2010 Construction Method of Single-Family Homes, by Region (Thousand Units and Percent of Total Units) Region Total Northeast 49 10% 4 33% 2 18% 54 Midwest 76 16% 3 25% 2 18% 82 South 247 52% 4 33% 6 55% 258 West 101 21% 1 8% 1 9% 103 Total 473 100% 12 100% 11 100% 497 Source(s): Stick-Built Modular Panelized/Precut DOC, Manufacturing, Mining and Construction Statistics, New Residential Construction: Type of Construction Method of New Single-Family Houses Completed

  20. Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    America Top Innovation | Department of Energy Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building America Top Innovation Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building America Top Innovation Increasing attic insulation in manufactured housing has been a significant challenge due to cost, production, and transportation constraints. This 2014 Top Innovation highlights research conducted by the Top Innov Manufact home attic insul -guy blowing

  1. DOE Tour of Zero: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Bellingham Power House by TC Legend Homes Addthis 1 of 19 TC Legend Homes built this 2,781-square-foot home in ...

  2. Built-in | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Built-in Jump to: navigation, search Manufacturer Model Number Distributed Generation Purpose The heat recovery system is either unknown or is indistinguishable from the prime...

  3. Built Environs Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Built Environs Pty Ltd Place: Adelaide, South Australia, Australia Zip: 5000 Product: Adelaide based construction and engineering firm...

  4. EASI HOUSE

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A first-time Solar Decathlon entrant in 2015, the Western New England University, Universidad Tecnológica de Panamá, and Universidad Tecnológica Centroamericana team is seeking a blend in its Efficient, Affordable, Solar, Innovation--or EASI--House.

  5. Education Office Housing

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Office Housing Housing A housing forum and listings for housing in and around Los Alamos. Contact Postdoc Housing Email LANL Students' Association Email LANL postdoc program housing The Lab's postdoc program has a postdoc housing listing. If you are interested in posting a housing opportunity, send an email with the pertinent information to postdocprogram@lanl.gov. Housing listings will be posted for 1 month. If you wish for the listing to remain on the web site longer, please contact

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

    2012-03-01

    This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

  7. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Islip Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York | Department of Energy Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes: Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York In this project, ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHA) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement at the time when units

  8. SkyBuilt Power | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    US-based renewable energy system integrator such as solar, wind, fuel cells, and micro-hydro power. References: SkyBuilt Power1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  9. Built Environment Analysis Tool: April 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.

    2013-05-01

    This documentation describes the tool development. It was created to evaluate the effects of built environment scenarios on transportation energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This documentation also provides guidance on how to apply the tool.

  10. Forward House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Space Heating and Ventilation Forward House UW-Madison UW-Milwaukee Faculty Advisors Professor Mark Keane | UW-Milwaukee Dr. Michael Cheadle | UW-Madison Professor Lesley Sager | UW-Madison Nic Dan Laura Jake Rob Jonnie Nasim Drew 1 2 Industry Partners Special Thanks to Professionals Professor Linda Keane | The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Cozette Moffatt | Interior Designer Students Emily Cruz | UW-Madison Marilyn Grace Cervantes | UW-Madison Rebecca Cohn | UW-Madison S t o r y A r c

  11. Solar Electric Workshop and Open House

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted on the Pine Ridge Reservation, Trees, Water, and People is hosting a free solar electric workshop with classroom instruction and hands-on training. Attendees will install a 4-Kw solar array on the new three-bedroom compressed earth block house built this year.

  12. Written Statement of David Huizenga Senior Advisor for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States House of Representatives (May 9, 2013)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Senior Advisor David Huizenga represented the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Armed Services Committee United States...

  13. Superinsulated houses

    SciTech Connect

    Shurcliff, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Superinsulation is a direct response to the fast-rising cost of home heating. Of the many kinds of responses, superinsulation is proving to be the simplest and most cost-effective. Until the oil embargo of 1973 there was little interest in saving heat. When the oil shortage arrived and fuel costs doubled and redoubled, many architects responded, at first, by invoking solar energy. They examined the designs of existing solar-heated houses and proposed a great variety of new designs, most of which appeared - to the uninitiated - to have great promise. Most of the early designs were of the active type; some were of the passive type; a few were of the hybrid design.

  14. Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool, which is designed to assess impacts of future land use/built environment patterns on transportation-related energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The tool can be used to evaluate a range of population distribution and urban design scenarios for 2030 and 2050. This tool was produced as part of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  15. Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap J. Smith, T. Forsyth, K. Sinclair, and F. Oteri Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-50499 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap J. Smith,

  16. DOE ZERH Case Study: Mutual Housing California, Mutual Housing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Housing California, Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, CA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning multifamily project of 62 affordable-housing...

  17. Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Urban form has evolved in response to a variety of demographic, social, economic, technological, and policy drivers. While direct authority over land use resides primarily at the local level, the federal government's transportation and housing policies have indirectly influenced the built environment.Local governments are increasingly implementing smart growth policies in attempts to manage growth and land use change, and constrain sprawl, with governments at higher levels supporting initiatives through funding, technical assistance, and incentives. This study examines the energy implications of the built environment, and the role the federal government could play.

  18. 2015 Arizona Housing Forum

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 12th annual Arizona Housing Forum provides a platform for affordable housing professionals to network and share ideas to improve and create housing choices for Arizona. Registration is $350.

  19. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

  20. The smartest house in Los Alamos

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Latest Issue:October 1, 2016 all issues All Issues submit The smartest house in Los Alamos The first project in the United States to demonstrate how "smart grid" technology ...

  1. Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Delivery and Energy Reliability Subject: Smart Grid: Cyber-Security 10-27-09FinalTestim... Environment Subcommittee, United States House of Representatives, October 27, 2009 ...

  2. Built Environment Analysis Tool: April 2013

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Built Environment Analysis Tool April 2013 C. Porter Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL Technical Monitor: Laura Vimmerstedt Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-58552 May 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No.

  3. Hydro trash rack rake built by Riegel Textile (Engineering Materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1981-11-05

    The Fries, Virginia plant of the Riegel Textile Corporation of Ware Shoals, South Carolina, found it necessary to install a trash rack rake for proper operation of their hydro plant. They put the job out for bid, but when they received bids above budget they decided to build their own rack rake. Mr. Sanford Byrd, plant engineer, put together a design that included use of standard off-the-shelf items and readily available structural steel components. The rake was built by the Fries maintenance personnel for only $50,000. The unit operates hydraulically and runs on a set of tracks placed on the intake canal wall. This unit can be adapted to most low-head hydro projects. The information furnished in this package will allow you to build your own trash rack rake.

  4. Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Forsyth, T.; Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2012-11-01

    Although only a small contributor to total electricity production needs, built-environment wind turbines (BWTs) nonetheless have the potential to influence the public's consideration of renewable energy, and wind energy in particular. Higher population concentrations in urban environments offer greater opportunities for project visibility and an opportunity to acquaint large numbers of people to the advantages of wind projects on a larger scale. However, turbine failures will be equally visible and could have a negative effect on public perception of wind technology. This roadmap provides a framework for achieving the vision set forth by the attendees of the Built-Environment Wind Turbine Workshop on August 11 - 12, 2010, at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The BWT roadmap outlines the stakeholder actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers identified. The actions are categorized as near-term (0 - 3 years), medium-term (4 - 7 years), and both near- and medium-term (requiring immediate to medium-term effort). To accomplish these actions, a strategic approach was developed that identifies two focus areas: understanding the built-environment wind resource and developing testing and design standards. The authors summarize the expertise and resources required in these areas.

  5. Protocol for House Parties

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Protocol for House Parties, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  6. CSU - Institute for the Built Environment | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Institute for the Built Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name: CSU - Institute for the Built Environment Address: 1000 Oval Drive Place: Fort Collins, Colorado Zip: 80523...

  7. Short-Term Monitoring Results for Advanced New Construction Test House -- Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.; Imm, C.

    2013-09-01

    A builder (K. Hovnanian Homes), design consultant, and trades collaborated to identify a systems integrated measures package for a 2,253-ft2 slab-on-grade ranch house to achieve a modeled energy savings of 60% with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, R. and Engebrecht, C. 'Building America House Simulation Protocols.' Golden, CO: National Renewable EnergyLaboratory, 2010) while minimizing construction costs and without requiring changes to the drawing that would impact local code or zoning approval. The key building improvements were applying R-10 insulation to the slab edge, increasing exterior wall cavity insulation from R-13 to R-15, and increasing attic insulation from R-30 to R-38. Also, the air handling unit was relocated from the attic toconditioned space, and ductwork was relocated along the attic floor with an insulated bulkhead built above it. Short-term testing results showed that duct air leakage was low due to short duct runs and the placement of ductwork in conditioned space. However, during commissioning, the lack of access for servicing the ductwork and dampers in the bulkhead area prevented retroactive balancing ofindividual branches, resulting in significant differences between specified and measured airflow values for some duct runs. Thermal imaging results performed on the house when operating in both heating and cooling modes validated historic stratification issues of ceiling supply registers with high supply air temperatures. Long-term monitoring results will be detailed in a future report.

  8. CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE CHICAGO HOUSE PARTIES SHOW WAYS TO UPGRADE The Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) and its partners created Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) to promote home energy upgrades in single-family homes, multifamily housing units, and commercial buildings to help the region meet its 2008 Chicago Climate Action Plan and longer term GO TO 2040 Strategic Plan. EI2 enlisted the help of the Elevate Energy, a

  9. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Testing Ductless Heat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Pumps in High-Performance Affordable Housing, The Woods at Golden Given, Tacoma,Washington | Department of Energy Testing Ductless Heat Pumps in High-Performance Affordable Housing, The Woods at Golden Given, Tacoma,Washington Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Testing Ductless Heat Pumps in High-Performance Affordable Housing, The Woods at Golden Given, Tacoma,Washington The Woods is a 30-home, high- performance, energy efficient sustainable community built by Habitat for

  10. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: The Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    House: A Cold Climate Challenge Home, Old Greenwich, Connecticut (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy The Performance House: A Cold Climate Challenge Home, Old Greenwich, Connecticut (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: The Performance House: A Cold Climate Challenge Home, Old Greenwich, Connecticut (Fact Sheet) The first Challenge Home built in New England features cool-roof shingles, HERS 20-42, and walls densely packed with blown fiberglass. The Performance

  11. Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing, Phase 3—Design Development and Prototyping

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Building America report describes the Advanced Envelope Research project, which will provide factory home builders with high-performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs.

  12. Building America Webinar: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory-Built Housing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar was conducted on December 14, 2011, by the ARIES Collaborative, a U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team.

  13. Factory-built integrated solar homes - A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rawlings, L.K.

    1995-12-31

    Over the past fifteen years, hundreds of people across the US have built for themselves highly advanced residences which integrated passive solar architecture; photovoltaic power systems; high-efficiency lights, appliances, and HVAC (heating, ventilating, and cooling) equipment; high-level insulation and airtight construction; and other renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies. Such a home can be referred to as an {open_quotes}integrated solar home{close_quotes}. As the essential technologies have improved in performance, price, and availability, the performance of such homes has steadily advanced to the point where they could provide amenities at more-or-less normal US standards of luxury, yet require as little as 5% to 10% of the level of fossil fuel or biomass use that are required in an average US home. However, the resources required to build such a home, both in terms of the time and dedication needed for research, design, and construction of the homes, and in terms of the additional cost of the renewable energy/energy efficient features, have prevented such construction from moving beyond a tiny handful of highly motivated homeowners and into the mainstream of residential construction. This paper has design summaries of six different houses.

  14. Tribal Housing Authorities: Advancing Energy Projects Through Informed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Collaboration | Department of Energy Housing Authorities: Advancing Energy Projects Through Informed Collaboration Tribal Housing Authorities: Advancing Energy Projects Through Informed Collaboration May 10, 2016 - 4:00pm Addthis Six PV arrays generate 32 kW of energy to power 20 units at the AHA Sunrise Acres housing complex on the Saint Regis Mohawk Reservation. Photo by Rachel Sullivan, National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Six PV arrays generate 32 kW of energy to power 20 units at the

  15. Students Lead the Way at the White House Science Fair | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Lead the Way at the White House Science Fair Students Lead the Way at the White House Science Fair October 18, 2010 - 6:55pm Addthis The President looks at a model solar car built by Mikayla Nelson of Montana, White House Photo, Chuck Kennedy, 10/18/10 The President looks at a model solar car built by Mikayla Nelson of Montana, White House Photo, Chuck Kennedy, 10/18/10 John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Mikayla Nelson doesn't understand

  16. House Retirement Timeline

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Your actions: Update all scripts - switch from jgitools to module files. Check houseHunter https:househunter.jgi-psf.org (login with NERSC credentials) Move all data from house ...

  17. AHFC Affordable Housing Summit

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) is hosting a summit to bring together Alaskans from across the state to identify the barriers and seek budget-neutral solutions to the numerous housing challenges facing Alaskans.

  18. 2015 Housing Innovation Awards

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Housing Innovation Awards recognize the very best in innovation on the path to zero energy ready homes. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Housing Innovation...

  19. Building America Case Study: Zero Energy Ready Home Multifamily Project: Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, California

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    Building cost effective, high performance homes that provide superior comfort, health, and durability is the goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Zero Energy Ready Homes (ZERH) program. Through Building America research and other innovative programs throughout the country, many of the technical challenges to building to the ZERH standard have been addressed. This case study describes the development of a 62-unit multifamily community constructed by nonprofit developer Mutual Housing at the Spring Lake subdivision in Woodland, CA. The Spring Lake project is expected to be the first ZERH-certified multifamily project nationwide. Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation worked with Mutual Housing throughout the project. The case study discusses challenges encountered, lessons learned, and how obstacles were overcome. An objective of this project was to gain a highly visible foothold for residential buildings built to the DOE ZERH specification that can be used to encourage participation by other California builders.

  20. Insulator for laser housing

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  1. Peoria Tribal Housing Authority: Weatherization Training Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Program 2009 Program Review Denver Colorado  Jason Dollarhide, Second Chief  Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma  Deputy Director, Housing Authority of the Peoria Tribe  The Peoria Tribe is located in Miami, Oklahoma  We currently have an enrollment of 2,900 Tribal members  The Peoria Tribal operations and Housing Authority employ 39 persons.  The Peoria Tribe and Housing Authority work in partnership with the Ottawa Tribe of Oklahoma. We manage 127 low-rent units in various

  2. Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Video Cassette Recorders (VCR)...... 89.4 24.5 6.4 2.7 4.2 10.3 1.0 ... Digital Video Disc Players (DVD)...... ) 89.3 25.8 6.8 2.8 4.5 11.0 0.8 ...

  3. Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ......... 1.5 1.3 1.3 N Q N N Video Cassette Recorders (VCR)...... Digital Video Disc Players (DVD)...... ) 89.3 63.5 52.6 3.3 1.3 1.8 4.5 ...

  4. Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................

    Annual Energy Outlook

    ... Video Cassette Recorders (VCR)...... 89.4 11.2 5.6 10.2 10.3 15.5 15.1 14.3 7.2 ... Digital Video Disc Players (DVD)...... 89.3 11.0 5.5 9.6 9.6 15.3 15.7 14.7 7.9 ...

  5. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... For this report, the heating or cooling degree-days are a measure of how cold or how hot a location is over a period of one year, relative to a base temperature of 65 degrees ...

  6. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,8.9,2.6,1.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  7. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,6.5,1.4,2.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  8. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,7.5,4.9,0.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... for 2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ...

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,3.2,2.5,0.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005...

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,15.6,1.1,"...

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,6.5,3.2,1.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  13. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,1,4.2,4.2,... weather station. 2. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  14. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    More",14.2,3,2.2,0.8 "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,3.5,2.6,0.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  15. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,9.1,1.5,1,... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  16. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,3.2,3.5,6.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  17. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    More",14.2,4,1.1,3 "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,3.4,0.9,2.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,5.9,3.5,2,... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line" "Below 100 Percent",16.6,3.1,1.6,2.... " 1. Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  20. Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .... 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment......d...... 27.9 1.8 5.3 5.8 6.5 8.6 Poorly ...

  1. Million U.S. Housing Units Total.....................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment....................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................... 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment..................................... 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................... 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central

  2. Million U.S. Housing Units Total......................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................... 35.5 5.7 3.3 4.6 4.7 5.8 5.7 4.0 1.7 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 9.0 4.1 7.9 7.8 13.1 12.9 13.3 7.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model........................................... 58.6 6.7 3.5 6.3 6.2 10.3 9.9 10.2 5.6 Laptop Model............................................... 16.9 2.3 0.7 1.7 1.5 2.8 2.9 3.1 1.9 Hours Turned on

  3. Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...................................................... 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7

  4. Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...................................................... 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5

  5. Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 71.3 7.4 7.7 16.4 6.8 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 5.7 0.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 Once a Day....................................................... 19.2 13.3 1.3 1.4 2.1 1.0 Between Once a Day and Once a Week........... 32.0 22.7 2.1 1.8 4.0 1.5 Once a Week.................................................... 19.1 12.2 1.2 1.3 3.0 1.4 Less than Once a

  6. Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    8.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer......................... 35.5 20.3 14.8 1.2 0.6 0.9 2.8 Use a Personal Computer...................................... 75.6 57.8 49.2 2.9 1.2 1.4 3.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model................................................. 58.6 45.8 38.9 2.2 1.0 1.1 2.6 Laptop Model.................................................... 16.9 12.0 10.3 0.8 0.2 Q 0.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  7. Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer......................... 35.5 15.3 3.0 1.9 3.1 6.4 0.8 Use a Personal Computer...................................... 75.6 17.7 5.0 1.6 2.8 8.0 0.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model................................................. 58.6 12.8 4.0 1.1 2.0 5.4 0.3 Laptop Model.................................................... 16.9 4.9 1.0 0.4 0.8 2.6 Q Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2

  8. Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 0.4 1.7 2.1 2.2 1.7 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 2.3 6.0 5.9 5.5 5.0 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 5.6 10.3 9.7 8.1 8.7 A Few Times Each Week..................................... 27.2 2.1 6.1 7.2 6.0 5.7 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.3 0.7 1.0 1.1 0.8

  9. Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer......................... 35.5 3.2 8.3 8.9 7.7 7.5 Use a Personal Computer...................................... 75.6 7.8 17.8 18.4 16.3 15.3 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model................................................. 58.6 6.2 14.3 14.2 12.1 11.9 Laptop Model.................................................... 16.9 1.6 3.5 4.3 4.2 3.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours.............................................

  10. Million U.S. Housing Units Total.............................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.......................................... 8.2 1.0 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.6 2 Times A Day....................................................... 24.6 3.6 1.7 2.3 2.9 4.6 3.8 3.9 1.9 Once a Day............................................................ 42.3 5.4 2.5 4.7 4.5 7.0 7.9 6.6 3.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 3.6 1.6 3.4 2.8 4.7 4.5

  11. Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 4.7 3.8 Q Q Q 0.6 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 16.0 13.3 0.8 0.4 Q 1.3 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 32.1 26.5 1.6 0.7 1.1 2.2 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 19.3 15.8 1.3 0.4 0.6 1.3 About Once a

  12. Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.4 1.0 0.4 0.6 1.2 Q 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 8.6 2.3 1.0 1.6 3.5 0.2 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 10.1 2.3 1.1 2.1 4.3 0.4 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 7.8 2.0 0.7 1.3 3.6 Q About Once a

  13. Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Space Heating Usage Indicators UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs ... Space Heating Usage Indicators UrbanRural Location (as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs ...

  14. Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy ... Type of Supplemental Heating Equipment Used Heat Pump......0.6 SteamHot Water System......

  15. Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ... 1.3 Q Q Q Energy Information Administration ... Type of Supplemental Heating Equipment Used Heat Pump......Q Q SteamHot Water System......

  16. Total U.S. Housing Units.............................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Heating Equipment................ 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Space Heating Equipment................. 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have But Do Not Use Equipment............... 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.2 1.2

  17. Total U.S. Housing Units.................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Heating Equipment.................... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Space Heating Equipment..................... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Space Heating Equipment...................... 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have But Do Not Use Equipment................... 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None........................................................... 3.6 1.5 0.9 Q Q Q 0.3 1 to

  18. Total U.S. Housing Units.................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .... 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Heating Equipment.................... 1.2 N Q Q 0.2 0.4 0.2 0.2 Q Have Space Heating Equipment..................... 109.8 14.7 7.4 12.4 12.2 18.5 18.3 17.1 9.2 Use Space Heating Equipment...................... 109.1 14.6 7.3 12.4 12.2 18.2 18.2 17.1 9.1 Have But Do Not Use Equipment................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q 0.3 Q N Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet)

  19. Total U.S. Housing Units..................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Equipment..................... 1.2 0.4 Q Q 0.4 Q Have Space Heating Equipment...................... 109.8 71.7 7.5 7.6 16.3 6.8 Use Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.1 71.5 7.4 7.4 16.0 6.7 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None............................................................ 3.6 1.1 Q 0.5 1.3 0.4 1 to 499....................................................... 6.1 2.0 0.4

  20. Total U.S. Housing Units........................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 0.5 Q Q 1 to

  1. Total U.S. Housing Units........................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Space Heating Equipment............................ 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.1 40.1 21.2 6.9 12.0 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 Q Q N N Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None................................................................. 3.6 0.8 0.7 Q Q 1 to

  2. Total U.S. Housing Units............................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .. 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Heating Equipment............................... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment................................ 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Space Heating Equipment................................. 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.............................. 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................................... 3.6 Q 0.7 Q 1.3 1

  3. EcoHouse Program Overview

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides an overview of the Indianapolis Better Buildings program, the EcoHouse program, and Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing partnership (INHP).

  4. Short-Term Monitoring Results for Advanced New Construction Test House - Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.; Imm, C.

    2013-09-01

    A builder (K. Hovnanian® Homes®), design consultant, and trades collaborated to identify a systems integrated measures package for a 2,253-ft² slab-on-grade ranch house to achieve a modeled energy savings of 60% with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols, while minimizing construction costs and without requiring changes to the drawing that would impact local code or zoning approval. The key building improvements were applying R-10 insulation to the slab edge, increasing exterior wall cavity insulation from R-13 to R-15, and increasing attic insulation from R-30 to R-38. Also, the air handling unit was relocated from the attic to conditioned space, and ductwork was relocated along the attic floor with an insulated bulkhead built above it. Short-term testing results showed that duct air leakage was low due to short duct runs and the placement of ductwork in conditioned space. However, during commissioning, the lack of access for servicing the ductwork and dampers in the bulkhead area prevented retroactive balancing of individual branches, resulting in significant differences between specified and measured airflow values for some duct runs. Thermal imaging results performed on the house when operating in both heating and cooling modes validated historic stratification issues of ceiling supply registers with high supply air temperatures. Long-term monitoring results will be detailed in a future report.

  5. White House Solar Champions of Change - Watch Now | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    White House Solar Champions of Change - Watch Now White House Solar Champions of Change - Watch Now April 17, 2014 - 10:29am Addthis On April 17, 2014 the White House honored solar energy deployment Champions of Change from across the United States. The honorees included several current and former SunShot awardees. The event live streamed from the White House - check out the video above. Additional Resources White House Fact Sheet: Building Progress, Supporting Solar Deployment and Jobs White

  6. Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP)

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, Janet; Chandra, Subrato; Barkaszi, Stephen; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Fonorow, Ken; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Hutchinson, Stephanie; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McCluney, Ross; McGinley, Mark; McSorley, Mike; Moyer, Neil; Mullens, Mike; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Vieira, Rob; Wichers, Susan

    2006-06-30

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (www.baihp.org) for the period 9/1/99-6/30/06. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida and focuses on factory built housing. In partnership with over 50 factory and site builders, work was performed in two main areas--research and technical assistance. In the research area--through site visits in over 75 problem homes, we discovered the prime causes of moisture problems in some manufactured homes and our industry partners adopted our solutions to nearly eliminate this vexing problem. Through testing conducted in over two dozen housing factories of six factory builders we documented the value of leak free duct design and construction which was embraced by our industry partners and implemented in all the thousands of homes they built. Through laboratory test facilities and measurements in real homes we documented the merits of 'cool roof' technologies and developed an innovative night sky radiative cooling concept currently being tested. We patented an energy efficient condenser fan design, documented energy efficient home retrofit strategies after hurricane damage, developed improved specifications for federal procurement for future temporary housing, compared the Building America benchmark to HERS Index and IECC 2006, developed a toolkit for improving the accuracy and speed of benchmark calculations, monitored the field performance of over a dozen prototype homes and initiated research on the effectiveness of occupancy feedback in reducing household energy use. In the technical assistance area we provided systems engineering analysis, conducted training, testing and commissioning that have resulted in over 128,000 factory built and over 5,000 site built homes which are saving their owners over $17,000,000 annually in energy bills. These include homes built by Palm Harbor Homes, Fleetwood, Southern Energy Homes

  7. Multiple pump housing

    DOEpatents

    Donoho, II, Michael R.; Elliott; Christopher M.

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  8. Gas chemical complex to be built at Seidi

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-12-23

    Turkmenistan, the Central Asian republic of the CIS, is preparing to set up its first petrochemical complex as part of an industrialization program. Sources in Ashkhabad say the gas authority, Turkmengaz, has signed a letter of intent with TPL (Rome) to build a gas cracker and polyethylene (PE) units. Promoted by the deputy prime minister of Turkmenistan, Nazar Soyunov, the complex is expected to be built at Seidi, near an existing oil refinery. Feedstock will be natural gas supplied by Turkmengaz. It is understood that two processes - from BP Chemicals and Phillips - are being considered for PE production. Total PE capacity will be 200,000 m.t./year. An additional plant, making 10,000 m.t./year of the PE comonomer butene-1, is also planned. Turkmengaz is looking for a quick return on investment and hopes to export 150,000 m.t./year of PE to Western Europe, the Turkic region, and Southeast Asia. The contact is expected to be signed as soon as financing has been raised. The complex has been estimated to require investment of $1 billion. Basic engineering on the cracker, which will use KTI (Zoetermeer, the Netherlands) furnaces, has been completed.

  9. Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool Built Environment Energy Analysis Tool This documentation describes the development of a tool created to evaluate the effects of built environment scenarios on transportation energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and provides guidance on how to apply the tool. Documentation Presentation More Documents & Publications Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change in NEPA Reviews Scenario Development for the

  10. Transformation of the Built Environment by 2030 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transformation of the Built Environment by 2030 Transformation of the Built Environment by 2030 July 6, 2016 - 4:06pm Addthis Transformation of the Built Environment by 2030 By Monica Kanojia Architecture 2030 has been lauded by industry and collaborative colleagues alike for its development and implementation of key strategies to reduce fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as well as stimulating the creation of resilient communities that have the ability to adapt to the

  11. Brookhaven-Built Magnet Will Catch Subatomic Debris

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Wanderer

    2013-07-22

    Peter Wanderer, head of Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division, describes the magnet that's being built for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University

  12. Virginia Tech Operating System (OS) built on VOLTTRONTM for Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Murat Kuzlu (mkuzlu@vt.edu) Virginia Tech Virginia Tech Operating System (OS) built on VOLTTRON TM for Energy Management in Buildings HVAC Controllers Lighting Controllers Lighting ...

  13. Built-Environment Wind Turbines | Open Energy Information

    OpenEI (Open Energy Information) [EERE & EIA]

    Turbines Jump to: navigation, search Built-environment wind turbine projects are wind energy projects that are constructed on, in, or near buildings. These projects present an...

  14. Housing And Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R.F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Miller, Gregory V.; Peterson, David W.; Smith, Terrance T.

    2005-03-08

    This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

  15. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing Training

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Association of Alaska Housing Authorities (AAHA), this three-day training event covers strategies and technical issues related to sustainable housing development.

  16. Senior Advisor Huizenga's Written Statement before the House Armed Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Subcommittee on Strategic Forces (April 17, 2012) | Department of Energy Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces (April 17, 2012) Senior Advisor Huizenga's Written Statement before the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces (April 17, 2012) Statement of David Huizenga, Senior Advisor for Environmental Management, United States Department of Energy before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, Committee on Armed Services, United States House of Representatives on April

  17. Assistant Secretary Triay's Written Statement before the House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 16, 2010) | Department of Energy 16, 2010) Assistant Secretary Triay's Written Statement before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 16, 2010) Statement of Inès Triay, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy. Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations United States House of Representatives to answer

  18. Assistant Secretary Triay's Written Statement before the House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 30, 2011) | Department of Energy 30, 2011) Assistant Secretary Triay's Written Statement before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development (March 30, 2011) Written Statement of Inès Triay, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, United States Department of Energy, before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations, United States House of Representatives,

  19. Assistant Secretary Triay's Written Statement before the House Armed

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces (April 5, 2011) | Department of Energy April 5, 2011) Assistant Secretary Triay's Written Statement before the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces (April 5, 2011) Written Statement of Inès Triay, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, United States Department of Energy, before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, Committee on Armed Services, United States House of Representatives, on April 5, 2011, to answer questions

  20. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York

    SciTech Connect

    J. Dentz, F. Conlin, D. Podorson, and K. Alaigh

    2014-08-01

    In this project, Building America team ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHA) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies.

  1. Open House | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Other Useful Information What to Bring Bring your camera or smart phone device; photos and ... Observance of a few rules and safety precautions will make the 2016 Open House more ...

  2. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  3. Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S. Housing Units............

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Heating Equipment...... 1.2 Q Q N 0.3 0.8 Have Space Heating Equipment...... 109.8 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.7 ...

  4. Long-Term Results: New Construction Occupied Test House, Urbana, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

    2012-10-01

    For this study, a house was designed and built to the Passive House (Passivhaus) Standard for low energy consumption. The house incorporates an airtight, super-insulated thermal enclosure, southern facing windows with overhangs, a single point mini-split heat pump and electric resistance heaters, and a balanced energy recovery ventilator (ERV). The house was instrumented with sub-metering on all major electrical circuits, temperature and humidity measurements in each room, domestic hot water consumption, and recovery efficiency of the ERV. The energy performance was documented and compared to modeled predictions, and the thermal comfort performance of the heat pump was assessed.

  5. Long-Term Results. New Construction Occupied Test House, Urbana, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

    2012-10-01

    For this study, a house was designed and built to the Passive House (Passivhaus) Standard for low energy consumption. The house incorporates an airtight, super-insulated thermal enclosure, southern facing windows with overhangs, a single point mini-split heat pump and electric resistance heaters, and a balanced energy recovery ventilator (ERV). The house was instrumented with sub-metering on all major electrical circuits, temperature and humidity measurements in each room, domestic hot water consumption, and recovery efficiency of the ERV. The energy performance was documented and compared to modeled predictions, and the thermal comfort performance of the heat pump was assessed.

  6. U.S. Navy Moanalua Terrace Housing Project, Oahu, Hawaii | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Navy Moanalua Terrace Housing Project, Oahu, Hawaii U.S. Navy Moanalua Terrace Housing Project, Oahu, Hawaii Photo of the Moanalua Terrace U.S. Navy Housing Project on Oahu, Hawaii Moanalua Terrace is a U.S. Navy housing project on Oahu, Hawaii. At this site the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which were being rebuilt in four phases. The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction projects was an

  7. Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, Jordan; Conlin, Francis; Podorson, David; Alaigh, Kunal

    2014-06-01

    More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 public housing authorities (PHAs) across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low-cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two PHAs to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation 10 ten housing units. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6%-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of units per year nationally.

  8. Public Housing: A Tailored Approach to Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Podorson, D.; Alaigh, K.

    2014-06-01

    Over one million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

  9. Resilient Design: Transitioning to the New Built Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alex Wilson, Founder, BuildingGreen Inc. and Resilient Design Institute, provides context for why we need to be considering resilience in looking at the built environment during the coming decades.

  10. Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York Buffalo Pushes Energy-Efficient Affordable Housing in New York Better Buildings Residential Network member PUSH (People United for Sustainable Housing) Buffalo broke ground in March 2014 on its Massachusetts Avenue Sustainable Homes (MASH) project. The initiative will create energy-efficient, affordable housing by renovating two vacant historic buildings and building one new multifamily structure. Part of the project's

  11. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mutual Housing California, Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, CA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mutual Housing California Mutual Housing at Spring Lake Woodland, CA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced

  12. Performance House -- A Cold Climate Challenge Home

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, S.; Grab, J.; Williamson, J.

    2013-08-01

    Working with builder partners on a test homes allows for vetting of whole-house building strategies to eliminate any potential unintended consequences prior to implementing these solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, CARB partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 'Performance House' was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adapt with the homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the 'Performance House' were not cutting-edge, but simply 'best practices practiced'. The focus was on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. When seeking a 30% source energy savings targets over a comparable 2009 IECC code-built home in the cold climate zone, nearly all components of a home must be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. To help builders and architects seeking to match the performance of this home, a step-by-step guide through the building shell components of DOE's Challenge Home are provided in a pictorial story book. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a HERS Index Score of 20 (43 without PV, the minimum target was 55 for compliance). This home was also awarded the 2012 HOBI for Best Green Energy Efficient Home from the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Connecticut.

  13. Evaluation of Modeled and Measured Energy Savings in Existing All Electric Public Housing in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, A.; Lubliner, M.; Howard, L.; Kunkle, R.; Salzberg, E.

    2014-04-01

    This project analyzes the cost effectiveness of energy savings measures installed by a large public housing authority in Salishan, a community in Tacoma Washington. Research focuses on the modeled and measured energy usage of the first six phases of construction, and compares the energy usage of those phases to phase 7. Market-ready energy solutions were also evaluated to improve the efficiency of affordable housing for new and existing (built since 2001) affordable housing in the marine climate of Washington State.

  14. Evaluating Energy Savings in All-Electric Public Housing in the Pacific Northwest, Tacoma, Washington (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    This project analyzes the cost effectiveness of energy savings measures installed by a large public housing authority in Salishan, a community in Tacoma Washington. Research focuses on the modeled and measured energy usage of the first six phases of construction, and compares the energy usage of those phases to phase 7. Market-ready energy solutions were also evaluated to improve the efficiency of affordable housing for new and existing (built since 2001) affordable housing in the marine climate of Washington State.

  15. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  16. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  17. As-Built Modeling of Ojbects for Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kokko, E J; Martz, H E; Chinn, D J; Childs, H R; Jackson, J A; Chambers, D H; Schneberk, D J; Clark, G A

    2005-09-12

    The goal of ''as-built'' computational modeling is to incorporate the most representative geometry and material information for an (fabricated or legacy) object into simulations. While most engineering finite element simulations are based on an object's idealized ''as-designed'' configuration with information obtained from technical drawings or computer-aided design models, ''as-built'' modeling uses nondestructive characterization and metrology techniques to provide the feature information. By incorporating more representative geometry and material features as initial conditions, the uncertainty in the simulation results can be reduced, providing a more realistic understanding of the event and object being modeled. In this paper, key steps and technology areas in the as-built modeling framework are: (1) inspection using non-destructive characterization (NDC) and metrology techniques; (2) data reduction (signal and image processing including artifact removal, data sensor fusion, and geometric feature extraction); and (3) engineering and physics analysis using finite element codes. We illustrate the process with a cylindrical phantom and include a discussion of the key concepts and areas that need improvement. Our results show that reasonable as-built initial conditions based on a volume overlap criteria can be achieved and that notable differences between simulations of the as-built and as-designed configurations can be observed for a given load case. Specifically, a volume averaged difference of accumulated plastic strain of 3% and local spatially varying differences up to 10%. The example presented provides motivation and justification to engineering teams for the additional effort required in the as-built modeling of high value parts. Further validation of the approach has been proposed as future work.

  18. White House Tribal Nations Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White House will host the seventh annual Tribal Nations Conference to allow tribal leaders to engage with the President, cabinet officials, and the White House Council on Native America Affairs about key issues facing tribes.

  19. OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic OPEN HOUSE - Climate Prisms: Arctic WHEN: Jul 17, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, ...

  20. Manhattan Project: The "Big House"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The "Big House" was the dormitory for the Los Alamos Boys Ranch School. Students slept year-round on its unheated porches. During the Manhattan Project, the Big House contained, ...

  1. THE WHITE HOUSE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    THE WHITE HOUSE THE WHITE HOUSE PDF icon THE WHITE HOUSE More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0473 Lapse Documents Inspection Report: IG-0397...

  2. Microsoft Word - S01902_As Built Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 DOE-LM/GJ930-2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 DOE-LM/GJ930 2005 ESL-RPT-2005-05 Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site August 2005 Prepared for U. S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No.

  3. White House Tribal Youth Gathering

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The White House will host the first-ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering to provide American Indian and Alaska Native youth from across the country the opportunity to interact directly with senior Administration officials and the White House Council on Native American Affairs. Registration is due May 8, 2015.

  4. DOE Tour of Zero: Mad River Glen House by PepperTree Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Mad River Glen House by PepperTree Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Mad River Glen House by PepperTree Homes 1 of 15 PepperTree Homes built this 3,750-square-foot home in Waitsfield, Vermont, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 15 This home is expected to save $4,038 per year in energy costs. It has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score of 18-a typical new home built to code achieves a HERS of 80 to 100. 3 of 15 The home's

  5. DOE Tour of Zero: Mad River Glen House by PepperTree Homes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Mad River Glen House by PepperTree Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Mad River Glen House by PepperTree Homes Addthis 1 of 15 PepperTree Homes built this 3,750-square-foot home in Waitsfield, Vermont, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 15 This home is expected to save $4,038 per year in energy costs. It has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score of 18-a typical new home built to code achieves a HERS of 80 to 100. 3 of 15

  6. Annual Performance Evaluation of a Pair of Energy Efficient Houses (WC3 and WC4) in Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C; Jackson, Roderick K; Boudreaux, Philip R

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in 2008, two pairs of energy-saver houses were built at Wolf Creek in Oak Ridge, TN. These houses were designed to maximize energy efficiency using new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The first two houses contained 3713 square feet of conditioned area and were designated as WC1 and WC2; the second pair consisted of 2721 square feet conditioned area with crawlspace foundation and they re called WC3 and WC4. This report is focused on the annual energy performance of WC3 and WC4, and how they compare against a previously benchmarked maximum energy efficient house of a similar footprint. WC3 and WC4 are both about 55-60% more efficient than traditional new construction. Each house showcases a different envelope system: WC3 is built with advanced framing featured cellulose insulation partially mixed with phase change materials (PCM); and WC4 house has cladding composed of an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). The previously benchmarked house was one of three built at the Campbell Creek subdivision in Knoxville, TN. This house (CC3) was designed as a transformation of a builder house (CC1) with the most advanced energy-efficiency features, including solar electricity and hot water, which market conditions are likely to permit within the 2012 2015 period. The builder house itself was representative of a standard, IECC 2006 code-certified, all-electric house built by the builder to sell around 2005 2008.

  7. Solar Affordable Housing Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Affordable Housing Program Why Solar for Tribes Significant economic benefits for residents in electric savings over time Environmental benefits from a clean, renewable energy source Green jobs training and potential paid employment opportunities for tribal members in the growing field of solar installation Impacts to-date 335 Installs 1.5 Megawatts Clean, renewable solar power 189 tribal members volunteers Trained in solar installations Tribal Partners Installation with members of the

  8. Housing characteristics 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report, Housing Characteristics 1993, presents statistics about the energy-related characteristics of US households. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) -- the ninth in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. Over 7 thousand households were surveyed, representing 97 million households nationwide. A second report, to be released in late 1995, will present statistics on residential energy consumption and expenditures.

  9. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 21, 2015 FACT SHEET: Administration Announces New Agenda To Modernize Energy Infrastructure Releases Quadrennial Energy Review The Obama Administration is committed to taking responsible steps to modernize our energy infrastructure, create a clean energy economy built to last, combat climate change, and increase reliance on domestic energy resources. That is why, today, the Administration released the initial installment of the first-ever Quadrennial Energy Review

  10. Affordable Energy-Efficient New Housing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Subrato; Widder, Sarah H.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; McIlvaine, Janet; Chasar, David; Beal, David; Sutherland, Karen; Abbott, , K.; Fonorow, Ken; Eklund, Ken; Lubliner, Michael; Salzberg, Emily; Peeks, B.; Hewes, T.; Kosar, D.

    2012-05-31

    Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America has sponsored research at PNNL to investigate cost-effective, energy-saving home-building technologies and to demonstrate how high-performance homes can deliver lower utility bills, increased comfort, and improved indoor air quality, while maintaining accessibility for low-income homeowners. PNNL and its contractors have been investigating 1) cost-effective whole-house solutions for Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) and specific HFH affiliates in hot-humid and marine climates; 2) cost-effective energy-efficiency improvements for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in new, stick-built and manufactured homes; and 3) energy-efficient domestic hot-water systems.

  11. House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation ...

  12. Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing...

    Energy Saver

    Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily ...

  13. Underground house book

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.

    1980-01-01

    Aesthetics, attitudes, and acceptance of earth-covered buildings are examined initially, followed by an examination of land, money, water, earth, design, heat, and interior factors. Contributions made by architect Frank Lloyd Wright are discussed and reviewed. Contemporary persons, mostly designers, who contribute from their experiences with underground structures are Andy Davis; Rob Roy; Malcolm Wells; John Barnard, Jr.; Jeff Sikora; and Don Metz. A case study to select the site, design, and prepare to construct Earthtech 6 is described. Information is given in appendices on earth-protected buildings and existing basements; financing earth-sheltered housing; heating-load calculations and life-cycle costing; and designer names and addresses. (MCW)

  14. CAMDOpenHouse2016

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices OPEN HOUSE FREE & open to the public Hands on Science Demonstrations Tours of the Laboratory LSU CAMD 6980 Jefferson Hwy Baton Rouge, LA 70806 Phone: 225.578.8887 Fax: 225.578.6954 E-mail:evstev@lsu.edu Website: www.camd.lsu.edu *Located between College Drive and Corporate Boulevard Activities for all ages S a t u r d a y O c t o b e r 1 5 , 2 0 1 6 1 0 A . M . - 2 P . M .

  15. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Home Office Equipment Tables

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 13 pages, 48 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1b. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-2b. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-3b. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-4b. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-5b. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S.

  16. Development of Basic Housing Systems for Maximum Affordability

    SciTech Connect

    Aglan, H.; Gibbons, A.; McQueen, T.M.; Morris, C.; Raines, J.; Wendt, R.L.

    1999-04-19

    The ability to provide safe, habitable, comfortable housing for very low income residents within the target budget of $10,000 presents unique design and construction challenges. However, a number of preliminary conclusions have been inferred as being important concepts relative to the study of affordable housing. The term affordable housing can have many meanings and research is needed to define this explicitly. As it is most often used, affordable housing refers to an economic relationship between the price of housing, household income and current interest rates available from a lending institution. There is no direct relationship between architectural style, construction technology or user needs and the concept of affordability. For any home to be affordable, the home owner must balance the combination of housing needs and desires within the limits of an actual budget. There are many misconceptions that affordable housing must be defined as housing for those who cannot afford the free-market price. The concept of affordable housing must also include a component that recognizes the quality of the housing as an important element of the design and construction. In addition, responses to local climate impacts are necessary and are always part of a regional expression of architectural design. By using careful planning and design it may be possible to construct a limited dwelling unit today for a sum of approximately $10,000. Since the organization of the construction process must involve the owner/occupants as well as other volunteers, the project must not only be well conceived, but well developed and coordinated.

  17. Impacts of alternative residential energy standards - Rural Housing Amendments Study, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Balistocky, S.; Bohn, A.A.; Heidell, J.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lee, A.D.; Pratt, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1985-11-01

    This report has examined the role of manufactured housing in the housing market, the energy impacts of three manufactured housing standards and three site-built standards in 13 cities, and the economic impacts of those standards in 6 cities. The three standards applied to manufactured housing are the HUD Title VI standard (Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards, or MHCSS), the Hud Title II-E standard, and the existing FmHA Title V standard. Those applied to site-built homes are the HUD Minimum Property Standards (MPS), the ASHRAE 90A-80 standard, and the FmHA Title V standard. Based on energy consumption alone, these analyses show that the FmHA Title V standard is the most stringent standard for both housing types (a single-section menufactured home and a single-story detached ''ranch house''). The HUD Title VI standard is the least stringent for manufactured homes, while the HUD Minimum Property Standards are the least stringent for site-built homes. Cost-effectiveness comparisons required by the Act were made for the two prototypical homes. Results of this preliminary economic analysis indicate that none of the site-built standards reflect minimum life-cycle cost as a basic criterion of their development. For manufactured homes, both the FmHA standard and the HUD Title II-E standard reduce life-cycle cost and effect positive first-year cash flows in all cities analyzed when electric resistance heating is assumed. When natural gas heating is used, both standards pass the life-cycle cost test in all cities, but the FmHA standard fails the cash flow test in all but one city. However, in the worst case, net monthly expenditures in the first year are increased by less than $9.

  18. Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground Water Treatment System Monticello, Utah, Permeable Reactive Barrier Site Construction Summary and As-Built Report for Ground ...

  19. SURE HOUSE | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    blend in its Efficient, Affordable, Solar, Innovation--or EASI--House. Learn More AGGIE SOL The University of California, Davis, has strong pedigrees in both sustainable projects...

  20. Solar House in Maummee, Ohio

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This photograph features a home in Maumee, Ohio, built by Decker Homes of Lambertville, Michigan, with a photovoltaic (PV) solar electric system that uses building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV)...

  1. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    November 1, 2013 EXECUTIVE ORDER - - - - - - - PREPARING THE UNITED STATES FOR THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to prepare the Nation for the impacts of climate change by undertaking actions to enhance climate preparedness and resilience, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. Policy. The impacts of climate change -- including an increase in prolonged periods of excessively

  2. Issaquah Highlands Zero Energy Affordable Housing (WA) - YWCA

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, Vincent; DeRobbio, Wendy; Hall, Linda

    2012-04-30

    The YWCA Family Village at Issaquah, Net Zero Energy Approach Project provides a compelling model for how the nation can seriously respond to the critical need for affordable housing while advancing environmental standards and reducing economic inequities. Affordable housing developments for vulnerable members of the community and in today's workforce cannot overlook issues, such as climate impact, energy security and water conservation. This project's advanced building design was based on the goal of creating a 100 year building that could achieve net zero energy usage if funding had been available to support the final pieces of energy generation. The team worked closely with community stakeholders to ensure the baseline components of high quality and efficient building envelopes along with efficient systems were in place to set the stage for future incorporation of energy generating systems such as solar panels. As built, these 146 homes, large child care center and community services areas are proving the value of investing upfront for the benefit of future generations by reducing ongoing utility and maintenance costs with an eye toward environmental stewardship and community/resident education. The DOE award helped fund two critical energy conservation features for the YWCA Family Village at Issaquah campus: 1) super-insulated roof assembly with a continuous air barrier and 2) domestic hot water preheat system. The roof system at the YWCA Family Village at Issaquah project was built to include 6" of Polyiso rigid insulation (R-38) on top of the roof sheathing to provide a super-insulated roof in line with the other green features of the project. Placing the rigid insulation on top of the roof sheathing allows the building to have a continuous layer of insulation and provides a continuous air barrier. The domestic hot water preheat system includes flat panel arrays on roofs of the buildings that heat the water using solar power, which reduces the amount of

  3. Engine Air Intake Manifold Having Built In Intercooler

    DOEpatents

    Freese, V, Charles E.

    2000-09-12

    A turbocharged V type engine can be equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation cooler integrated into the intake manifold, so as to achieve efficiency, cost reductions and space economization improvements. The cooler can take the form of a tube-shell heat exchanger that utilizes a cylindrical chamber in the air intake manifold as the heat exchanger housing. The intake manifold depends into the central space formed by the two banks of cylinders on the V type engine, such that the central space is effectively utilized for containing the manifold and cooler.

  4. Chamberlain Heights Redevelopment: A Large Scale, Cold Climate Study of Affordable Housing Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, K.; Mahle, M.

    2012-03-01

    The City of Meriden Housing Authority (MHA) collaborated with affordable housing developer Jonathon Rose Companies (JRC) to complete a gut renovation of 124 residential units in the Chamberlain Heights retrofit project. The affordable housing community is made up of 36 buildings in duplex and quad configurations located on 22 acres within two miles of downtown Meriden, CT. The final post-retrofit analysis showed 40%-45% source energy savings over the existing pre-retrofit conditions.

  5. Chamberlain Heights Redevelopment: A Large Scale, Cold Climate Study of Affordable Housing Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, K.; Mahle, M.

    2012-03-01

    The City of Meriden Housing Authority (MHA) collaborated with affordable housing developer Jonathon Rose Companies (JRC) to complete a gut renovation of 124 residential units in the Chamberlain Heights retrofit project. The affordable housing community is made up of 36 buildings in duplex and quad configurations located on 22 acres within two miles of downtown Meriden, CT. The final post-retrofit analysis showed 40-45% source energy savings over the existing pre-retrofit conditions.

  6. Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Committee on Energy and Commerce Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subject: The Department of Energy's Role in Advancing the National, Economic, and Energy Security of the United States. Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce 9-15-16_Ernest_Moniz FT HEC.pdf (113.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources BEFORE THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS, SUBCOMMITTEE ON WESTERN HEMISPHERE Order 3690: American LNG

  7. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, P.; Podorson, D.; Varshney, K.

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques -- manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multi-unit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder two-story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  8. Housing characteristics, 1987: Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-26

    This report is the first of a series of reports based on data from the 1987 RECS. The 1987 RECS is the seventh in the series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers. These surveys provide baseline information on how households in the United States use energy. A cross section of housing types such as single-family detached homes, townhouses, large and small apartment buildings, condominiums, and mobile homes were included in the survey. Data from the RECS and a companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public use tapes. 10 figs., 69 tabs.

  9. Transformations, Inc.: Partnering to Build Net-Zero Energy Houses in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Wytrykowska, H.

    2013-09-01

    Transformations, Inc. is a residential development and building company that has partnered with Building Science Corporation to build new construction net-zero energy houses in Massachusetts under the Building America program. There are three communities that will be constructed through this partnership: Devens Sustainable Housing ('Devens'), The Homes at Easthampton Meadow ('Easthampton') andPhase II of the Coppersmith Way Development ('Townsend'). This report intends to cover all of the single-family new construction homes that have been completed to date. The houses built in these developments are net zero energy homes built in a cold climate. They will contribute to finding answers to specific research questions for homes with high R double stud walls and high efficiency ductlessair source heat pump systems ('mini-splits'); allow to explore topics related to the financing of photovoltaic systems and basements vs. slab-on-grade construction; and provide feedback related to the performance of ductless mini-split air source heat pumps.

  10. Transformations, Inc.. Partnering To Build Net-Zero Energy Houses in Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Wytrykowska, H.

    2013-09-01

    Transformations, Inc. is a residential development and building company that has partnered with Building Science Corporation to build new construction net-zero energy houses in Massachusetts under the Building America program. There are three communities that will be constructed through this partnership: Devens Sustainable Housing ("Devens"), The Homes at Easthampton Meadow ("Easthampton") and Phase II of the Coppersmith Way Development ("Townsend"). This report intends to cover all of the single-family new construction homes that have been completed to date. The houses built in these developments are net zero energy homes built in a cold climate. They will contribute to finding answers to specific research questions for homes with high R double stud walls and high efficiency ductless air source heat pump systems ("mini-splits"); allow to explore topics related to the financing of photovoltaic systems and basements vs. slab-on-grade construction; and provide feedback related to the performance of ductless mini-split air source heat pumps.

  11. Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

  12. Air Distribution Retrofit Strategies for Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, J.; Conlin, F.; Holloway, Parker; Podorson, David; Varshney, Kapil

    2014-03-01

    In multifamily and attached buildings, traditional duct sealing methods are often impractical or costly and disruptive because of the difficulty in accessing leakage sites. In this project, two retrofit duct sealing techniques, manually-applied sealants and injecting a spray sealant, were implemented in several low-rise multiunit buildings. An analysis on the cost and performance of the two methods are presented. Each method was used in twenty housing units: approximately half of each group of units are single story and the remainder are two story. Results show that duct leakage to the outside was reduced by an average of 59% through the use of manual methods, and by 90% in the units where the injected spray sealant was used. It was found that 73% of the leakage reduction in homes that were treated with injected spray sealant was attributable to the manual sealing done at boots, returns and the air handler. The cost of manually-applying sealant ranged from $275 to $511 per unit and for the injected spray sealant the cost was $700 per unit. Modeling suggests a simple payback of 2.2 years for manual sealing and 4.7 years for the injected spray sealant system. Utility bills were collected for one year before and after the retrofits. Utility bill analysis shows 14% and 16% energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing procedure respectively in heating season whereas in cooling season, energy savings using injected spray sealant system and hand sealing were both 16%.

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mutual Housing California...

    Energy Saver

    Mutual Housing California, Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, CA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mutual Housing California, Mutual Housing at Spring Lake, Woodland, CA ...

  14. 2016 Housing Innovation Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    2016 Housing Innovation Awards 2016 Housing Innovation Awards The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Housing Innovation Awards recognize the very best in innovation on the path to ...

  15. Self-adjustable supplemental support system for a cylindrical container in a housing

    DOEpatents

    Blaushild, Ronald M.

    1987-01-01

    A self-adjustable supplementary support system for a cylindrical container coaxially disposed in a cylindrical housing by upper flanged supports has a plurality of outwardly extending bracket units on the external surface of the container which coact with inwardly extending resiliently outwardly extending bracket units on the inner wall of the cylindrical housing. The bracket units have flanges which form a concave surface that seats on support bars, attached by links to torsion bars that are secured to ring segments annularly spaced about the inner wall of the cylindrical housing and the bracket units and support bars coact with each other to radially position and support the container in the housing during movement of the two components from a vertical to a horizontal position, and during transportation of the same.

  16. Self-adjustable supplemental support system for a cylindrical container in a housing

    DOEpatents

    Blaushild, R.M.

    1987-01-30

    A self-adjustable supplementary support system for a cylindrical container coaxially disposed in a cylindrical housing by upper flanged supports has a plurality of outwardly extending bracket units on the external surface of the container which coact with inwardly extending resiliently outwardly extending bracket units on the inner wall of the cylindrical housing. The bracket units have flanges which form a concave surface that seats on support bars, attached by links to torsion bars that are secured to ring segments annularly spaced about the inner wall of the cylindrical housing and the bracket units and support bars coact with each other to radially position and support the container in the housing during movement of the two components from a vertical to a horizontal position, and during transportation of the same. 14 figs.

  17. Building America Case Studies for Existing Homes: Philadelphia Housing Authority Energy-Efficiency Turnover Protocols

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Philadelphia Housing Authority worked with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America Program to integrate energy-efficiency measures into the refurbishment process that each unit normally goes through between occupancies.

  18. Evaluation of Affordable Prototype Houses at Two Levels of Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, R.; Barker, G.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

    2006-10-01

    Two high performance prototype houses were built in Carbondale, Colorado, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America (BA) Program. Each prototype was a 1256 ft2 (117 m2), 1-story, 3-bedroom house, and met the local requirements for affordable housing. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performed short-term field testing and DOE-2.2 simulations in support of this project at the end of December 2004. We also installed long-term monitoring equipment in one of the houses, and are currently tracking the performance of key building systems under occupied conditions. One of the houses (designated H1) included a package of cost-effective energy efficiency features that placed it well above the Energy Star level, targeting a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score of 88-89. The other (designated H2) was a BA research house, targeting a HERS score of 94-95, and 45% whole-house energy savings compared to the BA Benchmark. Preliminary results from the field evaluation indicate that the energy savings for both houses will exceed the design targets established for the project, although the performance of certain building systems, including the ventilation and foundation systems, leave some room for improvement.

  19. Marketing manufactured housing under the ''Super Good Cents'' Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, B.L.; Smith, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a strategy for including manufactured housing (MH) in Bonneville Power Administration's Super Good Cents (SGC) Program. This report presents information on the site-built SGC program, the characterization of MH consumers, the options for including MH in the SGC program, and the recommendations for including MHs in the SGC program. The purposed strategy for including MHs in the SGC program is designed to reduce risks to manufacturers and dealers, stimulate demand, and allow for maximum flexibility.

  20. Recycling in public housing: The Syracuse Housing Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, K.C.; DeVoe, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    The mission of the Syracuse Housing Authority (SHA, Syracuse, N.Y.) is to provide clean, safe, and affordable housing for low-income citizens of the city of Syracuse. In doing so, it has worked to be innovative. SHA owns and manages 12 federally funded housing developments and one New York state-funded project, in addition to managing two buildings owned by the city. After nearly 60 years of success in providing affordable housing in the Syracuse area, the pioneering SHA took on another daunting mission in the 1990s: modernization of waste collection and recycling. By the beginning of 1990, SHA was facing two mandates: to initiate a recycling program by July 1, as mandated by Onondaga County law, and to reduce its trash bill significantly.

  1. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Efficiency Action Plan Today, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the launch of a new U.S.-China Energy Efficiency Action Plan to strengthen the economy, improve energy security and combat climate change by reducing energy waste in both countries. The United States and China consume over 40 percent of global energy resources, costing businesses and households in the two countries roughly $1.5 trillion per year. Working together to improve energy efficiency in

  2. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Shale Gas Resource Initiative Today, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao announced the launch of a new U.S.-China Shale Gas Resource Initiative. This Initiative will help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, promote energy security and create commercial opportunities for U.S. companies through:  Shale gas resource assessment: The Initiative will use experience gained in the United States to assess China's shale gas potential and promote environmentally sustainable development of shale

  3. Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development Conference Travois Indian Country Affordable Housing & Economic Development Conference April 4, 2016 8:00AM CDT to ...

  4. 2015 Housing Innovation Awards Application Form | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Housing Innovation Awards Application Form 2015 Housing Innovation Awards Application Form ... The 2015 ceremony will take place at the EEBA Excellence in Building Conference & Expo ...

  5. Peoria Tribe: Housing Authority- 2010 Project

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Housing Authority of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma (Peoria Housing Authority or PHA) will conduct the "PHA Weatherization Training Project."

  6. Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing Energy Efficiency Upgrades in Multifamily Housing Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Energy Efficiency Upgrades in ...

  7. Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential Efficiency Housing Innovation Awards Recognize Leadership in Residential Efficiency September 25, 2014 - 1:40pm ...

  8. Grandma's House (Weatherization) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Grandma's House (Weatherization) Grandma's House (Weatherization) Addthis When you weatherize a home it needs to work as a system. Learn more here

  9. Assessing the Energy Savings of Tankless Water Heater Retrofits in Public Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, R.; Walters, R.; Dwiantoro, D.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis, and findings from a case study of a 110 unit retrofit of gas tankless water heaters in a hot/humid climate in Alachua County, Florida. The housing units had their gas-fired tank type water heaters replaced with gas-fired tankless water heaters as part of a federal program that targeted reduced energy use in public housing.

  10. Assessing the Energy Savings of Tankless Water Heater Retrofits in Public Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, R.; Walters, R.; Dwiantoro, D.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis, and findings from a case study of a 110 unit retrofit of gas tankless water heaters in a hot/humid climate in Alachua County, Florida.The gas-fired tank type water heaters in the housing units were replaced with gas-fired tankless water heaters as part of a federal program that targeted reduced energy use in public housing.

  11. SURE HOUSE | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    just yet, but the ultra-efficient Alf House could soon change that. Learn More CASA DEL SOL With the 2015 Solar Decathlon taking place in Irvine, California, Team Orange County --...

  12. ALF HOUSE | Department of Energy

    Energy.gov [DOE] (indexed site)

    was looking for a way to represent its home territory. They found their inspiration in nature: the golden poppy, California's state flower. Learn More DURA URBAN HOUSE People from...

  13. Public Housing Project Performance Benchmarks

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reports five major performance metrics that can be used to benchmark proposed energy service company projects within public housing, disaggregated and reported by major retrofit strategy. Author: U.S. Department of Energy

  14. Important notice about using /house

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    using house July 6, 2012 Description There have been a lot of issues recently with NFS hangs on the gpint machines. The origin of the gpint hanging has been determined to be...

  15. Open House with Environmental Scientists

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Open House with Environmental Scientists Open House with Environmental Scientists WHEN: Apr 23, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Laboratory Environmental Research and Monitoring Event Description Ask Laboratory biologists and anthropologists your natural resource questions. In honor of Earth Week, Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental

  16. White_House_0921.pdf

    Energy Saver

    Market Grows | Department of Energy White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as Market Grows White House, DOE Announce New Residential PACE Financing Initiatives as Market Grows The HERO logo. The Obama Administration's Clean Energy Savings for All Initiative is working to provide American households with more tools to complete renewable and home energy efficiency improvements. As part of this effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released updated "Best

  17. Earth sheltered housing phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, L.L.

    1981-06-21

    Both national and international attention has recently been focused on earth sheltered construction as an emerging energy alternative. This is especially true for the High Plains region of the central United States. Traditionally, inhabitants of this region have been sensitized to the need for windstorm protection. However, the dramatic potentials for energy savings have served as a strong secondary inducement to the burgeoning construction activity in what is now viewed as a contemporary dwelling concept. The typical characteristics of such dwellings are reviewed as well as the educational challenge awaiting professional input to this developing boom in earth sheltered construction. 12 refs.

  18. Built-in-test by signature inspection (bitsi)

    DOEpatents

    Bergeson, Gary C.; Morneau, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A system and method for fault detection for electronic circuits. A stimulus generator sends a signal to the input of the circuit under test. Signature inspection logic compares the resultant signal from test nodes on the circuit to an expected signal. If the signals do not match, the signature inspection logic sends a signal to the control logic for indication of fault detection in the circuit. A data input multiplexer between the test nodes of the circuit under test and the signature inspection logic can provide for identification of the specific node at fault by the signature inspection logic. Control logic responsive to the signature inspection logic conveys information about fault detection for use in determining the condition of the circuit. When used in conjunction with a system test controller, the built-in test by signature inspection system and method can be used to poll a plurality of circuits automatically and continuous for faults and record the results of such polling in the system test controller.

  19. Inside the White House: Solar Panels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Inside the White House: Solar Panels Inside the White House: Solar Panels

  20. Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S.........................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    ........................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................. 109.6 77.3 63.4 4.1 1.8 2.3 5.6 1............................................................ 103.3 71.9 58.6 3.9 1.6 2.2 5.5 2 or More............................................... 6.2 5.4 4.8 Q Q Q Q Do Not Use an Oven................................. 1.5 0.8 0.6 Q N Q Q Most-Used Oven Fuel

  1. Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S.........................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................. 109.6 32.3 7.9 3.3 5.9 14.1 1.1 1............................................................ 103.3 31.4 7.6 3.3 5.7 13.7 1.1 2 or More............................................... 6.2 0.9 0.3 Q Q 0.4 Q Do Not Use an Oven................................. 1.5 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Q Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric.................................................. 67.9 19.4 4.5

  2. Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S.............................................................

    Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    .... 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven................................................. 109.6 14.4 7.2 12.4 12.4 18.6 18.3 17.2 9.1 1................................................................ 103.3 13.5 6.8 11.8 11.5 17.7 17.5 16.1 8.4 2 or More................................................... 6.2 1.0 0.4 0.6 0.8 0.9 0.8 1.1 0.7 Do Not Use an Oven..................................... 1.5 0.3 Q Q Q 0.3 0.3 Q Q Most-Used Oven Fuel

  3. Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion ...

  4. Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li/(CFx)n and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li(CFx)n and LiFePO4 Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li(CFx)n ...

  5. Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li/(CFx)n and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li(CFx)n and LiFePO4 Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li...

  6. Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: BrightBuilt Home...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: BrightBuilt Home, Modular Zero Energy Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: BrightBuilt Home, Modular Zero Energy When done ...

  7. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  8. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation. Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-15

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  9. A Built for Purpose Micro-Hole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Bart Patton

    2007-09-30

    This report will serve as the final report on the work performed from the contract period October 2005 thru April 2007. The project 'A Built for Purpose Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)' purpose was to upgrade an existing state-of-the-art Coiled Tubing Drilling Rig to a Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) capable of meeting the specifications and tasks of the Department of Energy. The individual tasks outlined to meet the Department of Energy's specifications are: (1) Concept and development of lubricator and tool deployment system; (2) Concept and development of process control and data acquisition; (3) Concept and development of safety and efficiency improvements; and (4) Final unit integration and testing. The end result of the MCTR upgrade has produced a unit capable of meeting the following requirements: (1) Capable of handling 1-inch through 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing (Currently dressed for 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing and capable of running up to 3-1/2-inch coiled tubing); (2) Capable of drilling and casing surface, intermediate, production and liner hole intervals; (3) Capable of drilling with coiled tubing and has all controls and installation piping for a top drive; (4) Rig is capable of running 7-5/8-inch range 2 casing; and (5) Capable of drilling 5,000 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 6,000 ft true measured depth (TMD).

  10. Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    More than 1 million HUD-supported public housing units provide rental housing for eligible low-income families across the country. A survey of over 100 PHAs across the country indicated that there is a high level of interest in developing low cost solutions that improve energy efficiency and can be seamlessly included in the refurbishment process. Further, PHAs, have incentives (both internal and external) to reduce utility bills. ARIES worked with two public housing authorities (PHAs) to develop packages of energy efficiency retrofit measures the PHAs can cost effectively implement with their own staffs in the normal course of housing operations at the time when units are refurbished between occupancies. The energy efficiency turnover protocols emphasized air infiltration reduction, duct sealing and measures that improve equipment efficiency. ARIES documented implementation in ten housing units. Reductions in average air leakage were 16-20% and duct leakage reductions averaged 38%. Total source energy consumption savings was estimated at 6-10% based on BEopt modeling with a simple payback of 1.7 to 2.2 years. Implementation challenges were encountered mainly related to required operational changes and budgetary constraints. Nevertheless, simple measures can feasibly be accomplished by PHA staff at low or no cost. At typical housing unit turnover rates, these measures could impact hundreds of thousands of unit per year nationally.

  11. Housing Innovation Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Zero Energy Ready Home » Housing Innovation Awards Housing Innovation Awards HIA Awards.JPG Since 2013, The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Housing Innovation Awards has recognized the very best in innovation on the path to zero energy ready homes. The Housing Innovation Awards recognize forward-thinking builders for delivering American homebuyers with the home of the future, today. Explore these award winning homes on the Tour of Zero. The 2016 Housing Innovation Awards ceremony was held

  12. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, B.

    1995-04-11

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow there between. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow. 8 figures.

  13. Ceramic tile expansion engine housing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Blake

    1995-01-01

    An expandable ceramic tile housing for a high temperature engine is disclosed wherein each tile is independently supported in place in an interlocking matrix by retention mechanisms which mechanically couple the individual ceramic tiles to an outer metal support housing while maintaining thermal isolation of the metal housing from the ceramic tiles. The ceramic tiles are formed with either an octagonal front face portion and a square shank portion or a square front face portion with an octagonal shank portion. The length of the sides of the octagonal front face portion on one tile is equal to the length of the sides of the square front face portion of adjoining tiles to permit formation of an interlocking matrix. Fibrous ceramic sealing material may be placed between radial and tangential facing surfaces of adjacent tiles to limit radial gas flow therebetween. Labyrinth-sealed pressure-controlled compartments may be established between the tile housing and the outer metal support housing to control radial gas flow.

  14. DOE Tour of Zero: Birch House by Bundle Design Studio | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Birch House by Bundle Design Studio DOE Tour of Zero: Birch House by Bundle Design Studio 1 of 12 Bundle Design Studio built this 2,065-square-foot home in Bellingham, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 12 Sliding wooden screens provide shading on south-facing windows, while the planted "green" roof helps control storm water runoff. 3 of 12 Over the 2-by-6 framing, the builder installed a

  15. DOE Tour of Zero: Minden House by Knaggs Construction | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Minden House by Knaggs Construction DOE Tour of Zero: Minden House by Knaggs Construction 1 of 8 Knaggs Construction built this 4,566-square-foot home in Kearney, Nebraska, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 8 The site has the advantage of a southern exposure for future solar panels. The slope allowed for the construction of a daylight basement providing living space without increasing the building footprint. 3 of 8

  16. DOE Tour of Zero: Whitewebs Lane House by Clifton View Homes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    of Energy Whitewebs Lane House by Clifton View Homes DOE Tour of Zero: Whitewebs Lane House by Clifton View Homes 1 of 11 Clifton View Homes built this 1,852-square-foot home in Greenbank, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. The south-facing roof is designed to hold enough solar photovoltaic panels to power the home and an electric car. 2 of 11 This home is expected to save $880 per year in energy costs after cutting

  17. DOE Tour of Zero: Birch House by Bundle Design Studio | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Birch House by Bundle Design Studio DOE Tour of Zero: Birch House by Bundle Design Studio Addthis 1 of 12 Bundle Design Studio built this 2,065-square-foot home in Bellingham, Washington, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 12 Sliding wooden screens provide shading on south-facing windows, while the planted "green" roof helps control storm water runoff. 3 of 12 Over the 2-by-6 framing, the builder installed

  18. DOE Tour of Zero: Minden House by Knaggs Construction | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Minden House by Knaggs Construction DOE Tour of Zero: Minden House by Knaggs Construction Addthis 1 of 8 Knaggs Construction built this 4,566-square-foot home in Kearney, Nebraska, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 8 The site has the advantage of a southern exposure for future solar panels. The slope allowed for the construction of a daylight basement providing living space without increasing the building

  19. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM EXTRACTION (PUREX) FACILITY ALARACT DEMONSTRATION FOR FILTER HOUSING

    SciTech Connect

    LEBARON GJ

    2008-11-25

    This document presents an As Low As Reasonably Achievable Control Technology (ALARACT) demonstration for evaluating corrosion on the I-beam supporting filter housing No.9 for the 291-A-l emission unit of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The PUREX facility is currently in surveillance and maintenance mode. During a State of Washington, Department of Health (WDOH) 291-A-l emission unit inspection, a small amount of corrosion was observed at the base of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter housing. A series of internal and external inspections identified the source of the corrosion material as oxidation of a small section of one of the carbon steel I-beams that provides support to the stainless steel filter housing. The inspections confirmed the corrosion is isolated to one I-beam support location and does not represent any compromise of the structural support or filter housing integrity. Further testing and inspections of the support beam corrosion and its cause were conducted but did not determine the cause. No definitive evidence was found to support any degradation of the housing. Although no degradation of the housing was found, a conservative approach will be implemented. The following actions will be taken: (1) The current operating filter housing No.9 will be removed from service. (2) The only remaining available filter housings (No.1, No.2, and No.3) will be placed in service. These filter housings have new HEPA filters fitted with stainless steel frames and faceguards which were installed in the spring of 2007. (3) Filter housings No.5 and No.10 will be put on standby as backups. To document the assessment of the unit, a draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing was prepared, and informally provided to WDOH on August 7, 2008. A follow up WDOH response to the draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing questioned whether

  20. Canadian House Dust Study: Lead Bioaccessibility and Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    P Rasmussen; S Beauchemin; M Chenier; C Levesque; L MacLean; L Marrow; H Jones-Otazo; S Petrovic; L McDonald; H Gardner

    2011-12-31

    Vacuum samples were collected from 1025 randomly selected urban Canadian homes to investigate bioaccessible Pb (Pb{sub S}) concentrations in settled house dust. Results indicate a polymodal frequency distribution, consisting of three lognormally distributed subpopulations defined as 'urban background' (geomean 58 {micro}g g{sup -1}), 'elevated' (geomean 447 {micro}g g{sup -1}), and 'anomalous' (geomean 1730 {micro}g g{sup -1}). Dust Pb{sub S} concentrations in 924 homes (90%) fall into the 'urban background' category. The elevated and anomalous subpopulations predominantly consist of older homes located in central core areas of cities. The influence of house age is evidenced by a moderate correlation between house age and dust Pb{sub S} content (R{sup 2} = 0.34; n = 1025; p < 0.01), but it is notable that more than 10% of homes in the elevated/anomalous category were built after 1980. Conversely, the benefit of home remediation is evidenced by the large number of homes (33%) in the background category that were built before 1960. The dominant dust Pb species determined using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy were as follows: Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb sulfate, Pb chromate, Pb oxide, Pb citrate, Pb metal, Pb adsorbed to Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides, and Pb adsorbed to humate. Pb bioaccessibility estimated from solid phase speciation predicts Pb bioaccessibility measured using a simulated gastric extraction (R{sup 2} = 0.85; n = 12; p < 0.0001). The trend toward increased Pb bioaccessibility in the elevated and anomalous subpopulations (75% {+-} 18% and 81% {+-} 8%, respectively) compared to background (63% {+-} 18%) is explained by the higher proportion of bioaccessible compounds used as pigments in older paints (Pb carbonate and Pb hydroxyl carbonate). This population-based study provides a nationally representative urban baseline for applications in human health risk assessment and risk management.

  1. The Performance House - A Cold Climate Challenge Home

    SciTech Connect

    Puttagunta, S.; Grab, J.; Williamson, J.

    2013-08-01

    Working with builder partners on test homes allows for vetting of whole-house building strategies to eliminate any potential unintended consequences prior to implementing these solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, CARB partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 "Performance House" was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adapt with the homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the "Performance House" were not cutting-edge, but simply "best practices practiced". The focus was on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. When seeking a 30% source energy savings targets over a comparable 2009 IECC code-built home in the cold climate zone, nearly all components of a home must be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. To help builders and architects seeking to match the performance of this home, a step-by-step guide through the building shell components of DOE's Challenge Home are provided in a pictorial story book. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a HERS Index Score of 20 (43 without PV, the minimum target was 55 for compliance). This home was also awarded the 2012 HOBI for Best Green Energy Efficient Home from the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Connecticut.

  2. Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

    2006-02-01

    A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

  3. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: The Performance House: A Cold Climate Challenge Home, Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    2013-11-01

    By working with builder partners on test homes, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America program can vet whole-house building strategies and avoid potential unintended consequences of implementing untested solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, Connecticut. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 “Performance House” was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adaptable to the needs of homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the “Performance House” were best practices rather than cutting edge, with a focus on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. Achieving 30% source energy savings compared with a home built to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code in the cold climate zone requires that nearly all components and systems be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 20 (43 without photovoltaics [PV]).

  4. Senior Advisor Huizenga's Written Statement before the House Energy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Water Development Subcommittee on Appropriations (March 21, 2012) | Department of Energy Energy and Water Development Subcommittee on Appropriations (March 21, 2012) Senior Advisor Huizenga's Written Statement before the House Energy and Water Development Subcommittee on Appropriations (March 21, 2012) Written Statement of David Huizenga, Senior Advisor for Environmental Management, United States Department of Energy, before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book

    5 2004 Number of Industrialized Housing Manufacturers Versus Production (Stick-Builders) Companies Type Panelized Modular (1) HUD-Code Production Builders Component Manufacturers Special (Commercial) Units Note(s): Source(s): 170 1) 170 of these companies also produce panelized homes. Automated Builder Magazine, Mar. 2005, p. 34-35; Automated Builder Magazine, Jan. 2004, p. 16. Number of Companies 3,500 200 90 7,000 2,200

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, Ithaca, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services Ithaca, NY BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study 2013: Transformation, Inc., Production House, Devens, MA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Production House Devens, MA BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in to give you superior

  8. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Quadrant Homes, Kent,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Washington | Department of Energy Quadrant Homes, Kent, Washington Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Quadrant Homes, Kent, Washington Case study of Quadrant Homes, who worked with Building America partner WSU Energy Extension to design HERS-65 homes with ducts in conditioned space; 2x6 factory-built walls; and systems-engineered streamlined construction. Quadrant Homes: Kentlake Highlands - Kent, WA (653.91 KB) More Documents & Publications Building America

  9. DOE-HUD Initiative on Energy Efficiency in Housing: A federal partnership. Program summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Brinch, J.

    1996-06-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Department of Housing and urban Development (HUD) is the expansion of home ownership and affordable housing opportunities. Recognizing that energy efficiency is a key component in an affordable housing strategy, HUD and the US Department of Energy (DOE) created the DOE-HUD Initiative on Energy Efficiency in Housing. The DOE-HUD Initiative was designed to share the results of DOE research with housing providers throughout the nation, to reduce energy costs in federally-subsidized dwelling units and improve their affordability and comfort. This Program Summary Report provides an overview of the DOE-HUD Initiative and detailed project descriptions of the twenty-seven projects carried out with Initiative funding.

  10. Open House | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    Open House Open House In early 2015, PARC moved it's adminstration offices to Siegle Hall 4th floor on Washington University in St. Louis' campus. In celebration of this move, we...

  11. Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of iStockphotobrebca. A whole-house ventilation...

  12. Sustainability Around the House | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sustainability Around the House Sustainability Around the House April 13, 2015 - 7:46am Addthis Rain barrels collect rain water and provide a free source of fresh water for your ...

  13. PARC Open House | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    PARC Open House PARC Open House Join us for food and refreshments April 10, 2015 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm Washington University in St. Louis, Seigle Hall 4th Floor, Suite 435 We welcome...

  14. Native American Housing: Obstacles and Opportunities

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), this event will cover tribal housing and how to develop and implement programs based on and conducive to local conditions and...

  15. 2014 Housing Innovation Awards DOE Challenge Home Application...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Housing Innovation Awards DOE Challenge Home Application 2014 Housing Innovation Awards DOE Challenge Home Application The U.S. Department of Energy's Housing Innovation Awards ...

  16. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Energy Saver

    House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House ... More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy ...

  17. Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Demonstration House...

    Energy Saver

    Demonstration House of Cold-Climate Solutions for Affordable Housing Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Demonstration House of Cold-Climate Solutions for Affordable ...

  18. Argonne Open House 2016 | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - all webpages (Extended Search)

    day of discovery and family fun. The Open House featured interactive demonstrations, ... batteries --Electricity transmission --Smart Grid Environment -Biology --Computational ...

  19. Advanced House Framing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Design » Design for Efficiency » Advanced House Framing Advanced House Framing Two-story home using advanced framing techniques. Two-story home using advanced framing techniques. Advanced house framing, sometimes called optimum value engineering (OVE), refers to framing techniques designed to reduce the amount of lumber used and waste generated in the construction of a wood-framed house. These techniques boost energy efficiency by replacing lumber with insulation material while maintaining the

  20. Builders Challenge Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Cold and Very Cold Climate – Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2011-02-01

    This document describes measures builders can use to construct homes that have whole-house energy savings of 40% in the cold and very cold climate region of the United States.