National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hosts mindi farber-deanda

  1. Second AEO2016 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    April 8, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: MINDI FARBER-DEANDA ACTING TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: Second AEO2016 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on February 29, 2016) Attendees: Joseph Benneche (EIA) Katie Dyl (EIA) Terry Yen (EIA) Danya Murali (EIA) Laura Singer (EIA) Faouzi Aloulou (EIA) Dana

  2. Hosting Webpages

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosting Webpages Hosting Webpages While PDSF no longer provides a webserver for its users' webpages can be hosted from your group's project directory. To do this put your pages under /project/projectdirs/<your_group>/www and they will be visible as http://portal.nersc.gov/project/<your_group>/<yourpage.html> For more information about using NGF please see Other Filesystems here on the PDSF pages or the NERSC page about Science Gateways. Last edited: 2016-04-11 17:50:3

  3. Glob-Hosts

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-08-31

    The glob-hosts utility manipulates hostlist strings in UNIX shell scripts. Hostlists are a parseable string representatin of list of hosts, which compress nicely when a group of hosts are named with contiguous numeric suffixes. For example, the hosts blue1, blue2, and blue3 can be represented by the hostlist string "blue1, blue2, blue3" or equivalently "blue[1-3]". The globhost utility cn peform the following operations on a hostlist string: count, size, expand, nth, union, minus, intersection, andmore » exclude.« less

  4. hosting-transims-online

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosting the TRANSIMS Online Community Scott B. Smith, Ph.D. US DOT RITA Volpe Center ... You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ... Scott Smith ...

  5. DOE Host: Gene Turner LANL Technical Hosts: Terrill Lemke and...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Host: Gene Turner LANL Technical Hosts: Terrill Lemke and Steve Veenis LANL Environmental Outreach: envoutreach@lanl.gov, Lorrie Bonds Lopez @ 667-0216 Agenda Individual Permit for ...

  6. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  7. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  8. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  9. NERSC Hosts Digital Stargazing Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Hosts Digital Stargazing Portal NERSC Hosts Digital Stargazing Portal June 4, 2015 Legacy highres 1400x800 Courtesy of DECam Legacy Survey Even non-scientists can now browse sky survey images hosted at NERSC. The DECam Legacy Survey has published the first in a series of web-based catalogs that will offer an update to images of the night sky originally taken with the 15-year-old camera of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In the spirit of the new information age, the survey will share frequent

  10. Westinghouse to host education fair

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    to Host Education Fair CARLSBAD, N.M., June 8, 2000 - The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) invites the public to participate in an education fair June 14 in Carlsbad....

  11. NERSC Hosts Digital Stargazing Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    browse sky survey images hosted at NERSC. The DECam Legacy Survey has published the first in a series of web-based catalogs that will offer an update to images of the night sky ...

  12. High Impact Technology HQ- Host a Site

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    We are always looking for partners to host technology demonstrations. Host site participants receive recognition by the Department of Energy, site applicability analysis as well as the opportunity...

  13. High Impact Technology Hub- Host a Site

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    We are always looking for partners to host technology demonstrations. Host site participants receive recognition by the Department of Energy, site applicability analysis as well as the opportunity...

  14. Host Event Based Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Chugg

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of INL’s research on this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of a host event based network monitoring tool and the effects on host performance. Current host based network monitoring tools work on polling which can miss activity if it occurs between polls. Instead of polling, a tool could be developed that makes use of event APIs in the operating system to receive asynchronous notifications of network activity. Analysis and logging of these events will allow the tool to construct the complete real-time and historical network configuration of the host while the tool is running. This research focused on three major operating systems commonly used by SCADA systems: Linux, WindowsXP, and Windows7. Windows 7 offers two paths that have minimal impact on the system and should be seriously considered. First is the new Windows Event Logging API, and, second, Windows 7 offers the ALE API within WFP. Any future work should focus on these methods.

  15. HOST

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ...

  16. NREL Hosts Consumer Energy Expo

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosts Consumer Energy Expo For more information contact: Sarah Holmes Barba, 303-275-3023 email: Sarah Barba Golden, Colo., May. 23, 2001 - Consumers can learn about reducing their home energy consumption and get advice from experts who specialize in energy efficient and renewable energy products and services at the Consumer Energy Expo June 14 - 16 at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The Expo includes exhibits and activities for the entire family.

  17. TRIDAC host computer functional specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, S.M.; Hunter, S.L.

    1983-08-23

    The purpose of this document is to outline the baseline functional requirements for the Triton Data Acquisition and Control (TRIDAC) Host Computer Subsystem. The requirements presented in this document are based upon systems that currently support both the SIS and the Uranium Separator Technology Groups in the AVLIS Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and upon the specific demands associated with the extended safe operation of the SIS Triton Facility.

  18. EM Hosts Contract Performance and Management Workshop

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM hosted the Environmental Management Contract Performance and Management Workshop at DOE headquarters Wednesday.

  19. HostDesigner, Version 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-18

    HostDesigner is a computer-aided molecular design code that enables the general application of de novo structure-based methods to problems in chemistry and material science. Its purpose is to identify organic molecules with 3D structures that match user-input specifications. To accomplish this, the code connects chemical fragments to build millions of potential molecules, evaluates the resulting structures based on geometric constraints, and outputs a rank-ordered list of candidates. Example applications include the design of metal ion sequestering agents for use in separations processes, molecules that form self-assembled nanoscale containers, and molecular building blocks for metal-organic frameworks.

  20. KCP Field Office hosts leadership meeting | National Nuclear...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Office hosts leadership meeting KCP Field Office hosts leadership meeting The Kansas City Field Office recently hosted the semi-annual NA-00 Leadership meeting for field...

  1. HostDesigner, Version 3

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-09-18

    HostDesigner is a computer-aided molecular design code that enables the general application of de novo structure-based methods to problems in chemistry and material science. Its purpose is to identify organic molecules with 3D structures that match user-input specifications. To accomplish this, the code connects chemical fragments to build millions of potential molecules, evaluates the resulting structures based on geometric constraints, and outputs a rank-ordered list of candidates. Example applications include the design of metal ionmore » sequestering agents for use in separations processes, molecules that form self-assembled nanoscale containers, and molecular building blocks for metal-organic frameworks.« less

  2. OREM Hosts Community Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hosts Community Workshop OREM Hosts Community Workshop The Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) hosted a community workshop on June 24. The purpose of the workshop was to develop a set of ideas that OREM and the Oak Ridge community can work on together to help maintain momentum in the Oak Ridge environmental cleanup program. More than 80 members of the Oak Ridge community were present for the interactive dialogue. OREM community workshop presentation (8.03 MB) Community Workshop

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office Hosts Alternative Aviation Fuel...

    Energy Savers

    Related Articles Bioenergy Technologies Office Hosts Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Brings Lead Experts to Inform Algae-Based Biofuel Strategy ...

  4. PyGridware OGSI Hosting Container

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-08-01

    PyGridWare OGSI Hosting Container provides a Python container for building Open Grid Services Infrastructure (OGSI) services. It provides a complete implementation of the OGSI standars.

  5. WIPP Hosts All-Hazards Planning Meeting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    February 20, 2015 WIPP hosted the first annual All- Hazards, Offsite Interface Briefing ... Center (CEMRC) and URENCO, a uranium enrichment company located near Eunice, New Mexico. ...

  6. Laboratory hosts 12th annual HAZMAT Challenge

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory hosts 12th annual HAZMAT Challenge Teams from New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Arizona ... At the Laboratory-sponsored event, teams from New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Arizona ...

  7. Host Site Criteria for Each Demonstration Opportunity

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    We are always looking for partners to host technology demonstrations. Host site participants receive recognition by the Department of Energy, site applicability analysis as well as the opportunity to preview and provide feedback on the performance of high-impact technologies.

  8. Host compounds for red phosphorescent OLEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Chuanjun; Cheon, Kwang -Ohk

    2015-08-25

    Novel compounds containing a triphenylene moiety linked to an .alpha..beta. connected binaphthyl ring system are provided. These compounds have surprisingly good solubility in organic solvents and are useful as host compounds in red phosphorescent OLEDs.

  9. AMO Hosted Workshop on Composite Manufacturing

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Manufacturing Office will host a workshop on Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing on January 13, 2014 at the Hilton Crystal City in Arlington, VA.

  10. OREM hosts annual community budget workshop

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 29, the Oak Ridge Office of EM hosted its annual community budget workshop. The organization invited stakeholders to share their priorities as it begins developing its Fiscal Year 2017 budget.

  11. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  12. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  13. Energy Department Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER 2012 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    R&D Newsletter. The Energy Department will host an exhibit booth at the American Wind ... Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER Wind Program to Host Exhibit Booth at AWEA's Offshore WINDPOWER

  14. Department of Energy to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting DOE to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee Meeting Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Hosts Conference Call on Shale Gas Draft Report

  15. Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and...

  16. W&M, JLab Host International Neutrino Workshop (William & Mary...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    W&M, JLab Host International Neutrino Workshop (William & Mary News & Events) External Link: http:www.wm.edunewsstories2012william--mary-hosts-international-neutrino-w... By ...

  17. Core-Collapse Supernovae and Host Galaxy Stellar Populations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Core-Collapse Supernovae and Host Galaxy Stellar Populations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Core-Collapse Supernovae and Host Galaxy Stellar Populations Authors: Kelly, ...

  18. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass ...

  19. DOE Hosts Conference Call for Open Funding Opportunity Announcement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hosts Conference Call for Open Funding Opportunity Announcement DOE Hosts Conference Call for Open Funding Opportunity Announcement July 18, 2008 - 3:35pm Addthis The Department of...

  20. Energy and Interior Departments Host Offshore Energy Knowledge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    and Interior Departments Host Offshore Energy Knowledge Exchange Workshop Energy and Interior Departments Host Offshore Energy Knowledge Exchange Workshop May 1, 2012 - 2:52pm ...

  1. Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Host Outreach Letter Template...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Host Outreach Letter Template Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Host Outreach Letter Template Approach employers in your community that already have workplace charging to serve ...

  2. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling The GRB Host ...

  3. NERSC Hosts 50 Enthusiastic Computer Science Students from Dougherty...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosts 50 Enthusiastic Computer Science Students from Dougherty Valley High NERSC Hosts 50 Enthusiastic Computer Science Students from Dougherty Valley High May 31, 2016 A group of ...

  4. Deputy Secretary Poneman to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department FY 2014 Budget Request Deputy Secretary Poneman to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department FY 2014 Budget Request April 9, 2013 -...

  5. Energy Department to Host Tribal Leader Forum and Tribal Renewable...

    Energy Savers

    Host Tribal Leader Forum and Tribal Renewable Energy Development Workshop in New Mexico Energy Department to Host Tribal Leader Forum and Tribal Renewable Energy Development ...

  6. Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and ...

  7. Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under Secretary of Energy Majumdar Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under ...

  8. Host a Meeting | Argonne National Laboratory

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Host a meeting Blue Jeans is a cloud-based video, web, and audio collaboration solution available to Argonne employees for hosting meetings. Blue Jeans works for both person-to-person video conferences as well as with meetings held in video conference rooms. You can share out your desktop to meeting participants to show presentations and more. Participants on the go can join via phone. Blue Jeans is now available for all Argonne employees. Just log in with your Argonne username and password to

  9. Workplace Charging Toolkit: Workshop Host Outreach Letter Template

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approach employers in your community that already have workplace charging to serve as a workshop host.

  10. Homogeneous fluorescence linewidths for amorphous hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyo, S.K.; Orbach, R.

    1980-11-01

    A contribution to the homogeneous linewidth of optical transitions in amorphous hosts is calculated. The microscopic process is diagonal in the phonon interaction with two level systems (TLS) common to amorphous materials, and diagonal in the coupling between TLS and the optical center. The model predicts an optical homogeneous linewidth proportional to the square of the temperature at low temperature.

  11. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for

  12. Wind Powering America Hosts Fifth Annual Wind for Schools Summit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Powering America Hosts Fifth Annual Wind for Schools Summit Wind Powering America Hosts Fifth Annual Wind for Schools Summit February 24, 2012 - 10:46am Addthis This is an excerpt ...

  13. NREL and Sandia host PV Module Reliability Workshop, Feb. 23...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Sandia host PV Module Reliability Workshop, Feb. 23-25, 2016 - Sandia Energy Energy ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare NREL and Sandia host PV Module Reliability ...

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory to host robot rodeo

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL to host robot rodeo Los Alamos National Laboratory to host robot rodeo Teams compete in events and simulations that may include having their robots remove bombs from the...

  15. DOE to Host Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to Host Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop April 29-30 DOE to Host Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop April 29-30 March 13, 2014 - 12:58pm Addthis The ...

  16. Department of Energy to Host Quadrennial Technology Review Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy to Host Quadrennial Technology Review Workshop July 12, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - On Wednesday, July 13, the U.S. Department of Energy will host ...

  17. Bioenergy Technologies Office Hosts Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Hosts Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop Bioenergy Technologies Office Hosts Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop September 13, 2016 - 4:40pm Addthis Bioenergy Technologies Office Hosts Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting a 2-day workshop gathering lead experts in the field of aviation biofuels on September 14-15, 2016. The Alternative Aviation Fuel Workshop, which is being held in Macon,

  18. V.P. Biden Hosts the Middle Class Task Force

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu will join Vice President Biden at the White House as he hosts a Middle Class Task Force event.

  19. EM Hosts Second Contract Performance and Management Workshop in 2012

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM hosted its second Environmental Management Contract Performance and Management Workshop at DOE headquarters today.

  20. High power laser having a trivalent liquid host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R.

    2005-08-16

    A laser having a lasing chamber and a semiconductor pumping device with trivalent titanium ions dissolved in a liquid host within the lasing chamber. Since the host is a liquid, it can be removed from the optical cavity when it becomes heated avoiding the inevitable optical distortion and birefringence common to glass and crystal hosts.

  1. President Obama Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit President Obama Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit Washington, DC President Obama hosts a Global Nuclear Security Summit to facilitate discussion on the nature of the nuclear threat and develop steps that can be taken together to secure vulnerable materials, combat nuclear smuggling and deter, detect, and disrupt attempts at nuclear terrorism

  2. Department of Energy Hosts Inaugural Energy Frontier Research Center Summit

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Meetings | Department of Energy Hosting First of Eight Consent-Based Siting Public Meetings Department of Energy Hosting First of Eight Consent-Based Siting Public Meetings March 29, 2016 - 8:30am Addthis John Kotek John Kotek Acting Assistant Secretary for the Office of Nuclear Energy Today, in downtown Chicago, the Department of Energy is hosting the first of eight public meetings around the country on the Department's consent-based siting initiative for facilities needed to manage our

  3. Secretary Moniz Hosts Energy Security Symposium, Honors Dr. Daniel Yergin

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    with First James R. Schlesinger Medal for Energy Security | Department of Energy Hosts Energy Security Symposium, Honors Dr. Daniel Yergin with First James R. Schlesinger Medal for Energy Security Secretary Moniz Hosts Energy Security Symposium, Honors Dr. Daniel Yergin with First James R. Schlesinger Medal for Energy Security October 1, 2014 - 11:00am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Secretary Moniz Hosts Energy Security Symposium, Honors Dr. Daniel Yergin with First James R.

  4. Energy Department Hosts FORGE Webinar and Resource Reporting Methodology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Workshop at the Upcoming National Geothermal Summit, August 4-5 | Department of Energy Hosts FORGE Webinar and Resource Reporting Methodology Workshop at the Upcoming National Geothermal Summit, August 4-5 Energy Department Hosts FORGE Webinar and Resource Reporting Methodology Workshop at the Upcoming National Geothermal Summit, August 4-5 July 29, 2014 - 1:34pm Addthis Energy Department Hosts FORGE Webinar and Resource Reporting Methodology Workshop at the Upcoming National Geothermal

  5. Recombinant hosts suitable for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Zhou, Shengde

    2007-06-05

    The invention provides recombinant host cells containing at least one heterologous polynucleotide encoding a polysaccharase under the transcriptional control of a surrogate promoter capable of increasing the expression of the polysaccharase. In addition, the invention further provides such hosts with genes encoding secretory protein/s to facilitate the secretion of the expressed polysaccharase. Preferred hosts of the invention are ethanologenic and capable of carrying out simultaneous saccharification fermentation resulting in the production of ethanol from complex cellulose substrates.

  6. MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Conference Call | Department of Energy BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call MEDIA BRIEFING CONFERENCE CALL: Secretary Chu to Host Solar Energy Conference Call February 4, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON -TOMORROW, February 4, 2011, Secretary Steven Chu will join with Richard Swanson, President Emeritus of SunPower Corp., to host a media conference call to announce new funding for solar technology and manufacturing projects. Secretary Chu will also

  7. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative | Department of Energy Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the

  8. EM Hosts Business Opportunity Forum | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers

    Hosts British Research Scholar EM Headquarters Hosts British Research Scholar August 28, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis British Research Scholar David Ward British Research Scholar David Ward WASHINGTON, D.C. - For the first time in four years, EM headquarters is hosting a research scholar from the United Kingdom. David Ward, a recent University of Nottingham graduate, arrived from England's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) this summer to support EM's WTP and Tank Farm Program Office. That office is

  9. Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit Addthis Description Below is the text version for "Energy Department to Host First Sustainable Transportation Summit." Text Version The video opens by showing an electric car driving down the street. A voice starts talking. I think we've made a lot of progress over the last ten years in terms of seeing the cost of technologies starting to fall,

  10. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Siting Guidelines | Department of Energy Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting guidelines, both in the US and other countries. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign

  11. JLab Registration/International Services - Hosting Foreign Nationals

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosting Foreign Nationals Steps for Hosting Foreign National Visitors/Researchers stop Please be sure to follow ALL the required steps for hosting ALL foreign national visitor/researchers (also includes interview participants) coming to JLab. An Invitation letter is required at the port of entry for all non US citizens requesting a business visa (B-1, WB) to participate in research, workshop, conferences and meetings at JLab. These activities are prohibited with Tourist Visa (B-2, WT) Review of

  12. Illustrious Visitors Good Hosts Real Celebrity | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Illustrious Visitors Good Hosts Real Celebrity Illustrious Visitors; Good Hosts! Real Celebrity. June 15, 2015 On a regular basis, the DOE Site Office asks us to update our list of illustrious visitors; often, there is nothing to say. Other times we are inundated. The past few months has seen a fine selection of events hosted by Jefferson Lab, and Jefferson Science Associates and its parent Southeastern Universities Research Association. This past week, Joachim Mnich, a member of the DESY

  13. Sandia hosts tribal colleges and university students | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) hosts tribal colleges and university students Friday, June 20, 2014 - 11:26am Sandia National Laboratories recently hosted students from various tribal colleges and universities. During the event, Sandia's Stan Atcitty and Julius Yellowhair lead tours of renewable energy work at Sandia. Sandia hosts tribal colleges and university students Julius E. Yellowhair shows students molten salt receivers at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (Solar Tower).

  14. Thornberry hosts House Majority Leader at Pantex visit | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Thornberry hosts House Majority Leader at Pantex visit Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 12:00am Thornberry hosts House Majority Leader at Pantex visit Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, hosted Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-CA, at both Pantex and Bell Helicopter in Amarillo recently to discuss the Texas Panhandle's role in national security. At Pantex, Thornberry and McCarthy viewed the High Explosives Pressing Facility along with the locations where nuclear weapons

  15. Jefferson Lab hosts World Year of Physics guest speaker Erich...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Erich Vogt discussing Einstein - the Person and His Legacy Erich Vogt Jefferson Lab hosts World Year of Physics guest speaker Erich Vogt discussing Einstein - the Person and His ...

  16. Department of Energy Hosts First Steering Committee Meeting on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    free nuclear energy technology, including fast reactor, fuel cycle technology advancements and safeguards for civilian nuclear reactors. "We are pleased to have been able to host ...

  17. Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent: Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates Citation Details ... DOE Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Patent Resource Relation: Patent File ...

  18. EM Hosts Well-Attended, Successful Business Opportunity Forum

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM hosted its quarterly public forum today to discuss upcoming business opportunities for contractors in the legacy nuclear cleanup program.

  19. Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses an enzyme capable of catalyzing the esterification of an isoprenol and a ...

  20. Energy Secretary Moniz Will Host North American Energy Ministers...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Secretary Moniz Will Host North American Energy Ministers in Trilateral Meeting Focused on Energy Cooperation WASHINGTON-On December 15, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz ...

  1. DOE and MEEA Host Fourth Annual SSL Market Introduction Workshop...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the fourth annual Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Market Introduction Workshop, hosted by ... on the successful market introduction of high-quality, energy-efficient SSL solutions. ...

  2. President Obama Hosts Global Nuclear Security Summit | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    President Obama hosts a Global Nuclear Security Summit to facilitate discussion on the nature of the nuclear threat and develop steps that can be taken together to secure...

  3. Host Lipid and Temperature as Important Screening Variables for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Host Lipid and Temperature as Important Screening Variables for Crystallizing Integral ... Screening Variables for Crystallizing Integral Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. ...

  4. Sandia to host PV Bankability workshop at Solar Power International...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    host PV Bankability workshop at Solar Power International (SPI) 2013 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & ...

  5. Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases. A Host...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    utility of host lipid screening as a means for generating diffraction-quality crystals. ... Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ASYMMETRY; CHAINS; ...

  6. ALCF hosts physics workshop to bridge computational and experimental...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ALCF hosts physics workshop to bridge computational and experimental efforts Author: Jim ... generate new ideas and projects in the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model. ...

  7. Chicago To Host Energy Department's First Public Meeting on Consent...

    Energy Savers

    Chicago To Host Energy Department's First Public Meeting on Consent-Based Siting For Nuclear Waste Management System ... the location of future storage and disposal facilities ...

  8. DOE Hosts Workshop on Transition to Electric Vehicles | Department...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington, DC - On Thursday, July 22, 2010, the Department of Energy will host an electric vehicle workshop at DOE Headquarters in Washington, DC, bringing together more than 150 ...

  9. WIPP Hosts Fire Protection and Emergency Response Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    August 6, 2015 WIPP Hosts Fire Protection and Emergency Response Workshop Fire protection experts from the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), the...

  10. DOE Hosts U.S.-Africa Energy Ministerial Ambassador Roundtable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On March 9, 2014 the U.S. Department of Energy and Secretary Moniz hosted over 35 ambassadors to the United States from across the African continent.

  11. NREL to Host Demonstration of Ford's Electric Ranger PU Truck

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Laboratory to Host Demonstration of Ford's Electric Ranger Pickup Truck ... Media are invited to cover Ford's demonstration of the Electric Ranger at the National ...

  12. Department of Energy Hosts Inaugural Energy Frontier Research...

    Office of Science (SC) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Hosts Inaugural Energy Frontier Research Center Summit Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events ...

  13. Secretary Moniz to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Meeting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON - On Friday, September 13, 2013, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will host his first Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) meeting.

  14. Sandia hosts annual robot rodeo | National Nuclear Security Administra...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    hosts annual robot rodeo | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  15. Host cells and methods for production of isobutanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anthony, Larry Cameron; He, Hongxian; Huang, Lixuan Lisa; Okeefe, Daniel P.; Kruckeberg, Arthur Leo; Li, Yougen; Maggio-Hall, Lori Ann; McElvain, Jessica; Nelson, Mark J.; Patnaik, Ranjan; Rothman, Steven Cary

    2016-08-23

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of isobutanol. Yeast host cells provided comprise an isobutanol biosynthetic pathway and at least one of reduced or eliminated aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, reduced or eliminated acetolactate reductase activity; or a heterologous polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide having ketol-acid reductoisomerase activity.

  16. Methods for production of proteins in host cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2004-01-13

    The present invention provides methods for the production of proteins, particularly toxic proteins, in host cells. The invention provides methods which use a fusion protein comprising a chaperonin binding domain in host cells induced or regulated to have increased levels of chaperonin which binds the chaperonin binding domain.

  17. DOE Host: David Rhodes LANL Technical Hosts: Terrill Lemke and Steve Veenis

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    David Rhodes LANL Technical Hosts: Terrill Lemke and Steve Veenis LANL Environmental Outreach: envoutreach@lanl.gov, Lorrie Bonds Lopez @ 667-0216 LA-UR-16-27801 Agenda Individual Permit for Storm Water Project Update Public Meeting Tuesday, October 18, 2016 UNM-Los Alamos, Building 2, Room ### 5:30 - 7:30 5:30 - 6 p.m. Poster Session * Storm Water Individual Permit Process * Watersheds/Sites * Remote Telemetry Unit Overview * ISCO Sampler demonstration * LID Approaches 6 - 6:15 Welcome and

  18. Wind Program to Host Booth at WINDPOWER | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to Host Booth at WINDPOWER Wind Program to Host Booth at WINDPOWER May 11, 2016 - 12:34pm Addthis The Energy Department's Wind Program will host a booth at the AWEA WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans, Louisiana, May 23-26, 2016. Stop by booth #4847 to talk to Wind Program personnel about the program's latest funded research. You can also pick up a free flash drive containing the Wind Program's most recent research reports and learn how the Atmosphere to Electrons initiative is

  19. Secretary Chu Hosts FY 2012 Budget Briefing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hosts FY 2012 Budget Briefing Secretary Chu Hosts FY 2012 Budget Briefing February 14, 2011 - 10:22am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs UPDATE, Feb 15: You can now view video of the event below. At 1:30 PM EST today, Secretary Chu will host a media briefing on the Department of Energy's Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request. As the Secretary said in his Friday post, he'll outline how the budget request makes strategic investments in

  20. Berkeley Lab Hosts Fourth X-Stack PI Meeting

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab Hosts Fourth X-Stack PI Meeting Berkeley Lab Hosts Fourth X-Stack PI Meeting Application code demos utilized more than 1,000 nodes on NERSC supercomputers April 25, 2016 Contact: Kathy Kincade, kkincade@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2124 x stack overhead A Technology Marketplace held April 6 during the X-Stack at Berkeley Lab meeting gave application developers the opportunity to demo the software prototypes Berkeley Lab hosted the fourth annual X-Stack PI meeting April 6 and 7, where X-Stack

  1. DOE Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER DOE Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER April 1, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2013 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program will host an exhibit booth at the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) WINDPOWER 2013 Conference & Exhibition in Chicago, Illinois, from May 5-8, 2013. Visit DOE's booth, #1808, to learn more about the program's wind energy research and development (R&D)

  2. Webinar: How to Host a Youth Climate Summit

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join us for a live informational webinar on Earth Day to learn how to host a Youth Climate Summit and engage high school students in a dialogue on Climate Change!

  3. DOE Hosts Conference Call for Open Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) is hosting a one- to two-hour conference call for the geothermal community on Friday, July 25, 2008, at 1 p.m. EDT/10 a.m. PDT.

  4. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. ...

  5. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security Symposium September 26, 2014 - 11:35am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to ...

  6. Acting Biomass Program Manager Dr. Valerie Reed to Host Live...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    December 16th, the Energy Department (@energy) will be hosting a live Twitter Q&A on biofuels with Dr. Valerie Reed, Acting Manager of the Biomass Program. Dr. Reed holds a Ph. D....

  7. Press Pass - Press Release - Fermilab Hosts Global Warming Presentatio...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Office, 630-840-5588 For immediate release Fermilab Hosts Presentation on Global Warming on Feb. 28 Program is free and open to the public Dr. David Carlson,...

  8. Department of Energy to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board...

    Energy Savers

    Washington, DC - On Wednesday, July 13, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy will host a public meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. ...

  9. Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Diet appears to be the dominant factor, but host phylogeny also seems to be an important, if unpredictable, correlate. Here we show that baleen whales, which prey on animals (fish ...

  10. Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity...

    Energy Savers

    Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity July 26, 2006 - 4:34pm Addthis Energy Leaders sign MOU to further promote ...

  11. Energy Secretary Moniz Hosts Gathering of World's Energy Ministers...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Union Announce Efforts to Double Clean Energy R&D Investments over Five Years to 30 Billion per Year SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. - U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz hosted 23 ...

  12. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ? 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at ? 1?, the step is not ...

  13. NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs January 16, 2015 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) hosted a roundtable today with 13 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to discuss new funding that will strengthen American cybersecurity expertise. A

  14. Laboratory hosts Supercomputing Challenge April 25-26

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory hosts Supercomputing Challenge Laboratory hosts Supercomputing Challenge April 25-26 The goal of the yearlong competition is to increase knowledge of science and computing, expose students and teachers to computers and applied mathematics. April 20, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory to host Robot Rodeo

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL to host Robot Rodeo Los Alamos National Laboratory to host Robot Rodeo Hazardous devices teams from around the Southwest will wrangle their bomb squad robots at the sixth annual Robot Rodeo. June 18, 2012 Sixth annual Robot Rodeo at LANL Sixth annual Robot Rodeo at LANL Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email Events test skills of hazardous devices teams from around the Southwest LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, June 18, 2012-Hazardous devices teams from around the

  16. DOE and NREL to Host Meeting for Community

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE and NREL to Host Meeting for Community For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., May 4, 1998 — Please include the following information in your calendar section. What: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will host a community meeting to share information about NREL's management and operating contract status; major events; funding and employment issues; construction plans; DOE's Environmental Assessment; Public

  17. OSDBU Hosts FY 2015 Small Business Kickoff | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    OSDBU Hosts FY 2015 Small Business Kickoff OSDBU Hosts FY 2015 Small Business Kickoff October 27, 2014 - 4:04pm Addthis On Wednesday, October 22, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) presented its FY 2015 Small Business Kick-Off Forum. This event shared DOE initiatives and upcoming procurement opportunities, empowering small businesses to support the Department's mission. The kickoff was held at DOE's headquarters building in

  18. Sandia California hosts Military Academic Collaboration students | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) California hosts Military Academic Collaboration students Friday, August 12, 2016 - 9:45am Sandia National Laboratories in California was one of nine national laboratory sites that hosted students from military undergraduate institutions as part of the NNSA's Military Academic Collaboration. The collaboration, now in its seventh year, exposes cadets to careers within the national laboratory complex. This year students came from the U.S. Merchant

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory to host forum June 16

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL to host forum June 16 Los Alamos National Laboratory to host forum June 16 Area business owners can learn about planned construction projects and potential economic opportunities at a community forum. May 28, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos

  20. Moab Project Hosts International Meeting on Uranium Mining and Remediation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    | Department of Energy Hosts International Meeting on Uranium Mining and Remediation Moab Project Hosts International Meeting on Uranium Mining and Remediation October 17, 2016 - 12:30pm Addthis The visitors pose for a group photo on the disposal cell cover at the Crescent Junction site. The visitors pose for a group photo on the disposal cell cover at the Crescent Junction site. EM Federal Project Director Donald Metzler (orange vest) discusses mill tailings removal and conditioning

  1. NERSC Hosts 50 Enthusiastic Computer Science Students from Dougherty Valley

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    High Hosts 50 Enthusiastic Computer Science Students from Dougherty Valley High NERSC Hosts 50 Enthusiastic Computer Science Students from Dougherty Valley High May 31, 2016 A group of 50 enthusiastic computer science students from Dougherty Valley High School in San Ramon, CA visited NERSC May 26, where they toured the computer room and participated in lively discussions about the facility and how supercomputers work. They asked great questions, such as "In the future, will there be

  2. NERSC Hosts Application Readiness and Portability Meeting with OLCF and

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ALCF Hosts Application Readiness and Portability Meeting with OLCF and ALCF NERSC Hosts Application Readiness and Portability Meeting with OLCF and ALCF September 25, 2014 Over 30 staff members from NERSC, Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility and Argonne Leadership Computing Facility met at Berkeley Lab's Oakland Scientific Facility September 24-25 to coordinate strategies for application readiness in preparation for the next generation of supercomputers. The meeting also included

  3. Method of determining lanthanidies in a transition element host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Kalb, Edward L.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1976-02-03

    A phosphor composition contains a lanthanide activator element within a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO.sub.4 with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On X-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence.

  4. Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Taek Soon; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides for a method of producing an isoprenyl alkanoate in a genetically modified host cell. In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses an enzyme capable of catalyzing the esterification of an isoprenol and a straight-chain fatty acid, such as an alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) or lipase, under a suitable condition so that the isoprenyl alkanoate is produced.

  5. Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric acid production and regulates the formation of some secondary metabolites Title: Identification of a classical mutant in the industrial host Aspergillus niger by systems genetics: LaeA is required for citric

  6. Phyllostomid bat microbiome composition is associated to host phylogeny and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    feeding strategies (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Phyllostomid bat microbiome composition is associated to host phylogeny and feeding strategies Title: Phyllostomid bat microbiome composition is associated to host phylogeny and feeding strategies The members of the Phyllostomidae, the New-World leaf-nosed family of bats, show a remarkable evolutionary diversification of dietary strategies including insectivory, as the ancestral trait, followed by appearance of carnivory and plant-based diets

  7. Jefferson Lab Hosts Upcoming Science Lectures on DNA and Chocolate |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Upcoming Science Lectures on DNA and Chocolate Jefferson Lab Hosts Upcoming Science Lectures on DNA and Chocolate NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 24, 2011 - Jefferson Lab will host a public lecture on March 29 titled DNA: The Strand That Connects Us All presented by Matt Kaplan from the Human Origins Genotyping Laboratory, Phoenix, Ariz. Kaplan will discuss how the methods and discoveries of human population genetics studies are applied for personal genealogical reconstruction and

  8. Lab hosts multi-lab cyber security games

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab hosts multi-lab cyber security games Lab hosts multi-lab cyber security games Eventide brought together cyber and IT leaders from 20 sites to develop recommendations on resources they need from the Joint Cyber Coordination Center. April 12, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and

  9. APM hosts contracting officers in Albuquerque | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) APM hosts contracting officers in Albuquerque Monday, July 28, 2014 - 10:22am NNSA's Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM), the community manager for acquisition professionals, hosted NNSA Contracting Officers in Albuquerque this week to align NNSA acquisition policies and procedures with Departmental goals and priorities, and to clarify roles and responsibilities among the various COs across the Nuclear Security Enterprise. A key discussion topic was how

  10. NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House Announcement of $25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs Friday, January 16, 2015 - 12:42pm The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) hosted a roundtable today with 13 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to discuss new funding that will strengthen American cybersecurity expertise. A

  11. PNNL hosts NNSA's Graduate Fellowship Program closing ceremony | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) PNNL hosts NNSA's Graduate Fellowship Program closing ceremony Tuesday, May 26, 2015 - 12:16pm NNSA Blog Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) recently hosted the closing ceremony for NNSA's Graduate Fellowship Program (NGFP) Class of 2014 in Washington, D.C. The ceremony marked the completion of the Fellows' one-year appointment to NNSA program offices across the country. Speakers at the event included Cindy Lersten, NNSA Senior Advisor to the

  12. Y-12 hosts NNSA aging infrastructure workshop | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) hosts NNSA aging infrastructure workshop Friday, April 17, 2015 - 3:52pm Y-12 hosts NNSA aging infrastructure workshop Personnel from throughout NNSA and private industry recently gathered in Oak Ridge, Tenn., to discuss lessons learned and brainstorm solutions for dealing with the aging nuclear infrastructure. By focusing on successes in the public and private sectors, attendees were able to discuss the issues in three categories-maintenance, standards and

  13. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz to Host Media Briefing on Energy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Ernest Moniz to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department's Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Request Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department's Fiscal ...

  14. THE EXTREMELY RED HOST GALAXY OF GRB 080207

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, Leslie; Cresci, Giovanni; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Klose, Sylvio; Savaglio, Sandra; Michalowski, Michal; Pian, Elena

    2011-08-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the host galaxy of the dark Swift gamma-ray burst GRB 080207. The host is faint, with extremely red optical-infrared colors (R - K = 6.3, 24 {mu}m/R-band flux {approx}1000) making it an extremely red object (ERO) and a dust-obscured galaxy (DOG). The spectral energy distribution (SED) shows the clear signature of the 1.6 {mu}m photometric 'bump', typical of evolved stellar populations. We use this bump to establish the photometric redshift z{sub phot} as 2.2{sup +0.2}{sub -0.3}, using a vast library of SED templates, including M 82. The star formation rate (SFR) inferred from the SED fitting is {approx}119 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, the stellar mass 3 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and A{sub V} extinction from 1 to 2 mag. The ERO and DOG nature of the host galaxy of the dark GRB 080207 may be emblematic of a distinct class of dark GRB hosts, with high SFRs, evolved and metal-rich stellar populations, and significant dust extinction within the host galaxy.

  15. Wind Program to Host Booth at WINDPOWER | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Booth at WINDPOWER Wind Program to Host Booth at WINDPOWER May 18, 2015 - 2:16pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program will host a booth at the AWEA WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition in Orlando, Florida, May 18-21, 2015. Stop by booth #3801 to meet Wind Program Personnel and learn about the latest DOE-funded research. Visitors can also pick up a free flash drive containing the Wind Program's most recent research reports and learn about DOE's newest initiatives-the Wind

  16. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Larsen and Dai GigaScience (2015) 4:42 DOI 10.1186/S13742-015-0084-3 RESEARCH Open Access Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis Peter E. Larsen1,2* and Yang Dai1 Abstract Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. However, the

  17. Host-Based Data Exfiltration Detection via System Call Sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaver, Justin M; Jewell, Brian C

    2011-01-01

    The host-based detection of malicious data exfiltration activities is currently a sparse area of research and mostly limited to methods that analyze network traffic or signature based detection methods that target specific processes. In this paper we explore an alternative method to host-based detection that exploits sequences of system calls and new collection methods that allow us to catch these activities in real time. We show that system calls sequences can be found to reach a steady state across processes and users, and explore the viability of new methods as heuristics for profiling user behaviors.

  18. SECRETARY MONIZ TO HOST NATIONAL LABORATORY DAY ON CAPITOL HILL |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy SECRETARY MONIZ TO HOST NATIONAL LABORATORY DAY ON CAPITOL HILL SECRETARY MONIZ TO HOST NATIONAL LABORATORY DAY ON CAPITOL HILL September 12, 2014 - 10:16am Addthis News Media Contact 202 - 586 - 4940 Washington D.C. - On Tuesday, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz will join Senator Dick Durbin and Senator Jim Risch for the Department's National Lab Day on the Hill. Lab Directors and representatives from all 17 of the Department of Energy National Laboratories will be on

  19. Lab to host annual LDRD day September 13

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab to host annual LDRD day Lab to host annual LDRD Day September 13 Some of LANL's most innovative scientists will explain and present their cutting-edge work to the public. September 6, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top

  20. Hosting foreign educators | Y-12 National Security Complex

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosting foreign educators Hosting foreign educators Posted: November 27, 2013 - 11:16am Six Indonesian educators (seated) met with Y-12, UT’s Institute for Nuclear Security, and ORNL experts to learn about Y-12’s role in U.S. nuclear security. Y-12, in support of the University of Tennessee's Institute for Nuclear Security, recently welcomed a group of professors from Indonesia's Universitas Gadjah Mada, the only university in Indonesia that offers a nuclear engineering program. As part of a

  1. Jefferson Lab Hosts 2012 SPAFOA Members Meeting (Meyer Cryogenic, Vacuum

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Pressure Technologies) | Jefferson Lab Hosts 2012 SPAFOA Members Meeting (Meyer Cryogenic, Vacuum and Pressure Technologies) External Link: http://ourmailer.com/Z2U-TRYV-D24Q2F5T0E/cr.aspx?b=32

  2. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  3. Hiding in Plain Sight: Exploiting Broadcast for Practical Host Anonymity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shue, Craig A; Gupta, Prof. Minaxi

    2010-01-01

    Users are being tracked on the Internet more than ever before as Web sites and search engines gather pieces of information sufficient to identify and study their behavior. While many existing schemes provide strong anonymity, they are inappropriate when high bandwidth and low latency are required. In this work, we explore an anonymity scheme for end hosts whose performance makes it possible to have it always on. The scheme leverages the natural grouping of hosts in the same subnet and the universally available broadcast primitive to provide anonymity at line speeds. Our scheme is strongly resistant against all active or passive adversaries as long as they are outside the subnet. Even within the subnet, our scheme provides reasonable resistance against adversaries, providing anonymity that is suitable for common Internet applications.

  4. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  5. NREL Hosts PV Module Reliability Workshop for Industry | PV | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosts PV Module Reliability Workshop for Industry March 1, 2016 Nearly 200 researchers from more than 100 companies and representing 16 countries attended the 7th annual PV Module Reliability Workshop, held Feb. 23-25, 2016, in Golden, Colo. The program was designed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and the photovoltaic (PV) industry. "NREL's PV Module Reliability Workshop is unique in its requirement for all organizations

  6. NREL Hosts PV Module Reliability Workshop for Industry | Solar | NREL

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosts PV Module Reliability Workshop for Industry March 1, 2016 Nearly 200 researchers from more than 100 companies and representing 16 countries attended the 7th annual PV Module Reliability Workshop, held Feb. 23-25, 2016, in Golden, Colo. The program was designed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and the photovoltaic (PV) industry. "NREL's PV Module Reliability Workshop is unique in its requirement for all organizations

  7. NREL: Workforce Development and Education Programs - NREL Hosts PV Module

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Reliability Workshop for Industry NREL Hosts PV Module Reliability Workshop for Industry March 1, 2016 Nearly 200 researchers from more than 100 companies and representing 16 countries attended the 7th annual PV Module Reliability Workshop, held Feb. 23-25, 2016, in Golden, Colo. The program was designed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and the photovoltaic (PV) industry. "NREL's PV Module Reliability Workshop is

  8. NNSA Hosts International Nuclear Forensics Workshop with Participants from

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Eight Countries | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Hosts International Nuclear Forensics Workshop with Participants from Eight Countries May 22, 2015 WASHINGTON, D.C. - During May 11-22, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence program held a hands-on nuclear forensics course at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. The "International Training Course on Nuclear Forensics

  9. Bacteriophage Host-Range Expansion - Energy Innovation Portal

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bacteriophage Host-Range Expansion Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Bacteriophage v. 1.pdf (513 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryDecades of widespread antibiotic use has created antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria that are becoming increasingly difficult to treat. In 2006, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of bacteriophages (phages) for food industry applications to eliminate the presence of bacteria,

  10. HOST GALAXIES OF X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springmann, A.; Cheung, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, active galaxies that emit much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies has an “X”-or winged-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being a realignment of the black hole within the AGN and the second positing that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium, causing backflow and producing secondary wings. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, the distribution of the stellar mass is compared to the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN. Results show elliptical host galaxies with an orthogonal offset between the semi-major axis of the host galaxy and the secondary radio wings, which lends support to the hydrodynamical model. However, results also show circular host galaxies with radio wings, making the realignment scenario a more likely model to describe the formation of these X-shaped radio sources.

  11. Lab to host second annual LDRD Day September 8

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Second annual LDRD Day Lab to host second annual LDRD Day September 8 The event provides an opportunity for people to see some of the most exciting research currently underway at the Laboratory. September 2, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National

  12. Jefferson Lab hosts three prominent science-author book discussions |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab three prominent science-author book discussions Strange Matters: Undiscovered Ideas at the Frontiers of Space and Time Journalist and author Tom Siegfried will discuss "Strange Matters: Science Headlines from the 21st Century" at Jefferson Lab on November 5 Jefferson Lab hosts three prominent science-author book discussions October 28, 2003 On Wednesday, Nov. 5, at Jefferson Lab, Tom Siegfried, Science Editor for The Dallas Morning News and author of the recently

  13. NNSA hosts IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    partnership | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) IAEA Directors to discuss emergency preparedness & response partnership Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 3:17pm NNSA hosted the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - a core partner of the agency's global nonproliferation and counterterrorism efforts - to discuss cooperative efforts in emergency preparedness and response. Early in their visit, IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo, IAEA Division of Nuclear

  14. Bradbury Science Museum hosts talk March 15 by Philip Taubman

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Taubman Bradbury Museum talk Bradbury Science Museum hosts talk March 15 by Philip Taubman Former New York Times reporter talks about the current state of nuclear threats, including Pakistan, North Korea, Iran, and possibility of a nuclear 9-11. March 7, 2012 Philip Taubman Philip Taubman Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email Book signing for new book The Partnership follows at Otowi Station bookstore LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 7, 2012-Former New York Times

  15. CMI at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders | Critical Materials Institute

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders Colorado School of Mines graduate student Mandi Hutchinson shows a compact fluorescent light bulb as she discusses the use of critical materials and rare earths in current technologies. The Denver School of Science and Technology's (DSST) College View sixth graders visited the Colorado School of Mines campus on Wednesday, July 8, for their fourth annual visit. More than 160 students enjoyed critical materials and energy presentations delivered by the Critical

  16. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  17. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent onmore » its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.« less

  18. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Peter E.; Dai, Yang

    2015-09-14

    Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human microbiomes also vary dramatically from individual to individual, and over time, making it difficult to uncover the underlying mechanisms linking the microbiome to human health. We propose that a microbiome’s interaction with its human host is not necessarily dependent upon the presence or absence of particular bacterial species, but instead is dependent on its community metabolome; an emergent property of the microbiome. Results: Using data from a previously published, longitudinal study of microbiome populations of the human gut, we extrapolated information about microbiome community enzyme profiles and metabolome models. Using machine learning techniques, we demonstrated that the aggregate predicted community enzyme function profiles and modeled metabolomes of a microbiome are more predictive of dysbiosis than either observed microbiome community composition or predicted enzyme function profiles. Conclusions: Specific enzyme functions and metabolites predictive of dysbiosis provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of microbiome–host interactions. The ability to use machine learning to predict dysbiosis from microbiome community interaction data provides a potentially powerful tool for understanding the links between the human microbiome and human health, pointing to potential microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutic interventions.

  19. The nucleocapsid protein of measles virus blocks host interferon response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takayama, Ikuyo; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Akira; Omi-Furutani, Mio; Sugai, Akihiro; Kanki, Keita; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2012-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) belongs to the genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. A number of paramyxoviruses inhibit host interferon (IFN) signaling pathways in host immune systems by various mechanisms. Inhibition mechanisms have been described for many paramyxoviruses. Although there are inconsistencies among previous reports concerning MV, it appears that P/V/C proteins interfere with the pathways. In this study, we confirmed the effects of MV P gene products of a wild MV strain on IFN pathways and examined that of other viral proteins on it. Interestingly, we found that N protein acts as an IFN-{alpha}/{beta} and {gamma}-antagonist as strong as P gene products. We further investigated the mechanisms of MV-N inhibition, and revealed that MV-N blocks the nuclear import of activated STAT without preventing STAT and Jak activation or STAT degradation, and that the nuclear translocation of MV-N is important for the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of the N protein was observed as a common feature of other morbilliviruses. The results presented in this report suggest that N protein of MV as well as P/V/C proteins is involved in the inhibition of host IFN signaling pathways.

  20. LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites October 16, 2012 - 1:51pm Addthis LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment The U.S. Department of Energy

  1. THE MASS DEPENDENCE BETWEEN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS AND THEIR STELLAR HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Sean M.; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-07-10

    We present a substantial extension of the millimeter (mm) wave continuum photometry catalog for circumstellar dust disks in the Taurus star-forming region, based on a new ''snapshot'' {lambda} = 1.3 mm survey with the Submillimeter Array. Combining these new data with measurements in the literature, we construct a mm-wave luminosity distribution, f(L{sub mm}), for Class II disks that is statistically complete for stellar hosts with spectral types earlier than M8.5 and has a 3{sigma} depth of roughly 3 mJy. The resulting census eliminates a longstanding selection bias against disks with late-type hosts, and thereby demonstrates that there is a strong correlation between L{sub mm} and the host spectral type. By translating the locations of individual stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram into masses and ages, and adopting a simple conversion between L{sub mm} and the disk mass, M{sub d} , we confirm that this correlation corresponds to a statistically robust relationship between the masses of dust disks and the stars that host them. A Bayesian regression technique is used to characterize these relationships in the presence of measurement errors, data censoring, and significant intrinsic scatter: the best-fit results indicate a typical 1.3 mm flux density of {approx}25 mJy for 1 M{sub Sun} hosts and a power-law scaling L{sub mm}{proportional_to}M{sub *}{sup 1.5-2.0}. We suggest that a reasonable treatment of dust temperature in the conversion from L{sub mm} to M{sub d} favors an inherently linear M{sub d} {proportional_to}M{sub *} scaling, with a typical disk-to-star mass ratio of {approx}0.2%-0.6%. The measured rms dispersion around this regression curve is {+-}0.7 dex, suggesting that the combined effects of diverse evolutionary states, dust opacities, and temperatures in these disks imprint a full width at half-maximum range of a factor of {approx}40 on the inferred M{sub d} (or L{sub mm}) at any given host mass. We argue that this relationship between M{sub d

  2. The host galaxies of fast-ejecta core-collapse supernovae (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The host galaxies of fast-ejecta core-collapse supernovae Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The host galaxies of fast-ejecta core-collapse supernovae Spectra of broad-lined ...

  3. U.S. Department of Energy to Host Groundwater Open House in Beatty...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    to Host Groundwater Open House in Beatty, Nevada U.S. Department of Energy to Host Groundwater Open House in Beatty, Nevada May 23, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Darwin J. ...

  4. DOE Office of Indian Energy to Host Tribal Renewable Energy Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Host Tribal Renewable Energy Workshop Feb. 9-11 DOE Office of Indian Energy to Host Tribal Renewable Energy Workshop Feb. 9-11 January 28, 2016 - 7:14pm Addthis Bringing a ...

  5. Los Angeles CleanTech Incubator to Host Event With Senior Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    CleanTech Incubator to Host Event With Senior Energy Department Official Dr. Arun Majumdar Los Angeles CleanTech Incubator to Host Event With Senior Energy Department Official Dr. ...

  6. BETO Hosts Biorefinery Optimization Workshop October 5-6 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Hosts Biorefinery Optimization Workshop October 5-6 BETO Hosts Biorefinery Optimization Workshop October 5-6 October 4, 2016 - 5:30pm Addthis BETO Hosts Biorefinery Optimization Workshop October 5–6 The Biorefinery Optimization Workshop, hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), is being held on October 5-6, 2016, in Chicago, Illinois. The workshop will advance the understanding of the current capabilities, barriers, and opportunities for

  7. Y-12 Hosts 100th IAEA Inspection | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | (NNSA) Hosts 100th IAEA Inspection April 08, 2003 PDF icon 04-07-03.pdf

  8. Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carnivores and herbivores (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores Title: Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores Mammals host gut microbiomes of immense physiological consequence, but the determinants of diversity in these communities remain poorly understood. Diet appears to be the dominant factor, but host phylogeny also seems to be an important, if

  9. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nearby Supernova Factory; Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Feindt, U.; Fleury, M.; Gangler, E.; Greskovic, P.; Guy, J.; Kowalski, M.; Lombardo, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.

    2014-01-17

    Kim et al. (2013) [K13] introduced a new methodology for determining peak- brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spec- trophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ? 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at ? 1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement the Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.045 ? 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch param- eters: Steps at> 2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light- curve width and color around peak (similar to the∆m15 and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20 to 30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  10. Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals and host-galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Fleury, M.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Feindt, U.; Greskovic, P.; Kowalski, M.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Université de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon; Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne; CNRS and others

    2014-03-20

    Kim et al. introduced a new methodology for determining peak-brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ± 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at <<1σ, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement of the Hubble residual step with the host mass is 0.045 ± 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch parameters: steps at >2σ significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light-curve width and color around peak (similar to the Δm {sub 15} and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20-30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  11. NREL Hosts Free Workshops on Solar and Wind Energy

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops on Solar and Wind Energy For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., Dec. 15, 1999 - Engineers from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) next month will host three workshops on "Solar and Wind Power for Farms and Ranches" at the National Western Stock Show in Denver. The workshops will feature hands-on displays of clean, renewable energy systems that farmers and ranchers can use today. The consumer-oriented

  12. Secretary Chu to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Meeting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy September 14, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - On Thursday, September 16, 2010, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host his first Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) meeting. The inaugural meeting will allow SEAB members to become better acquainted with the Department's policies and the issues that lie ahead. Media wishing to attend should contact Niketa Kumar at niketa.kumar@hq.doe.gov by Wednesday, September 15th by 3 p.m. WHAT: Secretary of Energy

  13. Secretary Chu to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Meeting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy January 19, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - On Thursday, January 20, 2011, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host the second meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB). The first meeting of the New Year will focus on the importance of innovation in maintaining global competitiveness. Secretary Chu will begin his remarks at 9:30 AM. Media wishing to attend should contact Niketa Kumar at Niketa.kumar@hq.doe.gov by Wednesday, January 19th by 5 p.m.

  14. Crystal Structure of an Anthrax Toxin -Host Cell Receptor Complex

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Eugenio Santelli1, Laurie A. Bankston1, Stephen H. Leppla2 & Robert C. Liddington1 1Program on Cell Adhesion, The Burnham Institute, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, U.S.A. 2Microbial Pathogenesis Section, National Insitute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, U.S.A. Fig. 1a: Mechanism of anthrax toxin entry into host cells. Fig. 1b: Two orthogonal views of the PA-cmg2 complex. Cmg2 is shown in blue. PA domains are colored yellow (I), red (II), gray

  15. Field Deployable Tritium Assay System Host Graphical User Interface Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-12

    The FDTASHOST software is a Graphical User Interface for the Field Deployable Tritium Assay System (FDTAS - Invention Disclosure SRS-96-09-091 has been submitted). The program runs on the Host computer which is located in the Laboratory and connected to the FDTAS remote field system via a modem over a phone line. The operator receives status information and messages from the Remote system. The operator can enter in commands to be executed by the remote systemmore » using the mouse and a pull down menu.« less

  16. Wind Program to Host Exhibit Booth at AWEA's Offshore WINDPOWER |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Exhibit Booth at AWEA's Offshore WINDPOWER Wind Program to Host Exhibit Booth at AWEA's Offshore WINDPOWER October 1, 2012 - 11:15am Addthis This is an excerpt from the Third Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program will welcome visitors to its booth, #600, at AWEA's Offshore WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition October 9 - 11, 2012, in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Visitors to the booth will have an opportunity

  17. CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy mlthach's picture Submitted by mlthach on Wed, 09/10/2014 - 18:00 Finding ways to ensure the planet's supply of rare earths and other materials necessary for clean energy technologies is a global challenge, and experts from around the world gathered to meet it at the fourth annual EU-US-Japan Trilateral Conference on Critical Materials on Monday (September 8, 2014). The U.S. Department of Energy's

  18. AN ULTRAVIOLET INVESTIGATION OF ACTIVITY ON EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2013-03-20

    Using the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) photometry from the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we searched for evidence of increased stellar activity due to tidal and/or magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) in the 272 known FGK planetary hosts observed by GALEX. With the increased sensitivity of GALEX, we are able probe systems with lower activity levels and at larger distances than what has been done to date with X-ray satellites. We compared samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.1 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 0.5 AU) and looked for correlations of excess activity with other system parameters. This statistical investigation found no clear correlations with a, M{sub p} , or M{sub p} /a, in contrast to some X-ray and Ca II studies. However, there is tentative evidence (at a level of 1.8{sigma}) that stars with radial-velocity-(RV)-detected close-in planets are more FUV-active than stars with far-out planets, in agreement with several published X-ray and Ca II results. The case is strengthened to a level of significance to 2.3{sigma} when transit-detected close-in planets are included. This is most likely because the RV-selected sample of stars is significantly less active than the field population of comparable stars, while the transit-selected sample is similarly active. Given the factor of 2-3 scatter in fractional FUV luminosity for a given stellar effective temperature, it is necessary to conduct a time-resolved study of the planet hosts in order to better characterize their UV variability and generate a firmer statistical result.

  19. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E.; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome.

  20. The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of supramolecular catalysis of Prins cyclizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart-Cooper, William M.; Zhao, Chen; Triano, Rebecca M.; Yaghoubi, Parastou; Ozores, Haxel Lionel; Burford, Kristen N.; Toste, F. Dean; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2014-11-28

    The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of intramolecular Prins reactions is evaluated using K12Ga4L6 tetrahedral catalysts. The host structure was varied by modifying the structure of the chelating moieties and the size of the aromatic spacers. While variation in chelator substituents was generally observed to affect changes in rate but not selectivity, changing the host spacer afforded differences in efficiency and product diastereoselectivity. An extremely high number of turnovers (up to 840) was observed. Maximum rate accelerations were measured to be on the order of 105, which numbers among the largest magnitudes of transition state stabilization measured with a synthetic host-catalyst. Host/guest size effects were observed to play an important role in host-mediated enantioselectivity.

  1. The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of supramolecular catalysis of Prins cyclizations

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hart-Cooper, William M.; Zhao, Chen; Triano, Rebecca M.; Yaghoubi, Parastou; Ozores, Haxel Lionel; Burford, Kristen N.; Toste, F. Dean; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2014-11-28

    The effect of host structure on the selectivity and mechanism of intramolecular Prins reactions is evaluated using K12Ga4L6 tetrahedral catalysts. The host structure was varied by modifying the structure of the chelating moieties and the size of the aromatic spacers. While variation in chelator substituents was generally observed to affect changes in rate but not selectivity, changing the host spacer afforded differences in efficiency and product diastereoselectivity. An extremely high number of turnovers (up to 840) was observed. Maximum rate accelerations were measured to be on the order of 105, which numbers among the largest magnitudes of transition state stabilizationmore » measured with a synthetic host-catalyst. Host/guest size effects were observed to play an important role in host-mediated enantioselectivity.« less

  2. Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Innovation and Deployment | Department of Energy Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment Senior Adviser Richard Kauffman to Host Live Chat on Renewable Energy Innovation and Deployment October 19, 2011 - 3:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Thursday, October 20th, Richard Kauffman, Senior Adviser to the Secretary of Energy, will host the Department of Energy's third "Energy Matters" live chat. Kauffman will discuss the challenges and

  3. Senior DOE Official to Host Press Call on Electricity Advisory Committee's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    New Reports | Department of Energy Senior DOE Official to Host Press Call on Electricity Advisory Committee's New Reports Senior DOE Official to Host Press Call on Electricity Advisory Committee's New Reports January 15, 2009 - 5:39pm Addthis WASHINGTON - On Thursday, January 15th 2009, the Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability will host a call with the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC), to announce the completion of three reports prepared for the Secretary

  4. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Security Symposium | Department of Energy to Host First Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security Symposium Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security Symposium September 26, 2014 - 11:35am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz to Host First Schlesinger Medal Ceremony and Energy Security Symposium WASHINGTON-On Wednesday, October 1, 2014, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will kick off Energy Action Month

  5. DOE to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Meeting | Department of Energy to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee Meeting DOE to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas Subcommittee Meeting May 27, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - On Wednesday, June 1 and Thursday, June 2, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy will host the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee meeting. The meeting will allow subcommittee members to hear from key stakeholders as it works to

  6. Selecting a Host DOE Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Selecting a Host DOE Laboratory Visiting Faculty Program (VFP) VFP Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to Apply Selecting a Host DOE Laboratory Developing a Research Proposal Recommender Information Student Participants Submitting a Proposal to DOE Application Selection Process and Notification Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions Contact WDTS Home How to Apply Selecting a Host DOE Laboratory Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Participating DOE Laboratories and Contacts

  7. Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra The physical relation between the properties of Type Ia supernovae and their host galaxies is investigated. Such supernovae are used to constrain the properties of dark energy, making it crucial to understand their physical properties and to check for systematic

  8. Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carnivores and herbivores (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores Mammals host gut microbiomes of immense physiological consequence, but the determinants of diversity in these communities remain poorly understood. Diet appears to be the dominant

  9. Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | DOE PAGES Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis Title: Metabolome of human gut microbiome is predictive of host dysbiosis Background: Humans live in constant and vital symbiosis with a closely linked bacterial ecosystem called the microbiome, which influences many aspects of human health. When this microbial ecosystem becomes disrupted, the health of the human host can suffer; a condition called dysbiosis. The community compositions of human

  10. The Department of Energy Hosts Its First STEM in Indian Country Roundtable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Series | Department of Energy The Department of Energy Hosts Its First STEM in Indian Country Roundtable Series The Department of Energy Hosts Its First STEM in Indian Country Roundtable Series April 13, 2015 - 9:22am Addthis The Department of Energy Hosts Its First STEM in Indian Country Roundtable Series In December 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary, Ernest Moniz, met with Departmental Tribal Advisory Groups in Phoenix, Arizona. During the meeting, many tribal leaders

  11. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center

    Public Charging Station Hosts Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts 2 Table of Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PEV Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Charging Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Benefits and Costs of Hosting a Charging Station . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Charging Station Locations and Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Ownership and Payment Models . . . . . . 14

  12. Jefferson Lab to host open house May 19 (Inside Newport News Central) |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab to host open house May 19 (Inside Newport News Central) External Link: http://www.insidenewportnewscentral.com/stories/364451-community-jefferson-lab-t...

  13. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-01

    This handbook answers basic questions about plug-in electric vehicles, charging stations, charging equipment, and considerations for station owners, property owners, and station hosts.

  14. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Public Charging Station Hosts (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    This handbook answers basic questions about plug-in electric vehicles, charging stations, charging equipment, and considerations for station owners, property owners, and station hosts.

  15. NNSA Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Labs host U.S. and Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Non-Nuclear Weapon State Representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS...

  16. TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing...

    Energy Savers

    Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation ...

  17. Secretaries Chu and Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Energy-Saving Improvements Program ... doors and windows, HVAC systems, water heaters, solar panels, and geothermal systems. ...

  18. NNSA's Sandia, Los Alamos National Laboratories host U.S. and...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sandia, Los Alamos National Laboratories host U.S. and Foreign Officials to discuss NPT Topics | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People...

  19. NNSA Co-Hosts Nuclear Security Summit Workshop on Maritime Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Co-Hosts Nuclear Security Summit Workshop on Maritime Security with UK November 19, 2015 WASHINGTON - This week, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration ...

  20. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2015-08-18

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  1. Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systematic Effects in Type-1a Supernovae Surveys from Host Galaxy Spectra Strauss, Michael A. Princeton University 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS Cosmology, supernovae, stellar...

  2. Creation of synthetic host molecules led to 1987 Nobel Prize for Cram |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Creation of synthetic host molecules led to 1987 Nobel Prize for Cram Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2012 Twenty years after creating synthetic host molecules that mimic some of the actions that enzymes perform in cells, Donald Cram was awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. In his host-guest research, Cram and his colleagues designed and prepared more than 1,000 hosts -- each with unique chemical and physical

  3. Electroluminescence efficiencies of erbium in silicon-based hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cueff, Sbastien E-mail: christophe.labbe@ensicaen.fr; Manel Ramrez, Joan; Berencn, Yonder; Garrido, Blas; Kurvits, Jonathan A.; Zia, Rashid; Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 ; Rizk, Richard; Labb, Christophe E-mail: christophe.labbe@ensicaen.fr

    2013-11-04

    We report on room-temperature 1.5??m electroluminescence from trivalent erbium (Er{sup 3+}) ions embedded in three different CMOS-compatible silicon-based hosts: SiO{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and SiN{sub x}. We show that although the insertion of either nitrogen or excess silicon helps enhance electrical conduction and reduce the onset voltage for electroluminescence, it drastically decreases the external quantum efficiency of Er{sup 3+} ions from 2% in SiO{sub 2} to 0.001% and 0.0004% in SiN{sub x} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, respectively. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that hot carrier injection is significantly more efficient than defect-assisted conduction for the electrical excitation of Er{sup 3+} ions. These results suggest strategies to optimize the engineering of on-chip electrically excited silicon-based nanophotonic light sources.

  4. Host Galaxies of X-Shaped Radio Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springmann, Alessondra; /Wellesley Coll. /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The majority of radiation from galaxies containing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is emitted not by the stars composing the galaxy, but from an active source at the galactic center, most likely a supermassive black hole. Of particular interest are radio galaxies, the active galaxies emitting much of their radiation at radio wavelengths. Within each radio galaxy, an AGN powers a pair of collimated jets of relativistic particles, forming a pair of giant lobes at the end of the jets and thus giving a characteristic double-lobed appearance. A particular class of radio galaxies have an ''X''-shaped morphology: in these, two pairs of lobes appear to originate from the galactic center, producing a distinctive X-shape. Two main mechanisms have been proposed to explain the X-shape morphology: one being through the merger of a binary supermassive black hole system and the second being that the radio jets are expanding into an asymmetric medium. By analyzing radio host galaxy shapes, we probe the distribution of the stellar mass to compare the differing model expectations regarding the distribution of the surrounding gas and stellar material about the AGN.

  5. Biogas, once flared, fuels cogen plant serving two hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.K.; McRae, C.L.

    1995-04-01

    This article reports that digester gas from a wastewater treatment plant meets up to 40% of the fuel needs of this cogenerator. Steam is exported for heating the treatment plant`s digesters and for ice production by a second steam host. The Carson Ice-Gen Project promises to enhance the reliability of electric service to the Sacramento Regional Waste water Treatment Plant (SRWTP), to prevent effluent discharges to nearby water ways during power disruptions, and to reduce air emissions associated with flaring of digester gas. The project comprises a 95-MW combined-cycle cogeneration powerplant and a 300-ton/day ice-production plant. The powerplant features twin LM 6000 gas turbines (GTs). One, used as a 53-MW base-load unit, is paired with a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) feeding an extraction/condensing steam turbine/generator (STG). The other GT is used as a 42-MW, simple-cycle peaking unit. Primary fuel is natural gas, which is supplemented by digester gas that is currently being flared at the wastewater treatment plant. Export steam extracted from the STG is used to heat the digesters and to drive ammonia compressors at the ice plant. Steam is also used on-site to chill water in absorption chillers that cool the GT inlet air for power augmentation.

  6. Dynamical Study of Guest-Host Orientational Interaction in LiquidCrystalline Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, Thai Viet

    2005-12-20

    Guest-host interaction has long been a subject of interest in many disciplines. Emphasis is often on how a small amount of guest substance could significantly affect the properties of a host material. This thesis describe our work in studying a guest-host effect where dye-doping of liquid crystalline materials greatly enhances the optical Kerr nonlinearity of the material. The dye molecules, upon excitation and via intermolecular interaction, provides an extra torque to reorient the host molecules, leading to the enhanced optical Kerr nonlinearity. We carried out a comprehensive study on the dynamics of the photoexcited dye-doped liquid crystalline medium. Using various experimental techniques, we separately characterized the dynamical responses of the relevant molecular species present in the medium following photo-excitation, and thus were able to follow the transient process in which photo-excitation of the dye molecules exert through guest-host interaction a net torque on the host LC material, leading to the observed enhanced molecular reorientation. We also observed for the first time the enhanced reorientation in a pure liquid crystal system, where the guest population is created through photoexcitation of the host molecules themselves. Experimental results agree quantitatively with the time-dependent theory based on a mean-field model of the guest-host interaction.

  7. W&M, JLab Host International Neutrino Workshop (William & Mary News &

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Events) | Jefferson Lab W&M, JLab Host International Neutrino Workshop (William & Mary News & Events) External Link: http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2012/william--mary-hosts-international-neutrino-w... By jlab_admin on Thu, 2012-07-19

  8. Spread of an introduced parasite across the Hawaiian archipelago independent of its introduced host

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Gagne, Roderick B.; Hogan, J. Derek; McIntyre, Peter B.; Hain, Ernie F.; Gilliam, James F.; Pracheil, Brenda M.; Blum, Michael J.

    2014-11-11

    1. Co-introductions of non-native parasites with non-native hosts can be a major driver of disease emergence in native species, but the conditions that promote the establishment and spread of nonnative parasites remain poorly understood. Here, we characterise the infection of a native host species by a non-native parasite relative to the distribution and density of the original non-native host species and a suite of organismal and environmental factors that have been associated with parasitism, but not commonly considered within a single system. 2. We examined the native Hawaiian goby Awaous stamineus across 23 catchments on five islands for infection bymore » the non-native nematode parasite Camallanus cotti. We used model selection to test whether parasite infection was associated with the genetic diversity, size and population density of native hosts, the distribution and density of non-native hosts, land use and water quality. 3. We found that the distribution of non-native C. cotti parasites has become decoupled from the non-native hosts that were primary vectors of introduction to the Hawaiian Islands. Although no single intrinsic or extrinsic factor was identified that best explains parasitism of A. stamineus by C. cotti, native host size, population density and water quality were consistently identified as influencing parasite intensity and prevalence. 4. The introduction of non-native species can indirectly influence native species through infection of co-introduced parasites. Here, we show that the effects of enemy addition can extend beyond the range of non-native hosts through the independent spread of non-native parasites. This suggests that control of non-native hosts is not sufficient to halt the spread of introduced parasites. Furthermore, designing importation regulations to prevent host parasite co-introductions can promote native species conservation, even in remote areas that may not seem susceptible to human influence.« less

  9. Genomes of three facultatively symbiotic Frankia sp. strainsreflect host plant biogeography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Normand, Philippe; Lapierre, Pascal; Tisa, Louis S.; Gogarten, J.Peter; Alloisio, Nicole; Bagnarol, Emilie; Bassi, Carla A.; Berry,Alison; Bickhart, Derek M.; Choisne, Nathalie; Couloux, Arnaud; Cournoyer, Benoit; Cruveiller, Stephane; Daubin, Vincent; Demange, Nadia; Francino, M. Pilar; Ggoltsman, Eugene; Huang, Ying; Kopp, Olga; Labarre,Laurent; Lapidus, Alla; Lavire, Celine; Marechal, Joelle; Martinez,Michele; Mastronunzio, Juliana E.; Mullin, Beth; Niemann, James; Pujic,Pierre; Rawnsley, Tania; Rouy, Zoe; Schenowitz, Chantal; Sellstedt,Anita; Tavares, Fernando; Tomkins, Jeffrey P.; Vallenet, David; Valverde,Claudio; Wall, Luis; Wang, Ying; Medigue, Claudine; Benson, David R.

    2006-02-01

    Filamentous actinobacteria from the genus Frankia anddiverse woody trees and shrubs together form N2-fixing actinorhizal rootnodule symbioses that are a major source of new soil nitrogen in widelydiverse biomes 1. Three major clades of Frankia sp. strains are defined;each clade is associated with a defined subset of plants from among theeight actinorhizal plant families 2,3. The evolution arytrajectoriesfollowed by the ancestors of both symbionts leading to current patternsof symbiont compatibility are unknown. Here we show that the competingprocesses of genome expansion and contraction have operated in differentgroups of Frankia strains in a manner that can be related to thespeciation of the plant hosts and their geographic distribution. Wesequenced and compared the genomes from three Frankia sp. strains havingdifferent host plant specificities. The sizes of their genomes variedfrom 5.38 Mbp for a narrow host range strain (HFPCcI3) to 7.50Mbp for amedium host range strain (ACN14a) to 9.08 Mbp for a broad host rangestrain (EAN1pec.) This size divergence is the largest yet reported forsuch closely related bacteria. Since the order of divergence of thestrains is known, the extent of gene deletion, duplication andacquisition could be estimated and was found to be inconcert with thebiogeographic history of the symbioses. Host plant isolation favoredgenome contraction, whereas host plant diversification favored genomeexpansion. The results support the idea that major genome reductions aswell as expansions can occur in facultatively symbiotic soil bacteria asthey respond to new environments in the context of theirsymbioses.

  10. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  11. Secretary Chu Hosts First-Ever Clean Energy Ministerial | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Hosts First-Ever Clean Energy Ministerial Secretary Chu Hosts First-Ever Clean Energy Ministerial July 16, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host the first-ever Clean Energy Ministerial, bringing together ministers and stakeholders from more than 20 countries to launch or join new initiatives that will accelerate the world's transition to clean energy technologies. Government delegations will meet on Monday, July 19. On Tuesday, July 20,

  12. News Release: DOE Hosting Public Meeting to Discuss the Riverton UMTRCA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Site | Department of Energy DOE Hosting Public Meeting to Discuss the Riverton UMTRCA Site News Release: DOE Hosting Public Meeting to Discuss the Riverton UMTRCA Site April 9, 2012 - 2:37pm Addthis News Contact: News Contact: Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov The U.S. Department of Energy will host an informational public meeting for Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Site stakeholders from 6:00 p.m.

  13. DOE Wind Program to Host Booth at Offshore WINDPOWER | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Wind Program to Host Booth at Offshore WINDPOWER DOE Wind Program to Host Booth at Offshore WINDPOWER September 12, 2014 - 10:16am Addthis The Department of Energy's Wind Program will once again host a booth at the AWEA Offshore WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition in Atlantic City, New Jersey, October 7 and 8, 2014. Stop by booth #200 to meet Wind Program personnel and learn about the latest DOE-funded research. Visitors can also pick up a free flash drive containing the Wind Program's most

  14. Deputy Secretary Sherwood-Randall hosts 2016 U.S.- UAE Strategic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Dialogue | Department of Energy hosts 2016 U.S.- UAE Strategic Energy Dialogue Deputy Secretary Sherwood-Randall hosts 2016 U.S.- UAE Strategic Energy Dialogue November 1, 2016 - 5:55pm Addthis Deputy Secretary Sherwood-Randall hosts 2016 U.S.- UAE Strategic Energy Dialogue Washington, DC, October 31, 2016 - The United States of America and the United Arab Emirates today reaffirmed their shared commitment to a strong bilateral relationship during the U.S.-UAE Strategic Energy Dialogue held

  15. Chicago To Host Energy Department's First Public Meeting on Consent-Based

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Siting For Nuclear Waste Management System | Department of Energy Chicago To Host Energy Department's First Public Meeting on Consent-Based Siting For Nuclear Waste Management System Chicago To Host Energy Department's First Public Meeting on Consent-Based Siting For Nuclear Waste Management System March 25, 2016 - 1:25pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-9680 DOE News CHICAGO - On Tuesday, March 29, in Chicago, the U.S. Department of Energy will host the first of eight public meetings

  16. TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation | Department of Energy ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation TODAY: ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Live Chat on Reducing America's Oil Dependence Through Innovation June 28, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Wednesday, June 29, ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar will host the Department of Energy's second "Energy Matters" live chat. Dr. Majumdar will

  17. U.S. Department of Energy to Host Regional Energy Efficiency Conference in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Istanbul, Turkey on June 3-4 | Department of Energy Host Regional Energy Efficiency Conference in Istanbul, Turkey on June 3-4 U.S. Department of Energy to Host Regional Energy Efficiency Conference in Istanbul, Turkey on June 3-4 April 20, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a major Energy Efficiency Conference for industry and government leaders in Istanbul on June 3-4, 2010. This two-day conference, co-sponsored by the American-Turkish

  18. TOMORROW: Secretary Chu To Host Earth Day Live Chat | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Secretary Chu To Host Earth Day Live Chat TOMORROW: Secretary Chu To Host Earth Day Live Chat April 19, 2012 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - On Friday, April 20, 2012, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host a livechat as part of the Energy Department's Earth Day celebrations to highlight the environmental and economic benefits of the Department's investments in clean energy. The live chat will be streamed on www.energy.gov tomorrow, and will feature questions from both in-person and

  19. Under Secretary D'Agostino to Host Conference Call Announcing Major

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Milestone at the Savannah River Site | Department of Energy Secretary D'Agostino to Host Conference Call Announcing Major Milestone at the Savannah River Site Under Secretary D'Agostino to Host Conference Call Announcing Major Milestone at the Savannah River Site March 28, 2012 - 2:35pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Thursday, March 29, 2012, U.S. Energy Under Secretary for Nuclear Security Thomas D'Agostino will host a media conference call with Karen Patterson, Chair of the South Carolina

  20. WEDNESDAY: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on Clean Energy and Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on Clean Energy and Innovation WEDNESDAY: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on Clean Energy and Innovation January 24, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host the Department of Energy's inaugural "Energy Matters" online town hall on President Obama's clean energy and innovation agenda as a follow-up to the State of the Union. He will speak to and answer questions from an online and

  1. A HOST PHASE FOR THE DISPOSAL OF WEAPONS PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WERNER LUTZE; K. B. HELEAN; W. L. GONG - UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO RODNEY C. EWING - UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

    1999-01-01

    Research was conducted into the possible use of zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) as a host phase for storage or disposal of excess weapons plutonium. Zircon is one of the most chemically durable minerals. Its structure can accommodate a variety of elements, including plutonium and uranium. Natural zircon contains uranium and thorium together in different quantities, usually in the range of less than one weight percent up to several weight percent. Zircon occurs in nature as a crystalline or a partially to fully metamict mineral, depending on age and actinide element concentration, i.e., on radiation damage. These zircon samples have been studied extensively and the results are documented in the literature in terms of radiation damage to the crystal structure and related property changes, e.g., density, hardness, loss of uranium and lead, etc. Thus, a unique suite of natural analogues are available to describe the effect of decay of {sup 239}Pu on zircon's structure and how zircon's physical and chemical properties will be affected over very long periods of time. Actually, the oldest zircon samples known are over 3 billion years old. This period covers the time for decay of {sup 239}Pu (half-life 24,300 yr.) and most of its daughter {sup 235}U (half-life 700 million yr.). Because of its chemical durability, even under extreme geological conditions, zircon is the most widely used mineral for geochronological dating (7,000 publications). It is the oldest dated mineral on earth and in the universe. Zircon has already been doped with about 10 weight percent of plutonium. Pure PuSiO{sub 4} has also been synthesized and has the same crystal structure as zircon. However, use of zircon as a storage medium or waste form for plutonium requires further materials characterization. Experiments can either be conducted in laboratories where plutonium can be handled or plutonium can be simulated by other elements, and experiments can be done under less restricted conditions. The authors

  2. ALCF, NERSC, OLCF co-host HPC software webinar series | Argonne...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ALCF, NERSC, OLCF co-host HPC software webinar series Author: Miki Nolin, OLCF May 31, ... Design of Extreme-scale Application Software (IDEAS) project are presenting a series ...

  3. DOE Hosts Public Roundtable Discussion of Smart-Grid Data Access and Privacy Issues

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On June 29, 2010, the Department of Energy will host a public roundtable panel discussion to collect additional information about the data access and privacy implications of smart-grid technologies...

  4. Department of Energy Hosts Seminar on Spectrum Policy Seminar for Utility Sector

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On December 8, 2010, the Department of Energy General Counsel’s office hosted a seminar on the topic of spectrum policy, attended by approximately fifty representatives of the utility industry.  At...

  5. KNOW THE STAR, KNOW THE PLANET. II. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY OF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Raghavan, Deepak; Subasavage, John P.; Roberts, Lewis C.; Turner, Nils H.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu E-mail: nils@chara-array.org

    2011-11-15

    A study of the host stars to exoplanets is important for understanding their environment. To that end, we report new speckle observations of a sample of exoplanet host primaries. The bright exoplanet host HD 8673 (= HIP 6702) is revealed to have a companion, although at this time we cannot definitively establish the companion as physical or optical. The observing lists for planet searches and for these observations have for the most part been pre-screened for known duplicity, so the detected binary fraction is lower than what would otherwise be expected. Therefore, a large number of double stars were observed contemporaneously for verification and quality control purposes, to ensure that the lack of detection of companions for exoplanet hosts was valid. In these additional observations, 10 pairs are resolved for the first time and 60 pairs are confirmed. These observations were obtained with the USNO speckle camera on the NOAO 4 m telescopes at both KPNO and CTIO from 2001 to 2010.

  6. LUMINOSITY DISTRIBUTION OF GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    result from our simulation agrees with the observed luminosity PDF of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) host galaxies when we assume that the core-collapse SNe trace star formation. ...

  7. U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Tuesday, November 12, 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will host a press call to discuss Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project (CEUSP) shipment and disposal plans in Nevada.

  8. Energy Secretary Moniz Will Host North American Energy Ministers in Trilateral Meeting Focused on Energy Cooperation

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON—On December 15, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will host a trilateral meeting with Natural Resources Canada Minister Greg Rickford and Mexican Secretary of Energy Pedro Joaquin Coldwell.

  9. News Release: DOE to Host Public Scoping Meetings on Uranium Leasing PEIS

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. — The U.S. Department of Energy is hosting public scoping meetings to invite comments on the scope of the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

  10. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  11. KNOW THE STAR, KNOW THE PLANET. I. ADAPTIVE OPTICS OF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Lewis C.; Turner, Nils H.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I. E-mail: nils@chara-array.org E-mail: bdm@usno.navy.mil

    2011-11-15

    The results of an adaptive optics survey of exoplanet host stars for stellar companions are presented. We used the Advanced Electro-Optical System telescope and its adaptive optics system to collect deep images of the stars in the I band. Sixty-two exoplanet host stars were observed and fifteen multiple star systems were resolved. Of these eight are known multiples, while seven are new candidate binaries. For all binaries, we measured the relative astrometry of the pair and the differential magnitude in the I band. We improved the orbits of HD 19994 and {tau} Boo. These observations will provide improved statistics on the duplicity of exoplanet host stars and provide an increased understanding of the dynamics of known binary star exoplanet hosts.

  12. NREL: Wind Research - NREL Heads to Big Easy to Host Collegiate...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Heads to Big Easy to Host Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 May 20, 2016 The U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 begins May 24-less than a week from ...

  13. U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Radioactive Waste Shipment and Disposal November 12, 2013 - 10:26am Addthis NEWS MEDIA...

  14. DOE Hosts Solid-State Lighting Commercial Product Testing Program Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) hosted a workshop on October 27, 2006, to introduce the DOE SSL Commercial Product Testing Program. The workshop, held in Washington, D.C., drew over 40...

  15. Deputy Secretary Poneman to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department FY 2014 Budget Request

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, April 10, 2013, U.S. Department of Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman will host a media briefing on the Energy Department’s Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Request

  16. NNSA Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Friday, December 4, 2015 - 10:48am NNSA Blog From left, NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear ...

  17. Missouri Lithium-Ion Battery Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Missouri Lithium-Ion Battery Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy ... and Innovation at Events Across the Nation A123 Systems Moves From the Lab to the Assembly ...

  18. The phage-host arms-race: Shaping the evolution of microbes ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: The phage-host arms-race: Shaping the evolution of microbes Bacteria, the most ... Faced with the rapid evolution and turnover of phage particles, bacteria have evolved ...

  19. Dr. Kathleen Hogan to Host Live Chat on Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WHAT: Assistant Deputy Secretary of Energy Efficiency Kathleen Hogan to host "Energy Matters" live chat WHEN: Wednesday, November 16th 2:00 PM EST HOW: Watch online at Energy.gov...

  20. DOE Hosts Public Roundtable Discussion of Smart-Grid Data Access...

    Energy Savers

    June 25, 2010 - 2:57pm Addthis On June 29, 2010, the Department of Energy will host a public roundtable panel discussion to collect additional information about the data access and ...

  1. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  2. On the Origin of the Mass-Metallicity Relation for GRB Host Galaxies...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for GRB Host Galaxies We investigate the nature of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relation ... The nature of this offset is consistent with suggestions that low metallicity environments ...

  3. Energy Department to Host SunShot Initiative Summit and Technology Forum in Denver, Colorado

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy will host the SunShot Initiative Summit and Technology Forum. The SunShot Initiative seeks to achieve grid-parity solar energy within the decade.

  4. Deterministically Polarized Fluorescence from Single Dye Molecules Aligned in Liquid Crystal Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; Knox, R.; Freivald, P.; Boyd, R. W.; Stroud, Jr., C. R.; Marshall, K.L.

    2005-09-30

    We demonstrated for the first time to our konwledge deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules. Planar aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts provide deterministic alignment of single dye molecules in a preferred direction.

  5. NREL to Host Photovoltaics Presentation at 2014 Solar Day - News Releases |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL to Host Photovoltaics Presentation at 2014 Solar Day June 3, 2014 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory will host several events at the 2014 Denver Solar Day on Sunday, June 8. The free expo is expected to attract more than 2,000 photovoltaics (PV) installers, PV buyers, students, utility officials and members of the public. NREL, a global leader in solar photovoltaic research, also takes a leading role in educating the public about renewable energy. Solar Day

  6. Los Angeles CleanTech Incubator to Host Event With Senior Energy Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Official Dr. Arun Majumdar | Department of Energy Angeles CleanTech Incubator to Host Event With Senior Energy Department Official Dr. Arun Majumdar Los Angeles CleanTech Incubator to Host Event With Senior Energy Department Official Dr. Arun Majumdar January 30, 2012 - 4:40pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of the Energy Department's ongoing efforts to highlight President Obama's State of the Union address and discuss the Obama Administration's commitment to American energy resources and

  7. Arkansas Natural Gas Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Poneman | Department of Energy Arkansas Natural Gas Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Poneman Arkansas Natural Gas Company Hosts Tour With U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Poneman February 3, 2012 - 12:54pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman joined with Conway Mayor Tab Townsell and company officials to tour Southwestern Energy's natural gas operations near Conway, Arkansas. During the visit, Poneman highlighted

  8. Energy Department to Host Event With 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Perlmutter | Department of Energy Event With 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter Energy Department to Host Event With 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter January 10, 2012 - 12:02pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy (DOE) will host an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at

  9. OSTI hosts UT grad students | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Technical Information OSTI hosts UT grad students Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2006 OSTI is hosting two graduate students this fall as part of the Science Links scholarship program. Gary Robinson, a graduate of Miles College (computer science), and Erin Dominick, a graduate of Oklahoma State University (psychology) will spend 20 hours per week as interns at OSTI while earning a Master's degree in information science from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT). Science Links is

  10. NNSA Hosts NPT Parties at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) NNSA Hosts NPT Parties at Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories April 06, 2015 WASHINGTON D.C. - On March 25-27, 2015, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) hosted representatives from 11 States Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and one representative from the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs. The officials from the non-nuclear-weapon States visited facilities at Los

  11. Secretary Chu to Host Conference Call Announcing the Winners of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge | Department of Energy to Host Conference Call Announcing the Winners of the America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge Secretary Chu to Host Conference Call Announcing the Winners of the America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge February 9, 2012 - 4:35pm Addthis Washington, DC - Building on President Obama's State of the Union address in which he discussed the Obama Administration's commitment to supporting innovation and American

  12. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY HOSTS REMAKE LEARNING LAB DAY FOR LOCAL STUDENTS

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY HOSTS REMAKE LEARNING LAB DAY FOR LOCAL STUDENTS Pittsburgh, Pa. - The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in collaboration with Remake Learning Days, a program sponsored by Allegheny County's Executive and the Allegheny County Housing Authority, hosted a lab day May 11, 2016, at NETL's South Park, Pa., site. Approximately 54 students from Woodland Hills Jr. / Sr. High Schools participated in NETL's event. They were

  13. Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at a Conference Hosted by Center for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Transatlantic Relations & the Atlantic Council Conference - As Prepared for Delivery | Department of Energy a Conference Hosted by Center for Transatlantic Relations & the Atlantic Council Conference - As Prepared for Delivery Deputy Secretary Poneman's Remarks at a Conference Hosted by Center for Transatlantic Relations & the Atlantic Council Conference - As Prepared for Delivery May 31, 2011 - 6:07pm Addthis Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman Remarks - As Prepared for

  14. Energy Secretary Moniz Hosts Gathering of World's Energy Ministers in San

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Francisco to Advance Technology Solutions, Accelerate Clean Energy Deployment | Department of Energy Hosts Gathering of World's Energy Ministers in San Francisco to Advance Technology Solutions, Accelerate Clean Energy Deployment Energy Secretary Moniz Hosts Gathering of World's Energy Ministers in San Francisco to Advance Technology Solutions, Accelerate Clean Energy Deployment June 2, 2016 - 5:47pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov 21 Major Governments and the

  15. TODAY: Secretary Chu and Former Senator John Warner to Host Conference Call

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    on Lighting Efficiency Standards | Department of Energy Former Senator John Warner to Host Conference Call on Lighting Efficiency Standards TODAY: Secretary Chu and Former Senator John Warner to Host Conference Call on Lighting Efficiency Standards July 8, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will join former Virginia Senator John Warner on a conference call to discuss the commonsense, bipartisan energy saving standards for residential lighting

  16. Y-12 hosts visit from directors of weapons labs | Y-12 National Security

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex hosts visit from ... Y-12 hosts visit from directors of weapons labs Posted: October 13, 2014 - 8:44am Assembly/Disassembly Operations Manager Reed Mullins, Y-12 Site Manager Bill Tindal, LLNL Director William Goldstein, LANL Director Charles McMillan, SNL Director Paul Hommert and NNSA Production Office Manager Steve Erhart. Laboratory directors from Sandia National Lab, Lawrence Livermore National Lab and Los Alamos National Lab recently visited the Y-12 National Security Complex.

  17. Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties Kim et al. (2013) [K13] introduced a new methodology for determining peak- brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized

  18. Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 Teams for Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 Teams for Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 Teams for Middle School Science Bowl on March 7 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., March 2, 2009 - The nation's future scientists, engineers and mathematicians may be found testing their mental skills at the Department of Energy's Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl taking place at Jefferson Lab on Saturday, March 7. Twenty-three teams, representing middle schools from across the region are registered for

  19. Jefferson Lab Hosts Virginia Science Bowl on Feb. 9 | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosts Virginia Science Bowl on Feb. 9 Jefferson Lab Hosts Virginia Science Bowl on Feb. 9 February 7, 2002 Some of the brightest young minds in the state will come together at Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 9 to compete in the Virginia Regional Science Bowl. Twenty teams, representing high schools from across the state are participating in this annual academic competition. Denbigh Baptist Christian School and New Horizon's Governor's School from the Peninsula will be competing in the event. In

  20. Jefferson Lab hosts Virginia Science Bowl on February 8 | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    hosts Virginia Science Bowl on February 8 Jefferson Lab hosts Virginia Science Bowl on February 8 February 4, 2003 Some of the brightest young minds in the commonwealth will come together at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, February 8, to compete in the Virginia Regional Science Bowl. Twenty-one teams, representing high schools from across the state are participating in this annual academic competition. In an intense question-and-answer game format, the contestants will be

  1. Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Secretary of Energy Majumdar | Department of Energy Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under Secretary of Energy Majumdar Volvo Truck Headquarters in North Carolina to Host Event With Acting Under Secretary of Energy Majumdar January 26, 2012 - 2:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Tomorrow, Friday, January 27, Acting Under Secretary of Energy Arun Majumdar and North Carolina Congressman Howard Coble will visit the Volvo Group's truck headquarters in Greensboro,

  2. A Bayesian approach to multi-messenger astronomy: identification of gravitational-wave host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, XiLong; Messenger, Christopher; Heng, Ik Siong

    2014-11-01

    We present a general framework for incorporating astrophysical information into Bayesian parameter estimation techniques used by gravitational wave data analysis to facilitate multi-messenger astronomy. Since the progenitors of transient gravitational wave events, such as compact binary coalescences, are likely to be associated with a host galaxy, improvements to the source sky location estimates through the use of host galaxy information are explored. To demonstrate how host galaxy properties can be included, we simulate a population of compact binary coalescences and show that for ?8.5% of simulations within 200 Mpc, the top 10 most likely galaxies account for a ?50% of the total probability of hosting a gravitational wave source. The true gravitational wave source host galaxy is in the top 10 galaxy candidates ?10% of the time. Furthermore, we show that by including host galaxy information, a better estimate of the inclination angle of a compact binary gravitational wave source can be obtained. We also demonstrate the flexibility of our method by incorporating the use of either the B or K band into our analysis.

  3. INTERMEDIATE-AGE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN CLASSICAL QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canalizo, Gabriela; Stockton, Alan E-mail: stockton@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2013-08-01

    Although mergers and starbursts are often invoked in the discussion of quasi-stellar object (QSO) activity in the context of galaxy evolution, several studies have questioned their importance or even their presence in QSO host galaxies. Accordingly, we are conducting a study of z {approx} 0.2 QSO host galaxies previously classified as passively evolving elliptical galaxies. We present deep Keck/LRIS spectroscopy of a sample of 15 hosts and model their stellar absorption spectra using stellar synthesis models. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our spectra allows us to break various degeneracies that arise from different combinations of models, varying metallicities, and contamination from QSO light. We find that none of the host spectra can be modeled by purely old stellar populations and that the majority of the hosts (14/15) have a substantial contribution from intermediate-age populations with ages ranging from 0.7 to 2.4 Gyr. An average host spectrum is strikingly well fit by a combination of an old population and a 2.1 (+0.5, -0.7) Gyr population. The morphologies of the host galaxies suggest that these aging starbursts were induced during the early stages of the mergers that resulted in the elliptical-shaped galaxies that we observe. The current active galactic nucleus activity likely corresponds to the late episodes of accretion predicted by numerical simulations, which occur near the end of the mergers, whereas earlier episodes may be more difficult to observe due to obscuration. Our off-axis observations prevent us from detecting any current star formation or young stellar populations that may be present in the central few kiloparsecs.

  4. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H. E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), H?{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (?0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  5. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; et al.

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  6. MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb: Massive planetary companion to galactic-disk host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yee, J. C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y.; Hwang, K.-H.; Jung, Y. K.; Skowron, J.; Udalski, A.; Bond, I. A.; Hundertmark, M.; Monard, L. A. G.; Porritt, I.; Nelson, P.; Bozza, V.; Albrow, M. D.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Lee, C.-U.; McCormick, J.; Collaboration: μFUN Collaboration),; MOA Collaboration),; OGLE Collaboration),; RoboNet Collaboration),; and others

    2014-07-20

    We report the discovery of MOA-2013-BLG-220Lb, which has a super-Jupiter mass ratio q = 3.01 ± 0.02 × 10{sup –3} relative to its host. The proper motion, μ = 12.5 ± 1 mas yr{sup –1}, is one of the highest for microlensing planets yet discovered, implying that it will be possible to separately resolve the host within ∼7 yr. Two separate lines of evidence imply that the planet and host are in the Galactic disk. The planet could have been detected and characterized purely with follow-up data, which has important implications for microlensing surveys, both current and into the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) era.

  7. Structural Aspects of Hydrogen Bonding with Nitrate and Sulfate: Design Criteria for Polyalcohol Hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, Benjamin P.; Dixon, David A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Vargas, Rubicelia; Garza, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Organic hosts for oxyanion complexation can be constructed by combining two or more hydrogen bonding sites. The deliberate design of architectures for such hosts requires knowledge of the optimal geometry for the hydrogen bonds formed between the host and the guest. Important structural parameters include the O--H distance, the O--H-D angle, the X-O--H angle, and the X-O--H-D dihedral angle (H-D=hydrogen bond donor, X=any atom). This information can be obtained through the analysis of hydrogen bonding observed in crystal structures and electronic structure calculations on simple gas-phase complexes. In this chapter, we present an analysis of hydrogen bonding structural parameters for alcohol hydrogen donors and the oxygen atom acceptors in nitrate and sulfate.

  8. A DETECTION OF MOLECULAR GAS EMISSION IN THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB080517

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanway, E. R.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Van der Laan, T. P. R.

    2015-01-01

    We have observed the host galaxy of the low-redshift, low-luminosity Swift GRB080517 at 105.8 GHz using the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer. We detect an emission line with integrated flux S?? = 0.39 0.05Jykms{sup 1}consistent both spatially and in velocity with identification as the J = 1-0 rotational transition of carbon monoxide (CO) at the host galaxy redshift. This represents only the third long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy with molecular gas detected in emission. The inferred molecular gas mass, M{sub H{sub 2}}?6.310{sup 8} M {sub ?}, implies a gas consumption timescale of ?40Myr if star formation continues at its current rate. Similar short timescales appear characteristic of the long GRB population with CO observations to date, suggesting that the GRB in these sources occurs toward the end of their star formation episode.

  9. Wind Powering America Hosts 11th Annual All-States Summit | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy Powering America Hosts 11th Annual All-States Summit Wind Powering America Hosts 11th Annual All-States Summit October 1, 2012 - 11:57am Addthis This is an excerpt from the Third Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Approximately 100 members of Wind Powering America's (WPA's) network attended the 11th Annual All-States Summit on June 7 at the Georgia Tech Research Institute Conference Center in Atlanta, with an additional 53 attending via webinar. The Summit,

  10. Secretary Chu to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department FY 2013 Budget

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Request | Department of Energy Media Briefing on Energy Department FY 2013 Budget Request Secretary Chu to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department FY 2013 Budget Request February 10, 2012 - 2:29pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, February 13, 2012, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will host a media briefing on the Energy Department's Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Request, outlining the proposed investments in an all-of-the-above energy strategy that includes critical innovation, in the

  11. Ask the Directors: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on the Energy Innovation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Hubs | Department of Energy Ask the Directors: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on the Energy Innovation Hubs Ask the Directors: Secretary Chu to Host Live Chat on the Energy Innovation Hubs March 5, 2012 - 12:32pm Addthis Secretary Chu is accepting questions on Facebook, Twitter and e-mail for the Energy Innovation Hub directors -- who are working to build better nuclear reactors, obtain fuel from sunlight and design the most energy efficient buildings to date. Michael Hess Michael Hess

  12. Energy Department to Host Biomass 2012 Conference in Washington, D.C |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Biomass 2012 Conference in Washington, D.C Energy Department to Host Biomass 2012 Conference in Washington, D.C July 9, 2012 - 4:52pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - On July 10-11, the U.S. Department of Energy will host its fifth annual conference, Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy. Biomass 2012 will bring together hundreds of diverse stakeholders in the public and private sectors

  13. OSTI-hosted DOE datasets, tools now in Data.gov | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information OSTI-hosted DOE datasets, tools now in Data.gov Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2009 As part of the Administration-wide Open Gov Initiative, Secretary Chu announced that the Department of Energy is contributing various tools and data sets for the National Assets program being undertaken by a group of six departments and agencies across the federal government. The DOE datasets included are hosted by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical

  14. MEDIA ADVISORY: REAC/TS hosts 5th International Symposium on the Medical

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Basis for Radiation Accident Preparedness MEDIA ADVISORY: REAC/TS hosts 5th International Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation Accident Preparedness FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 27, 2011 FY11-35 Who: Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site What: REAC/TS-a program of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education- is hosting a three-day symposium titled the 5th International REAC/TS Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation Accident Preparedness. The symposium will

  15. Secretaries Chu and Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Energy-Saving Improvements Program | Department of Energy Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Energy-Saving Improvements Program Secretaries Chu and Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Energy-Saving Improvements Program April 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Thursday, April 21st, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan will launch a new pilot program intended to offer homeowners low-cost

  16. Secretaries Chu and Duncan to Host Press Conference Call to Announce

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    National School Energy Challenge | Department of Energy Duncan to Host Press Conference Call to Announce National School Energy Challenge Secretaries Chu and Duncan to Host Press Conference Call to Announce National School Energy Challenge May 24, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Tuesday, May 24, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan will join with the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) to make an announcement about a new energy

  17. "Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop hosted by

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    LMI-EFRC | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop hosted by LMI-EFRC Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News EFRC Events DOE Announcements Publications History Contact BES Home 06.02.10 "Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop hosted by LMI-EFRC Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page July 7, 2010 :: The Light-Material

  18. DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships Host Two-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Boston

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over 100 attendees gathered in Boston, MA to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 16-17, 2007. The workshop, hosted by DOE and Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), was the second DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The first workshop, hosted by DOE and Southern California Edison, was held in Pasadena in April 2007. In both workshops, a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – shared insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  20. DOE Hosts Record Number of Attendees at Annual Small Business Conference |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Department of Energy Hosts Record Number of Attendees at Annual Small Business Conference DOE Hosts Record Number of Attendees at Annual Small Business Conference May 10, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy, the largest civilian contracting agency within the Federal government, is convening its 11th Annual Small Business Conference & Expo at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia from May 10-12, 2010. Drawing more than 1,700

  1. DOE and Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Co-Host First Ever

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Electric Vehicle Forum | Department of Energy and Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Co-Host First Ever Electric Vehicle Forum DOE and Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology Co-Host First Ever Electric Vehicle Forum September 30, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Beijing, China - Yesterday, the first-ever U.S.-China Electric Vehicle Forum concluded in Beijing, China, bringing together more than 140 U.S. and Chinese officials from government, industry, academia and advocacy groups to discuss

  2. NERSC Hosts 150 HPC Experts as they Prepare for Intel's Xeon Phi

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Processor Hosts 150 HPC Experts as they Prepare for Intel's Xeon Phi Processor NERSC Hosts 150 HPC Experts as they Prepare for Intel's Xeon Phi Processor October 6, 2015 Contact: Richard Gerber, 510-486-6820, RAGerber@lbl.gov About 150 members of the high performance computing community spent four days preparing for the next generation of processor architectures at the 2015 IXPUG (Intel Xeon Phi Users Group) meeting at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Sept. 28-Oct. 1 meeting was

  3. Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    31 Jan 2015 | Accepted 4 Aug 2015 | Published 22 Sep 2015 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms9285 OPEN Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores Jon G. Sanders1, Annabel C. Beichman2 3 , Joe Roman1,3, Jarrod J. Scott4, David Emerson4, James J. McCarthy1 & Peter R. Girguis1 Mammals host gut microbiomes of immense physiological consequence, but the determinants of diversity in these communities remain poorly understood. Diet appears to be the dominant

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    U.S. Department of Energy Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER U.S. Department of Energy Hosts Booth at WINDPOWER March 28, 2014 - 5:35pm Addthis Stop by the U.S. Department of Energy's new exhibit in booth number 1653 at the AWEA 2014 WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition in Las Vegas to meet Wind Program personnel and learn about the latest DOE-funded research. Visitors can also pick up a free flash drive containing the Wind Program's most recent research reports and learn about DOE's newest initiatives-the

  5. Jefferson Lab hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School Science

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Bowl on Feb. 10 | Jefferson Lab hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on Feb. 10 Jefferson Lab hosts 19 schools for Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl on Feb. 10 January 30, 2007 Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 10, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Nineteen teams, representing high schools from across the region are participating in this

  6. Jefferson Lab hosts 22 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb.

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    12 | Jefferson Lab hosts 22 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb. 12 Science Bowl Click above for print version (tiff) of the Jefferson Lab Science Bowl logo. Jefferson Lab hosts 22 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb. 12 February 1, 2005 Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 12, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Twenty-two teams, representing high

  7. Jefferson Lab hosts 23 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb.

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    11 | Jefferson Lab hosts 23 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb. 11 Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 teams for Virginia High School Science Bowl on Feb. 11 February 3, 2006 Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 11, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Twenty-three teams, representing high schools from across the region are participating in this year's academic competition.

  8. University of Minnesota Hosts Clean Energy Events With U.S. Deputy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Secretary of Energy Poneman and Senator Franken | Department of Energy Hosts Clean Energy Events With U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Poneman and Senator Franken University of Minnesota Hosts Clean Energy Events With U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Poneman and Senator Franken January 26, 2012 - 2:22pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - Tomorrow, Friday, January 27, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman will join Senator Al Franken at the University of Minnesota for events highlighting the

  9. U-232: Xen p2m_teardown() Bug Lets Local Guest OS Users Deny Service on the Host OS

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Xen. A local user on a guest operating system can cause denial of service conditions on the host.

  10. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Dash, Pradyot; Diercks, Alan H.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Ellis, Amy L.; Fan, Shufang; Ferris, Martin T.; Gralinski, Lisa; Green, Richard; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hatta, Masato; Heegel, Robert A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Jeng, Sophia; Josset, Laurence; Kaiser, Shari M.; Kelly, Sarah; Law, Gale Lynn; Li, Chengjun; Li, Jiangning; Long, Casey; Luna, Maria L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Menachery, Vineet; Metz, Thomas O.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Navarro, Garnet; Neumann, Gabriele; Podyminogin, Rebecca L.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Sanders, Catherine J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Sims, Amy; Sova, Pavel; Tam, Vincent C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Thomas, Paul G.; Tilton, Susan C.; Totura, Allison L.; Wang, Jing; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wen, Ji; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Feng; Yount, Boyd; Zhang, Qibin; Mcweeney, Shannon K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph; Aderem, Alan; Katze, Michael G.; Scheuermann, Richard H.

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archived at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.

  11. Oak Ridge Hosts EM Site Specific Advisory Board Spring Chairs Meeting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge, Tenn. – More than 60 participants from across the country traveled to Oak Ridge this month to attend the EM Site Specific Advisory Board’s (SSAB) 2016 Spring Chairs Meeting. The event was hosted by the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB).

  12. DOE to Host Workshop in Conjunction with Alaska Rural Energy Conference

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is hosting a workshop on April 25, 2016, to help Alaska Native communities identify opportunities to engage with federal agencies to advance their energy projects and address energy and climate challenges.

  13. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  14. Do Nuclear Star Clusters and Supermassive Black Holes Follow the Same Host-Galaxy Correlations?

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Erwin, Peter; Gadotti, Dimitri Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Smore » tudies have suggested that there is a strong correlation between the masses of nuclear star clusters (NSCs) and their host galaxies, a correlation which is said to be an extension of the well-known correlations between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. But careful analysis of disk galaxies—including 2D bulge/disk/bar decompositions—shows that whileMBHs correlate with the stellar mass of the bulge component of galaxies, the masses of NSCs correlate much better with the total galaxy stellar mass. In addition, the mass ratio M NSC / M ⋆ ,  tot for NSCs in spirals (at least those with Hubble typesc and later) is typically an order of magnitude smaller than the mass ratio M BH / M ⋆ ,  bul ofMBHs. The absence of a universal “central massive object” correlation argues against common formation and growth mechanisms for bothMBHs and NSCs. We also discuss evidence for a break in the NSC-host galaxy correlation, galaxies with Hubble types earlier thanbc appear to host systematically more massive NSCs than do typesc and later.« less

  15. The hydroxyl-water megamaser connection. I. Water emission toward OH megamaser hosts

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Brandon K.; Migenes, Victor; Smidt, Joseph M.

    2016-02-05

    Questions surround the connection of luminous extragalactic masers to galactic processes. The observation that water and hydroxyl megamasers rarely coexist in the same galaxy has given rise to a hypothesis that the two species appear in different phases of nuclear activity. The detection of simultaneous hydroxyl and water megamaser emission toward IC694 has called this hypothesis into question, but, because many megamasers have not been surveyed for emission in the other molecule, it remains unclear whether IC694 occupies a narrow phase of galaxy evolution or whether the relationship between megamaser species and galactic processes is more complicated than previously believed. In this paper, we present results of a systematic search for 22 GHz water maser emission among OH megamaser hosts to identify additional objects hosting both megamasers. Our work roughly doubles the number of galaxies searched for emission in both molecules, which host at least one confirmed maser. We confirm with a high degree of confidence (more » $$\\gt 8\\sigma $$) the detection of water emission toward IIZw96, firmly establishing it as the second object to cohost both water and hydroxyl megamasers after IC694. We find high luminosity, narrow features in the water feature in IIZw96. All dual megamaser candidates appear in merging galaxy systems suggestive that megamasers that coexistance may signal a brief phase along the merger sequence. In conclusion, a statistical analysis of the results of our observations provide possible evidence for an exclusion of H2O kilomasers among OH megamaser hosts.« less

  16. Comparison of composition and texture of calcite-cemented concretions and host sandstones, northern Apennines, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cibin, U. . Dept. de Scienze Geologiche); Cavazza, W. . Dept de Scienze Mineralogiche); Fontana, D. . Inst. di Geologia); Milliken, K.L.; McBride, E.F. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-09-01

    Compositional and textural characteristics of 13 calcite-cemented concretions are compared with those in adjacent but essentially uncemented host sandstones to test the belief that concretions better preserve original detrital compositions than do host rocks. Sandstones sampled are from five upper Eocene to Pliocene clastic units deposited in a piggy-back setting and from one Miocene unit in the foreland basin of the northern Apennines. The authors' data indicate that calcite-cemented concretions do not necessarily preserve unstable grains more readily than host sandstones, especially if cementation occurs late in the burial history of the sandstones. In the examined formations the main factors controlling the capability of concretions to preserve unstable framework grains seem to be (1) the types of unstable grains, (2) their susceptibility to dissolution by interstitial fluids or replacement by calcite, (3) burial depth and temperature during and after concretion development, and (4) time. Correct provenance reconstructions of sandstone units containing concretions must be preceded by assessment of any diagenetic alteration affecting the framework grains of both concretions and host rocks.

  17. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-09-30

    The objective of this project is to synthesize nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y nanoclusters, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates, and evaluate the 'zeolite Y/Nanoporous host' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. In comparison to conventionally-used zeolite Y catalysts of micron size particles, the nanocrystals (< 100 nm particle size) which contain shorter path lengths, are expected to allow faster diffusion of large hydrocarbon substrates and the catalysis products within and out of the zeolite's channels and cages (<1 nm size). This is expected to significantly reduce deactivation of the catalyst and to prolong their period of reactivity. Encapsulating zeolite Y nanocrystals within the nanoporous materials is expected to protect its external surfaces and pore entrances from being blocked by large hydrocarbon substrates, since these substrates will initially be converted to small molecules by the nanoporous host (a catalyst in its own right). The project consisted of four major tasks as follows: (1) synthesis of the nanoparticles of zeolite Y (of various chemical compositions) using various techniques such as the addition of organic additives to conventional zeolite Y synthesis mixtures to suppress zeolite Y crystal growth; (2) synthesis of nanoporous silicate host materials of up to 30 nm pore diameter, using poly (alkylene oxide) copolymers which when removed will yield a mesoporous material; (3) synthesis of zeolite Y/Nanoporous Host composite materials as potential catalysts; and (4) evaluation of the catalyst for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  18. Newport News School Board Member Hosting Town Hall Thursday (Daily Press) |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Newport News School Board Member Hosting Town Hall Thursday (Daily Press) External Link: http://articles.dailypress.com/2012-03-05/news/dp-nws-ednotebook-0305-20120304_1... By jlab_admin on Tue, 2012-03-06

  19. Scintillator having a MgAI.sub.2O.sub.4 host lattice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2011-12-20

    A scintillator having a host lattice of MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4 was prepared by hot pressing under a vacuum environment a powder mixture of MgAl.sub.2O.sub.4, CeO.sub.2, and LiF.

  20. Energy Department to Host Tribal Leader Forum and Tribal Renewable Energy Development Workshop in New Mexico

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is hosting two back-to-back events July 27–29, 2015, at the Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico: a Tribal Leader Forum on forming tribal utilities and an interactive workshop on developing community-scale renewable energy projects on tribal lands.

  1. METALLICITY IN THE GRB 100316D/SN 2010bh HOST COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Emily M.; Berger, Edo; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chornock, Ryan

    2011-09-20

    The recent long-duration GRB 100316D, associated with supernova SN 2010bh and detected by Swift, is one of the nearest gamma-ray burst (GRB)-supernovae (SNe) ever observed (z = 0.059). This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the explosion environment on {approx}kpc scale in relation to the host galaxy complex. Here we present spatially resolved spectrophotometry of the host galaxy, focusing on both the explosion site and the brightest star-forming regions. Using these data, we extract the spatial profiles of the relevant emission features (H{alpha}, H{beta}, [O III]{lambda}5007, and [N II]{lambda}6584) and use these profiles to examine variations in metallicity and star formation rate (SFR) as a function of position in the host galaxy. We conclude that GRB 100316D/SN2010bh occurred in a low-metallicity host galaxy, and that the GRB-SN explosion site corresponds to the region with the lowest metallicity and highest SFR sampled by our observations.

  2. A comprehensive collection of systems biology data characterizing the host response to viral infection

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Aevermann, Brian D.; Pickett, Brett E.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Klem, Edward B.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Askovich, Peter S.; Bankhead, Armand; Bolles, Meagan; Carter, Victoria; Chang, Jean H.; et al

    2014-10-14

    The Systems Biology for Infectious Diseases Research program was established by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to investigate host-pathogen interactions at a systems level. This program generated 47 transcriptomic and proteomic datasets from 30 studies that investigate in vivo and in vitro host responses to viral infections. Human pathogens in the Orthomyxoviridae and Coronaviridae families, especially pandemic H1N1 and avian H5N1 influenza A viruses and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), were investigated. Study validation was demonstrated via experimental quality control measures and meta-analysis of independent experiments performed under similar conditions. Primary assay results are archivedmore » at the GEO and PeptideAtlas public repositories, while processed statistical results together with standardized metadata are publically available at the Influenza Research Database (www.fludb.org) and the Virus Pathogen Resource (www.viprbrc.org). As a result, by comparing data from mutant versus wild-type virus and host strains, RNA versus protein differential expression, and infection with genetically similar strains, these data can be used to further investigate genetic and physiological determinants of host responses to viral infection.« less

  3. Acid Catalysis in Basic Solution: A Supramolecular Host PromotesOrthoformate Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-12-12

    Though many enzymes can promote chemical reactions by tuning substrate properties purely through the electrostatic environment of a docking cavity, this strategy has proven challenging to mimic in synthetic host-guest systems. Here we report a highly-charged, water soluble, metal-ligand assembly with a hydrophobic interior cavity that thermodynamically stabilizes protonated substrates and consequently catalyzes the normally acidic hydrolysis of orthoformates in basic solution, with rate accelerations of up to 890-fold. The catalysis reaction obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics, exhibits competitive inhibition, and the substrate scope displays size selectivity consistent with the constrained binding environment of the molecular host. Synthetic chemists have long endeavored to design host molecules capable of selectively binding slow-reacting substrates and catalyzing their chemical reactions. While synthetic catalysts are often site-specific and require certain properties of the substrate to insure catalysis, enzymes are often able to modify basic properties of the bound substrate such as pK{sub a} in order to enhance reactivity. Two common motifs used by nature to activate otherwise unreactive compounds are the precise arrangement of hydrogen-bonding networks and electrostatic interactions between the substrate and adjacent residues of the protein. Precise arrangement of hydrogen bonding networks near the active sites of proteins can lead to well-tuned pK{sub a}-matching, and can result in pK{sub a} shifts of up to eight units, as shown in bacteriorhodopsin. Similarly, purely electrostatic interactions can greatly favor charged states and have been responsible for pK{sub a} shifts of up to five units for acetoacetate decarboxylase. Attempts have been made to isolate the contributions of electrostatic versus covalent interactions to such pK{sub a} shifts; however this remains a difficult challenge experimentally. This challenge emphasizes the importance of synthesizing

  4. TESTING THE METAL OF LATE-TYPE KEPLER PLANET HOSTS WITH IRON-CLAD METHODS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, Andrew W.; Hilton, Eric J.; Gaidos, Eric; Kraus, Adam

    2013-06-10

    It has been shown that F, G, and early K dwarf hosts of Neptune-sized planets are not preferentially metal-rich. However, it is less clear whether the same holds for late K and M dwarf planet hosts. We report metallicities of Kepler targets and candidate transiting planet hosts with effective temperatures below 4500 K. We use new metallicity calibrations to determine [Fe/H] from visible and near-infrared spectra. We find that the metallicity distribution of late K and M dwarfs monitored by Kepler is consistent with that of the solar neighborhood. Further, we show that hosts of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets have metallicities consistent with those lacking detected planets and rule out a previously claimed 0.2 dex offset between the two distributions at 6{sigma} confidence. We also demonstrate that the metallicities of late K and M dwarfs hosting multiple detected planets are consistent with those lacking detected planets. Our results indicate that multiple terrestrial and Neptune-sized planets can form around late K and M dwarfs with metallicities as low as 0.25 solar. The presence of Neptune-sized planets orbiting such low-metallicity M dwarfs suggests that accreting planets collect most or all of the solids from the disk and that the potential cores of giant planets can readily form around M dwarfs. The paucity of giant planets around M dwarfs compared to solar-type stars must be due to relatively rapid disk evaporation or a slower rate of planet accretion, rather than insufficient solids to form a core.

  5. DEMOGRAPHICS OF THE GALAXIES HOSTING SHORT-DURATION GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Margutti, R.; Czekala, I.; Zauderer, B. A.; Laskar, T.; Servillat, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J.; Tunnicliffe, R. L. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fox, D. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Perley, D. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Room 232, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Persson, S. E.; Monson, A. J.; Kelson, D. D.; Birk, C.; Murphy, D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Anglada, G. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, Universitaet Goettingen, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-05-20

    We present observations of the afterglows and host galaxies of three short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs): 100625A, 101219A, and 110112A. We find that GRB 100625A occurred in a z = 0.452 early-type galaxy with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 0.7 Gyr, and GRB 101219A originated in a star-forming galaxy at z = 0.718 with a stellar mass of Almost-Equal-To 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, a star formation rate of Almost-Equal-To 16 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and a stellar population age of Almost-Equal-To 50 Myr. We also report the discovery of the optical afterglow of GRB 110112A, which lacks a coincident host galaxy to i {approx}> 26 mag, and we cannot conclusively identify any field galaxy as a possible host. From afterglow modeling, the bursts have inferred circumburst densities of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4}-1 cm{sup -3} and isotropic-equivalent gamma-ray and kinetic energies of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 50}-10{sup 51} erg. These three events highlight the diversity of galactic environments that host short GRBs. To quantify this diversity, we use the sample of 36 Swift short GRBs with robust associations to an environment ({approx}1/2 of 68 short bursts detected by Swift to 2012 May) and classify bursts originating from four types of environments: late-type ( Almost-Equal-To 50%), early-type ( Almost-Equal-To 15%), inconclusive ( Almost-Equal-To 20%), and ''host-less'' (lacking a coincident host galaxy to limits of {approx}> 26 mag; Almost-Equal-To 15%). To find likely ranges for the true late- and early-type fractions, we assign each of the host-less bursts to either the late- or early-type category using probabilistic arguments and consider the scenario that all hosts in the inconclusive category are early-type galaxies to set an upper bound on the early-type fraction. We calculate most likely ranges for the late- and early-type fractions of Almost-Equal-To 60

  6. CANDELS: CONSTRAINING THE AGN-MERGER CONNECTION WITH HOST MORPHOLOGIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Wuyts, Stijn; Rangel, Cyprian; Laird, Elise S.; Bell, Eric F.; Alexander, David M.; Bournaud, Frederic; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dekel, Avishai; and others

    2012-01-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, we examine the role that major galaxy mergers play in triggering active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity at z {approx} 2. Our sample consists of 72 moderate-luminosity (L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42-44} erg s{sup -1}) AGNs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 that are selected using the 4 Ms Chandra observations in the Chandra Deep Field South, the deepest X-ray observations to date. Employing visual classifications, we have analyzed the rest-frame optical morphologies of the AGN host galaxies and compared them to a mass-matched control sample of 216 non-active galaxies at the same redshift. We find that most of the AGNs reside in disk galaxies (51.4{sup +5.8}{sub -5.9}%), while a smaller percentage are found in spheroids (27.8{sup +5.8}{sub -4.6}%). Roughly 16.7{sup +5.3}{sub -3.5}% of the AGN hosts have highly disturbed morphologies and appear to be involved in a major merger or interaction, while most of the hosts (55.6{sup +5.6}{sub -5.9}%) appear relatively relaxed and undisturbed. These fractions are statistically consistent with the fraction of control galaxies that show similar morphological disturbances. These results suggest that the hosts of moderate-luminosity AGNs are no more likely to be involved in an ongoing merger or interaction relative to non-active galaxies of similar mass at z {approx} 2. The high disk fraction observed among the AGN hosts also appears to be at odds with predictions that merger-driven accretion should be the dominant AGN fueling mode at z {approx} 2, even at moderate X-ray luminosities. Although we cannot rule out that minor mergers are responsible for triggering these systems, the presence of a large population of relatively undisturbed disk-like hosts suggests that the stochastic accretion of gas plays a greater role in fueling AGN activity at z {approx} 2 than previously thought.

  7. Most sub-arcsecond companions of Kepler exoplanet candidate host stars are gravitationally bound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2014-11-01

    Using the known detection limits for high-resolution imaging observations and the statistical properties of true binary and line-of-sight companions, we estimate the binary fraction of Kepler exoplanet host stars. Our speckle imaging programs at the WIYN 3.5 m and Gemini North 8.1 m telescopes have observed over 600 Kepler objects of interest and detected 49 stellar companions within ?1 arcsec. Assuming binary stars follow a log-normal period distribution for an effective temperature range of 3000-10,000 K, then the model predicts that the vast majority of detected sub-arcsecond companions are long period (P > 50 yr), gravitationally bound companions. In comparing the model predictions to the number of real detections in both observational programs, we conclude that the overall binary fraction of host stars is similar to the 40%-50% rate observed for field stars.

  8. Kondo effect in a host with fractional statistics: Absence of Kondo logarithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yupeng; Schlottmann, P.

    2001-09-15

    By constructing the reflection Dunkl operator we derive several integrable models consisting of a boundary impurity coupled to an electron gas with interactions of the Calogero-Sutherland type. Some of these models were constucted previously using Lax-pair operators. The necessary condition of integrability imposes that the impurity potential has a form similar to that of the bulk interactions. Based on these results we conjecture that a Kondo impurity coupled to the host with long-range interactions of the 1/r{sup 2} type is also integrable. Using the asymptotic Bethe Ansatz we show that there are no Kondo logarithms, and depending on the coupling of the impurity to the host, the impurity spin can either be totally screened, partially screened, or unscreened. On the other hand, for a 1/sinh{sup 2}(r) interaction potential a Kondo effect with logarithms is obtained.

  9. Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, Jon G.; Beichman, Annabel C.; Roman, Joe; Scott, Jarrod J.; Emerson, David; McCarthy, James J.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-09-22

    Mammals host gut microbiomes of immense physiological consequence, but the determinants of diversity in these communities remain poorly understood. Diet appears to be the dominant factor, but host phylogeny also seems to be an important, if unpredictable, correlate. Here we show that baleen whales, which prey on animals (fish and crustaceans), harbor unique gut microbiomes with surprising parallels in functional capacity and higher level taxonomy to those of terrestrial herbivores. These similarities likely reflect a shared role for fermentative metabolisms despite a shift in primary carbon sources from plant-derived to animal-derived polysaccharides, such as chitin. In contrast, protein catabolism and essential amino acid synthesis pathways in baleen whale microbiomes more closely resemble those of terrestrial carnivores. Our results demonstrate that functional attributes of the microbiome can vary independently even given an animal-derived diet, illustrating how diet and evolutionary history combine to shape microbial diversity in the mammalian gut.

  10. Baleen whales host a unique gut microbiome with similarities to both carnivores and herbivores

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Sanders, Jon G.; Beichman, Annabel C.; Roman, Joe; Scott, Jarrod J.; Emerson, David; McCarthy, James J.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-09-22

    Mammals host gut microbiomes of immense physiological consequence, but the determinants of diversity in these communities remain poorly understood. Diet appears to be the dominant factor, but host phylogeny also seems to be an important, if unpredictable, correlate. Here we show that baleen whales, which prey on animals (fish and crustaceans), harbor unique gut microbiomes with surprising parallels in functional capacity and higher level taxonomy to those of terrestrial herbivores. These similarities likely reflect a shared role for fermentative metabolisms despite a shift in primary carbon sources from plant-derived to animal-derived polysaccharides, such as chitin. In contrast, protein catabolism andmore » essential amino acid synthesis pathways in baleen whale microbiomes more closely resemble those of terrestrial carnivores. Our results demonstrate that functional attributes of the microbiome can vary independently even given an animal-derived diet, illustrating how diet and evolutionary history combine to shape microbial diversity in the mammalian gut.« less

  11. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-02-01

    The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the pastincluding the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biologyhave not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

  12. NNSA Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (CTBTO) | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Sites Host Head of Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Friday, December 4, 2015 - 10:48am NNSA Blog From left, NNSA Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Anne Harrington; Dr. Lassina Zerbo, Executive Secretary of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO); and NNSA Acting Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Brigadier General Stephen

  13. Department of Energy to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Subcommittee Meeting | Department of Energy June 24, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - On Tuesday, June 28, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy will host a public meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. The meeting will allow subcommittee members to hear presentations from stakeholders and experts on the safety and environmental performance of hydraulic fracturing. Media wishing to attend are strongly encouraged to contact Niketa Kumar at

  14. Department of Energy to Host Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Subcommittee Meeting | Department of Energy July 11, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - On Wednesday, July 13, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy will host a public meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Natural Gas Subcommittee. The meeting will allow subcommittee members to hear presentations from stakeholders and experts on the safety and environmental performance of hydraulic fracturing. Media wishing to attend are strongly encouraged to contact Niketa Kumar at

  15. DOE Office of Indian Energy to Host Tribal Renewable Energy Workshop Feb.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    9-11 | Department of Energy Tribal Renewable Energy Workshop Feb. 9-11 DOE Office of Indian Energy to Host Tribal Renewable Energy Workshop Feb. 9-11 January 28, 2016 - 7:14pm Addthis Bringing a tribal energy project to fruition is a complex, multifaceted process that can be challenging to navigate. From planning and structuring to financing and implementation, each phase of project development involves obstacles, setbacks, twists, and turns dictated by the tribe's unique energy landscape.

  16. The unique structural parameters of the underlying host galaxies in blue compact dwarfs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Salzer, John J. E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu

    2014-10-01

    The nature of possible evolutionary pathways between various types of dwarf galaxies is still not fully understood. Blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) provide a unique window into dwarf galaxy formation and evolution and are often thought of as an evolutionary stage between different classes of dwarf galaxies. In this study we use deep optical and near-infrared observations of the underlying hosts of BCDs in order to study the structural differences between different types of dwarf galaxies. When compared with dwarf irregular galaxies of similar luminosities, we find that the underlying hosts of BCDs have significantly more concentrated light distributions, with smaller scale lengths and brighter central surface brightnesses. We demonstrate here that the underlying hosts of BCDs are distinct from the broad continuum of typical dwarf irregular galaxies, and that it is unlikely that most dwarf irregular galaxies can transform into a BCD or vice versa. Furthermore, we find that the starburst in a BCD only brightens it on average by ?0.8 mag (factor of two), in agreement with other studies. It appears that a BCD is a long-lived and distinct type of dwarf galaxy that exhibits an exceptionally concentrated matter distribution. We suggest that it is this compact mass distribution that enables the strong star formation events that characterize this class of dwarf galaxy, that the compactness of the underlying host can be used as a distinguishing parameter between BCDs and other dwarf galaxies, and that it can also be used to identify BCDs which are not currently experiencing an intense starburst event.

  17. ORISE: ORAU, ORNL partnered to host first ever Career Center Discovery

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Event ORAU, ORNL partnered to host college and university career center employees Attendees learned of research opportunities for students at their schools FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 14, 2011 FY11-38 Career Center Discovery Event attendees visit the ORNL Graphite Reactor Click image to enlarge. OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Career center staff representing 21 colleges and universities were onsite at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tuesday, July 12, for the first ever Career Center Discovery Event. The

  18. Jefferson Lab hosts World Year of Physics guest speaker Erich Vogt

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    discussing Einstein - the Person and His Legacy | Jefferson Lab World Year of Physics guest speaker Erich Vogt discussing Einstein - the Person and His Legacy Erich Vogt Jefferson Lab hosts World Year of Physics guest speaker Erich Vogt discussing Einstein - the Person and His Legacy October 4, 2005 In this celebratory year for physics, the world is marking the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's "miraculous" contributions to physics. A few people still remember Einstein in his

  19. Lab Hosts 22 teams for Virginia Science Bowl, Feb. 7; Thomas Jefferson High

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    School wins 3rd year running | Jefferson Lab Hosts 22 teams for Virginia Science Bowl, Feb. 7; Thomas Jefferson High School wins 3rd year running First place at the Virginia Regional Science Bowl on Feb. 7 went to the team from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology, Alexandria, Virginia. Team members include (left to right) Kay Aull, Michael Zhang, Paul Yang, Samuel Lederer (behind), Team Coach Sharon Baker, and Lisa Marrone. Taking second place at the Virginia Regional

  20. NNSA Co-Hosts Nuclear Security Summit Workshop on Maritime Security with UK

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Co-Hosts Nuclear Security Summit Workshop on Maritime Security with UK November 19, 2015 WASHINGTON - This week, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) and the U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change concluded a workshop at Wilton Park, United Kingdom, on the growing challenge of securing the global maritime supply chain. In total, 55 participants from 15 countries and 9 international

  1. NNSA hosts international CTBT on-site inspection experts at Nevada National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Site | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) international CTBT on-site inspection experts at Nevada National Security Site Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 2:26pm CTBT surrogate inspectors and other inspection experts visited the Nevada National Security Site, a former nuclear explosive test site. Here they are pictured on the edge of the Sedan Crater. This month, NNSA hosted a Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on-site inspection activity at the Nevada National

  2. Donald J. Cram, Host-Guest Chemistry, Cram's Rule of Asymmetric Induction

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    and Carceplexes Donald J. Cram, Host-Guest Chemistry, Cram's Rule of Asymmetric Induction and Carceplexes Resources with Additional Information * Cram Honored Donald J. Cram Courtesy of UCLA Photography Donald J. Cram ... taught and conducted research at UCLA for more than 50 years ... . A chemist at UCLA since 1947, Cram opened broad new avenues for exploration across organic chemistry, with applications in both basic research as well as specific fields, such as pharmaceutical production

  3. Globular cluster systems and their host galaxies: comparison of spatial distributions and colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargis, Jonathan R.; Rhode, Katherine L.

    2014-11-20

    We present a study of the spatial and color distributions of four early-type galaxies and their globular cluster (GC) systems observed as part of our ongoing wide-field imaging survey. We use BVR KPNO 4 m+MOSAIC imaging data to characterize the galaxies' GC populations, perform surface photometry of the galaxies, and compare the projected two-dimensional shape of the host galaxy light to that of the GC population. The GC systems of the ellipticals NGC 4406 and NGC 5813 both show an elliptical distribution consistent with that of the host galaxy light. Our analysis suggests a similar result for the giant elliptical NGC 4472, but a smaller GC candidate sample precludes a definite conclusion. For the S0 galaxy NGC 4594, the GCs have a circular projected distribution, in contrast to the host galaxy light, which is flattened in the inner regions. For NGC 4406 and NGC 5813, we also examine the projected shapes of the metal-poor and metal-rich GC subpopulations and find that both subpopulations have elliptical shapes that are consistent with those of the host galaxy light. Lastly, we use integrated colors and color profiles to compare the stellar populations of the galaxies to their GC systems. For each galaxy, we explore the possibility of color gradients in the individual metal-rich and metal-poor GC subpopulations. We find statistically significant color gradients in both GC subpopulations of NGC 4594 over the inner ?5 effective radii (?20 kpc). We compare our results to scenarios for the formation and evolution of giant galaxies and their GC systems.

  4. Strategies for Using Host-Guest Chemistry in the Extractive Separations of Ionic Guests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2005-09-12

    Host-guest chemistry has led to a new paradigm in extractive separations, generating new possibilities for efficient separations of ionic species to meet the challenging needs of industry. This account describes the approach the authors have recently undertaken, recent results, and future directions toward highly selective separations of anions based on host?guest chemistry principles. The material presented deals mainly with the genesis and discovery of new extractive systems, illustrating the potential of particular chemical concepts with examples of practical application. Major questions of interest concern the role of anions in extractive processes and factors underlying the recognition and transport of anions. Theoretical efforts explore the technique of molecular-design itself as embodied in the evolving HostDesigner program. Design calculations are capable of generating ranked candidate multifunctional ion receptors based on hydrogen-bond-donor groups having O?H and N?H donor functionalities. Efforts to synthesize candidate receptors together with studies of molecular structure and the thermodynamics of binding and transport provide a complete picture for understanding structure-function relationships and feedback for further molecular modeling. Extraction data are evaluated in a thermochemical context in which the solvent matrix, including use of anion-solvating lipophilic alcohols, plays a pivotal role. Applications are envisioned for the solution of many types of separations needs, and examples are taken mainly from the authors' own research as applied to treatment of radioactive wastes for disposal.

  5. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  6. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  7. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; et al

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  8. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Perley, R. A., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscuredsuggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  9. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University] [Cornell University

    2011-03-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  10. Host Genetic Control of the Microbiome in Humans and Maise or Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ley, Ruth [Cornell University

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Ruth Ley of Cornell University gives a presentation on "Relating Host Genetic Variation to the Microbiome" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011.

  11. Microsoft Word - EMAB Mtg Agenda.Draft

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Mindy Mets, Nuclear Workforce Initiative Program Manager, Savannah River Site Community Reuse Organization Panel Discussion * Dr. Joe Newton, Augusta University * Dr. Susan Winsor, ...

  12. A. M. Szelc, Neutrino 2014, Boston

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy Flavio Cavanna Ornella Palamara Virginia Tech Mindy Jen Leonidas Kalousis Camillo Mariani Yale University Corey Adams Eric Church ...

  13. MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Andrzej Szelc Yale University

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy Flavio Cavanna Ornella Palamara Virginia Tech Mindy Jen Leonidas Kalousis Camillo Mariani Yale University Corey Adams Christina ...

  14. APS_april_mtg_2014

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Function Implementation in Neutrino Event Generator and Its Impact on Neutrino Oscillation Parameters Chun-Min (Mindy) Jen, Center for Neutrino Physics, Virginia Tech &23; 1 Outline ...

  15. Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area Dr. Susan A. Winsor Aiken ... SC 29802, winsors@atc.edu Mindy Mets Nuclear Workforce Initiative Program Manager, SRS ...

  16. ARPA-E Director Arun Majumdar to Host Conference Call to Announce New ARPA-E Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Washington, D.C. – Tomorrow, Thursday, September 29, Arun Majumdar, Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E) at the Department of Energy, will host a conference call to...

  17. Acting Biomass Program Manager Dr. Valerie Reed to Host Live Twitter Q&A on Advanced Biofuels

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, D.C. – On Friday, December 16th, the Energy Department (@energy) will be hosting a live Twitter Q&A on biofuels with Dr. Valerie Reed, Acting Manager of the Biomass Program.

  18. Department of Energy Hosts First Steering Committee Meeting on U.S.- Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Dennis R. Spurgeon, today hosted Director-General of Japan's Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Harufumi...

  19. Another short-burst host galaxy with an optically obscured high star formation rate: The case of GRB 071227

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Klose, S.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Schmidl, S. [Thringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg, Sternwarte 5, D-07778 Tautenburg (Germany); Micha?owski, M. J.; McKenzie, M. R. G. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Savaglio, S.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fr Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrae, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hunt, L. K. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Gorosabel, J. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Andaluca, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientficas (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronoma s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Palazzi, E. [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    We report on radio continuum observations of the host galaxy of the short gamma-ray burst 071227 (z = 0.381) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect the galaxy in the 5.5 GHz band with an integrated flux density of F {sub ?} = 43 11 ?Jy, corresponding to an unobscured star-formation rate of about 24 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}, 40 times higher than what was found from optical emission lines. Among the ?30 well-identified and studied host galaxies of short bursts this is the third case where the host is found to undergo an episode of intense star formation. This suggests that a fraction of all short-burst progenitors hosted in star-forming galaxies could be physically related to recent star formation activity, implying a relatively short merger timescale.

  20. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  1. The host galaxies of fast-ejecta core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Modjaz, Maryam; Kocevski, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Spectra of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic-BL), the only kind of SN observed at the locations of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), exhibit wide features indicative of high ejecta velocities (?0.1c). We study the host galaxies of a sample of 245 low-redshift (z < 0.2) core-collapse SNe, including 17 SNe Ic-BL, discovered by galaxy-untargeted searches, and 15 optically luminous and dust-obscured z < 1.2 LGRBs. We show that, in comparison with Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies having similar stellar masses, the hosts of low-redshift SNe Ic-BL and z < 1.2 LGRBs have high stellar mass and star formation rate densities. Core-collapse SNe having typical ejecta velocities, in contrast, show no preference for such galaxies. Moreover, we find that the hosts of SNe Ic-BL, unlike those of SNe Ib/Ic and SNe II, exhibit high gas velocity dispersions for their stellar masses. The patterns likely reflect variations among star-forming environments and suggest that LGRBs can be used as probes of conditions in high-redshift galaxies. They may be caused by efficient formation of massive binary progenitor systems in densely star-forming regions, or, less probably, a higher fraction of stars created with the initial masses required for an SN Ic-BL or LGRB. Finally, we show that the preference of SNe Ic-BL and LGRBs for galaxies with high stellar mass and star formation rate densities cannot be attributed to a preference for low metal abundances but must reflect the influence of a separate environmental factor.

  2. NREL Heads to Big Easy to Host Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 | Wind |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL NREL Heads to Big Easy to Host Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 May 20, 2016 The U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 begins May 24-less than a week from now-at the annual American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans, Louisiana. Whether you're part of the action or hearing about it for the first time, Collegiate Wind Competition is a unique event for everyone-and something to keep on your radar. Funded by the Energy

  3. Final Technical Report for the BOOST2013 Workshop. Hosted by the University of Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, Kenneth

    2015-02-20

    BOOST 2013 was the 5th International Joint Theory/Experiment Workshop on Phenomenology, Reconstruction and Searches for Boosted Objects in High Energy Hadron Collisions. It was locally organized and hosted by the Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of Arizona and held at Flagstaff, Arizona on August 12-16, 2013. The workshop provided a forum for theorists and experimentalists to present and discuss the latest findings related to the reconstruction of boosted objects in high energy hadron collisions and their use in searches for new physics. This report gives the outcomes of the BOOST 2013 Workshop.

  4. Berkeley Lab Hosts 5 Emerging Leaders During TechWomen 2013

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    TechWomen2013 Berkeley Lab Hosts 5 Emerging Leaders During TechWomen 2013 Mentoring program brought more than 70 women from 16 Middle Eastern and African countries to the U.S. November 26, 2013 Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov For Aseel Honein, an architect, teacher and design activist from Lebanon, spending a month collaborating with scientists at Berkeley Lab was a dream come true. She got the opportunity to do so through the TechWomen 2013 program, which brought 76 women from

  5. Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages.

  6. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-31

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. New results indicated that good quality highly ordered nanoporous silica host can be synthesized in the presence of zeolite Y seed precursor depending on the amount of precursor added. Preliminary research on the catalytic performance of the materials is underway. Probe acid catalyzed reactions, such as the cracking of cumene is currently being conducted. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of ZeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite catalysts of improved structural and

  7. DOE and Northwest Partners Host Three-Day Market Introduction Workshop in Portland

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 270 attendees gathered in Portland, OR to participate in the "Voices for SSL Efficiency" Solid-State Lighting Workshop on July 9-11, 2008. The workshop, hosted by DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Energy Trust of Oregon, Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, and Puget Sound Energy, was the third DOE meeting to explore how Federal, State, and private-sector organizations can work together to guide market introduction of high-performance SSL products. The workshop brought together a diverse gathering of participants – energy efficiency organizations, utilities, government, and industry – to share insights, ideas, and updates on the rapidly evolving SSL market.

  8. A Novel Secreted Protein, MYR1, Is Central to Toxoplasma's Manipulation of Host Cells

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | ] CrossMaik J <■ click for updates A Novel Secreted Protein, MYR1, Is Central to Toxoplasma's Manipulation of Host Cells Magdalena Franco,a'b Michael W. Panas,a Nicole D. Marino,a Mei-Chong Wendy Lee,c Kerry R. Buchholz,a Felice D. Kelly,a Jeffrey J. Bednarski,d Barry P. Sleckman,® Nader Pourmand,c John C. Boothroyda Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University Schoolof Medicine, Stanford, California, USAa; Biosciences and Biotechnology Division, Lawrence Livermore

  9. Jefferson Lab Hosts 20 Teams for High School Science Bowl on Feb. 2 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab High School Science Bowl on Feb. 2 Jefferson Lab Hosts 20 Teams for High School Science Bowl on Feb. 2 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Jan. 25, 2008 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 2, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Twenty teams, representing high schools from across the region are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl®

  10. Jefferson Lab Hosts 22 Teams for High School Science Bowl on Feb. 7 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab 2 Teams for High School Science Bowl on Feb. 7 Jefferson Lab Hosts 22 Teams for High School Science Bowl on Feb. 7 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 2, 2009 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 7, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Twenty-two teams, representing high schools from across the region, are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science

  11. Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 teams for Virginia Science Bowl on Feb. 7 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab 23 teams for Virginia Science Bowl on Feb. 7 Jefferson Lab Hosts 23 teams for Virginia Science Bowl on Feb. 7 January 30, 2004 Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will come together at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 7, to compete in the Virginia Regional Science Bowl. Twenty-three teams, representing high schools from across the state are participating in this annual academic competition. Nine schools from the Hampton Roads area

  12. Jefferson Lab Hosts High School Science Bowl on Feb. 27 | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    27 Jefferson Lab Hosts High School Science Bowl on Feb. 27 Please note the date change from Feb. 6 to Saturday, Feb. 27 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 5, 2010 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 27, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Teams from 20 high schools from across the region are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl tournament - sponsored by

  13. Jefferson Lab Hosts High School Science Bowl on Feb. 4 | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Jefferson Lab Hosts High School Science Bowl on Feb. 4 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Jan. 31. , 2012 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 4, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Teams from 22 high schools from across the region are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl tournament - sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy since 1991 - is an annual

  14. Jefferson Lab Hosts High School Science Bowl on Feb. 5 | Jefferson Lab

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Jefferson Lab Hosts High School Science Bowl on Feb. 5 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 2, 2011 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, Feb. 5, to compete in the Virginia Regional High School Science Bowl. Teams from 23 high schools from across the region are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl tournament - sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy since 1991 - is an annual

  15. Jefferson Lab Hosts Series of Public Lectures in the Coming Months |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Series of Public Lectures in the Coming Months Jefferson Lab Hosts Series of Public Lectures in the Coming Months February 21, 2002 The Lab's Spring Science Series kicks off at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 28, when the Lab brings Richard S. Williams, Jr., from the U.S. Geological Survey Center in to present his life's work "Iceland: Dynamic Land of Ice and Fire." Iceland is a land of great contrasts, especially in its physical geography and geology. Glaciers and volcanoes

  16. Jefferson Lab Hosts Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 |

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 Jefferson Lab Hosts Virginia Middle School Science Bowl on March 1 NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Feb. 26, 2014 - Some of the brightest young minds in the Commonwealth will meet at the Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab on Saturday, March 1, to compete in the Virginia Regional Middle School Science Bowl. Teams from 16 middle schools are registered for this year's academic competition. The National Science Bowl® - sponsored and managed by the U.S.

  17. Jefferson Lab hosts two World Year of Physics events in March | Jefferson

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab two World Year of Physics events in March Jefferson Lab hosts two World Year of Physics events in March March 7, 2005 March 16 Einstein's Biggest Blunder: A Cosmic Mystery Story A World Year of Physics Series Lecture by Professor Lawrence Krauss, internationally known theoretical physicist from Case Western Reserve University and best-selling author. CEBAF Center Auditorium, beginning at 7 p.m. Within a decade of adding a "Cosmological Constant" to his triumphant General Theory

  18. Department of Energy Hosting First of Eight Consent-Based Siting Public Meetings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today, in downtown Chicago, the Department of Energy is hosting the first of eight public meetings around the country on the Department’s consent-based siting initiative for facilities needed to manage our nation’s nuclear waste. We hope to hear from the public, communities, states, Tribal governments, and others on what matters to them as the Department moves forward in developing a consent-based process for siting facilities to store, transport, and dispose of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

  19. Interpreting short gamma-ray burst progenitor kicks and time delays using the host galaxy-dark matter halo connection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Fryer, Christopher L.

    2014-09-10

    Nearly 20% of short gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) have no observed host galaxies. Combining this finding with constraints on galaxies' dark matter halo potential wells gives strong limits on the natal kick velocity distribution for sGRB progenitors. For the best-fitting velocity distribution, one in five sGRB progenitors receives a natal kick above 150 km s{sup 1}, consistent with merging neutron star models but not with merging white dwarf binary models. This progenitor model constraint is robust to a wide variety of systematic uncertainties, including the sGRB progenitor time-delay model, the Swift redshift sensitivity, and the shape of the natal kick velocity distribution. We also use constraints on the galaxy-halo connection to determine the host halo and host galaxy demographics for sGRBs, which match extremely well with available data. Most sGRBs are expected to occur in halos near 10{sup 12} M {sub ?} and in galaxies near 5 10{sup 10} M {sub ?} (L {sub *}); unobserved faint and high-redshift host galaxies contribute a small minority of the observed hostless sGRB fraction. We find that sGRB redshift distributions and host galaxy stellar masses weakly constrain the progenitor time-delay model; the active versus passive fraction of sGRB host galaxies may offer a stronger constraint. Finally, we discuss how searches for gravitational wave optical counterparts in the local universe can reduce follow-up times using these findings.

  20. Structure and dynamics in low-dimensional guest-host systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J.E. . Dept. of Materials Science)

    1992-04-01

    New synthetic materials continue to be discovered at a rapid rate. Many of these can be broadly described as guest-host systems, in the sense that a range of compositions is accessible by selectively inserting heteroatoms or molecules into the interstitial sites in an otherwise pure starting material. The premier examples are layer intercalates (graphite, transition metal di- and trichalocogenides, silicate clays) and doped polymers (notably polyacetylene). With a somewhat broader definition of intercaiation, one might include the high-{Tc} cuprate superconductors (variable oxygen and alkaline earth concentrations), ion-exchanged beta-alumina and related defect oxides, and alkali metal-doped buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}). The interest in these material families for energy applications is directly attributable to the guest-in-a-host feature, either by exploiting guest ion mobility in electrochemical devices or by tuning/optimizing properties via control of guest concentration and sublattice structure. This document is a progress report covering the first 25 months (6/89 to 7/91) of the present 3-year period. Part IV describes the proposed research 6/1/92--5/31/95.

  1. Cyber-Physical System Security With Deceptive Virtual Hosts for Industrial Control Networks

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Todd; Manic, Milos

    2014-05-01

    A challenge facing industrial control network administrators is protecting the typically large number of connected assets for which they are responsible. These cyber devices may be tightly coupled with the physical processes they control and human induced failures risk dire real-world consequences. Dynamic virtual honeypots are effective tools for observing and attracting network intruder activity. This paper presents a design and implementation for self-configuring honeypots that passively examine control system network traffic and actively adapt to the observed environment. In contrast to prior work in the field, six tools were analyzed for suitability of network entity information gathering. Ettercap, anmore » established network security tool not commonly used in this capacity, outperformed the other tools and was chosen for implementation. Utilizing Ettercap XML output, a novel four-step algorithm was developed for autonomous creation and update of a Honeyd configuration. This algorithm was tested on an existing small campus grid and sensor network by execution of a collaborative usage scenario. Automatically created virtual hosts were deployed in concert with an anomaly behavior (AB) system in an attack scenario. Virtual hosts were automatically configured with unique emulated network stack behaviors for 92% of the targeted devices. The AB system alerted on 100% of the monitored emulated devices.« less

  2. High Precision Measurement of Isotope Effects on Noncovalent Host-Guest Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-06-23

    Isotope effects (IEs) are a powerful tool for examining the reactivity of, and interactions between, molecules. Recently, secondary IEs have been used to probe the nature of noncovalent interactions between guest and host molecules in supramolecular systems. While these studies can provide valuable insight into the specific interactions governing guest recognition and binding properties, IEs on noncovalent interactions are often very small and difficult to measure precisely. The Perrin group has developed an NMR titration method capable of determining ratios of equilibrium constants with remarkable precision. They have used this technique to study small, secondary equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) on the acidity of carboxylic acids and phenols and on the basicity of amines, measuring differences down to thousandths of a pK{sub a} unit. It occurred to us that this titration method can in principle measure relative equilibrium constants for any process which is fast on the NMR timescale and for which the species under comparison are distinguishable by NMR. Here we report the application of this method to measure very small EIEs on noncovalent host-guest interactions in a supramolecular system.

  3. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gnedin, Nickolay Y., E-mail: muratov@umich.edu [Particle Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  4. Cyber-Physical System Security With Deceptive Virtual Hosts for Industrial Control Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollmer, Todd; Manic, Milos

    2014-05-01

    A challenge facing industrial control network administrators is protecting the typically large number of connected assets for which they are responsible. These cyber devices may be tightly coupled with the physical processes they control and human induced failures risk dire real-world consequences. Dynamic virtual honeypots are effective tools for observing and attracting network intruder activity. This paper presents a design and implementation for self-configuring honeypots that passively examine control system network traffic and actively adapt to the observed environment. In contrast to prior work in the field, six tools were analyzed for suitability of network entity information gathering. Ettercap, an established network security tool not commonly used in this capacity, outperformed the other tools and was chosen for implementation. Utilizing Ettercap XML output, a novel four-step algorithm was developed for autonomous creation and update of a Honeyd configuration. This algorithm was tested on an existing small campus grid and sensor network by execution of a collaborative usage scenario. Automatically created virtual hosts were deployed in concert with an anomaly behavior (AB) system in an attack scenario. Virtual hosts were automatically configured with unique emulated network stack behaviors for 92% of the targeted devices. The AB system alerted on 100% of the monitored emulated devices.

  5. Approaches to LLW disposal site selection and current progress of host states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J.; Kerr, T.A.

    1990-11-01

    In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and under the guidance of 10 CFR 61, States have begun entering into compacts to establish and operate regional disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The progress a state makes in implementing a process to identify a specific location for a disposal site is one indication of the level of a state's commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Federal law and interstate compact agreements. During the past few years, several States have been engaged in site selection processes. The purpose of this report is to summarize the site selection approaches of some of the Host States (California, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Texas, and Illinois), and their progress to date. An additional purpose of the report is to discern whether the Host States's site selection processes were heavily influenced by any common factors. One factor each state held in common was that political and public processes exerted a powerful influence on the site selection process at virtually every stage. 1 ref.

  6. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  7. Hubble space telescope high-resolution imaging of Kepler small and cool exoplanet host stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Cartier, Kimberly M. S.; Wright, Jason T.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Ciardi, David R.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution imaging is an important tool for follow-up study of exoplanet candidates found via transit detection with the Kepler mission. We discuss here Hubble Space Telescope imaging with the WFC3 of 23 stars that host particularly interesting Kepler planet candidates based on their small size and cool equilibrium temperature estimates. Results include detections, exclusion of background stars that could be a source of false positives for the transits, and detection of physically associated companions in a number of cases providing dilution measures necessary for planet parameter refinement. For six Kepler objects of interest, we find that there is ambiguity regarding which star hosts the transiting planet(s), with potentially strong implications for planetary characteristics. Our sample is evenly distributed in G, K, and M spectral types. Albeit with a small sample size, we find that physically associated binaries are more common than expected at each spectral type, reaching a factor of 10 frequency excess in M. We document the program detection sensitivities, detections, and deliverables to the Kepler follow-up program archive.

  8. Simulation of mixed-host emitting layer based organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riku, C.; Kee, Y. Y.; Ong, T. S.; Tou, T. Y.; Yap, S. S.

    2015-04-24

    ‘SimOLED’ simulator is used in this work to investigate the efficiency of the mixed-host organic light emitting devices (MH-OLEDs). Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(3) (Alq{sub 3}) and N,N-diphenyl-N,N-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1-diphenyl-4,4-diamine (TPD) are used as the electron transport layer (ETL) material and hole transport layer (HTL) material respectively, and the indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum (Al) as anode and cathode. Three MH-OLEDs, A, B and C with the same structure of ITO / HTM (15 nm) / Mixed host (70 nm) / ETM (10 nm) /Al, are stimulated with ratios TPD:Alq{sub 3} of 3:5, 5:5, and 5:3 respectively. The Poole-Frenkel model for electron and hole mobilities is employed to compute the current density-applied voltage-luminance characteristics, distribution of the electric field, carrier concentrations and recombination rate.

  9. Mechanical Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, Sharad M.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Robinson, Bruce Alan

    2015-01-09

    This report is being prepared under the FY14 activity FT-14LA0818069, Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-Field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations, and fulfills the Los Alamos National Laboratory deliverable M4FT-14LA08180610, which in PICS:NE is titled “Draft report, Test Plan for Mechanical and Hydrological Behavior of the Near-field Host Rock Surrounding Excavations.” Since the report is an intermediate deliverable intended as input to the eventual test plan for this test, rather than being an actual test plan, the activity title is used as the title of this document to avoid confusion as to the contents in the report. This report summarizes efforts to simulate mechanical processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report summarizes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt “, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013).

  10. Proton Mediated Chemistry and Catalysis in a Self-Assembled Supramolecular Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-04-10

    Synthetic supramolecular host assemblies can impart unique reactivity to encapsulated guest molecules. Synthetic host molecules have been developed to carry out complex reactions within their cavities, despite the fact that they lack the type of specifically tailored functional groups normally located in the analogous active sites of enzymes. Over the past decade, the Raymond group has developed a series of self-assembled supramolecules and the Bergman group has developed and studied a number of catalytic transformations. In this Account, we detail recent collaborative work between these two groups, focusing on chemical catalysis stemming from the encapsulation of protonated guests and expanding to acid catalysis in basic solution. We initially investigated the ability of a water-soluble, self-assembled supramolecular host molecule to encapsulate protonated guests in its hydrophobic core. Our study of encapsulated protonated amines revealed rich host-guest chemistry. We established that self-exchange (that is, in-out guest movement) rates of protonated amines were dependent on the steric bulk of the amine rather than its basicity. The host molecule has purely rotational tetrahedral (T) symmetry, so guests with geminal N-methyl groups (and their attendant mirror plane) were effectively desymmetrized; this allowed for the observation and quantification of the barriers for nitrogen inversion followed by bond rotation. Furthermore, small nitrogen heterocycles, such as N-alkylaziridines, N-alkylazetidines, and N-alkylpyrrolidines, were found to be encapsulated as proton-bound homodimers or homotrimers. We further investigated the thermodynamic stabilization of protonated amines, showing that encapsulation makes the amines more basic in the cavity. Encapsulation raises the effective basicity of protonated amines by up to 4.5 pK{sub a} units, a difference almost as large as that between the moderate and strong bases carbonate and hydroxide. The thermodynamic stabilization

  11. Hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts have similar host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunnan, R.; Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Laskar, T.; Fong, W.; Sanders, N. E.; Challis, P. M.; Drout, M. R.; Foley, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Leibler, C.; Marion, G. H.; Milisavljevic, D.; Narayan, G.; Rest, A.; Huber, M. E.; McCrum, M.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Scolnic, D.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present optical spectroscopy and optical/near-IR photometry of 31 host galaxies of hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), including 15 events from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. Our sample spans the redshift range 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 1.6, and is the first comprehensive host galaxy study of this specific subclass of cosmic explosions. Combining the multi-band photometry and emission-line measurements, we determine the luminosities, stellar masses, star formation rates, and metallicities. We find that, as a whole, the hosts of SLSNe are a low-luminosity ((M{sub B} ) ≈ –17.3 mag), low stellar mass ((M {sub *}) ≈ 2 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}) population, with a high median specific star formation rate ((sSFR) ≈ 2 Gyr{sup –1}). The median metallicity of our spectroscopic sample is low, 12 + log (O/H) ≈ 8.35 ≈ 0.45 Z {sub ☉}, although at least one host galaxy has solar metallicity. The host galaxies of H-poor SLSNe are statistically distinct from the hosts of GOODS core-collapse SNe (which cover a similar redshift range), but resemble the host galaxies of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) in terms of stellar mass, SFR, sSFR, and metallicity. This result indicates that the environmental causes leading to massive stars forming either SLSNe or LGRBs are similar, and in particular that SLSNe are more effectively formed in low metallicity environments. We speculate that the key ingredient is large core angular momentum, leading to a rapidly spinning magnetar in SLSNe and an accreting black hole in LGRBs.

  12. A Novel Secreted Protein, MYR1, Is Central to Toxoplasma ’s Manipulation of Host Cells

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Franco, Magdalena; Panas, Michael W.; Marino, Nicole D.; Lee, Mei-Chong Wendy; Buchholz, Kerry R.; Kelly, Felice D.; Bednarski, Jeffrey J.; Sleckman, Barry P.; Pourmand, Nader; Boothroyd, John C.

    2016-02-02

    The intracellular protozoanToxoplasma gondiidramatically reprograms the transcriptome of host cells it infects, including substantially up-regulating the host oncogene c-myc. By applying a flow cytometry-based selection to infected mouse cells expressing green fluorescent protein fused to c-Myc (c-Myc–GFP), we isolated mutant tachyzoites defective in this host c-Myc up-regulation. Whole-genome sequencing of three such mutants led to the identification ofMYR1(Mycregulation1;TGGT1_254470) as essential for c-Myc induction. MYR1 is a secreted protein that requires TgASP5 to be cleaved into two stable portions, both of which are ultimately found within the parasitophorous vacuole and at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Deletion ofMYR1revealed that in additionmore » to its requirement for c-Myc up-regulation, the MYR1 protein is needed for the ability ofToxoplasmatachyzoites to modulate several other important host pathways, including those mediated by the dense granule effectors GRA16 and GRA24. This result, combined with its location at the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, suggested that MYR1 might be a component of the machinery that translocatesToxoplasmaeffectors from the parasitophorous vacuole into the host cytosol. Support for this possibility was obtained by showing that transit of GRA24 to the host nucleus is indeed MYR1-dependent. As predicted by this pleiotropic phenotype, parasites deficient inMYR1were found to be severely attenuated in a mouse model of infection. We conclude, therefore, that MYR1 is a novel protein that plays a critical role in howToxoplasmadelivers effector proteins to the infected host cell and that this is crucial to virulence. IMPORTANCEToxoplasma gondiiis an important human pathogen and a model for the study of intracellular parasitism. Infection of the host cell withToxoplasmatachyzoites involves the introduction of protein effectors, including many that are initially secreted into the parasitophorous vacuole but must

  13. Specific Mutations in H5N1 Mainly Impact the Magnitude and Velocity of the Host Response in Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tchitchek, Nicholas; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Tisoncik-Go, Jennifer; Josset, Laurence; Gralinski, Lisa; Becavin, Christophe; Tilton, Susan C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Ferris, Martin T.; Totura, Allison L.; Li, Chengjun; Neumann, Gabriele; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.

    2013-07-29

    Influenza infection causes respiratory disease that can lead to death. The complex interplay between virus-encoded and host-specific pathogenicity regulators is not well-understood. By analyzing a collection of mouse lung samples infected by A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1; VN1203) influenza, we characterized a signature of transcripts and proteins associated with the kinetics of the host response. Using a new geometrical representation method and two criteria, we show that infection concentrations and four specific mutations in VN1203 mainly impact on the magnitude and velocity of the host response kinetics, rather than on specific sets of genes up- and down-regulated. We observed similar kinetic effects using A/California/04/2009 (H1N1)-infected samples, and we show that these effects correlate with mice morbidity and viral titer measurements. Speed and extent of changes in the host response between days 1 and 2 post-infection were attenuated for each VN1203 mutant compared to the wild-type, except for PB1-F2 deletion at a high dose, which was associated with high virulence. This indicates that the host response in that time frame is critical and that immunomodulatory therapeutics should specifically be applied during the early days post-infection.

  14. ASTROPHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND HABITABLE ZONE OF THE EXOPLANET HOSTING STAR GJ 581

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; McAlister, Harold A.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Riedel, Adric R.; Van Belle, Gerard T.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Subasavage, John P.; Schaefer, Gail; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Sturmann, Laszlo; Sturmann, Judit; Mazingue, Jude; Turner, Nils H.; Farrington, Chris; Goldfinger, P. J.; Ridgway, Stephen

    2011-03-10

    GJ 581 is an M dwarf host of a multiplanet system. We use long-baseline interferometric measurements from the CHARA Array, coupled with trigonometric parallax information, to directly determine its physical radius to be 0.299 {+-} 0.010 R{sub sun}. Literature photometry data are used to perform spectral energy distribution fitting in order to determine GJ 581's effective surface temperature T{sub EFF} = 3498 {+-} 56 K and its luminosity L = 0.01205 {+-} 0.00024 L{sub sun}. From these measurements, we recompute the location and extent of the system's habitable zone and conclude that two of the planets orbiting GJ 581, planets d and g, spend all or part of their orbit within or just on the edge of the habitable zone.

  15. A multi-wavelength study of the host environment of SMBHB 4C+37.11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romani, Roger W.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, S. S.; Readhead, A. C.; Taylor, Greg B.; Zavala, R. T.

    2014-01-10

    4C+37.11, at z = 0.055, shows two compact radio nuclei, imaged by very long baseline interferometry at 7 mas separation, making it the closest known resolved supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB). An important question is whether this unique object is young and was caught on the way to a gravitational in-spiral and merger, or has 'stalled' at 7 pc. We describe new radio/optical/X-ray observations of the massive host and its surrounding X-ray halo. These data reveal X-ray/optical channels following the radio outflow and large scale edges in the X-ray halo. These structures are promising targets for further study which should elucidate their relationship to the unique SMBHB core.

  16. The phage-host arms-race: Shaping the evolution of microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adi_Stern,; Rotem_Sorek,; Stern, Adi; Sorek, Rotem

    2010-10-01

    Bacteria, the most abundant organisms on the planet, are outnumbered by a factor of 10 to 1 by phages that infect them. Faced with the rapid evolution and turnover of phage particles, bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to evade phage infection and killing, leading to an evolutionary arms-race. The extensive co-evolution of both phage and host has resulted in considerable diversity on the part of both bacterial and phage defensive and offensive strategies. Here, we discuss the unique and common features of phage resistance mechanisms and their role in global biodiversity. The commonalities between defense mechanisms suggest avenues for the discovery of novel such mechanisms based on their evolutionary traits.

  17. Low-phonon-frequency chalcogenide crystalline hosts for rare earth lasers operating beyond three microns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Nostrand, Michael C.; Krupke, William F.; Schunemann, Peter G.

    2000-01-01

    The invention comprises a RE-doped MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 crystalline gain medium, where M includes a divalent ion such as Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb, Eu, or Yb; A is selected from trivalent ions including Al, Ga, and In; X is one of the chalcogenide ions S, Se, and Te; and RE represents the trivalent rare earth ions. The MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 gain medium can be employed in a laser oscillator or a laser amplifier. Possible pump sources include diode lasers, as well as other laser pump sources. The laser wavelengths generated are greater than 3 microns, as becomes possible because of the low phonon frequency of this host medium. The invention may be used to seed optical devices such as optical parametric oscillators and other lasers.

  18. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SUPER-EARTH HOST GJ 1214

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalitha, S.; Singh, K. P.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2014-07-20

    Stellar activity can produce large amounts of high-energy radiation, which is absorbed by the planetary atmosphere leading to irradiation-driven mass loss. We present the detection and an investigation of high-energy emission in a transiting super-Earth host system, GJ 1214, based on XMM-Newton observations. We derive an X-ray luminosity of L{sub X} = 7.4 10{sup 25}ergs{sup 1} and a corresponding activity level of log (L{sub X} /L {sub bol}) ? 5.3. Further, we determine a coronal temperature of about ?3.5MK, which is typical for coronal emission of moderately active low-mass stars. We estimate that GJ 1214 b evaporates at a rate of 1.3 10{sup 10}gs{sup 1} and has lost a total of ?2-5.6 M {sub ?}.

  19. A tale of two feedbacks: Star formation in the host galaxies of radio AGNs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Ji Hoon; Trichas, Markos; Goto, Tomo; Malkan, Matt; Ruiz, Angel; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kim, Seong Jin; Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Murata, K.; Wada, Takehiko; Wada, Kensuke; Shim, Hyunjin; Hanami, Hitoshi; Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J.; and others

    2014-04-01

    Several lines of argument support the existence of a link between activity at the nuclei of galaxies, in the form of an accreting supermassive black hole, and star formation activity in these galaxies. Radio jets have long been argued to be an ideal mechanism that allows active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to interact with their host galaxies and affect star formation. We use a sample of radio sources in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field to study the nature of this putative link, by means of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We employ the excellent spectral coverage of the AKARI infrared space telescope and the rich ancillary data available in the NEP to build SEDs extending from UV to far-IR wavelengths. We find a significant AGN component in our sample of relatively faint radio sources (host galaxy, independent of the radio luminosity. In contrast, for narrow redshift and AGN luminosity ranges, we find that increasing radio luminosity leads to a decrease in the specific star formation rate. The most radio-loud AGNs are found to lie on the main sequence of star formation for their respective redshifts. For the first time, we potentially see such a two-sided feedback process in the same sample. We discuss the possible suppression of star formation, but not total quenching, in systems with strong radio jets, that supports the maintenance nature of feedback from radio AGN jets.

  20. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2005-03-21

    The objectives of this project are to synthesis nanocrystals of highly acidic zeolite Y, encapsulate them within the channels of mesoporous (nanoporous) silicates or nanoporous organosilicates and evaluate the ''zeolite Y/Nanoporous host'' composites as catalysts for the upgrading of heavy petroleum feedstocks. Our results to date are summarized as follows. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica of expanded pore diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished. The successful synthesis of zeoliteY/Nanoporous host composite materials by sequential combination of zeolite precursors and nanoporous material precursor mixtures was implied based on results from various characterization techniques such as X-Ray diffraction, infrared spectra, thermal analysis, porosimetry data. The resulting materials showed pore sizes up to 11 nm, and infrared band at 570 cm{sup -1} suggesting the presence of both phases. Work in the immediate future will be focused on the following three areas: (1) Further characterization of all-silica and aluminosilicate mesoporous materials with expanded pore sizes up to 30 nm will continue; (2) Research efforts to reduce the average particle size of zeolite nanoparticles down to 35-30 nm will continue; (3) Further synthesis of polymer-SBA15 nanocomposites will be conducted by changing the amount and chemistry of the zeolitic precursors added; and (4) Investigation on the catalytic properties of the materials using probe catalytic reactions (such as cumene cracking), followed by catalytic testing for heavy oil conversion.

  1. External and Internal Guest Binding of a Highly Charged Supramolecular Host in Water: Deconvoluting the Very Different Thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sgarlata, Carmelo; Mugridge, Jeffrey; Pluth, Michael; Tiedemann,, Bryan; Zito, Valeria; Arena, Giuseppe; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-07-22

    NMR, UV-vis and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements probe different aspects of competing host-guest equilibria as simple alkylammonium guest molecules interact with both the exterior (ion-association) and interior (encapsulation) of the [Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} supramolecular assembly in water. Data obtained by each independent technique measure different components of the host-guest equilibria and only when analyzed together does a complete picture of the solution thermodynamics emerge. Striking differences between the internal and external guest binding are found. External binding is enthalpy driven and mainly due to attractive interactions between the guests and the exterior surface of the assembly while encapsulation is entropy driven as a result of desolvation and release of solvent molecules from the host cavity.

  2. Subcellular proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions using human monocytes exposed to Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, C G; Gonzales, A D; Choi, M W; Chromy, B A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2004-05-20

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is of concern to human health both from an infectious disease and a civilian biodefense perspective. While Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis share more than 90% DNA homology, they have significantly different clinical manifestations. Plague is often fatal if untreated, yet Y. pseudotuberculosis causes severe intestinal distress and is rarely fatal. A better understanding of host response to these closely related pathogens may help explain the different mechanisms of virulence and pathogenesis that result in such different clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize host protein expression changes in human monocyte-like U937 cells after exposure to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. In order to gain global proteomic coverage of host response, proteins from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions of host cells were studied by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and relative protein expression differences were quantitated. Differentially expressed proteins, with at least 1.5 fold expression changes and p values of 0.01 or less, were identified by MALDI-MS or LC/MS/MS. With these criteria, differential expression was detected in 16 human proteins after Y. pestis exposure and 13 human proteins after Y. pseudotuberculosis exposure, of which only two of the differentially expressed proteins identified were shared between the two exposures. Proteins identified in this study are reported to be involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions and host defense mechanisms including apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, protein synthesis and degradation, DNA replication and transcription, metabolism, protein folding, and cell signaling. Notably, the differential expression patterns observed can distinguish the two pathogen exposures from each other and from unexposed host cells. The functions of the differentially expressed proteins identified provide insight on the different

  3. GEMINI SPECTROSCOPY OF THE SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130603B AFTERGLOW AND HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Cardwell, A.; Turner, J.; Bloom, J. S.; Cobb, B. E.

    2013-11-10

    We present early optical photometry and spectroscopy of the afterglow and host galaxy of the bright short-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B discovered by the Swift satellite. Using our Target of Opportunity program on the Gemini South telescope, our prompt optical spectra reveal a strong trace from the afterglow superimposed on continuum and emission lines from the z = 0.3568 0.0005 host galaxy. The combination of a relatively bright optical afterglow (r' = 21.52 at ?t = 8.4 hr), together with an observed offset of 0.''9 from the host nucleus (4.8 kpc projected distance at z = 0.3568), allow us to extract a relatively clean spectrum dominated by afterglow light. Furthermore, the spatially resolved spectrum allows us to constrain the properties of the explosion site directly, and compare these with the host galaxy nucleus, as well as other short-duration GRB host galaxies. We find that while the host is a relatively luminous (L?0.8 L{sup *}{sub B}), star-forming (SFR = 1.84 M{sub ?} yr{sup 1}) galaxy with almost solar metallicity, the spectrum of the afterglow exhibits weak Ca II absorption features but negligible emission features. The explosion site therefore lacks evidence of recent star formation, consistent with the relatively long delay time distribution expected in a compact binary merger scenario. The star formation rate (SFR; both in an absolute sense and normalized to the luminosity) and metallicity of the host are both consistent with the known sample of short-duration GRB hosts and with recent results which suggest GRB 130603B emission to be the product of the decay of radioactive species produced during the merging process of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary ({sup k}ilonova{sup )}. Ultimately, the discovery of more events similar to GRB 130603B and their rapid follow-up from 8 m class telescopes will open new opportunities for our understanding of the final stages of compact-objects binary systems and provide crucial information (redshift

  4. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GROUPS AND CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES: DETECTION AND HOST MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Timothy J.; Martini, Paul; Mulchaey, John S.; Berti, Angela; Jeltema, Tesla E. E-mail: martini@astronomy.ohio-state.ed E-mail: tesla@ucolick.or

    2009-12-20

    The incidence and properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the field, groups, and clusters can provide new information about how these objects are triggered and fueled, similar to how these environments have been employed to study galaxy evolution. We have obtained new XMM-Newton observations of seven X-ray selected groups and poor clusters with 0.02 < z < 0.06 for comparison with previous samples that mostly included rich clusters and optically selected groups. Our final sample has ten groups and six clusters in this low-redshift range (split at a velocity dispersion of sigma = 500 kms{sup -1}). We find that the X-ray selected AGN fraction increases from f{sub A} (L{sub X} >= 10{sup 41}; M{sub R} <= M*{sub R} + 1) = 0.047{sup +0.023}{sub -0.016} in clusters to 0.091{sup +0.049}{sub -0.034} for the groups (85% significance), or a factor of 2, for AGN above an 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosity of 10{sup 41}ergs{sup -1} hosted by galaxies more luminous than M*{sub R} + 1. The trend is similar, although less significant, for a lower-luminosity host threshold of M{sub R} = -20 mag. For many of the groups in the sample, we have also identified AGN via standard emission-line diagnostics and find that these AGNs are nearly disjoint from the X-ray selected AGN. Because there are substantial differences in the morphological mix of galaxies between groups and clusters, we have also measured the AGN fraction for early-type galaxies alone to determine if the differences are directly due to environment, or indirectly due to the change in the morphological mix. We find that the AGN fraction in early-type galaxies is also lower in clusters f{sub A,n>}={sub 2.5}(L{sub X} >= 10{sup 41}; M{sub R} <= M*{sub R} + 1) = 0.048{sup +0.028}{sub -0.019} compared to 0.119{sup +0.064}{sub -0.044} for the groups (92% significance), a result consistent with the hypothesis that the change in AGN fraction is directly connected to environment.

  5. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  6. Gas/solvent-induced transformation and expansion of a nonporous solid to 1:1 host guest form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2008-07-01

    Herein we report the gas (CO2, N2O and propane) and solvent (CS2 and acetone) induced transformation and expansion of guest free thermodynamic form of a p-tert-butylcalix [4]arene to 1:1 host guest form.

  7. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz to Host Media Briefing on Energy Department’s Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Request

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Monday, February 2, 2015, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will host a media briefing on the Energy Department’s Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Request, outlining the Department’s proposed investments in research, infrastructure, and an all-of-the-above energy strategy.

  8. WHICH GALAXIES HOST BARS AND DISKS? A STUDY OF THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendez-Abreu, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L. E-mail: jalfonso@iac.es

    2010-03-10

    We present a study of the bar fraction in the Coma Cluster galaxies based on a sample of {approx}190 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 and observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Survey (ACS). The unprecedented resolution of the HST-ACS images allows us to explore the presence of bars, detected by visual classification, throughout a luminosity range of 9 mag (-23 {approx}< M{sub r} {approx}< -14), permitting us to study the poor known region of dwarf galaxies. We find that bars are hosted by galaxies in a tight range of both luminosities (-22 {approx}< M{sub r} {approx}< -17) and masses (10{sup 9}{approx}

  9. METHANE HYDRATE STUDIES: DELINEATING PROPERTIES OF HOST SEDIMENTS TO ESTABLISH REPRODUCIBLE DECOMPOSITION KINETICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajan, Devinder; Jones, Keith W.; Feng, Huan; Winters, William J.

    2004-12-01

    The use of methane hydrate as an energy source requires development of a reliable method for its extraction from its highly dispersed locations in oceanic margin sediments and permafrost. The high pressure (up to 70 MPa) and low temperature (272 K to 278 K) conditions under which hydrates are stable in the marine environment can be mimicked in a laboratory setting and several kinetic studies of pure methane hydrate decomposition have been reported. However, the effect of host sediments on methane hydrate occurrence and decomposition are required to develop reliable hydrate models. In this paper, we describe methods to measure sediment properties as they relate to pore-space methane gas hydrate. Traditional geotechnical techniques are compared to the micrometer level by use of the synchrotron Computed Microtomography (CMT) technique. CMT was used to measure the porosity at the micrometer level and to show pore-space pathways through field samples. Porosities for three sediment samples: one from a site on Georges Bank and two from the known Blake Ridge methane hydrate site, from different depths below the mud line were measured by traditional drying and by the new CMT techniques and found to be in good agreement. The integration of the two analytical approaches is necessary to enable better understanding of methane hydrate interactions with the surrounding sediment particles.

  10. Does Size Really Matter? The Steric Isotope Effect in a Supramolecular Host?Guest Exchange Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-01-29

    Isotope effects (IEs), which arise from differences in zero point energies (ZPEs) between a parent and isotopically substituted bond, have been used extensively by chemists to probe molecular interactions and reactivity. Due to the anharmonicity of the C-H/D vibrational potential energy function and the lower ZPE of a C-D bond, the average C-D bond length is typically {approx}0.005 {angstrom} shorter than an equivalent C-H bond. It is this difference in size that is often invoked to explain the observation of secondary, inverse kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in chemical processes which proceed through a sterically strained transition state. This so-called 'steric isotope effect' (SIE) has been observed in processes such as the racemization of ortho-substituted biphenyls[6] and phenanthrenes, ring flipping of cyclophanes, and more recently in the deslipping of rotaxanes, where substitution of the sterically less demanding deuterium for protium results in rate accelerations for these processes. Herein, we use deuterium substitution in a cationic guest molecule to probe the sensitivity limits of the guest exchange process from a highly-charged supramolecular host.

  11. A miniature mimic of host defense peptides with systemic antibacterial efficacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarig, Hadar; Livne, Liran; Held-Kuznetsov, Victoria; Zaknoon, Fadia; Ivankin, Andrey; Gidalevitz, David; Mor, Amram

    2010-08-23

    Oligomers of acylated lysines (OAKs) are synthetic mimics of host defense peptides (HDPs) with promising antimicrobial properties. Here we challenged the OAK concept for its ability to generate both systemically efficient and economically viable lead compounds for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. We describe the design and characterization of a miniature OAK composed of only 3 lysyls and 2 acyls (designated C{sub 12({omega}7)}K-{beta}{sub 12}) that preferentially targets gram-positive species by a bacteriostatic mode of action. To gain insight into the mechanism of action, we examined the interaction of OAK with various potential targets, including phospholipid bilayers, using surface plasmon resonance, and Langmuir monolayers, using insertion assays, epifluorescence microscopy, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, in a complementary manner. Collectively, the data support the notion that C{sub 12({omega}7)}K-{beta}{sub 12} damages the plasma-membrane architecture similarly to HDPs, that is, following a near-classic 2-step interaction including high-affinity electrostatic adhesion and a subsequent shallow insertion that was limited to the phospholipid head group region. Notably, preliminary acute toxicity and efficacy studies performed with mouse models of infection have consolidated the potential of OAK for treating bacterial infections, including systemic treatments of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Such simple yet robust chemicals might be useful for various antibacterial applications while circumventing potential adverse effects associated with cytolytic compounds.

  12. A mid-infrared search for substellar companions of nearby planet-host stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulsebus, A.; Marengo, M.; Carson, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.

    2014-03-20

    Determining the presence of widely separated substellar-mass companion is crucial to understand the dynamics of inner planets in extrasolar planetary systems (e.g., to explain their high mean eccentricity as inner planets are perturbed by the Kozai mechanism). We report the results of our Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) imaging search for widely separated (10''-25'') substellar-mass companions for 14 planet-host stars within 15 pc of the Sun. Using deep 3.6 and 4.5 μm observations in subarray mode, we found one object in the field of 47 UMa with [3.6]–[4.5] color similar to a T5 dwarf, which is, however, unlikely to share common proper motion with 47 UMa. We also found three objects with brown-dwarf-like [3.6]–[4.5] color limits in the fields of GJ 86, HD 160691, and GJ 581, as well as another in the field of HD 69830 for which we have excluded common proper motion. We provide model-based upper mass limits for unseen objects around all stars in our sample, with typical sensitivity to 10 M {sub J} objects from a projected separation of 50-300 AU from the parent star. We also discuss our data analysis methods for point-spread-function subtraction, image co-alignment, and artifact subtraction of IRAC subarray images.

  13. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2004-06-30

    The focus of this project is to improve the catalytic performance of zeolite Y for heavy petroleum hydrocracking by synthesizing nanoparticles of the zeolite ({approx}20-30 nm) inside nanoporous silicate or aluminosilicate hosts of similar pore diameters. The encapsulated zeolite nanoparticles are expected to possess pores of reduced diffusional path lengths, hence hydrocarbon substrates will diffuse in, are converted and the products quickly diffused out. This is expected to prevent over-reaction, hence minimizing pore blockage and active sites deactivation. In this phase of the project, research activities were focused on refining procedures to: (a) improve the synthesis of ordered, high surface area nanoporous silica, such as SBA-15, with expanded pore size using trimethylbenzene as additive to the parent SBA-15 synthesis mixture; and (b) reduce the particle size of zeolite Y such that they can be effectively incorporated into the nanoporous silicas. The synthesis of high surface ordered nanoporous silica containing enlarged pores of diameter of 25 nm (larger than the standard size of 8.4 nm) using trimethylbenzene as a pore size expander was accomplished. The synthesis of zeolite Y nanoparticles with median pore size of approximately 50 nm (smaller than the 80 nm typically obtained with TMAOH) using combined TMABr/TMAOH as organic additives was also accomplished.

  14. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN STABLE NANOPOROUS HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram

    2003-09-03

    The focus of this project is to improve the catalytic performance of zeolite Y for petroleum hydrocracking by synthesizing nanoparticles of the zeolite ({approx}20-25 nm) inside nanoporous silicate or aluminosilicate hosts. The encapsulated zeolite nanoparticles are expected to possess reduced diffusional path lengths, hence hydrocarbon substrates will diffuse in, are converted and the products quickly diffused out. This is expected to prevent over-reaction and the blocking of the zeolite pores and active sites will be minimized. In this phase of the project, procedures for the synthesis of ordered nanoporous silica, such as SBA-15, using block copolymers and nonionic surfactant were successful reproduced. Expansion of the pores sizes of the nanoporous silica using trimethylbenzene is suggested based on shift in the major X-Ray Diffraction peak in the products to lower 2 angles compared with the parent SBA-15 material. The synthesis of ordered nanoporous materials with aluminum incorporated in the predominantly silicate framework was attempted but is not yet successful, and the procedures needs will be repeated and modified as necessary. Nanoparticles of zeolite Y of particle sizes in the range 40 nm to 120 nm were synthesized in the presence of TMAOH as the particle size controlling additive.

  15. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH STUDY OF DEBRIS DISKS AROUND PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Beichman, C. A.; Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, Geoffrey

    2011-01-15

    Since giant planets scatter planetesimals within a few tidal radii of their orbits, the locations of existing planetesimal belts indicate regions where giant planet formation failed in bygone protostellar disks. Infrared observations of circumstellar dust produced by colliding planetesimals are therefore powerful probes of the formation histories of known planets. Here we present new Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectrophotometry of 111 solar-type stars, including 105 planet hosts. Our observations reveal 11 debris disks, including two previously undetected debris disks orbiting HD 108874 and HD 130322. Combining the 32 {mu}m spectrophotometry with previously published MIPS photometry, we find that the majority of debris disks around solar-type stars have temperatures in the range 60 {approx}< T{sub dust} {approx}< 100 K. Assuming a dust temperature T{sub dust} = 70 K, which is representative of the nine debris disks detected by both IRS and MIPS, debris rings surrounding Sun-like stars orbit between 15 and 240 AU depending on the mean particle size. Our observations imply that the planets detected by radial-velocity searches formed within 240 AU of their parent stars. If any of the debris disks studied here have mostly large, blackbody emitting grains, their companion giant planets must have formed in a narrow region between the ice line and 15 AU.

  16. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Intra-Host Populations Are Characterized by Numerous High Frequency Variants

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Borucki, Monica K.; Lao, Victoria; Hwang, Mona; Gardner, Shea; Adney, Danielle; Munster, Vincent; Bowen, Richard; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-20

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging human pathogen related to SARS virus. In vitro studies indicate this virus may have a broad host range suggesting an increased pandemic potential. Genetic and epidemiological evidence indicate camels serve as a reservoir for MERS virus but the mechanism of cross species transmission is unclear and many questions remain regarding the susceptibility of humans to infection. Deep sequencing data was obtained from the nasal samples of three camels that had been experimentally infected with a human MERS-CoV isolate. A majority of the genome was covered and average coverage was greater thanmore » 12,000x depth. Although only 5 mutations were detected in the consensus sequences, 473 intrahost single nucleotide variants were identified. Lastly, many of these variants were present at high frequencies and could potentially influence viral phenotype and the sensitivity of detection assays that target these regions for primer or probe binding.« less

  17. A glimpse at quasar host galaxy far-UV emission using damped Lyα's as natural coronagraphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Finley, Hayley; Petitjean, Patrick; Carithers, Bill; Bian, Fuyan; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ge, Jian; Slosar, Anze

    2014-10-01

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. We have stacked the spectra of ∼2000 DLA systems (N {sub H} {sub I} > 10{sup 20.6} cm{sup –2}) with a median absorption redshift (z) = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift (z) = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ((L) = 2.5 × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} Å{sup –1}; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  18. Abrogation of hybrid resistance to bone marrow engraftment by graft versus host induced immune deficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakim, F.T.; Shearer, G.M.

    1986-03-01

    Lethally irradiated F/sub 1/ mice, heterozygous at the hematopoietic histocompatibility (Hh) locus at H-2D/sup b/, reject bone marrow grafts from homozygous H-2/sup b/ parents. This hybrid resistance (HR) is reduced by prior injection of H-2/sup b/ parental spleen cells. Since injection of parental spleen cells produces a profound suppression of F/sub 1/ immune functions, the authors investigated whether parental-induced abrogation of HR was due to graft-vs-host induced immune deficiency (GVHID). HR was assessed by quantifying engraftment in irradiated mice using /sup 125/I-IUdR spleen uptake; GVHID by measuring generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from unirradiated mice. They observed correlation in time course, spleen dose dependence and T cell dependence between GVHID and loss of HR. The injection of B10 recombinant congenic spleens into (B10 x B10.A) F/sub 1/ mice, prior to grafting with B10 marrow, demonstrated that only those disparities in major histocompatibility antigens which generated GVHID would result in loss of HR. Spleens from (B10 x B10.A(2R))F/sub 1/ mice (Class I disparity only) did not induce GVHID or affect HR, while (B10 x B10.A(5R)F/sub 1/ spleens (Class I and II disparity) abrogated CTL generation and HR completely. GVHID produced by a Class II only disparity, as in (B10 x B10.A(5R))F/sub 1/ spleens injected into (B6/sup bm12 x B10.A(5R))F/sub 1/ mice, was also sufficient to markedly reduce HR to B10 bone marrow. Modulation of hematopoietic graft rejection by GVHID may affect marrow engraftment in man.

  19. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions of Protons in Host Metals at Picometre Distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrich Hora; George H. Miley; Jak C. Kelly

    2000-11-12

    A review is given for the explanation of the measurements of Miley et al. of a fully reproducible generation of nuclei of the whole periodic table by protons in host metals during a several-weeks reaction. Similar low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR) were observed by other groups. The fact that the heavy nuclides are not due to pollution can be seen from the fact that such very rare elements as thulium and terbium were detected by unique K-shell X-ray spectra. The nuclear reaction energy goes into the heavy nuclei as measured from much bigger traces in CR39 than from alphas. The fact that any reaction of the protons results in stable daughter nuclei is confirmed by the fact that the highest energy gain is resulting with stable reaction products. This has been explained in Ref. 2, and the energy gain for the heavy element generation by a compound reaction was discussed. The explanation is based on the model of the authors from 1989 to assume free motion of the protons contrary to localized crystalline states. A relation of the reaction time U on distance d of the reacting nuclei by a power law with an exponent 34.8 was derived. Based on few reproducible D-D reactions, a reaction time near the range of megaseconds and a reaction distance of nanometers was concluded. A splendid confirmation of the picometre-megasecond reactions was achieved by Li et al. from his direct quantum mechanical calculations of the hot fusion D-T reactions based on a one-step selective resonance tunneling model. Li et al. were able for the first time to derive the cross sections of the hot fusion. Li's application to picometre distance showed megasecond reaction times with no neutron or gamma emission. Because of the imaginary part in the Schroedinger potential, the problem of the level width is reduced by damping.

  20. DIVERSITY OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS FROM COMPACT BINARY MERGERS HOSTING PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Cole; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Montes, Gabriela [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs) are widely believed to result from the mergers of compact binaries. This model predicts an afterglow that bears the characteristic signatures of a constant, low-density medium, including a smooth prompt-afterglow transition, and a simple temporal evolution. However, these expectations are in conflict with observations for a non-negligible fraction of sGRB afterglows. In particular, the onset of the afterglow phase for some of these events appears to be delayed and, in addition, a few of them exhibit late-time rapid fading in their light curves. We show that these peculiar observations can be explained independently of ongoing central engine activity if some sGRB progenitors are compact binaries hosting at least one pulsar. The Poynting flux emanating from the pulsar companion can excavate a bow-shock cavity surrounding the binary. If this cavity is larger than the shock deceleration length scale in the undisturbed interstellar medium, then the onset of the afterglow will be delayed. Should the deceleration occur entirely within the swept-up thin shell, a rapid fade in the light curve will ensue. We identify two types of pulsar that can achieve the conditions necessary for altering the afterglow: low-field, long-lived pulsars, and high-field pulsars. We find that a sizable fraction (?20%-50%) of low-field pulsars are likely to reside in neutron star binaries based on observations, while their high-field counterparts are not. Hydrodynamical calculations motivated by this model are shown to be in good agreement with observations of sGRB afterglow light curves.

  1. Electrically switchable polymer liquid crystal and polymer birefringent flake in fluid host systems and optical devices utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Faris, Sadeg M.; Li, Le

    2003-12-16

    Flakes or platelets of polymer liquid crystals (PLC) or other birefringent polymers (BP) suspended in a fluid host medium constitute a system that can function as the active element in an electrically switchable optical device when the suspension is either contained between a pair of rigid substrates bearing transparent conductive coatings or dispersed as microcapsules within the body of a flexible host polymer. Optical properties of these flake materials include large effective optical path length, different polarization states and high angular sensitivity in their selective reflection or birefringence. The flakes or platelets of these devices need only a 3-20.degree. rotation about the normal to the cell surface to achieve switching characteristics obtainable with prior devices using particle rotation or translation.

  2. Refractory oxide hosts for a high power, broadly tunable laser with high quantum efficiency and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Yok; Gonzalez, Roberto

    1986-01-01

    Refractory oxide crystals having high-quantum efficiency and high thermal stability for use as broadly tunable laser host materials. The crystals are formed by removing hydrogen from a single crystal of the oxide material to a level below about 10.sup.12 protons per cm.sup.3 and subsequently thermochemically reducing the oxygen content of the crystal to form sufficient oxygen anion vacancies so that short-lived F.sup.+ luminescence is produced when the crystal is optically excited.

  3. Refractory oxide hosts for a high power, broadly tunable laser with high quantum efficiency and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Yok; Gonzalez, R.

    1985-07-03

    Refractory oxide crystals having high-quantum efficiency and high thermal stability for use as broadly tunable laser host materials. The crystals are formed by removing hydrogen from a single crystal of the oxide material to a level below about 10/sup 12/ protons per cm/sup 3/ and subsequently thermochemically reducing the oxygen content of the crystal to form sufficient oxygen anion vacancies so that short-lived F/sup +/ luminescence is produced when the crystal is optically excited.

  4. Estimation of host rock thermal conductivities using thetemperature data from the drift-scale test at Yucca Mountain,Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Y.W.

    2003-11-25

    A large volume of temperature data has been collected from a very large, underground heater test, the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The DST was designed to obtain thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) data in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain. Sophisticated numerical models have been developed to analyze the collected THMC data. In these analyses, thermal conductivities measured from core samples have been used as input parameters to the model. However, it was not known whether these core measurements represented the true field-scale thermal conductivity of the host rock. Realizing these difficulties, elaborate, computationally intensive geostatistical simulations have also been performed to obtain field-scale thermal conductivity of the host rock from the core measurements. In this paper, we use the temperature data from the DST as the input (instead of the measured core-scale thermal conductivity values) to develop an estimate of the field-scale thermal conductivity values. Assuming a conductive thermal regime, we develop an analytical solution for the temperature rise in the host rock of the DST; and using a nonlinear fitting routine, we obtain a best-fit estimate of field-scale thermal conductivity for the DST host rock. The temperature data collected from the DST shows clear evidence of two distinct thermal regimes: a zone below boiling (wet) and a zone above boiling (dry). We obtain estimates of thermal conductivity for both the wet and dry zones. We also analyze the sensitivity of these estimates to the input heating power of the DST.

  5. Correlation Between Tumor Growth Delay and Expression of Cancer and Host VEGF, VEGFR2, and Osteopontin in Response to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solberg, Timothy D.; Nearman, Jessica; Mullins, John; Li Sicong; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the late effects of radiotherapy (RT) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2), and osteopontin (OPN) expression in cancer and stromal cells. Methods and Materials: LS174T xenografted athymic mice were used as a tumor model. Radiation was delivered in two equivalent fractionation schemes: 5 x 7 Gy and 1 x 20 Gy, the latter at two dose rates. Results: Tumor growth arrest was similar in all treatment groups, with the exception of a better response of small-size tumors in the 5 x 7-Gy group. The host VEGF and OPN levels were directly proportional to the tumor doubling time and were independent of the fractionation scheme. The host and cancer cell VEGFR2 levels in tumor were also directly related to the tumor response to RT. Conclusion: Upregulated VEGFR2 in cancer cells suggest paracrine signaling in the VEGFR2 pathway of cancer cells as the factor contributing to RT failure. The transient activation of the host VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway in tumor supports the model of angiogenic regeneration and suggests that radiation-induced upregulation of VEGF, VEGFR2, and downstream proteins might contribute to RT failure by escalating the rate of vascular repair. Coexpression of host OPN and VEGF, two factors closely associated with angiogenesis, indicate that OPN can serve as a surrogate marker of tumor recovery after RT. Taken together, these results strongly support the notion that to achieve optimal therapeutic outcomes, the scheduling of RT and antiangiogenic therapies will require patient-specific post-treatment monitoring of the VEGF/VEGFR2 pathway and that tumor-associated OPN can serve as an indicator of tumor regrowth.

  6. Host cells and methods for producing 1-deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) and/or a DXP derived compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirby, James; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Nishimoto, Minobu; Keasling, Jay D.

    2016-07-05

    The present invention provides for a genetically modified host cell capable of producing 1-deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate or 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) (12), and optionally one or more DXP derived compounds, comprising: (a) a mutant RibB, or functional variant thereof, capable of catalyzing xylulose 5-phosphate and/or ribulose 5-phosphate to DXP, or (b) a YajO, or functional variant thereof, and a XylB, or functional variant thereof.

  7. Insights into archaeal evolution and symbiosis from the genomes of a Nanoarchaeon and its crenarchaeal host from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podar, Mircea; Graham, David E; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Koonin, Eugene; Wolf, Yuri; Makarova, Kira S.

    2013-01-01

    A hyperthemophilic member of the Nanoarchaeota from Obsidian Pool, a thermal feature in Yellowstone National Park was characterized using single cell isolation and sequencing, together with its putative host, a Sulfolobales archaeon. This first representative of a non-marine Nanoarchaeota (Nst1) resembles Nanoarchaeum equitans by lacking most biosynthetic capabilities, the two forming a deep-branching archaeal lineage. However, the Nst1 genome is over 20% larger, encodes a complete gluconeogenesis pathway and a full complement of archaeal flagellum proteins. Comparison of the two genomes suggests that the marine and terrestrial Nanoarchaeota lineages share a common ancestor that was already a symbiont of another archaeon. With a larger genome, a smaller repertoire of split protein encoding genes and no split non-contiguous tRNAs, Nst1 appears to have experienced less severe genome reduction than N. equitans. The inferred host of Nst1 is potentially autotrophic, with a streamlined genome and simplified central and energetic metabolism as compared to other Sulfolobales. The two distinct Nanoarchaeota-host genomic data sets offer insights into the evolution of archaeal symbiosis and parasitism and will further enable studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these relationships.

  8. A NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST PROTOTYPE FOR z {approx} 7 LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES: SPITZER-IRS AND X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 031203

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.; French, J.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Christensen, L.; O'Halloran, B.; Michalowski, M.; Gordon, K. D.; Covino, S.

    2011-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG 031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z = 0.1055, allowing both low- and high-resolution spectroscopy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Medium-resolution UV to K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and submillimeter observations. These data allow us to construct a UV to radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3 to 35 {mu}m of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionization fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy-in particular the [S IV]/[S III] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios-suggestive of strong ongoing star formation and a very young stellar population. The absence of any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission supports these conclusions, as does the probable hot peak dust temperature, making HG 031203 similar to the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD), II Zw 40. The selection of HG 031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a useful analog of very young star-forming galaxies in the early universe, and hints that local BCDs may be used as more reliable analogs of star formation in the early universe than typical local starbursts. We look at the current debate on the ages of the dominant stellar populations in z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 galaxies in this context. The nebular line emission is so strong in HG 031203 that at z {approx} 7, it can reproduce the spectral energy distributions of z-band dropout galaxies with elevated IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m fluxes without the need to invoke a 4000 A break. Indeed, photometry of HG 031203 shows elevation of

  9. The influenza fingerprints: NS1 and M1 proteins contribute to specific host cell ultrastructure signatures upon infection by different influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrier, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Carron, Coralie; Cartet, Gaeelle; Frobert, Emilie; Yver, Matthieu; Traversier, Aurelien; Wolff, Thorsten; Naffakh, Nadia; and others

    2012-10-10

    Influenza A are nuclear replicating viruses which hijack host machineries in order to achieve optimal infection. Numerous functional virus-host interactions have now been characterized, but little information has been gathered concerning their link to the virally induced remodeling of the host cellular architecture. In this study, we infected cells with several human and avian influenza viruses and we have analyzed their ultrastructural modifications by using electron and confocal microscopy. We discovered that infections lead to a major and systematic disruption of nucleoli and the formation of a large number of diverse viral structures showing specificity that depended on the subtype origin and genomic composition of viruses. We identified NS1 and M1 proteins as the main actors in the remodeling of the host ultra-structure and our results suggest that each influenza A virus strain could be associated with a specific cellular fingerprint, possibly correlated to the functional properties of their viral components.

  10. Genome analysis of Daldinia eschscholtzii strains UM 1400 and UM 1020, wood-decaying fungi isolated from human hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-11-18

    Background: Daldinia eschscholtzii is a wood-inhabiting fungus that causes wood decay under certain conditions. It has a broad host range and produces a large repertoire of potentially bioactive compounds. However, there is no extensive genome analysis on this fungal species. Results: Two fungal isolates (UM 1400 and UM 1020) from human specimens were identified as Daldinia eschscholtzii by morphological features and ITS-based phylogenetic analysis. Both genomes were similar in size with 10,822 predicted genes in UM 1400 (35.8 Mb) and 11,120 predicted genes in UM 1020 (35.5 Mb). A total of 751 gene families were shared among both UM isolates, including gene families associated with fungus-host interactions. In the CAZyme comparative analysis, both genomes were found to contain arrays of CAZyme related to plant cell wall degradation. Genes encoding secreted peptidases were found in the genomes, which encode for the peptidases involved in the degradation of structural proteins in plant cell wall. In addition, arrays of secondary metabolite backbone genes were identified in both genomes, indicating of their potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Both genomes also contained an abundance of gene encoding signaling components, with three proposed MAPK cascades involved in cell wall integrity, osmoregulation, and mating/filamentation. Besides genomic evidence for degrading capability, both isolates also harbored an array of genes encoding stress response proteins that are potentially significant for adaptation to living in the hostile environments. In conclusion: Our genomic studies provide further information for the biological understanding of the D. eschscholtzii and suggest that these wood-decaying fungi are also equipped for adaptation to adverse environments in the human host.

  11. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Pian, E. [INAF, Trieste Astronomical Observatory, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Mazzali, P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2 Liverpool Science Park 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cano, Z. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Pe'er, A. [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Misra, K., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital-263 002 (India)

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ?17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ? 15, 000 km s{sup 1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ? 30, 000 km s{sup 1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ?4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  12. Genome analysis of Daldinia eschscholtzii strains UM 1400 and UM 1020, wood-decaying fungi isolated from human hosts

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-11-18

    Background: Daldinia eschscholtzii is a wood-inhabiting fungus that causes wood decay under certain conditions. It has a broad host range and produces a large repertoire of potentially bioactive compounds. However, there is no extensive genome analysis on this fungal species. Results: Two fungal isolates (UM 1400 and UM 1020) from human specimens were identified as Daldinia eschscholtzii by morphological features and ITS-based phylogenetic analysis. Both genomes were similar in size with 10,822 predicted genes in UM 1400 (35.8 Mb) and 11,120 predicted genes in UM 1020 (35.5 Mb). A total of 751 gene families were shared among both UM isolates,more » including gene families associated with fungus-host interactions. In the CAZyme comparative analysis, both genomes were found to contain arrays of CAZyme related to plant cell wall degradation. Genes encoding secreted peptidases were found in the genomes, which encode for the peptidases involved in the degradation of structural proteins in plant cell wall. In addition, arrays of secondary metabolite backbone genes were identified in both genomes, indicating of their potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Both genomes also contained an abundance of gene encoding signaling components, with three proposed MAPK cascades involved in cell wall integrity, osmoregulation, and mating/filamentation. Besides genomic evidence for degrading capability, both isolates also harbored an array of genes encoding stress response proteins that are potentially significant for adaptation to living in the hostile environments. In conclusion: Our genomic studies provide further information for the biological understanding of the D. eschscholtzii and suggest that these wood-decaying fungi are also equipped for adaptation to adverse environments in the human host.« less

  13. T-637: VMSA-2011-0009 VMware hosted product updates, ESX patches and VI, Client update resolve multiple

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This patch provides a fix for the following three security issues in the VMware Host Guest File System (HGFS). None of these issues affect Windows based Guest Operating Systems. CVE-2011-2146 Mount.vmhgfs Information Disclosure, information disclosure via a vulnerability that allows an attacker with access to the Guest to determine if a path exists in the Host filesystem and whether it is a file or directory regardless of permissions. CVE-2011-1787 Mount.vmhgfs Race Condition, privilege escalation via a race condition that allows an attacker with access to the guest to mount on arbitrary directories in the Guest filesystem and achieve privilege escalation if they can control the contents of the mounted directory. CVE-2011-2145 Mount.vmhgfs Privilege Escalation, privilege escalation via a procedural error that allows an attacker with access to the guest operating system to gain write access to an arbitrary file in the Guest filesystem. This issue only affects Solaris and FreeBSD Guest Operating Systems. For more information on the following associated CVE details please use the provided links below. This patch provides a fix for the following three security issues in the VMware Host Guest File System (HGFS). None of these issues affect Windows based Guest Operating Systems. CVE-2011-2146 Mount.vmhgfs Information Disclosure, information disclosure via a vulnerability that allows an attacker with access to the Guest to determine if a path exists in the Host filesystem and whether it is a file or directory regardless of permissions. CVE-2011-1787 Mount.vmhgfs Race Condition, privilege escalation via a race condition that allows an attacker with access to the guest to mount on arbitrary directories in the Guest filesystem and achieve privilege escalation if they can control the contents of the mounted directory. CVE-2011-2145 Mount.vmhgfs Privilege Escalation, privilege escalation via a procedural error that allows an attacker with access to the guest operating system

  14. The hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova iPTF 13ajg and its host galaxy in absorption and emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Rubin, Adam; Yaron, Ofer; Tal, David; Ofek, Eran O.; Savaglio, Sandra; Quimby, Robert M.; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Leloudas, Giorgos; Arcavi, Iair; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; and others

    2014-12-10

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF 13ajg. At a redshift of z = 0.7403, derived from narrow absorption lines, iPTF 13ajg peaked at an absolute magnitude of M {sub u,} {sub AB} = –22.5, one of the most luminous supernovae to date. The observed bolometric peak luminosity of iPTF 13ajg is 3.2 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}, while the estimated total radiated energy is 1.3 × 10{sup 51} erg. We detect narrow absorption lines of Mg I, Mg II, and Fe II, associated with the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at two different epochs with X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope. From Voigt profile fitting, we derive the column densities log N(Mg I) =11.94 ± 0.06, log N(Mg II) =14.7 ± 0.3, and log N(Fe II) =14.25 ± 0.10. These column densities, as well as the Mg I and Mg II equivalent widths of a sample of hydrogen-poor SLSNe taken from the literature, are at the low end of those derived for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) whose progenitors are also thought to be massive stars. This suggests that the environments of hydrogen-poor SLSNe and GRBs are different. From the nondetection of Fe II fine-structure absorption lines, we derive a lower limit on the distance between the supernova and the narrow-line absorbing gas of 50 pc. The neutral gas responsible for the absorption in iPTF 13ajg exhibits a single narrow component with a low velocity width, ΔV = 76 km s{sup –1}, indicating a low-mass host galaxy. No host galaxy emission lines are detected, leading to an upper limit on the unobscured star formation rate (SFR) of SFR{sub [O} {sub II]}<0.07M{sub ⊙}yr{sup −1}. Late-time imaging shows the iPTF 13ajg host galaxy to be faint, with g {sub AB} ≈ 27.0 and R {sub AB} ≥ 26.0 mag, corresponding to M {sub B,} {sub Vega} ≳ –17.7 mag.

  15. Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zer

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2030. Zero Waste is generally accepted to mean greater than 90% of waste generation is diverted for an alternate purpose. In the last five years, SNL/NM has reduced its commercial solid waste by 23% and increased its recycling and composting from 46% to 67%. Building upon this recent success in waste diversion, SNL/NM is seeking to achieve Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2025. Reduce - Reuse -

  16. Critical importance of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway for Trypanosoma cruzi growth in the mammalian host cell cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Morales, Jorge; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Inoue, Syou; Inoue, Masayuki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu; Tanaka, Akiko; Aoki, Takashi; Nara, Takeshi

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the gene for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the cpsII gene significantly reduced the growth of epimastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the CPSII-null mutant severely retarded intracellular growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo pyrimidine pathway is critical for the parasite growth in the host cell. -- Abstract: The intracellular parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In general, pyrimidine nucleotides are supplied by both de novo biosynthesis and salvage pathways. While epimastigotes-an insect form-possess both activities, amastigotes-an intracellular replicating form of T. cruzi-are unable to mediate the uptake of pyrimidine. However, the requirement of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis for parasite growth and survival has not yet been elucidated. Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway, and increased CPSII activity is associated with the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we showed that disruption of the T. cruzicpsII gene significantly reduced parasite growth. In particular, the growth of amastigotes lacking the cpsII gene was severely suppressed. Thus, the de novo pyrimidine pathway is important for proliferation of T. cruzi in the host cell cytoplasm and represents a promising target for chemotherapy against Chagas disease.

  17. Structure and dynamics in low-dimensional guest-host systems. Progress report, June 1, 1990--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    New synthetic materials continue to be discovered at a rapid rate. Many of these can be broadly described as guest-host systems, in the sense that a range of compositions is accessible by selectively inserting heteroatoms or molecules into the interstitial sites in an otherwise pure starting material. The premier examples are layer intercalates (graphite, transition metal di- and trichalocogenides, silicate clays) and doped polymers (notably polyacetylene). With a somewhat broader definition of intercaiation, one might include the high-{Tc} cuprate superconductors (variable oxygen and alkaline earth concentrations), ion-exchanged beta-alumina and related defect oxides, and alkali metal-doped buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}). The interest in these material families for energy applications is directly attributable to the guest-in-a-host feature, either by exploiting guest ion mobility in electrochemical devices or by tuning/optimizing properties via control of guest concentration and sublattice structure. This document is a progress report covering the first 25 months (6/89 to 7/91) of the present 3-year period. Part IV describes the proposed research 6/1/92--5/31/95.

  18. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intra-Host Evolution (LASSIE) identifies immune-selected HIV variants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hraber, Peter; Korber, Bette; Wagh, Kshitij; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gnanakaran, S.; Lapedes, Alan S.; Learn, Gerald H.; Kreider, Edward F.; Li, Yingying; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Montefiori, David C.; Alam, S. Munir; Bonsignori, Mattia; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Gao, Feng; Haynes, Barton

    2015-10-21

    Within-host genetic sequencing from samples collected over time provides a dynamic view of how viruses evade host immunity. Immune-driven mutations might stimulate neutralization breadth by selecting antibodies adapted to cycles of immune escape that generate within-subject epitope diversity. Comprehensive identification of immune-escape mutations is experimentally and computationally challenging. With current technology, many more viral sequences can readily be obtained than can be tested for binding and neutralization, making down-selection necessary. Typically, this is done manually, by picking variants that represent different time-points and branches on a phylogenetic tree. Such strategies are likely to miss many relevant mutations and combinations of mutations, and to be redundant for other mutations. Longitudinal Antigenic Sequences and Sites from Intrahost Evolution (LASSIE) uses transmitted founder loss to identify virus “hot-spots” under putative immune selection and chooses sequences that represent recurrent mutations in selected sites. LASSIE favors earliest sequences in which mutations arise. Here, with well-characterized longitudinal Env sequences, we confirmed selected sites were concentrated in antibody contacts and selected sequences represented diverse antigenic phenotypes. Finally, practical applications include rapidly identifying immune targets under selective pressure within a subject, selecting minimal sets of reagents for immunological assays that characterize evolving antibody responses, and for immunogens in polyvalent “cocktail” vaccines.

  19. A method for modeling oxygen diffusion in an agent-based model with application to host-pathogen infection

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Plimpton, Steven J.; Sershen, Cheryl L.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method for incorporating a diffusion field modeling oxygen usage and dispersion in a multi-scale model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection mediated granuloma formation. We implemented this method over a floating-point field to model oxygen dynamics in host tissue during chronic phase response and Mtb persistence. The method avoids the requirement of satisfying the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, which is necessary in implementing the explicit version of the finite-difference method, but imposes an impractical bound on the time step. Instead, diffusion is modeled by a matrix-based, steady state approximate solution to the diffusion equation. Moreover, presented in figuremore » 1 is the evolution of the diffusion profiles of a containment granuloma over time.« less

  20. A method for modeling oxygen diffusion in an agent-based model with application to host-pathogen infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plimpton, Steven J.; Sershen, Cheryl L.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a method for incorporating a diffusion field modeling oxygen usage and dispersion in a multi-scale model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection mediated granuloma formation. We implemented this method over a floating-point field to model oxygen dynamics in host tissue during chronic phase response and Mtb persistence. The method avoids the requirement of satisfying the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) condition, which is necessary in implementing the explicit version of the finite-difference method, but imposes an impractical bound on the time step. Instead, diffusion is modeled by a matrix-based, steady state approximate solution to the diffusion equation. Moreover, presented in figure 1 is the evolution of the diffusion profiles of a containment granuloma over time.

  1. Electrically Addressable Optical Devices Using A System Of Composite Layered Flakes Suspended In A Fluid Host To Obtain Angularly Depende

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2004-12-07

    Composite or layered flakes having a plurality of layers of different materials, which may be dielectric materials, conductive materials, or liquid crystalline materials suspended in a fluid host and subjected to an electric field, provide optical effects dependent upon the angle or orientation of the flakes in the applied electric field. The optical effects depend upon the composition and thickness of the layers, producing reflectance, interference, additive and/or subtractive color effects. The composition of layered flakes may also be selected to enhance and/or alter the dielectric properties of flakes, whereby flake motion in an electric field is also enhanced and/or altered. The devices are useful as active electro-optical displays, polarizers, filters, light modulators, and wherever controllable polarizing, reflecting and transmissive optical properties are desired.

  2. Oxygen Modulates the Effectiveness of Granuloma Mediated Host Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Multiscale Computational Biology Approach

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Sershen, Cheryl L.; Plimpton, Steven J.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2016-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated granuloma formation can be viewed as a structural immune response that can contain and halt the spread of the pathogen. In several mammalian hosts, including non-human primates, Mtb granulomas are often hypoxic, although this has not been observed in wild type murine infection models. While a presumed consequence, the structural contribution of the granuloma to oxygen limitation and the concomitant impact on Mtb metabolic viability and persistence remains to be fully explored. We develop a multiscale computational model to test to what extent in vivo Mtb granulomas become hypoxic, and investigate the effects of hypoxia on hostmore » immune response efficacy and mycobacterial persistence. Our study integrates a physiological model of oxygen dynamics in the extracellular space of alveolar tissue, an agent-based model of cellular immune response, and a systems biology-based model of Mtb metabolic dynamics. Our theoretical studies suggest that the dynamics of granuloma organization mediates oxygen availability and illustrates the immunological contribution of this structural host response to infection outcome. Furthermore, our integrated model demonstrates the link between structural immune response and mechanistic drivers influencing Mtbs adaptation to its changing microenvironment and the qualitative infection outcome scenarios of clearance, containment, dissemination, and a newly observed theoretical outcome of transient containment. We observed hypoxic regions in the containment granuloma similar in size to granulomas found in mammalian in vivo models of Mtb infection. In the case of the containment outcome, our model uniquely demonstrates that immune response mediated hypoxic conditions help foster the shift down of bacteria through two stages of adaptation similar to thein vitro non-replicating persistence (NRP) observed in the Wayne model of Mtb dormancy. Lastly, the adaptation in part contributes to the ability of Mtb to

  3. Oxygen Modulates the Effectiveness of Granuloma Mediated Host Response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Multiscale Computational Biology Approach

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Sershen, Cheryl L.; Plimpton, Steven J.; May, Elebeoba E.

    2016-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated granuloma formation can be viewed as a structural immune response that can contain and halt the spread of the pathogen. In several mammalian hosts, including non-human primates, Mtb granulomas are often hypoxic, although this has not been observed in wild type murine infection models. While a presumed consequence, the structural contribution of the granuloma to oxygen limitation and the concomitant impact on Mtb metabolic viability and persistence remains to be fully explored. We develop a multiscale computational model to test to what extent in vivo Mtb granulomas become hypoxic, and investigate the effects of hypoxia on hostmore » immune response efficacy and mycobacterial persistence. Our study integrates a physiological model of oxygen dynamics in the extracellular space of alveolar tissue, an agent-based model of cellular immune response, and a systems biology-based model of Mtb metabolic dynamics. Our theoretical studies suggest that the dynamics of granuloma organization mediates oxygen availability and illustrates the immunological contribution of this structural host response to infection outcome. Furthermore, our integrated model demonstrates the link between structural immune response and mechanistic drivers influencing Mtbs adaptation to its changing microenvironment and the qualitative infection outcome scenarios of clearance, containment, dissemination, and a newly observed theoretical outcome of transient containment. We observed hypoxic regions in the containment granuloma similar in size to granulomas found in mammalian in vivo models of Mtb infection. In the case of the containment outcome, our model uniquely demonstrates that immune response mediated hypoxic conditions help foster the shift down of bacteria through two stages of adaptation similar to thein vitro non-replicating persistence (NRP) observed in the Wayne model of Mtb dormancy. Finally, the adaptation in part contributes to the ability of Mtb to

  4. Transit confirmation and improved stellar and planet parameters for the super-Earth HD 97658 b and its host star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Grootel, V.; Gillon, M.; Scuflaire, R.; Valencia, D.; Madhusudhan, N.; Demory, B.-O.; Queloz, D.; Dragomir, D.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Deming, D.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Seager, S.

    2014-05-01

    Super-Earths transiting nearby bright stars are key objects that simultaneously allow for accurate measurements of both their mass and radius, providing essential constraints on their internal composition. We present here the confirmation, based on Spitzer transit observations, that the super-Earth HD 97658 b transits its host star. HD 97658 is a low-mass (M {sub *} = 0.77 0.05 M {sub ?}) K1 dwarf, as determined from the Hipparcos parallax and stellar evolution modeling. To constrain the planet parameters, we carry out Bayesian global analyses of Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (Keck-HIRES) radial velocities and Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) and Spitzer photometry. HD 97658 b is a massive (M{sub P}=7.55{sub ?0.79}{sup +0.83} M{sub ?}) and large (R{sub P}=2.247{sub ?0.095}{sup +0.098}R{sub ?} at 4.5 ?m) super-Earth. We investigate the possible internal compositions for HD 97658 b. Our results indicate a large rocky component, of at least 60% by mass, and very little H-He components, at most 2% by mass. We also discuss how future asteroseismic observations can improve the knowledge of the HD 97658 system, in particular by constraining its age. Orbiting a bright host star, HD 97658 b will be a key target for upcoming space missions such as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), the Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS), the Planetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO), and the James Webb Space Telescope to characterize thoroughly its structure and atmosphere.

  5. Host cells and methods for producing 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-butan-1-ol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chou, Howard H.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2011-07-26

    The invention provides for a method for producing a 5-carbon alcohol in a genetically modified host cell. In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses a first enzyme capable of catalyzing the dephosphorylation of an isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), such as a Bacillus subtilis phosphatase (YhfR), under a suitable condition so that 5-carbon alcohol is 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and/or 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol is produced. Optionally, the host cell may further comprise a second enzyme capable of reducing a 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol to 3-methyl-butan-1-ol, such as a reductase.

  6. MODERATE-LUMINOSITY GROWING BLACK HOLES FROM 1.25 < z < 2.7: VARIED ACCRETION IN DISK-DOMINATED HOSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, B. D.; Glikman, E.; Urry, C. M.; Schawinski, K.; Cardamone, C.

    2012-12-10

    We compute black hole masses and bolometric luminosities for 57 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the redshift range 1.25 {<=} z {<=} 2.67, selected from the GOODS-South deep multi-wavelength survey field via their X-ray emission. We determine host galaxy morphological parameters by separating the galaxies from their central point sources in deep Hubble Space Telescope images, and host stellar masses and colors by multi-wavelength spectral energy distribution fitting. Of GOODS AGNs at these redshifts, 90% have detected rest-frame optical nuclear point sources; bolometric luminosities range from 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. The black holes are growing at a range of accretion rates, with {approx}> 50% of the sample having L/L{sub Edd} < 0.1. Of the host galaxies, 70% have stellar masses M{sub *} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, with a range of colors suggesting a complex star formation history. We find no evolution of AGN bolometric luminosity within the sample, and no correlation between AGN bolometric luminosity and host stellar mass, color, or morphology. Fully half the sample of host galaxies are disk-dominated, with another 25% having strong disk components. Fewer than 15% of the systems appear to be at some stage of a major merger. These moderate-luminosity AGN hosts are therefore inconsistent with a dynamical history dominated by mergers strong enough to destroy disks, indicating that minor mergers or secular processes dominate the coevolution of galaxies and their central black holes at z {approx} 2.

  7. The Genomes of the Fungal Plant Pathogens Cladosporium fulvum and Dothistroma septosporum Reveal Adaptation to Different Hosts and Lifestyles But Also Signatures of Common Ancestry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; van der Burgt, Ate; Okmen, Bilal; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel A.; Aerts, Andrea L.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Beenen, Henriek G.; Chettri, Oranav; Cos, Murray P.; Datema, Erwin; de Vries, Ronald P.; DHillon, Braham; Ganley, Austen R.; Griffiths, Scott A.; Guo, Yanan; Gamelin, Richard C.; Henrissat, Bernard; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Kema, Gert; Klaubauf, Sylvia; Lapidus, Alla; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ohm, Robin A.; Owen, Timothy J.; Salamov, Asaf; Schwelm, Arne; Schijlen, Elio; Sun, Hui; van den Burg, Harrold A.; van Burg, Roeland C. H. J.; Zhang, Shuguang; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Collemare, Jerome; Bradshaw, Rosie E.

    2012-05-04

    We sequenced and compared the genomes of the Dothideomycete fungal plant pathogens Cladosporium fulvum (Cfu) (syn. Passalora fulva) and Dothistroma septosporum (Dse) that are closely related phylogenetically, but have different lifestyles and hosts. Although both fungi grow extracellularly in close contact with host mesophyll cells, Cfu is a biotroph infecting tomato, while Dse is a hemibiotroph infecting pine. The genomes of these fungi have a similar set of genes (70percent of gene content in both genomes are homologs), but differ significantly in size (Cfu >61.1-Mb; Dse 31.2-Mb), which is mainly due to the difference in repeat content (47.2percent in Cfu versus 3.2percent in Dse). Recent adaptation to different lifestyles and hosts is suggested by diverged sets of genes. Cfu contains an tomatinase gene that we predict might be required for detoxification of tomatine, while this gene is absent in Dse. Many genes encoding secreted proteins are unique to each species and the repeat-rich areas in Cfu are enriched for these species-specific genes. In contrast, conserved genes suggest common host ancestry. Homologs of Cfu effector genes, including Ecp2 and Avr4, are present in Dse and induce a Cf-Ecp2- and Cf-4-mediated hypersensitive response, respectively. Strikingly, genes involved in production of the toxin dothistromin, a likely virulence factor for Dse, are conserved in Cfu, but their expression differs markedly with essentially no expression by Cfu in planta. Likewise, Cfu has a carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalog that is more similar to that of necrotrophs or hemibiotrophs and a larger pectinolytic gene arsenal than Dse, but many of these genes are not expressed in planta or are pseudogenized. Overall, comparison of their genomes suggests that these closely related plant pathogens had a common ancestral host but since adapted to different hosts and lifestyles by a combination of differentiated gene content, pseudogenization, and gene regulation.

  8. Atomic evidence that modification of H-bonds established with amino acids critical for host-cell binding induces sterile immunity against malaria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Cifuentes, Gladys; Universidad del Rosario, Bogota ; Pirajan, Camilo; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Vanegas, Magnolia; Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota; Universidad del Rosario, Bogota

    2010-04-09

    Based on the 3D X-ray crystallographic structures of relevant proteins of the malaria parasite involved in invasion to host cells and 3D NMR structures of High Activity Binding Peptides (HABPs) and their respective analogues, it was found that HABPs are rendered into highly immunogenic and sterile immunity inducers in the Aotus experimental model by modifying those amino acids that establish H-bonds with other HABPs or binding to host's cells. This finding adds striking and novel physicochemical principles, at the atomic level, for a logical and rational vaccine development methodology against infectious disease, among them malaria.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy to Host Press Call on Transition of Legacy Cleanup Work at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, December 3, 2014, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will host a press call to discuss the Department’s plans for transitioning management and oversight of the legacy environmental cleanup work at Los Alamos National Laboratory from NNSA to EM.

  10. Context-dependent protein folding of a virulence peptide in the bacterial and host environments: structure of an SycHYopH chaperoneeffector complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vujanac, Milos; Stebbins, C. Erec, E-mail: stebbins@rockefeller.edu [The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The structure of a SycHYopH chaperoneeffector complex from Yersinia reveals the bacterial state of a protein that adopts different folds in the host and pathogen environments. Yersinia pestis injects numerous bacterial proteins into host cells through an organic nanomachine called the type 3 secretion system. One such substrate is the tyrosine phosphatase YopH, which requires an interaction with a cognate chaperone in order to be effectively injected. Here, the first crystal structure of a SycHYopH complex is reported, determined to 1.9 resolution. The structure reveals the presence of (i) a nonglobular polypeptide in YopH, (ii) a so-called ?-motif in YopH and (iii) a conserved hydrophobic patch in SycH that recognizes the ?-motif. Biochemical studies establish that the ?-motif is critical to the stability of this complex. Finally, since previous work has shown that the N-terminal portion of YopH adopts a globular fold that is functional in the host cell, aspects of how this polypeptide adopts radically different folds in the host and in the bacterial environments are analysed.

  11. First-principles study of the Kondo physics of a single Pu impurity in a Th host

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Zhu, Jian -Xin; Albers, R. C.; Haule, K.; Wills, J. M.

    2015-04-23

    Based on its condensed-matter properties, crystal structure, and metallurgy, which includes a phase diagram with six allotropic phases, plutonium is one of the most complicated pure elements in its solid state. Its anomalous properties, which are indicative of a very strongly correlated state, are related to its special position in the periodic table, which is at the boundary between the light actinides that have itinerant 5f electrons and the heavy actinides that have localized 5f electrons. As a foundational study to probe the role of local electronic correlations in Pu, we use the local-density approximation together with a continuous-time quantummore » Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the electronic structure of a single Pu atom that is either substitutionally embedded in the bulk and or adsorbed on the surface of a Th host. This is a simpler case than the solid phases of Pu metal. With the Pu impurity atom we have found a Kondo resonance peak, which is an important signature of electronic correlations, in the local density of states around the Fermi energy. We show that the peak width of this resonance is narrower for Pu atoms at the surface of Th than for those in the bulk due to a weakened Pu - 5f hybridization with the ligands at the surface.« less

  12. Encapsulation and Characterization of Proton-Bound Amine Homodimers in a Water Soluble, Self-Assembled Supramolecular Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael; Fiedler, Dorothea; Mugridge, Jeffrey; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    Cyclic amines can be encapsulated in a water-soluble self-assembled supramolecular host upon protonation. The hydrogen bonding ability of the cyclic amines, as well as the reduced degrees of rotational freedom, allows for the formation of proton-bound homodimers inside of the assembly which are otherwise not observable in aqueous solution. The generality of homodimer formation was explored with small N-alkyl aziridines, azetidines, pyrrolidines and piperidines. Proton-bound homodimer formation is observed for N-alkylaziridines (R = methyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl), N-alkylazetidines (R = isopropyl, tertbutyl), and N-methylpyrrolidine. At high concentration, formation of a proton-bound homotrimer is observed in the case of N-methylaziridine. The homodimers stay intact inside the assembly over a large concentration range, thereby suggesting cooperative encapsulation. Both G3(MP2)B3 and G3B3 calculations of the proton-bound homodimers were used to investigate the enthalpy of the hydrogen bond in the proton-bound homodimers and suggest that the enthalpic gain upon formation of the proton-bound homodimers may drive guest encapsulation.

  13. Direct evidence of an eruptive, filament-hosting magnetic flux rope leading to a fast solar coronal mass ejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bin; Gary, D. E.; Bastian, T. S.

    2014-10-20

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are believed to be at the heart of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). A well-known example is the prominence cavity in the low corona that sometimes makes up a three-part white-light (WL) CME upon its eruption. Such a system, which is usually observed in quiet-Sun regions, has long been suggested to be the manifestation of an MFR with relatively cool filament material collecting near its bottom. However, observational evidence of eruptive, filament-hosting MFR systems has been elusive for those originating in active regions. By utilizing multi-passband extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations from Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, we present direct evidence of an eruptive MFR in the low corona that exhibits a hot envelope and a cooler core; the latter is likely the upper part of a filament that undergoes a partial eruption, which is later observed in the upper corona as the coiled kernel of a fast, WL CME. This MFR-like structure exists more than 1 hr prior to its eruption, and displays successive stages of dynamical evolution, in which both ideal and non-ideal physical processes may be involved. The timing of the MFR kinematics is found to be well correlated with the energy release of the associated long-duration C1.9 flare. We suggest that the long-duration flare is the result of prolonged energy release associated with the vertical current sheet induced by the erupting MFR.

  14. Kondo Effect in 3d-host Ferromagnetic Sm1-xCexMn2Ge2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang,G.; Yao, Q.; Xi, H.; Mochizuki, K.; Markert, J.; Croft, M.

    2006-01-01

    Lattice, Ce L{sub 3}-edge, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical resistivity results on polycrystalline Sm{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}Mn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 1) compound series are presented. The lattice parameters a and c increase almost linearly with the increase of Ce concentration x. The Ce-L{sub 3} X-ray absorption spectra indicate that the Ce in this series is nearly trivalent, and Ce valence decreases slightly with the increase of Ce concentration x. Magnetic susceptibility results indicate that the antiferromagnetic (AF) phase in the re-entrant ferromagnetic compound, SmMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, is completely destroyed by merely 1.1% Ce for Sm substitution. For x > 0.011, only ferromagnetic (FM) phases exist below room temperature. It is found that in these materials Ce Kondo scattering coexists with the 3d-host FM fields and is also effectively weakened by such fields.

  15. Electrically actuatable doped polymer flakes and electrically addressable optical devices using suspensions of doped polymer flakes in a fluid host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trajkovska-Petkoska, Anka; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.

    2010-05-11

    Doped electrically actuatable (electrically addressable or switchable) polymer flakes have enhanced and controllable electric field induced motion by virtue of doping a polymer material that functions as the base flake matrix with either a distribution of insoluble dopant particles or a dopant material that is completely soluble in the base flake matrix. The base flake matrix may be a polymer liquid crystal material, and the dopants generally have higher dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity than the electrically actuatable polymer base flake matrix. The dopant distribution within the base flake matrix may be either homogeneous or non-homogeneous. In the latter case, the non-homogeneous distribution of dopant provides a dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity gradient within the body of the flakes. The dopant can also be a carbon-containing material (either soluble or insoluble in the base flake matrix) that absorbs light so as to reduce the unpolarized scattered light component reflected from the flakes, thereby enhancing the effective intensity of circularly polarized light reflected from the flakes when the flakes are oriented into a light reflecting state. Electro-optic devices contain these doped flakes suspended in a host fluid can be addressed with an applied electric field, thus controlling the orientation of the flakes between a bright reflecting state and a non-reflecting dark state.

  16. Specialized microbiome of a halophyte and its role in helping non-host plants to withstand salinity

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Yuan, Zhilin; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Labbé, Jessy; Redman, Regina; Qin, Yuan; Rodriguez, Russell; Zhang, Chulong; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Lin, Fucheng

    2016-08-30

    Root microbiota is a crucial determinant of plant productivity and stress tolerance. Here, we hypothesize that the superior halo-tolerance of seepweed Suaeda salsa is tightly linked to a specialized belowground microbiome. To test this hypothesis, we performed a phylogenetic trait-based framework analysis based on bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacer profiling. Data showed that the dominant α-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria communities in bulk soil and root endosphere tend to be phylogenetically clustered and at the same time exhibit phylogenetic over-dispersion in rhizosphere. Likewise, the dominant fungal genera occurred at high phylogenetic redundancy. Interestingly, we found themore » genomes of rhizospheric and endophytic bacteria associated with S. salsa to be enriched in genes contributing to salt stress acclimatization, nutrient solubilization and competitive root colonization. A wide diversity of rhizobacteria with similarity to known halotolerant taxa further supported this interpretation. These findings suggest that an ecological patterned root-microbial interaction strategy has been adopted in S. salsa system to confront soil salinity. We also demonstrated that the potential core microbiome members improve non-host plants growth and salt tolerance. As a result, this work provides a platform to improve plant fitness with halophytes-microbial associates and novel insights into the functions of plant microbiome under salinity.« less

  17. First-principles study of the Kondo physics of a single Pu impurity in a Th host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jian -Xin; Albers, R. C.; Haule, K.; Wills, J. M.

    2015-04-23

    Based on its condensed-matter properties, crystal structure, and metallurgy, which includes a phase diagram with six allotropic phases, plutonium is one of the most complicated pure elements in its solid state. Its anomalous properties, which are indicative of a very strongly correlated state, are related to its special position in the periodic table, which is at the boundary between the light actinides that have itinerant 5f electrons and the heavy actinides that have localized 5f electrons. As a foundational study to probe the role of local electronic correlations in Pu, we use the local-density approximation together with a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the electronic structure of a single Pu atom that is either substitutionally embedded in the bulk and or adsorbed on the surface of a Th host. This is a simpler case than the solid phases of Pu metal. With the Pu impurity atom we have found a Kondo resonance peak, which is an important signature of electronic correlations, in the local density of states around the Fermi energy. We show that the peak width of this resonance is narrower for Pu atoms at the surface of Th than for those in the bulk due to a weakened Pu - 5f hybridization with the ligands at the surface.

  18. Energy Storage Systems 2006 Peer Review - Day 2 afternoon presentation...

    Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    afternoon session are below. ESS 2006 Peer Review - Energy Storage and Wyoming Wind Power - Mindi Farber de Anda, SAIC.pdf (632.5 KB) ESS 2006 Peer Review - Hybrid Generation ...

  19. DOE Under Secretary Recognizes Residents who Helped Plan Manhattan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    David Klaus, Deputy Under Secretary for Management and Performance, was joined by Mindi Linquist, State Director for U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, right, and Erik Olds, Chief of Staff, ...

  20. Commemorating Black History: Contributions of African Americans...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    David Klaus, Deputy Under Secretary for Management and Performance, was joined by Mindi Linquist, State Director for U.S. Sen. Patty Murray, right, and Erik Olds, Chief of Staff, ...

  1. DOE's Quadrennial Energy Review Presented...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Law and Policy Center, North Dakota Office Good Morning. My name is Mindi Schmitz and I live in Jamestown. For the past five years I have worked in the Environmental Law and ...

  2. QER - Comment of Environmental Law & Policy Center | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Stephanie Chase SChase@elpc.org Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 6:02 PM To: QERcomments Cc: Mindi Schmitz; Jennifer Tarr Subject: ELPC Comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review...

  3. WIPP Hosts Stakeholder Workshop

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    . From L to R: NM State Representative Cathrynn Brown, NM State Representative Jim Townsend, Carlsbad Field Office Manager Joe Franco and NM State Senator Carroll Leavell take...

  4. MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    November 30, 2015 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS MICHAEL SCHAAL DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ENERGY ANALYSIS JOHN POWELL TEAM LEADER, LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM MINDI FARBER-DeANDA TEAM LEADER, BIOFUELS & EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES TEAM FROM: LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM SUBJECT: First AEO2016 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 11-19-2015) Attendees: (EIA) John Conti, Michael Schaal, John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Adrian Geagla, Beth May,

  5. MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    March 9, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS MICHAEL SCHAAL DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ENERGY ANALYSIS JOHN POWELL TEAM LEADER, LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM MINDI FARBER-DeANDA TEAM LEADER, BIOFUELS & EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES TEAM FROM: LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM SUBJECT: Second AEO2016 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 02-24-2016) Attendees: (EIA) John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Adrian Geagla, Beth May Jennifer Li (US DOE) Attending

  6. Down-regulation of gibberellic acid in poplar has negligible effects on host-plant suitability and insect pest response

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Buhl, Christine; Strauss, Steven H.; Lindroth, Richard L.

    2015-01-06

    Abstract Endogenous levels and signaling of gibberellin plant hormones such as gibberellic acid (GA) have been genetically down-regulated to create semi-dwarf varieties of poplar. The potential benefits of semi-dwarf stature include reduced risk of wind damage, improved stress tolerance, and improved wood quality. Despite these benefits, modification of growth traits may have consequences for non-target traits that confer defense against insect herbivores. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis, reductions in growth may shift allocation of carbon from growth to chemical resistance traits, thereby altering plant defense. To date, host-plant suitability and pest response have not been comprehensively evaluated in GAmore » down-regulated plants. We quantified chemical resistance and nitrogen (an index of protein) in GA down-regulated and wild-type poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) genotypes. We also evaluated performance of both generalist (Lymantria dispar) and specialist (Chrysomela scripta) insect pests reared on these genotypes. Our evaluation of resistance traits in four GA down-regulated genotypes revealed increased phenolic glycosides in one modified genotype and reduced lignin in two modified genotypes relative to the non-transgenic wild type. Nitrogen levels did not vary significantly among the experimental genotypes. Generalists reared on the four GA down-regulated genotypes exhibited reduced performance on only one modified genotype relative to the wild type. Specialists, however, performed similarly across all genotypes. Results from this study indicate that although some non-target traits varied among GA down-regulated genotypes, the differences in poplar pest susceptibility were modest and highly genotype-specific.« less

  7. Down-regulation of gibberellic acid in poplar has negligible effects on host-plant suitability and insect pest response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buhl, Christine; Strauss, Steven H.; Lindroth, Richard L.

    2015-01-06

    Abstract Endogenous levels and signaling of gibberellin plant hormones such as gibberellic acid (GA) have been genetically down-regulated to create semi-dwarf varieties of poplar. The potential benefits of semi-dwarf stature include reduced risk of wind damage, improved stress tolerance, and improved wood quality. Despite these benefits, modification of growth traits may have consequences for non-target traits that confer defense against insect herbivores. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis, reductions in growth may shift allocation of carbon from growth to chemical resistance traits, thereby altering plant defense. To date, host-plant suitability and pest response have not been comprehensively evaluated in GA down-regulated plants. We quantified chemical resistance and nitrogen (an index of protein) in GA down-regulated and wild-type poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) genotypes. We also evaluated performance of both generalist (Lymantria dispar) and specialist (Chrysomela scripta) insect pests reared on these genotypes. Our evaluation of resistance traits in four GA down-regulated genotypes revealed increased phenolic glycosides in one modified genotype and reduced lignin in two modified genotypes relative to the non-transgenic wild type. Nitrogen levels did not vary significantly among the experimental genotypes. Generalists reared on the four GA down-regulated genotypes exhibited reduced performance on only one modified genotype relative to the wild type. Specialists, however, performed similarly across all genotypes. Results from this study indicate that although some non-target traits varied among GA down-regulated genotypes, the differences in poplar pest susceptibility were modest and highly genotype-specific.

  8. THREE-DIMENSIONAL GAS DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE EXOPLANET WASP-12b AND ITS HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisikalo, D.; Kaygorodov, P.; Ionov, D.; Shematovich, V.; Lammer, H.; Fossati, L.

    2013-02-10

    Hubble Space Telescope transit observations in the near-UV performed in 2009 made WASP-12b one of the most 'mysterious' exoplanets; the system presents an early ingress, which can be explained by the presence of optically thick matter located ahead of the planet at a distance of {approx}4-5 planet radii. This work follows previous attempts to explain this asymmetry with an exospheric outflow or a bow shock, induced by a planetary magnetic field, and provides a numerical solution of the early ingress, though we did not perform any radiative transfer calculation. We performed pure 3D gas dynamic simulations of the plasma interaction between WASP-12b and its host star and describe the flow pattern in the system. In particular, we show that the overfilling of the planet's Roche lobe leads to a noticeable outflow from the upper atmosphere in the direction of the L{sub 1} and L{sub 2} points. Due to the conservation of the angular momentum, the flow to the L{sub 1} point is deflected in the direction of the planet's orbital motion, while the flow toward L{sub 2} is deflected in the opposite direction, resulting in a non-axisymmetric envelope, surrounding the planet. The supersonic motion of the planet inside the stellar wind leads to the formation of a bow shock with a complex shape. The existence of the bow shock slows down the outflow through the L{sub 1} and L{sub 2} points, allowing us to consider a long-living flow structure that is in the steady state.

  9. A SHAPIRO DELAY DETECTION IN THE BINARY SYSTEM HOSTING THE MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR J1910-5959A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corongiu, A.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; D'Amico, N.; Camilo, F.; Lyne, A. G.; Kramer, M.; Manchester, R. N.; Johnston, S.; Sarkissian, J. M.; Bailes, M.; Van Straten, W.

    2012-12-01

    PSR J1910-5959A is a binary pulsar with a helium white dwarf (HeWD) companion located about 6 arcmin from the center of the globular cluster NGC 6752. Based on 12 years of observations at the Parkes radio telescope, the relativistic Shapiro delay has been detected in this system. We obtain a companion mass M{sub C} = 0.180 {+-} 0.018 M {sub Sun} (1{sigma}) implying that the pulsar mass lies in the range 1.1 M {sub Sun} {<=} M{sub P} {<=} 1.5 M {sub Sun }. We compare our results with previous optical determinations of the companion mass and examine prospects for using this new measurement for calibrating the mass-radius relation for HeWDs and for investigating their evolution in a pulsar binary system. Finally, we examine the set of binary systems hosting a millisecond pulsar and a low-mass HeWD for which the mass of both stars has been measured. We confirm that the correlation between the companion mass and the orbital period predicted by Tauris and Savonije reproduces the observed values but find that the predicted M{sub P} -P{sub B} correlation overestimates the neutron star mass by about 0.5 M {sub Sun} in the orbital period range covered by the observations. Moreover, a few systems do not obey the observed M{sub P} -P{sub B} correlation. We discuss these results in the framework of the mechanisms that inhibit the accretion of matter by a neutron star during its evolution in a low-mass X-ray binary.

  10. ON THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE SCALING RELATIONS BETWEEN BLACK HOLES AND THEIR HOST GALAXIES: BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE zCOSMOS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merloni, A.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Lusso, E.; Mignoli, M.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Hao, H.; Fiore, F.; Jahnke, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Mainieri, V.; Miyaji, T.; Renzini, A.; Salvato, M.; Silverman, J.; Trump, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the physical properties (rest-frame K-band luminosity and total stellar mass) of the hosts of 89 broad-line (type-1) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected in the zCOSMOS survey in the redshift range 1 < z < 2.2. The unprecedented multi-wavelength coverage of the survey field allows us to disentangle the emission of the host galaxy from that of the nuclear black hole in their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We derive an estimate of black hole masses through the analysis of the broad Mg II emission lines observed in the medium-resolution spectra taken with VIMOS/VLT as part of the zCOSMOS project. We found that, as compared to the local value, the average black hole to host-galaxy mass ratio appears to evolve positively with redshift, with a best-fit evolution of the form (1+z){sup 0.68+}-{sup 0.12+0.6{sub -0.3}}, where the large asymmetric systematic errors stem from the uncertainties in the choice of initial mass function, in the calibration of the virial relation used to estimate BH masses and in the mean QSO SED adopted. On the other hand, if we consider the observed rest-frame K-band luminosity, objects tend to be brighter, for a given black hole mass, than those on the local M{sub BH}-M{sub K} relation. This fact, together with more indirect evidence from the SED fitting itself, suggests that the AGN hosts are likely actively star-forming galaxies. A thorough analysis of observational biases induced by intrinsic scatter in the scaling relations reinforces the conclusion that an evolution of the M{sub BH}-M{sub *} relation must ensue for actively growing black holes at early times: either its overall normalization, or its intrinsic scatter (or both) appear to increase with redshift. This can be interpreted as signature of either a more rapid growth of supermassive black holes at high redshift, a change of structural properties of AGN hosts at earlier times, or a significant mismatch between the typical growth times of

  11. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yung-Ting; Liu, Shun-Wei; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw; Wu, Chih-I E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw

    2013-11-07

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7?cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39?lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7?cd/A and 8.39?lm/W to 23?cd/A and 13.2?lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts.

  12. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF A z = 6.42 QUASAR HOST GALAXY WITH THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechtley, M.; Windhorst, R. A.; Cohen, S. H.; Jansen, R. A.; Scannapieco, E.; Ryan, R. E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Schneider, G.; Fan, X.; Hathi, N. P.; Keel, W. C.; Roettgering, H.; Schneider, D. P.; Strauss, M. A.; Yan, H. J.

    2012-09-10

    We report on deep near-infrared F125W (J) and F160W (H) Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 images of the z = 6.42 quasar J1148+5251 to attempt to detect rest-frame near-ultraviolet emission from the host galaxy. These observations included contemporaneous observations of a nearby star of similar near-infrared colors to measure temporal variations in the telescope and instrument point-spread function (PSF). We subtract the quasar point source using both this direct PSF and a model PSF. Using direct subtraction, we measure an upper limit for the quasar host galaxy of m{sub J} > 22.8 and m{sub H} > 23.0 AB mag (2 {sigma}). After subtracting our best model PSF, we measure a limiting surface brightness from 0.''3 to 0.''5 radius of {mu}{sub J} > 23.5 and {mu}{sub H} > 23.7 AB mag arcsec{sup -2} (2 {sigma}). We test the ability of the model subtraction method to recover the host galaxy flux by simulating host galaxies with varying integrated magnitude, effective radius, and Sersic index, and conducting the same analysis. These models indicate that the surface brightness limit ({mu}{sub J} > 23.5 AB mag arcsec{sup -2}) corresponds to an integrated upper limit of m{sub J} > 22-23 AB mag, consistent with the direct subtraction method. Combined with existing far-infrared observations, this gives an infrared excess log (IRX) > 1.0 and corresponding ultraviolet spectral slope {beta} > -1.2 {+-} 0.2. These values match those of most local luminous infrared galaxies, but are redder than those of almost all local star-forming galaxies and z {approx_equal} 6 Lyman break galaxies.

  13. DETAILED RADIO VIEW ON TWO STELLAR EXPLOSIONS AND THEIR HOST GALAXY: XRF 080109/SN 2008D AND SN 2007uy in NGC 2770

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Paragi, Z.; Sage, L. J.; Pal, S.; Taylor, G. B.; Granot, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Garrett, M. A.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Bhattacharya, D.; Curran, P. A.

    2011-01-10

    The galaxy NGC 2770 hosted two core-collapse supernova (SN) explosions, SN 2008D and SN 2007uy, within 10 days of each other and 9 years after the first SN of the same type, SN 1999eh, was found in that galaxy. In particular, SN 2008D attracted a lot of attention due to the detection of an X-ray outburst, which has been hypothesized to be caused by either a (mildly) relativistic jet or the SN shock breakout. We present an extensive study of the radio emission from SN 2008D and SN 2007uy: flux measurements with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, covering {approx}600 days with observing frequencies ranging from 325 MHz to 8.4 GHz. The results of two epochs of global Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations are also discussed. We have examined the molecular gas in the host galaxy NGC 2770 with the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope, and present the implications of our observations for the star formation and seemingly high SN rate in this galaxy. Furthermore, we discuss the near-future observing possibilities of the two SNe and their host galaxy at low radio frequencies with the Low Frequency Array.

  14. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Karita, Etienne; Gilmour, Jill; Goepfert, Paul; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan A.; Borrow, Persephone; Hunter, Eric; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/founder (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a

  15. Transmitted virus fitness and host T cell responses collectively define divergent infection outcomes in two HIV-1 recipients

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Yue, Ling; Pfafferott, Katja J.; Baalwa, Joshua; Conrod, Karen; Dong, Catherine C.; Chui, Cecilia; Rong, Rong; Claiborne, Daniel T.; Prince, Jessica L.; Tang, Jianming; et al

    2015-01-08

    Control of virus replication in HIV-1 infection is critical to delaying disease progression. While cellular immune responses are a key determinant of control, relatively little is known about the contribution of the infecting virus to this process. To gain insight into this interplay between virus and host in viral control, we conducted a detailed analysis of two heterosexual HIV-1 subtype A transmission pairs in which female recipients sharing three HLA class I alleles exhibited contrasting clinical outcomes: R880F controlled virus replication while R463F experienced high viral loads and rapid disease progression. Near full-length single genome amplification defined the infecting transmitted/foundermore » (T/F) virus proteome and subsequent sequence evolution over the first year of infection for both acutely infected recipients. T/F virus replicative capacities were compared in vitro, while the development of the earliest cellular immune response was defined using autologous virus sequence-based peptides. The R880F T/F virus replicated significantly slower in vitro than that transmitted to R463F. While neutralizing antibody responses were similar in both subjects, during acute infection R880F mounted a broad T cell response, the most dominant components of which targeted epitopes from which escape was limited. In contrast, the primary HIV-specific T cell response in R463F was focused on just two epitopes, one of which rapidly escaped. This comprehensive study highlights both the importance of the contribution of the lower replication capacity of the transmitted/founder virus and an associated induction of a broad primary HIV-specific T cell response, which was not undermined by rapid epitope escape, to long-term viral control in HIV-1 infection. It underscores the importance of the earliest CD8 T cell response targeting regions of the virus proteome that cannot mutate without a high fitness cost, further emphasizing the need for vaccines that elicit a breadth of

  16. Societal-Equity-Enhancing Criteria and Facility-Host Incentives Supporting Five Key Elements in the January 2012 Blue Ribbon Commission Report - 13015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksson, Leif G.; Dials, George E.; George, Critz H.

    2013-07-01

    In February 2009, the Obama Administration announced it would abandon USA's only candidate SNF/HLW-disposal facility since 1987. In 2010, all related activities were stopped and the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future was established 'to recommend a new strategy for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle', which it did in January 2012, emphasizing eight key elements. However, Key Element 1, 'A new, consent-based approach to siting future nuclear facilities', is qualitative/indeterminate rather than quantitative/measurable. It is thus highly-susceptible to semantic permutations that could extend rather than, as intended, expedite the siting of future nuclear facilities unless it also defines: a) Whose consent is needed?; and b) What constitutes consent? The following 'generic', radiation-risk- and societal-equity-based criteria address these questions: 1. Identify areas affected by projected radiation and other health risks from: a. The proposed nuclear facility (facility stakeholders); and b. The related nuclear-materials-transportation routes (transportation stakeholders); then 2. Surround each stakeholder area with a buffer zone and use this enlarged foot print to identify: a. Stakeholder hosts; and b. Areas not hosting any stakeholder category (interested parties). 3. Define 'consent-based' as being at least 60 percent of the 'population' in the respective stakeholder category and apply this yardstick to both 'in favor' and 'against' votes. Although criteria 1 and 2 also need facility-based definitions to make Key Element 1 measurable, the described siting approach, augmented by related facility-host incentives, would expedite the schedule and reduce the cost for achieving Key Elements 4-6 and 8, politics permitting. (authors)

  17. Black hole variability and the star formation-active galactic nucleus connection: Do all star-forming galaxies host an active galactic nucleus?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Civano, Francesca M.; Hainline, Kevin N.; Mullaney, James R.; Alexander, David M.; Goulding, Andy D.

    2014-02-10

    We investigate the effect of active galactic nucleus (AGN) variability on the observed connection between star formation and black hole accretion in extragalactic surveys. Recent studies have reported relatively weak correlations between observed AGN luminosities and the properties of AGN hosts, which has been interpreted to imply that there is no direct connection between AGN activity and star formation. However, AGNs may be expected to vary significantly on a wide range of timescales (from hours to Myr) that are far shorter than the typical timescale for star formation (?100 Myr). This variability can have important consequences for observed correlations. We present a simple model in which all star-forming galaxies host an AGN when averaged over ?100 Myr timescales, with long-term average AGN accretion rates that are perfectly correlated with the star formation rate (SFR). We show that reasonable prescriptions for AGN variability reproduce the observed weak correlations between SFR and L {sub AGN} in typical AGN host galaxies, as well as the general trends in the observed AGN luminosity functions, merger fractions, and measurements of the average AGN luminosity as a function of SFR. These results imply that there may be a tight connection between AGN activity and SFR over galaxy evolution timescales, and that the apparent similarities in rest-frame colors, merger rates, and clustering of AGNs compared to 'inactive' galaxies may be due primarily to AGN variability. The results provide motivation for future deep, wide extragalactic surveys that can measure the distribution of AGN accretion rates as a function of SFR.

  18. Detailed abundances of planet-hosting wide binaries. I. Did planet formation imprint chemical signatures in the atmospheres of HD 20782/81?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack III, Claude E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Schuler, Simon C.; Norris, John

    2014-06-01

    Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra obtained with Magellan/MIKE, we present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of both stars in the planet-hosting wide binary system HD 20782 + HD 20781. Both stars are G dwarfs, and presumably coeval, forming in the same molecular cloud. Therefore we expect that they should possess the same bulk metallicities. Furthermore, both stars also host giant planets on eccentric orbits with pericenters ≲0.2 AU. Here, we investigate if planets with such orbits could lead to the host stars ingesting material, which in turn may leave similar chemical imprints in their atmospheric abundances. We derived abundances of 15 elements spanning a range of condensation temperature, T {sub C} ≈ 40-1660 K. The two stars are found to have a mean element-to-element abundance difference of 0.04 ± 0.07 dex, which is consistent with both stars having identical bulk metallicities. In addition, for both stars, the refractory elements (T {sub C} >900 K) exhibit a positive correlation between abundance (relative to solar) and T {sub C}, with similar slopes of ≈1×10{sup –4} dex K{sup –1}. The measured positive correlations are not perfect; both stars exhibit a scatter of ≈5×10{sup –5} dex K{sup –1} about the mean trend, and certain elements (Na, Al, Sc) are similarly deviant in both stars. These findings are discussed in the context of models for giant planet migration that predict the accretion of H-depleted rocky material by the host star. We show that a simple simulation of a solar-type star accreting material with Earth-like composition predicts a positive—but imperfect—correlation between refractory elemental abundances and T {sub C}. Our measured slopes are consistent with what is predicted for the ingestion of 10-20 Earths by each star in the system. In addition, the specific element-by-element scatter might be used to distinguish between planetary accretion and Galactic chemical evolution scenarios.

  19. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

    1997-12-02

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 {micro}m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 {micro}m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 {micro}m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available. 9 figs.

  20. Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Ralph H.; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Payne, Stephen A.; Krupke, William F.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 .mu.m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 .mu.m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy.sup.3+ -doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 .mu.m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available.

  1. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  2. Identification of nitrogen- and host-related deep-level traps in n-type GaNAs and their evolution upon annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelczuk, ?.; Henini, M.

    2014-07-07

    Deep level traps in as-grown and annealed n-GaNAs layers (doped with Si) of various nitrogen concentrations (N=0.2%, 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.2%) were investigated by deep level transient spectroscopy. In addition, optical properties of GaNAs layers were studied by photoluminescence and contactless electroreflectance. The identification of N- and host-related traps has been performed on the basis of band gap diagram [Kudrawiec, Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 082109 (2012)], which assumes that the activation energy of electron traps of the same microscopic nature decreases with the rise of nitrogen concentration in accordance with the N-related shift of the conduction band towards trap levels. The application of this diagram has allowed to investigate the evolution of donor traps in GaNAs upon annealing. In general, it was observed that the concentration of N- and host-related traps decreases after annealing and PL improves very significantly. However, it was also observed that some traps are generated due to annealing. It explains why the annealing conditions have to be carefully optimized for this material system.

  3. ASTROMETRY AND RADIAL VELOCITIES OF THE PLANET HOST M DWARF GJ 317: NEW TRIGONOMETRIC DISTANCE, METALLICITY, AND UPPER LIMIT TO THE MASS OF GJ 317b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Butler, R. Paul; Thompson, Ian B.; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-02-10

    We have obtained precision astrometry of the planet host M dwarf GJ 317 in the framework of the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project. The new astrometric measurements give a distance determination of 15.3 pc, 65% further than previous estimates. The resulting absolute magnitudes suggest that it is metal-rich and more massive than previously assumed. This result strengthens the correlation between high metallicity and the presence of gas giants around low-mass stars. At 15.3 pc, the minimal astrometric amplitude for planet candidate GJ 317b is 0.3 mas (edge-on orbit), just below our astrometric sensitivity. However, given the relatively large number of observations and good astrometric precision, a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis indicates that the mass of planet b has to be smaller than twice the minimum mass with a 99% confidence level, with a most likely value of 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Additional radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with Keck by the Lick-Carnegie Planet search program confirm the presence of an additional very long period planet candidate, with a period of 20 years or more. Even though such an object will imprint a large astrometric wobble on the star, its curvature is yet not evident in the astrometry. Given high metallicity, and the trend indicating that multiple systems are rich in low-mass companions, this system is likely to host additional low-mass planets in its habitable zone that can be readily detected with state-of-the-art optical and near-infrared RV measurements.

  4. Optical devices having flakes suspended in a host fluid to provide a flake/fluid system providing flakes with angularly dependent optical properties in response to an alternating current electric field due to the dielectric properties of the system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kosc, Tanya Z.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Jacobs, Stephen D.

    2006-05-09

    Optical devices utilizing flakes (also called platelets) suspended in a host fluid have optical characteristics, such as reflective properties, which are angular dependent in response to an AC field. The reflectivity may be Bragg-like, and the characteristics are obtained through the use of flakes of liquid crystal material, such as polymer liquid crystal (PLC) materials including polymer cholesteric liquid crystal (PCLC) and polymer nematic liquid crystal (PNLC) material or birefringent polymers (BP). The host fluid may be propylene carbonate, poly(ethylene glycol) or other fluids or fluid mixtures having fluid conductivity to support conductivity in the flake/host system. AC field dependent rotation of 90.degree. can be obtained at rates and field intensities dependent upon the frequency and magnitude of the AC field. The devices are useful in providing displays, polarizers, filters, spatial light modulators and wherever switchable polarizing, reflecting, and transmission properties are desired.

  5. Open-field host specificity test of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanaceae) in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandolfo, D.; McKay, F.; Medal, J.C.; Cuda, J.P.

    2007-03-15

    An open-field experiment was conducted to assess the suitability of the South American leaf feeding beetle Gratiana boliviana Spaeth for biological control of Solanum viarum Dunal in the USA. An open-field test with eggplant, Solanum melongena L., was conducted on the campus of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a S. viarum control plot was established 40 km from the campus. One hundred adult beetles were released in each plot at the beginning of the experiment during the vegetative stage of the plants, and forty additional beetles were released in the S. melongena plot at the flowering stage. All the plants in each plot were checked twice a week and the number of adults, immatures, and eggs recorded. Results showed almost a complete rejection of eggplant by G. boliviana. No noticeable feeding damage was ever recorded on eggplant. The experiment was ended when the eggplants started to senesce or were severely damaged by whiteflies and spider mites. The results of this open-field experiment corroborate previous quarantine/laboratory host-specificity tests indicating that a host range expansion of G. boliviana to include eggplant is highly unlikely. Gratiana boliviana was approved for field release in May 2003 in the USA. To date, no non-target effects have been observed either on eggplant or native species of Solanum. (author) [Spanish] Una prueba de campo fue conducida para evaluar la especificidad del escarabajo suramericano defoliador Gratiana boliviana Spaeth para control biologico de Solanum viarum Dunal en los Estados Unidos. La prueba con berenjena se realizo en el campo experimental de la Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, y una parcela control con S. viarum fue establecida a 40 km. Cien escarabajos adultos fueron liberados en cada parcela al inicio del experimento durante la fase vegetativa, y cuarenta escarabajos adicionales fueron liberados en la parcela de berenjena durante la floracion. Todas las plantas en cada parcela fueron

  6. DOE Host: Gene Turner LANL Technical Hosts: Terrill Lemke and...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Permit for Storm Water Project Update Public Meeting Tuesday, April 28, 2015 Cities of Gold Conference Center, Pojoaque, NM 5:30 - 7:30 5:30 - 5:35 Welcome Terrill Lemke 5:35 -...

  7. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen; Sinderen, Douwe van

    2012-12-20

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  9. Simple Host?Guest Chemistry To Modulate the Process of Concentration and Crystallization of Membrane Proteins by Detergent Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Liang; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Seddon, Annela M.; Tereshko, Valentina; Ponomarenko, Nina; Ismagilov, Rustem F. (UC)

    2009-01-15

    This paper utilizes cyclodextrin-based host-guest chemistry in a microfluidic device to modulate the crystallization of membrane proteins and the process of concentration of membrane protein samples. Methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MBCD) can efficiently capture a wide variety of detergents commonly used for the stabilization of membrane proteins by sequestering detergent monomers. Reaction Center (RC) from Blastochloris viridis was used here as a model system. In the process of concentrating membrane protein samples, MBCD was shown to break up free detergent micelles and prevent them from being concentrated. The addition of an optimal amount of MBCD to the RC sample captured loosely bound detergent from the protein-detergent complex and improved sample homogeneity, as characterized by dynamic light scattering. Using plug-based microfluidics, RC crystals were grown in the presence of MBCD, giving a different morphology and space group than crystals grown without MBCD. The crystal structure of RC crystallized in the presence of MBCD was consistent with the changes in packing and crystal contacts hypothesized for removal of loosely bound detergent. The incorporation of MBCD into a plug-based microfluidic crystallization method allows efficient use of limited membrane protein sample by reducing the amount of protein required and combining sparse matrix screening and optimization in one experiment. The use of MBCD for detergent capture can be expanded to develop cyclodextrin-derived molecules for fine-tuned detergent capture and thus modulate membrane protein crystallization in an even more controllable way.

  10. SUSTAINABILITY ANNOUCEMENTS SPO to Host...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) (indexed site)

    Beginning in summer 2013, INL began converting its fleet of 80 biodiesel buses to "dual fuel," enabling the buses to run on both biodiesel and natural gas. Three buses have been ...

  11. Ethanol production in recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D.

    2005-02-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  12. EC OSTI-Hosted Publications

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  13. NNSS Hosts Groundwater Open House

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Ward Hawkins, Robert Abbott, Nedra Bonal, Scott Thomas Broome, Robert Corbell, Robert ... Jeff Thomsen, William Fenner, Travis Brooks, Roger Peterson, Terry Valverde, Susan ...

  14. Untargeted metabolomics studies employing NMR and LC–MS reveal metabolic coupling between Nanoarcheum equitans and its archaeal host Ignicoccus hospitalis

    DOE PAGES-Beta [OSTI]

    Hamerly, Timothy; Tripet, Brian P.; Tigges, Michelle; Giannone, Richard J.; Wurch, Louie; Hettich, Robert L.; Podar, Mircea; Copié, Valerie; Bothner, Brian

    2014-11-05

    Interactions between species are the basis of microbial community formation and infectious diseases. Systems biology enables the construction of complex models describing such interactions, leading to a better understanding of disease states and communities. However, before interactions between complex organisms can be understood, metabolic and energetic implications of simpler real-world host-microbe systems must be worked out. To this effect, untargeted metabolomics experiments were conducted and integrated with proteomics data to characterize key molecular-level interactions between two hyperthermophilic microbial species, both of which have reduced genomes. Metabolic changes and transfer of metabolites between the archaea Ignicoccus hospitalis and Nanoarcheum equitans weremore » investigated using integrated LC–MS and NMR metabolomics. The study of such a system is challenging, as no genetic tools are available, growth in the laboratory is challenging, and mechanisms by which they interact are unknown. Together with information about relative enzyme levels obtained from shotgun proteomics, the metabolomics data provided useful insights into metabolic pathways and cellular networks of I. hospitalis that are impacted by the presence of N. equitans, including arginine, isoleucine, and CTP biosynthesis. On the organismal level, the data indicate that N. equitans exploits metabolites generated by I. hospitalis to satisfy its own metabolic needs. Lastly, this finding is based on N. equitans’s consumption of a significant fraction of the metabolite pool in I. hospitalis that cannot solely be attributed to increased biomass production for N. equitans. Combining LC–MS and NMR metabolomics datasets improved coverage of the metabolome and enhanced the identification and quantitation of cellular metabolites.« less

  15. The Tip of the red giant branch distance to the perfect spiral galaxy M74 hosting three core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung Jang, In; Gyoon Lee, Myung E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-09-01

    M74 (NGC 628) is a famous face-on spiral galaxy, hosting three core-collapse supernovae (SNe): SN Ic 2002ap, SN II-P 2003gd, and SN II-P 2013ej. However, its distance is not well known. We present a distance estimation for this galaxy based on the Tip of the Red Giant Branch (TRGB) method. We obtain photometry of the resolved stars in the arm-free region of M74 from F555W and F814W images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. The color-magnitude diagram of the resolved stars shows a dominant red giant branch (RGB) as well as blue main sequence stars, red helium burning stars, and asymptotic giant branch stars. The I-band luminosity function of the RGB stars shows the TRGB to be at I {sub TRGB} = 26.13 ± 0.03 mag, and T {sub RGB} = 25.97 ± 0.03. From this, we derive the distance modulus to M74 to be 30.04 ± 0.04 (random) ± 0.12 (systematic) (corresponding to a linear distance of 10.19 ± 0.14 ± 0.56 Mpc). With this distance estimate, we calibrate the standardized candle method for SNe II-P. From the absolute magnitudes of SN 2003gd, we derive a value of the Hubble constant, H {sub 0} = 72 ± 6 (random) ± 7 (systematic) km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. It is similar to recent estimates based on the luminosity calibration of Type Ia supernovae.

  16. An examination of electronic file transfer between host and microcomputers for the AMPMODNET/AIMNET (Army Material Plan Modernization Network/Acquisition Information Management Network) classified network environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, K.A.

    1990-11-01

    This report presents the results of investigation and testing conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Project Manager -- Acquisition Information Management (PM-AIM), and the United States Army Materiel Command Headquarters (HQ-AMC). It concerns the establishment of file transfer capabilities on the Army Materiel Plan Modernization (AMPMOD) classified computer system. The discussion provides a general context for micro-to-mainframe connectivity and focuses specifically upon two possible solutions for file transfer capabilities. The second section of this report contains a statement of the problem to be examined, a brief description of the institutional setting of the investigation, and a concise declaration of purpose. The third section lays a conceptual foundation for micro-to-mainframe connectivity and provides a more detailed description of the AMPMOD computing environment. It gives emphasis to the generalized International Business Machines, Inc. (IBM) standard of connectivity because of the predominance of this vendor in the AMPMOD computing environment. The fourth section discusses two test cases as possible solutions for file transfer. The first solution used is the IBM 3270 Control Program telecommunications and terminal emulation software. A version of this software was available on all the IBM Tempest Personal Computer 3s. The second solution used is Distributed Office Support System host electronic mail software with Personal Services/Personal Computer microcomputer e-mail software running with IBM 3270 Workstation Program for terminal emulation. Test conditions and results are presented for both test cases. The fifth section provides a summary of findings for the two possible solutions tested for AMPMOD file transfer. The report concludes with observations on current AMPMOD understanding of file transfer and includes recommendations for future consideration by the sponsor.

  17. Regional Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Workforce Development in the Central Savannah River Area Dr. Susan A. Winsor Aiken Technical College President: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, winsors@atc.edu Mindy Mets Nuclear Workforce Initiative Program Manager, SRS Community Reuse Organization: P.O. Box 696, Aiken, SC 29802, mindy.mets@srscro.org INTRODUCTION An expanding role for nuclear energy in the United States has dramatic implications for the nuclear workforce demand in the two-state region of Georgia and South Carolina known

  18. Karl G. Jansky very large array observations of cold dust and molecular gas in starbursting quasar host galaxies at z ? 4.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagg, J.; Carilli, C. L.; Lentati, L.; Maiolino, R.; Hills, R.; Aravena, M.; Cox, P.; McMahon, R. G.; Riechers, D.; Walter, F.; Andreani, P.; Wolfe, A.

    2014-03-10

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 44 GHz continuum and CO J = 2-1 line emission in BRI 12020725 at z = 4.7 (a starburst galaxy and quasar pair) and BRI 13350417 at z = 4.4 (also hosting a quasar). With the full 8 GHz bandwidth capabilities of the upgraded VLA, we study the (rest-frame) 250 GHz thermal dust continuum emission for the first time along with the cold molecular gas traced by the low-J CO line emission. The measured CO J = 2-1 line luminosities of BRI 12020725 are L{sub CO}{sup ?}=(8.70.8)10{sup 10} K km s{sup 1} pc{sup 2} and L{sub CO}{sup ?}=(6.0 0.5)10{sup 10} K km s{sup 1} pc{sup 2} for the submillimeter galaxy (SMG) and quasar, respectively, which are equal to previous measurements of the CO J = 5-4 line luminosities implying thermalized line emission, and we estimate a combined cold molecular gas mass of ?910{sup 10} M {sub ?}. In BRI 13350417 we measure L{sub CO}{sup ?}=(7.30.6)10{sup 10} K km s{sup 1} pc{sup 2}. We detect continuum emission in the SMG BRI 12020725 North (S {sub 44} {sub GHz} = 51 6 ?Jy), while the quasar is detected with S {sub 44} {sub GHz} = 24 6 ?Jy and in BRI 13350417 we measure S {sub 44} {sub GHz} = 40 7 ?Jy. Combining our continuum observations with previous data at (rest-frame) far-infrared and centimeter wavelengths, we fit three-component models in order to estimate the star formation rates. This spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that the dominant contribution to the observed 44 GHz continuum is thermal dust emission, while either thermal free-free or synchrotron emission contributes less than 30%.

  19. Host absorption sensitizing and energy transfer to Eu³⁺ by Gd³⁺ in Ba₆Gd{sub 2–x}Na₂Eu{sub x}(PO₄)₆F₂

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Mubiao; Liang, Hongbin; Huang, Yan; Gao, Zhenhua; Tao, Ye

    2013-05-01

    Eu³⁺ activated fluoro-apatite phosphors Ba₆Gd{sub 2–x}Na₂Eu{sub x}(PO₄)₆F₂ were synthesized using the traditional high temperature solid state reaction method, and their VUV–vis spectroscopic properties of Eu³⁺ were studied. The results show that phosphor Ba₆Gd₁.₉₀Na₂Eu₀.₁₀(PO₄)₆F₂ has intense absorption in the VUV range because of Gd³⁺ ions as sensitizers. The energy transfer process from Gd³⁺ to Eu³⁺ in Ba₆Gd{sub 2-x}Na₂Eu{sub x}(PO₄)₆F₂ were investigated and discussed in terms of luminescence spectra and decay curves, showing that the energy transfer of Gd³⁺→Eu³⁺ is efficient. - Graphical abstract: The Gd³⁺ ions can enhance the host-related absorption in VUV range. The energy transfer from Gd³⁺ to Eu³⁺ ions is efficient. Highlights: • The Gd³⁺ ions play an important role in enhancing the host-related absorption in VUV range. • The charge-transfer energy of Eu³⁺ decreases from Ca²⁺ to Sr²⁺ and Ba²⁺ in M₆Gd₁.₉₀Na₂Eu₀.₁₀(PO₄)₆F₂ (M=Ca, Sr, Ba). • There is efficient energy transfer from Gd³⁺ to Eu³⁺ in Ba₆Gd{sub 2–x}Na₂Eu{sub x}(PO₄)₆F₂.

  20. DLEU2, frequently deleted in malignancy, functions as a critical host gene of the cell cycle inhibitory microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, Mikael; Harada, Masako; Loven, Jakob; Castro, Juan; Davis, Zadie; Oscier, David; Henriksson, Marie; Sangfelt, Olle; Grander, Dan; Corcoran, Martin M.

    2009-10-15

    The microRNAs miR-15a and miR-16-1 are downregulated in multiple tumor types and are frequently deleted in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Despite their abundance in most cells the transcriptional regulation of miR-15a/16-1 remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the putative tumor suppressor DLEU2 acts as a host gene of these microRNAs. Mature miR-15a/miR-16-1 are produced in a Drosha-dependent process from DLEU2 and binding of the Myc oncoprotein to two alterative DLEU2 promoters represses both the host gene transcript and levels of mature miR-15a/miR-16-1. In line with a functional role for DLEU2 in the expression of the microRNAs, the miR-15a/miR-16-1 locus is retained in four CLL cases that delete both promoters of this gene and expression analysis indicates that this leads to functional loss of mature miR-15a/16-1. We additionally show that DLEU2 negatively regulates the G1 Cyclins E1 and D1 through miR-15a/miR-16-1 and provide evidence that these oncoproteins are subject to miR-15a/miR-16-1-mediated repression under normal conditions. We also demonstrate that DLEU2 overexpression blocks cellular proliferation and inhibits the colony-forming ability of tumor cell lines in a miR-15a/miR-16-1-dependent way. Together the data illuminate how inactivation of DLEU2 promotes cell proliferation and tumor progression through functional loss of miR-15a/miR-16-1.

  1. Effect of Spin-Crossover-Induced Pore Contraction on CO2Host Interactions in the Porous Coordination Polymers [Fe(pyrazine)M(CN)4] (M = Ni, Pt)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Jeffrey T; Chen, De-Li; Liu, Jinchen; Chirdon, Danielle; Kauffman, Kristi; Goodman, Angela; Johnson, J Karl

    2013-02-01

    Variable-temperature in situ ATR-FTIR spectra are presented for the porous spin-crossover compounds [Fe(pyrazine)Ni(CN)4] and [Fe(pyrazine)Pt(CN)4] under CO2 pressures of up to 8 bar. Significant shifts in the ν3 and ν2 IR absorption bands of adsorbed CO2 are observed as the host materials undergo transition between low- and high-spin states. Computational models used to determine the packing arrangement of CO2 within the pore structures show a preferred orientation of one of the adsorbed CO2 molecules with close O=C=O···H contacts with the pyrazine pillar ligands. The interaction is a consequence of the commensurate distance of the inter-pyrazine separations and the length of the CO2 molecule, which allows the adsorbed CO2 to effectively bridge the pyrazine pillars in the structure. The models were used to assign the distinct shifts in the IR absorption bands of the adsorbed CO2 that arise from changes in the O=C=O···H contacts that strengthen and weaken in correlation with changes in the Fe–N bond lengths as the spin state of Fe changes. The results indicate that spin-crossover compounds can function as a unique type of flexible sorbent in which the pore contractions associated with spin transition can affect the strength of CO2host interactions.

  2. Laser activity at 1.18 um, 1.07 um, and 0.97 umin the low phonon energy crystalline hosts KPb2Br5 and RbPb2Br5 doped with Nd3+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rademaker, K; Heumann, E; Payne, S A; Huber, G; Krupke, W F; Isaenko, L I; Burger, A

    2004-09-15

    For the first time laser activity has been achieved in the low phonon energy, moisture-resistant bromide host crystals, neodymium-doped potassium lead bromide (Nd{sup 3+}:KPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5}) and rubidium lead bromide (Nd{sup 3+}:RbPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5}). Laser activity at 1.07 {micro}m was observed for both crystalline materials. Laser operation at the new wavelengths 1.18 {micro}m and 0.97 {micro}m resulting from the {sup 4}F{sub 5/2} + {sup 2}H{sub 9/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub J} transitions (J=13/2 and 11/2) in Nd:RPB was achieved for the first time in a solid state laser material. Rare earth- doped MPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5} (M=K, Rb) is a promising candidate for long wavelength infrared applications because of its low phonon frequencies and other favorable features. In principle, Nd{sup 3+}:MPb{sub 2}Br{sub 5} has high potential for laser operation at new wavelengths as well as for the realization of short-wavelength lasing due to upconversion processes.

  3. WorldWideScience.org is hosted ...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    speakers of these languages now have unprecedented access to English content. Multilingual translations are powered by Microsoft Translator. What type of information is...

  4. Open Access to Financing + Solar Hosting

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation summarizes the information given by GridParity Finance during the DOE SunShot Grand Challenge: Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

  5. DOE hosts public hearings in Idaho Falls

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Alternative (a closed fuel cycle); ThermalFast Reactor Recycle Fuel Cycle Alternative (a ... using Heavy Water Reactors or High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (an open fuel cycle). ...

  6. Ethanol production in non-recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Youngnyun; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2013-06-18

    Non-recombinant bacteria that produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product, associated nucleic acids and polypeptides, methods for producing ethanol using the bacteria, and kits are disclosed.

  7. Geothermal Technologies Office Hosts Collegiate Competition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To further accelerate the adoption of geothermal energy, the United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a Geothermal Case Study Challenge (CSC) to aggregate geothermal data that can help us...

  8. Assessment of Farmland Hosting Renewable Energy Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Income generated from the sale of heat or power generated by solar, wind, biomass facilities is not considered income for the purposes of meeting eligibility requirements for assessment, valuatio...

  9. DOE Hosts First Paducah Site Tours

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, Ky. — For the first time, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting guided public tours of its Paducah Site.  Several tours are being conducted for the public to learn about the...

  10. EM Hosts Used Fuel Management Workshop

    Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM’s Office of Nuclear Materials Disposition held a workshop with Swedish executives earlier this month to learn about their approaches to designing a national waste management program.

  11. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high-quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin ... Subject: 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; ANTIBIOTICS; CATIONS; ...

  12. Class Host: Johnson County Sheriff's Office Criminalist...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical tests to determine whether a suspected impact site is, or is not bulletpellet created Cartridge case ejection patterns Shotgun ballistics and pellet pattern...

  13. Hosted by the SRS Community Reuse...

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Simulator - Complete 30% of System Operability Tests - Procure and Install Laboratory Equipment - Transfer of East and West Transfer Lines to Savannah River Remediation to ...

  14. Become a Corporate Host | Robotics Internship Program

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) all webpages (Extended Search)

    of potential interns. ORISE, managed by ORAU on behalf of DOE, will administer the umbrella structure of this program. The basic components of the EERE Robotics Program include:...

  15. Second AEO2-015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    September 24, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS MICHAEL SCHAAL DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ENERGY ANALYSIS JOHN POWELL TEAM LEADER, LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM FROM: LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM SUBJECT: Second AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 09-24-2014) Attendees: (EIA) John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Mike Cole, Adrian Geagla, David Manowitz, Beth May Seth Meyer (USDA) Austin Brown (NREL) Robert Smith (US DOE) Ben Salisbury

  16. MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    March 11, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JIM TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS FROM: TRANSPORTATION CONSUMPTION AND EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAM SUBJECT: Second AEO2016 Transportation Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 03-09-2016) Attendees: Mindi Farber-DeAnda (EIA) David Stone (EIA) Alicia Birky (Energetics) Austin Brown (NREL) David Gohlk (DOE) Marc Goodman

  17. AEO2014 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    2 AEO2014 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting 1 July 24, 2013 Attendance (In Person) (EIA) John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Mike Cole, Beth May, Adrian Geagla, Vish Mantri, Tony Radich, Irene Olson, Julie Harris (non-EIA) Jeff Meyer (HIS CERA, Oil Market Analyst), Adam Christensen (Johns Hopkin) Attendance (WebEx) Dave Schmalzer, Seth Snyder (Argonne National Laboratory), Donald Hanson (Argonne National Laboratory), Wyatt Thompson (FAPRI, University of Missouri), Jarrett Whistance

  18. Working Group Presentation for Discussion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    1, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: IAN MEAD ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JIM TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS FROM: TRANSPORTATION CONSUMPTION AND EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAM SUBJECT: Annual Energy Outlook (AEO)2017 Transportation Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 08-31-2016) Attendees: David Daniels (EIA) Mindi Farber-DeAnda (EIA) Devi Mishra (EIA) Alicia Birky (Energetics) Sarah Garman (DOE)

  19. First AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    July 21, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS JOHN POWELL TEAM LEADER, LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM MICHAEL SCHAAL DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM SUBJECT: First AEO2015 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 07-17-2014) Attendees: (EIA) John Powell, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Mike Cole, Adrian Geagla, Arup Mallik, David Manowitz, Vishakh Mantri, Beth May, Terry Yen, John Conti, Michael Schaal Bryan Just

  20. First AEO2017 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) (indexed site)

    AEO2017 MODELING ASSUMPTIONS AND NOTE INPUTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. 1 September 13, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: IAN MEAD ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSYS FROM: JOHN STAUB TEAM LEADER, EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION TEAM ACTING TEAM LEADER, LIQUID FUELS MARKET TEAM SUBJECT: First AEO2017 Liquid Fuels Markets Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 08-25-2016) Attendees: (EIA) John Staub, Mindi Farber-DeAnda, Adrian Geagla, Beth May, John Powell (DOE) Attending by Phone: Dale Nesbitt